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Board of Trade journal, Volume 59 online

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+ 467,850 + 557,258


Total, Class II. ... £


26,851,382


31.934,969, 40.219,988


+ 8,285.014


•4- 13.368.601


in.-Artieles WlioUy or Mainly












MaaaAictiired—










A. Iron and steel and manufactures










thereof


23,256,759


28.755.634 35.623,319


+ 6,867,685


+12,366,560






1






thereof


6.389,221


7,256.535 9,238,573 + 1,982,038


+ 2.849,353






1






and instruments


3,708,322


4,317,693 4,782,057


+ 464.364


+ 1,073,785


D. Electrical goods and apparatus










(other than machinery and tele-










graph and telephone wire)
B. Machinery ...


1,797,137


1,936,790 1,703.030


- 233,760


- 94,107


16,883,904


19.497,196 23,11.3,859


+ 3.616.663


+ 6.229.955


F. Ships (jxei)

O. Manufactures of wood and


4,421,533


7,381,681


8,229,390


+ 847,709


+ 3,807,857












timber (including furniture) . . .


868,326


921,726


996,451


+ 74,725


+ 128,125


H. Yams and textile fabrics—












1. Cotton


67,976,876


74,578,634! 82,595,263


i- 8.016.629^ +14,618.887


2. Wool


22,088,296


24,520,740 26,672,935


+ 2,152,195 -i- 4,584,689


3. Other materials


9,663,367


10,858,106: 12,558.834


+ 1,700,728 + 2,895,467


I. Apparel

J. Chemicals, drugs, dyes and


4,488,794


«,193,SS6| 5,560,341


+ 367,255 + 1,071,547








colours


10,867,061


11,554,358 12,958,226


+ 1,403,868 + 2,091,165


K. Leatherandmanufacturesthereof






1


(including boota and shoes and






« J


L. Earthenwareand glass .'.'.'


4,047,222


4,566,917 4,954,832


+ 887,915 + 907.610


2,838,915


2,674,809 2,99iv819


+ 321,010 + 656,904


M. Paper


1,451,190


1.524,497 1,746.302


+ 221,805 + 295,112


N, Miscellaneous


18,404,463


21,864.395 24,721,992


+ 2,857,597 + 6.817.529


Total, Class m. ... £


198.65U86


227,402,797 258,451,223


jf31U048/126


H- 59,799,837


lY.— Misoellaneous and Unclassi-












fled (inolndiiig Parcel Post) £


3.432,124


4.017.983


4,531,387


+ 513,404


+ 1,099,268


Total £


843>8fl6i6tt


978X164,245


mmm


+41,m9W


+ it,mm



Exports of Foreign and Colonial Merchandise.*



Total yalue ...



£ £ I £

... 57,776,644 62,923,1101 72,247.060



£
+ 9.828.950



£
+14.470,416



* The Talues of the Exports represent the cost and the charges of deliTering the goods on board
the ship and are known as the "free on board " ralues.



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Oct. 10, 1907.] THS BOARD OF TEADB JOVBNAU 69

Foreign Trade of the United Kingdom in September, 1907*

Y.-SHiPFnra nr September, 1907.

The tonnage of vessels entered at ports in the United Kingdom
from foreign countries and British possessions, with cargoes, daring
September, 1907, amounted to 3,583,318 tons, and the tonnage
cleared to 4,801,021 tons, as against 3,604,568 tons entered, and
4,564,172 tons cleared during September, 1906. With regard to
the coasting trade, the tonnage entered with cargoes during
September, 1907, amounted to 2,640,419 tons, and the tonnage
cleared to 2,597,914 tons, as against 2,779,729 tons entered, and
2,707,688 tons cleared in September, 1906.

VL-NINE HGITTHS' SHIPFINa (JANXTAEY-SEPTEMBEB).

