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NORWAY.

The British Vice-Consul at Bergen (Mr. E. F. Gray) reports that

- », there would appear to be a considerable increase

. in mining activity in the district of the Lofoten

L f tfi T 1 dfl Islands. About 150 men are said to be now
isiaiL . engaged at the Kalrjord iron mines, which are

in English hands. Steam boilers, winches and pumps are reported

to have been ordered by the owners from Great Britain and 10,500

tons of iron ore shipped during the summer.

The Madmoderen iron mines are in Austrian hands and are now

said to employ over 300 persons.

Other trial sinkings for iron, under German auspices, are being

made in the district and also on Hammers Island for felspar.



BELGIUM.

The Board of Trade have been notified by the Foreign Ofiice that

Eeport on Coal i? ,^^^ '^P^'^ T? *^^ ^f!*[ mining industry in
ir;T.Uw» Tiiiii..f^. Belgmm recently published by the Foreign
mmiDg mauBwy. q^^^^ {Miscellanoous Series, No, 664), the word

A oorrecuon. up^event" on p. 9, line 36, should be "present : "
the sentence should read — ** relighters in the lamps do not present
any special danger."



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Oct 10, 1907.1 THB BOABD OF TBABS JOUBNAL. 81

Minerals, Metals, and Machinery.

SPAIN.

U.M. Gonsnl at Bilbao (Mr. A. Maolean) reports with regard to

I Om TraA *^® ^^^ ^^ trade of that district that stocks on

t WXha, • deposit are decreasing, and as a great scarcity

* ., ^ * of labour is noted, it is to be feared that, if

T 1. •'m^» demand keeps steady, the mines will, during

iDOQth and so cause delay to shipping. Longer ''turns" are
already noticed.

The scarcity of labour referred to is attributed to the exten-
sive emigration to Panama and South America — principally
to Chile, where free passages have been granted — and it has already
caused an increase in the average wage of 25 centimes per day,
though in some mines competition has led to an extra 50 centimes
being paid.

As regards iron and steel, Mr. Maclean states that during August
T*^*4> #G • *^^ British steamers loaded at Bilbao 2,530

T ;i 0* 1 went to Manchester, and the remainder to New*

SSiSlbao to P^"*' ^^^' ^^^^ ^'^^^ ^^^ ^^ pig-iron were
ITiiited Kind shipped to Stockton by a British vessel. It is

^ ™* not yet known whether other quantities of these
semi-manufactured products have been shipped by foreign vessels
to the United Kingdom. Local iron and steel works are well sup-
plied with orders, and the company owning the Altos Hornos and
Vizcaya expect to pay a dividend for the present year of at least
12 per cent.

ITALY.

In response to enquiries on the subject, H.M. Consul at Rome

• •# f (■^^' ^' ^* Morgan) repprts that, pursuant to

thA aS^ f^ section 773, par. 3, of the Italian Commercial

j-^j. Law, every important sale of agricultural

^^' or industrial machinery in Italy may, within

three months from date of invoice, be registered at the Chancery

of the Gvil and Penal Tribunal of the town where the machinery

is to be installed. This registration is an act of protection for the

final payment of the price of the machinery in question.

In order to secure the privilege of registration, it is necessary for
the seller of the machinery to send in an application (nota di
traserizioite) addressed to the "Regia CanceUeria del Tribunale
Civile e Penale, Sezione Commerciale " of the town where the
machinery is installed, giving all the necessary details regarding
price, terms of payment, &c. The said application must be drawn
out in duplicate on Italian stamped paper of 3*60 lire, as one copy
will be returned by the Tribunal after effecting registration, and



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82 THE BOAAD or TRABB lOUENAL. LO^t. 10, lf07

Minerals, Metals, and Maekinery.

IT A L Y — continued.

shonld be accompanied by a copy of the contract for the sale of th»
machinery, or, in default of such contract, by a copy of the invoice.
These copies must be stamped and registered with the Italian
Government at the competent office, and an amount sufficient to
cover the postage for the return of one of them should be sent to
the Tribunal. It is not necessary for the application for registra-
tion to be confirmed in any way by the buyer of the machinery.

The " Bulletin " of the French Chamber of Commerce at Milan

-^ ^ announces that important beds of polychrome

- ^V^ marble have been discovered on Lake Iseo, in

®* the territory of Avatico in the Bergamo

Province.



ROUMANIA.

With reference to the notice on p. 12 of the " Board of Trade
Journal '* of the 4th July, relative to the Inter-
Intemational national Petroleum Congress and Exhibition at
Petroleum Bucharest in September, a communication has

Congress at been received from H.M. Minister at Bucharest
Bucharest. reporting that the practical results of the Con-

gress are contained in the following resolutions,
viz. : — (1) the constitution of an International Committee with
the object of unifying the methods of analysis employed and for
giving uniform definitions, for commercial purposes, to the pro-
ducts of petroleum ; (2) the establishment of a permanent
International Committee of the Petroleum Congresses. Before
separating, the Congress passed a resolution to the effect that the
next Congress should meet in 1910 at Lemberg in Galicia.

TIBET.

The "Indian Trade Journal" contains an article on trade with
Tibet, in the course of which it states : —
Borax. " Another of the products of Tibet is borax.

It is found mixed with sand on the banks of
several lakes and streams. There appears to be any amount
of it to be had for the digging. The Lhasa authorities taking only
a nominal tax of about eight annas for ten sheep or goat l^s —
probably about three maunds or 247 lbs. Borax sufficient to
supply the potteries of Staffordshire and all Earope would be
forthcoming if the supply from Tuscany should ever run short.
Years ago Tibet was the principal source of supply of the
European market, and exported over 20,000 maunds annually.
The supply from Tuscany killed this trade, and for many years
past the Tibetan exports have never reached 2,700 maunds.
We believe, however, that a keener demand for Tibetan borax has
recently sprung up, and that if there were a decent road this
trade might greatly expand."



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Oct W, 1907.9 THE BOiklin OF TKADE JOURNAL. 88



YARNS AND TEXTILES.

BRITISH INDIA.

A memorandam has been received from the Director-General of
_. .- Commercial Intelligence at Calcutta, dealing

Ittd tar ^^^^ ^^^ woollen industry of India in 1906.

wry. rjHj^ woollen mills of India, six in number,

represent a paid-up capital of Rs. 42,15,400 (281,0271) and deben-
tures to the value of Rs. 4,00,000 (26,667Z.). In addition to this,
there is a small private mill at Bombay, the capital of which is not
stated. Two of the mills, those at Cawnpore in the United
Provinces and at Dhariwal in the Punjab, have between them a
paid-up capital of 30 lakhs (200,000Z.) or 70 per cent, of the whole.
The value of the outturn of these two mills represents 81 per cent,
of the total outturn of the Indian mills. They weave cloth for the
use of the army and police, and articles of superior quality gene-
rally, using for the high-class goods Australian wool, either pure or
mixed with Indian wool.

There has been no large increase in the amount of capital
employed since 1898, though the number of persons employed and
the number of looms and spindles have risen. The quantity and
value of the goods produced was larger in 1905 than in any
previous year. But in 1906 the production fell off considerably
and the quantity was actually smaller than that produced in 1898,
thongh the value, in consequence of the high price of wool, was
greater.

The quantity of woollen goods imported into India is very much
greater than the production of the Indian mills. The largest
classes of the imports are piece-goods and shawls, the bulk of
irfaich is received from the United Kingdom and Germany. The
woollen goods imported in 1906 were valued at Rs. 2,00,08,535
and the production of Indian mills at Rs. 34,81,808, as compared
with Rs. 2,50,09,337 and Rs. 44,28,887 respectively in 1905 and
Rs. 3,07.77,825 and Rs. 36,74,678 in 1904.

There are in various places factories for the weaving of carpets
and rugs, and of paiiu and pdehmina, but though these industries
are in the aggregate extensive, they are individually small, and
weaving is done on hand-looms.