The tonnage of vessels entered at ports in the United Eangdom
from foreign countries and British possessions, with cargoes,
daring the nine months ended 30th September, 1907, amounted
to 30,796,832 tons, and the tonnage cleared to 42,770,752 tons, as
against 31,255,112 tons entered and 40,401,908 tons cleared during
the corresponding period of 1906. With regard to the coasting
trade, the tonnage entered with cargoes during the nine months
ended 30th September, 1907, amounted to 23,450,599 tons, and
the tonnage cleared to 23,149,410 tons, as against 24,600,628 tons
entered and 24,233,374 tons cleared during the corresponding
period of 1906.

COTTON MILLS IN CHINA.

The following information respecting the cotton spinning
industry in China has been received from the Acting Commercial
Attache to H.M. Legation at Peking (Sir Alexander Hosie) : —

" There are now twenty-seven cotton spinning power mills in
China, to which may be added the mill in Hong-Kong, also
engaged in taming out yam for the China market. The mills
originally started in Shanghai, which at pi*esent boasts of 12, had
many obstacles to contend with at the start and for several years
after, such as labour diflBculties, cotton cornering and cotton
watering : losses were sustained, and in several cases capital had to
be written down. The years 1903 and 1904 were the worst since
1900, but 1905 and 1906 were good average years: cotton was
cheaper and the mills were kept ranning night and day. Chinese
cotton is whiter than Indian, and the product of the Shanghai mill
is superior in colour and cleanness to either Japanese or Indian
yam, but being shorter in staple it is not so strong nor is it so
well reeled owing to the low class of labour employed in this
department, and I have been informed by a mill manager that no
amount of supervision can obtain what may be considered high-
class work. Taking Chinese labour as a whole, however, it may
be considered as good as either Japanese or Indian, and when the
difference in the quality of the cotton is considered it is relatively
as cheap.

**The number of spindles in these 28 mills is approximately
750,000, and the production per spindle working day and night



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70 THE BOABD OP TRADE JOURNAL. [Oct. 10, 1907.

Cotton Mills in China,

is from 11 to 13 oz., according to counts, which are 10*8, 12's,
14'8 and 16'8. With 12 oz. as .the average, these 750,000 spindles
are capable of a daily outpnt of 562,500 lb., and on the assnmp-
tion that work is carried on 320 days of the year, the annual
output would be 180,000,000 lb. of yam, a quantity equal to
more than half the foreign import. What becomes of this yam ?
The great bulk of it finds its way into the country round
Shanghai and becomes the warp of Chinese cloth woven on hand
looms, which is exported in enormous quantities under the name
of nankeens to Northern China, but especially Manchuria,
principally by junk. The block in Manchuria in 1904-05 reacted
on Shanghai^ where the stocks at the dose of 1906 amounted to
27,666,000 lb. against 2,665,600 lb. in 1903, 6,873,9701b. in 1904
and 5,804,433 lb. in 1905. Were we to assume that all the
foreign yam imported into China as well as the product of the mills
in China and Hong-Kong is manufactured into cloth with native
spun weft — which is not the case — the weight of the latter might
approximately be estimated at 518,829,600 lb. or 231,620 tons,
and if to this be added the export from China in 1906 of 769,542
piculs or 45,806 tons and the large but i^nknown quantity used for
wadding, it is not unlikely that the production of cotton in China
would approximate, if not exceed, the estimate of 300,000 tons men-
tioned in my report for 1905. There was an import of raw cotton
into China in 1906 of 6,047,600 lb. against 12,078,667 lb. in 1905.

** The province of Ssuchuan, which is not well suited by soil for
the cultivation of cotton and produces only a limited quantity, is
the greatest consumer of imported yam. It took 51,555,867 lb. in
addition to 36,844,533 lb. of raw cotton from the central provinces.
The latter quantity, although mentioned by the Commissioner of
Customs at Ichang in his report, does not appear in the Customs
returns ; it passed through Ichang by junk.

**The price of raw cotton in 1906 ranged in December from
16-50 to 18-20 Shanghai taels according to quality, the best being
produced at Tungchow and Tai-ts'ang on the north and south
banks of the estuary of the Yangtsze.

" Although the great bulk of imported yam is made into cloth
with home-grown cotton, a certain but measureless quantity is
manufactured solely from foreign twist. I visited several estab-
lishments at Shanghai where British and Japanese yams were
respectively being used as warp and weft in the weaving of coloured
fancy-patterned cloth. The yam was dyed on the premises, and at
the time of my visit natural indigo and synthetic reds were being
employed. In one of these factories there were 80 hand looms of
Japanese pattern, and it was interesting to watch the women at the
looms. There was no idling to look at the foreign intruder, for
they were engaged on piecework at the rate of 7 cash per foot. A
woman could turn out 40 Chinese feet of cloth per day of 12 hours*
the length of a piece being 50 Chinese feet, with a width of 27
inches, and the Chinese manager told mo that on occasions a whole
piece might be woven in a day, but that it was an exception. Men
were employed to arrange and fix the warps oUg^^^ JyQggi^" ^^



0<*. 10, 1901J THE BOARD OP TRADE JOUSNAL. 71

NOTICES UNDER THE WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

ACT, 1904.

The following are copies of Notices (Nos. 54, 55 and 56)
giving the results of the examination and testing of certain kinds
of weighing instniments for use in trade that have been submitted
to the Boai*d of Trade under the provisions of Section 6 of the
Weights and Measures Act, 1904 : —

(54)



The Board of Trade have examined and tested a pattern of a
lever coal weighing machine, of the capacity of I cwt., of the form
herewith shown, submitted to the Department under the provisions
of Section 6 of the above Act, and have issued a certificate that the
pattern is not such as to facilitate the perpetration of fraud.



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72 THE BOASD OF. TRADE JOURNAL. [Oct. 10, 1907.



Notices under the Weights and Measures Act, 1904.



(55)



The Board of Trade have examined and tested a pattern of a
weighing instrument described as a portable lever coal weighing
machine of the capacity of 1 cwt., of the form herewith shown,
submitted to the Department under the provisions of Section 6 of
the above Act, and have issued a certificate that the pattern is not
such as to facilitate the perpetration of fraud.



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Oct 10, 11*07.1 THE BOABD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 7S



Notices under the IV eights mid Measures Act, 1904.



(56)



The Board of Trade have examined and tested a pattern of a
weighing instmment known as the ** Sinus " milk weigher, of the
capacity of 500 lb., of the form herewith shown, submitted to the
Department under the provisions of Section 6 of the above Act,
but as the result of the examination was not satisfactory, the Board
have declined to issue a certificate of approval.



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74 THE BOiUlD OF t&ADE jTOtTENAL. [Oct. 10, W07.*

PROPOSED TARIFF CHANCES.

NETHERLANDS.

The Board of Trade are in receipfc^ through the Foreign Office, of a

p^ , translation of a Bill which has recently been

aed^(Sr f submitted to the Dutch Legislature by the

Dutv ^ M^tto Mhiiater of Finance proposing to reduce the

P k ^^A ^ "' Netherlands import duty on mutton, pork and

^' bacon as shown in the following statement : —





Present
Rate of Duty.


Proposed
New Rate.


Mutton, pork and bacon :

Salted

Smoked or dried *


Florins.
100 pounds 1 -00
1-25


Florins.
100 ponnds 0-7ft
1-00



TARIFF CHANGES
AND CUSTOMS REGULATIONS.

AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH*

With reference to the Supplement to the ** Board of Trade

^, Journal" for 19th September last giving the

8 oms ^^^ Tariff proposals of the Australian Com-

cisions. monwealth, the Board of Trade have received,

through the OflBcer in charge of the Commonwealth offices in

London, a copy of a cablegram from the Commonwealth Customs

Department notifying that the definition of ** sheet and plate metal

and glass" given in the introduction to the Tariff (for which see

p. 3 of the above " Supplement ") has been suspended, pending

cancellafion in the House.