The exports of woollen goods from India consist almost entirely
of carpets and rugs, of which about two-thirds go to the United
Kingdom and the greater part of the remainder to the United
States. The exports of Indian carpets and rugs during the years
1904, 1905 and 1906 were valued at Rs. 20,61,615, Rs. 17,87,340
and Rs. 20,62,845 respectively.



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84



THE BOAKD OF TRADE JOT7BKAL. [Oct. 10, 1907.



Yarns and Textiles.



The following statement gives particulars of the woollen industry
in India for the years 1904, 1905 and 1906 :—



1906.



1904.


1905.


6


6


46,26,000

8,468

787


46,25,000

8,491

719


25,931
3,508,700t
86,74,678


27,387
4,126,987

44,28,887



Mills at work

Nominal capital employed*

Persons employed

Looms .«• ... ...

Spindles

Production



No.
Rt.

No.



(Lbs.
]Bs.



6

46,25,000

8,402

759

27,105

2,827,290

34,81,808



* Capital of five of the mills.

t The quantity prodnced by one of the mills was not reported.



BegoIationB

goyeming the

OradlBg and

Export of Hemp.



NEW ZEALAND.

With reference to the notice on p. 573 of the ** Board of Trade
Journal" of 20th June last respecting new-
regulations governing the grading and export
of New Zealand hemp, the "New Zealand
Trade Review" states that the Agricultural
Department has officially announced that the
new regulations came into force on the 1st October. In some
details slight changes have been made from the original regula-
tions. The allotment of points is to be as follows : —

For stripping, 25 points ; for scutching, 25 points ; for colour,
25 points ; for strength, 25 points. The original arrangement gave
20 points for each of the above and 20 for washing.

The grades will be as follows : —

A grade, " Superior," 90 to 100 points; B grade, *' Fine," 80 to
89 points; grade, "Good Fair," 70 to 79 points; D grade,
" Fair," 60 to 69 points; H grade, "Common," 50 to 59 points;
F grade, " Rejected," under 50 points.

The regulation forbidding the exportation of ** Rejected " hemp
(formerly called "Condemned") has been withdrawn, but it is
provided that any grader may absolutely condemn any hemp
which, in his opinion, has been so badly treated as to make it
useless for the purpose of manufacture or for any other trade
purpose. All hemp exported must bear on the leather tag the
miller's brand, the number of bale, and the grader's mark. •

The department abandons the designation of "Phormium
Fibre " and adopts the commercial title of "New Zealand Hemp"
or " Hemp."



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Oct 10, 1907.] THE BOAItD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 86*

AGRICULTURE.
UNITED KINGDOM.

The prices of British com per quarter of 8 bushels, as received
fix>m the inspectors and officers of Excise in
Com Pricef. the week ended the 5th October, 1907, were
as follows : —

Wheat .-. S28. 6d.

Barley 25^. bd.

Oats 17«. 9d.

For farther particulars see p. 89.

A statement is published on p. 90, showing the quantities of

T rta f A •- ^® various descriptions of agricultural produce

1?^ 1 !>• A^' imported into the United Kmgdom during the

cultural PToauce. ^^j^ ^^^^ ^^ 5^^ October, 1907, as well

as of the imports during the corresponding week of 1906.



CEYLON.

A Supplement to the " Ceylon Observer ** contains extracts from
... the Report for 1906 of the Director of the
A^cui ur Royal Botanic Gardens in Ceylon, stating that

iTOgresB. ^j^^ jj^^g|. notable features in local agriciStural

progress during that year were : — (a) the continued boom in
rubber planting, which now occupies about 115,000 acres; (b)
the successful sale of the cotton crop from Moha-iluppalama,
which gives hope that when a little more has been spent on the
reaUy good irrigable country of the North, agriculture may become
a large and important industry there ; (c) the extension of cam-
phor cultivation, stimulated by the extraordinary high price of the
drug. There ai^ now about 900 acres under this product and,
were seed available locally, there would soon be far more ; (d) the
holding of the Rubber Exhibition at Peradeniya, which was a
great success. Already as a result of the Exhibition decided im-
provements are being made in the rubber industry.



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.

According to reports received from the Acting British Consul at

Olive Oil Cron in ^^*® (^^* ^- Salvari), there is every prospect

TWlnmti^ of a good olivc oil crop in Dalmatia this year,

the fruit being healthy and in good progress of

ripening. It is impossible to indicate the quantity of oil that will

be obtained, but that of the two previous years may be taken as a

basis. During 1905, 3,607 metric tons were produced, a very

good crop; but in 1906 the production fell off to 175*6 metric

brna.



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86 THE BOAUD 07 TRADE 70TJENAL. [Oct. 10, 1907.

Agriculture.



TURKEY.

The following particulars concerning the tobacco crops in Turkey

during 1906 and 1907 have been supplied by

Tobacco Crop. the British Vice-Consul at Smyrna (Mr. H. C.

Venables) : —
The 1906 crop was somewhat below the average, amounting to
about 1,500,000 kilos. The quality was good, and the average
price ruling was 14^ piastres.* The crop for 1907 is calculated at
2,000,000 kilos. — a fair average crop — of which very little has as
yet come in. Owing to heavy rains in the latter part of the
summer, the quality is somewhat inferior. The price cannot be
given, as the crop does not come in before another month or six
weeks, but it is expected that there will be very little of superior
quality. •

The stock held is about 600,000 kilos., which, it is stated, is
below the average. Half of this will probably be shipped when
the new crop comes in.

* 119 piastres = \l. sterling.



MISCELLANEOUS.

UNITED KINGDOM.



The number of bales of cotton imported into the United Kingdom
during the week ended the 3rd October, 1907,
Cotton Statistics, was 36,398, and the number imported during
the forty weeks ended the 3rd October was
3,333,647 (including 5,629 bales British West Indian and 8,467
bales British West African). As regards exports, the figures are,
for the week ended the 3rd October, 7,692 bales, and for the forty
weeks, 400,410 bales.

For farther details see p. 89.

A return showing the number of bales of cotton imported and
exported, forwarded from ports to inland towns, and returned to
ports during the month and nine months ended 30th September
will be found on p. 88.

SPAIN.

Referring to the notice on p. 34 of last week's issue of the " Board

rh rtn Ad ^^ Trade Journal " relating to the constitution

^ ' . of a Chartered Company, under the name of the

^AfrT^ General Hispano- African Society, for the deve-

^^ lopment of Spanish interests in Africa, it is

understood that the company in question is the well-known " Com-

pania-Transatlantica " of Barcelona.



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Oct 10, 1907.J THE BOAED OF TRADE JOURNAL.



87



Miscdlaneous.



CHILE,

The " Moniteur Officiel du Commerce " (Paris) publishes a report

received from the French Consulate at Valpa-

Timber. raiso, giving the following particulars of the

principal kinds of Chilian timber and the

various uses to which they are put : —

"Roble pellier," very strong, used for building, furniture,
sleepers, &c.

" Alerce," a sort of red pine used for large-sized barrels (casks).

'* Lingne," similar to European oak, but soon rots. It is used
only for furniture, and its bark is used in tanning.

"Laurel," or wild laurel of the country; an ordinary white
wood, used for planks, flooring, and partition walls.

" Alamos," or poplar.

" Litre," an extremely hard wood, beautifully veined like pink
marble, not abundant. It is used for furniture, and for the centres
and rims of carriage wheels.

" Rauli,'^ a red, soft wood, much used for barrels. Formerly it
was abundant, but it is now becoming rare in the more accessible
provinces. Found in great quantities nowadays only in the pro-
vinces of Araucanie, Bio-Bio, Malleco, Valdivia, and the Soutii of
Chile.

BRAZIL.