It is further stated that " plate and sheet iron "are now regarded
&s identical, atid also that item 250 B relating to sheet glass is to be
interpreted to mean ** plain clear sheet glass" only.

The Board of Trade have also received a copy of a further cable-
grs^m notifying the following Customs decisions : —
• The value of tanks and casks containing ad vahr&tn goods,
duty 5 per cen^., is not now to be included in f.o.b. value, but
charged on tanks and casks, full or empty, according to items 160,
321 or 322. Casks, which are absolutely valueless as casks, when
empty, are charged no specific duty, but included in the value for
cid, valorem duty.

The duty on " medicinal preparations containing opium '* is
charged under item 293 at 30if. per lb., or under item 291 at
15 per cent, ad valorem, whichever is the higher duty. In c^ses of



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Oct. 10, 1907.1



THB BOABB OV TBADB TOtTRKAt.



V^



Tatijf Changes and Customs Regulations,



ilUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH-^^^»*^<«.

spiiituoxis preparations where the quantity of opium is small, the
duty is charged under item 293 or item 8 (14«. per proof gallon),
whichever yields the most duty.

The capacity of bottles (items 259 and 260) is taken to be the
contents when corked. Glass tube containers under one drachm,
and tx)ntainers sealed by fusing glass are not considered bottles
under the above items.

The following decisions are also given : —



Articles.



Item

in

Tariff.



General
Tariff.



Tariff on goods

the produce or

manufacture of

the United

KingdMn. ,



Manganese steel

Watches and all materials

Umbrella sticks and handles —

Inroiced at 7#. 6^. or less each

Oyer that price ...

The following articles were inadvertently omit-
ted from the free list in the Tariff —
* Machineiy, not including motiTe power,
^igine combinations or power connec-
tions, via. —

Garment drafting machines

Jewellers* polishing lathee

Knitting, linotype, monotype, mono-
line and other type • composing

machines

Printing machines and presses
Machinery used exclusively for and in
the actual process of electrotyping
and stereotyping aluminium
Rotary graining machines



164c
337



^0%ad vol,
30% „

Free.



26 % ad val.
20% .,

Free.



Dutiable according to
material.



V —



Free.



Free.



• The machines may be delivered free of duty on importers giving written
undertaking to pay duty if called upon, pending decision of Parliament.

The Board of Trade have also received, throngh the OflScer-in-charge
of the Commonwealth offices in London, a notifi-
cation from the Commonwealth Comptroller of
Customs, stating that Division I. (ale, spirits
and beverages) of the new tariff* proposals has
been passed without amendment, and that wood,

naphtha, and methylic alcohol have been added to the free list.



Duties on

Alcoholic and

Spiritoons

Liqaon.



SOUTH AFRICA.

The " Oape of Good Hope Government Gassette*' for 10th September
-, last contains a copy of a Customs Notice (No. 53)

Diftia?™ dated 6th September last, giving Customs

•vecitions. decisions relating to the rates of duty leviable



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76



THE BOAJLD OP TRADE JOUEITAL.



[Oct 10, 1907.



Tariff Changes and Customs ReguUUions.



SOUTH hFRlCh-cantinued,

on the undermentioned articles imported into the South African
Customs Union : —



Articles, and how classed.



Tariff
No.



Rates of
Duty.



Rebate allowed
upon Goods, th«

produce or
mumfactaie of
the United
Kingdom
and rectptooating
Colonies.



Handbooks (pablished by Hobbies, Ltd.)

Paper,; wiping; off, used in connexion

with the embossing of envelopes and

letter paper

Wedding cards, embossed, but otherwise
blank



188
175



Free

I5%adval,
26% „



3 % ad vol.



* GRENADA.

An Order-in-Council, which was approved by the Legislative
- T rf « Council on Slst May last, has been received,
f M^IaI ^^ providing for the free importation of the under-
U^if ^ ftc mentioned articles into Grenada: —

' '* Official uniforms, accoutrements, and equip-

ments imported with the consent of the Governor, for official use
by officers and men in H.M. naval, military, civil, or volunteer
services."



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A recent circular of the United States Treasury Department states
Dr&wh&isk o ^^^ ^^® Department is advised by the Attorney-



Materials from

the Philippine

Islands.



General that materials brought in from the
Philippine Islands on which duty has been paid
under the Philippine Revenue Act are to be
regarded as "imported materials" within the
meaning of Section 30 of the Tariff Act of 1897, although not
brought in from a foreign country. Drawback will therefore be
allowed upon the subsequent exportation to a foreign country of
the articles manufactured from such materials in accordance with
the provisions of the Section in question.

The following is the substance of some Decisions affecting the
- to application of the United States Customs Tariff,



Decisions.



which have recently been issued by the Treasury
Department at Washington :-



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Oct. 10, 1907.]



THE BOABD OF TEADE JOTJKNAL.



77



Tariff Changes and Customs ReguIaHans.
UNITED STATES OF AMRRICA- continued.



Articles.



Paragraph
of the Tariff
under which

dutiable.



Rate of Duty.



Jfeeiiaees compoeed of amber beads permanently
rtmnet having no metal parts attached thereto,
dotiable as articles composed of beads

HttfiuM with faceted heads, the faceting being
done by cutting or grinding, dutiable as articles
of glass, cut

&i€ nnd hack eomh$ mounted with precious metal
or base metal plated with gold or silver, with
or without imitation precious stone settings,
dut&ible as jewellery

(kdmimm sulphide^ produced by passing sulphur-
etted hydrogen gas through a solution of cad-
mium sulphate, Satiable as a pigment or colour

8ter§a$eopie photographs on glau, dutiable as
manufactures of glass not specially provided
for ..• ... ... ... ••• ... ...

Vegetdble imrjf rims for use in the manufacture
ot ** irory-rim " buttons, so designated In
trade and commerce for twenty-five years,
dutiable as parts of buttons at the same rate
as finished buttons

Pickers composed of raw hide and metalf raw
hide being the component material of chief
value, dutiable as manufactures in part of
mexai «•• ••• •>• .*• ••• ...




60% ad val.

60% „
30% „



46% „

f cent per

line per gross

and 15 %

ad vol.



43 % ad vol.



PERU.

The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign OflSce, of

jg -. . translations of three Decrees dated Slst July,

2jTjf?^"" issued by the President of the Peruvian

K^^matioiiB. Republic, introducing certain reforms in the

treatment of goods arriving at the principal ports of Peru. The

new regulations were to come into force on 1st October.

The new regulations provide that merchandise disembarked in
the ports of Callao, MoUendo, and Pay ta, immediately on being dis-
chai^^ed, will be put in the provisional warehouses provided at each
of the Customs-houses named. Cereals and explosives are excepted
and will continue to be sent to their special warehouses, and
packages which cannot easily be moved and cargoes in bulk, such
as lumber, coal, &c., will remain where discharged until despatched.
The examination, appraisement and calculation of import duty are
to be made within eight days of the entry of the merchandise in
the provisional warehouses. All imported merchandise not
intended for immediate re-shipment or consumption must be
deposited after the duties have been determined in the warehouses
which are to be established in the three ports named, managed by



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78



THE BOABD OF TBADK JOUBNAL.



[Oct. 10, 190r.



Tari-ff Changes and Cudomt Regtdaiians.



companies and administered for the acooant of the State. The
length of time during which merchandise may be deposited in the
warehouses in Callao is limited to three years, and in MoUendo and
Pajrta to two years.

The warehouse rent is as follows : —
Merehandise tubject to duty —

For the iirst month, or fraction thereof I per cent, of the net

amount of dnty.

For each subsequent month ... | per cent.

Jewellery and treasure | per oent. on the declared value.

Merehandite free of duty —

For the first month or fraction thereof 6 oents per 100 kilogs.

For each subsequent month 3 cents per 100 kilogs.'

The company in charge of the warehouse will issue receipts
showing date of entry, class of goods, duties leviable, &c., and to
each receipt will be attached a " warrant," if so desired by the
owner of the goods, containing the same details as the receipt.
These ** warrants'' will serve for obtaining advances on the goods,
on equal conditions and subject to the same procedure as other
documents guaranteed by mercantile securities.

A copy of the translation of the Regulations may be seen by
persons interested at the Commercial Intelligence Branch of the
Board of Trade, 73, Basinghall Street, E.G.



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.

The following recent Customs Decisions of the Argentine Tribunal
- of Appraisers have been notified to the Board



Decisions.



Trade by
Ay res : —



the British Consul at Buenos



Articles.


Tariff No.

under which

dutiable.


Rate

of
Duty.


Embroidered veiling of silk in the form of boleros
for application to bloases

Mixture of mineral and animal oils

*' Imperial Green " paint, not containing copper...

Apparatus for button-hole punching, used on the
counters of boot shops, in boot - blacking
saloons, Ix


2089

. - 1

3227


Dolfl.

(Gold)

Kilog. 8-00

26%

on the

declared yalue

Kilog. 0-075

on the
declared value



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Oct 10, 1907.]



THE BOAXD OV TEADB lOXTRRAL.



79



SHIPPING AND TRANSPORT.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA.

The Board of Trade have received from their correspondent at
Wharftu?e EatM and ^^^l^^^^ C"^- J- Crewwell) particulars of
ilr^ tI« ♦ *^^ wharfage rates and tonnage dues

Port^ld^d payaW© at the wharfs at Port Adelaide

^' which came into operation on Ist Septem-

ber last. These may be consulted by persons interested at the
Commercial Intelligence Branch of the Board of Trade, 73,
Basinghall Street, E.C.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

H.M. Embassy at Washington have forwarded the text of the

Verm' vermin regulations imposed by the Public

^J^^J^ - Health Service of San Francisco on coast-wise

^^^'^^^ . shipping clearing from that port. These

regulations, which appear to be applicable not

only to shipping bound to otiier United States ports but also to

shipping for Canadian, Mexican and Hawaiian ports, may be seen

by those interested at the Commercial Intelligence Branch of the

Board of Trade, 7«, Basinghall Street, London, E.C.



MINERALS, METALS AND MACHINERY.

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND.

The following figures, showing the gold production of the different
States of the Australian Commonwealth and of

Gold ProductioA. New Zealand for the first half of the present year,
as compared with the corresponding period of

last year, have been taken from the ''Queensland Government

Mining Journal " : —





First Six Months.





1906.


1907.


West Anstrali*

Victoria

Queensland

New SoQth Wales

New Zealand


Fine oz.
904,864
881,681
251,978
133,150
262,001


Fine oz.
838,258
336,110
227,077
138,489
213,048


Total ,


1,923,674


1,752,972



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80 THB BOAJLD OF TRADE JOUEITAL. [Oct. 10, 1107.

Minerals, MetcUsj and Machinery.

QUEENSLAND.

According to the " Queensland Government Mining Journal " a
. ^ well-known prospector in North Queensland

^ ^ has lately written to the Under-Secretary for

Hiscovery. Uine& from the Alice River to the eflFect that

he had recently discovered a very large antimony lode, traceable
on the 8ur£BK;e for a long distance. Since then he had found no
less than ten other antimony lodes, all within a mile and a-half of
the prospecting claim. When he was leaving he discovered still
another lode — a very large one — two miles north-east of the
prospecting claim. The ore on the surfiM^, he states, was stibnite,
and in places oxide of antimony, but on sinking a little on the
lodes the sulphide ore always came in. He sent to Sydney 21 cwt.
of ore, three-fourths of which was oxide. The find is 18 miles
nearer the Laura than the Alice Ooldfield, and the cost of packing
to the former place is bl. per ton. Railage thence to Cooktown is
95. 6d. per ton, but for under 5 tons in quantity 11. per ton. He
was convinced that this was one of the largest finds of antimony



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 16 of 112)