The following table showing the c.i.f. value of the imports into

Brazil (by countries) during the six months

Import Trade. January — June, 1907, as compared with the

corresponding period of 1906, is compiled from

statistics published in the ** Brazilian Eeview " : —



From


Six Months, January — June.


1906


1907


United Kingdom

Gennany

United States of America

Aigentina

Pnmce

Portngal

ItaJy

Belgium

Uruguay

Aastria-Hongary

Kewfoundland

Switzerland

Otlier Countries


£

3,910,168

1,955,619

1,928,096

1,580,497

1,813,367

975,500

501405

602,176

776,621

214,151

, 190,373

1 128.209

398,892


£

5,571,846

2,867,066

2,398,727

1,857,060

1,598,280

1,167,906

685,466

670,833

632,884

319,748

239,457

175,071

825,666


Total


£14,424,974


£18,899,497



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88



THE BOAED OF TRADE JOUBNAL.



[Oct. 10, 1907.



STATISTICAL TABLES.



Cotton Beturns.— September, 1907.

Betnm of the Number of Bales of Cotton Imported and Exported,
Forwarded from Forts to Inland Towns, and Betnmed to Forts
during the Month and Nine Months ended 30th September, 1907,
compared with the corresponding Periods of the Year 1906.





ICoNTH OF September.


Nine Months rndbd
80TH September.




1907.


1906.


1907.


1906.




Imports.


Amerioaa

BmiliaxL

East Indian

Bgyptian
lOiicellaneoas ...


57,864
8,528
19,828
14,880
18,782*


69,973
1,317
7,071
8,877

11,926


2,401,004
174,429
176,606
850,365
120,793t


1,683,793

193,105

117^316

292/)89

69,669


Total


119,872


89,163


8,228,097


2i366^72




Exports.


American

Bradlian

East Indian

Egyptian

HiBcellaneonB


18,762
855

12,810
2,448
2,405


8,372
1,361
2,536
1,900
601


201,873
15,486
60,528

105,615
11,016


139,815

13fi78

36,099

68,189

6,253


ToUl


86,270


14fi70


898,968


263fi34




Forwarded from Ports to ImjLirD Towns.


American

Braiilian

Bast Indian

B^SMllaneclas '.'/. Z


185,666

16,620

4,761

9,994

9,881


183,342

14fi66

2,763

7,304

4,846


2,287,044
111,546

55,997
246,654

61,111


2,169,569
141,326

46,646
224^96

62,613


Total


225,822


212^10


2,712,852


2fi44^




FoBWABDBD from Inland Towns to Ports.


American

Bradlian

Bast Indian

Egyptian

Ifiacellaneoiu


22


66


408
179


619

78


Total


22


66


587


697



* Inclnding 61 bales British West Indian and 810 bales British West African,
t n ' 6i^2S „ „ „ 8,467 „ „ „



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Oct 10, 1907.J



THE BOA&D OT TRADE JOWNAL.



•89



Cotton Betonu— con<im46<i.

Rotoni of (be ■ombtt of BaIm of Ootton Imported and Bzportod at the
Ttfioiis PoFti of the Unitod Kingdom duiing the Week and 40 Weeks
ended 3id October, 1907 :—





Week ended

3rd Oct.,

1907.


40 Weeks

ended

8rd Oct.,

1907.


Week ended

8rd Oct.,

1907.


40 Weeks
ended

3rd Oct.,
1907.




Imports.
(Bales.)


BzponTs.
(Bales.)


American

BniiliAn

Bwt Indian

KffTPtian

MiaoeDaneons


No
25,697

178
4,719

5,804

36,398


No.
2,490,141
182,903
179,764
359,184
121,666*


No.

5,853
270
819
608
142


No
204,817

16,686

61,426
107,465

11,116


Total


3,333,647


7,692


400,410



* Inclading 5,629 bales British West Indian and 8,467 bales British West African.



Com Prices.

showing the iTorage Priea of British Com, per quarter of
8 bushels, Imperial Measure,* as receiyed from the Inspectors and Officers of
Excise in the week ended 6th October, 1907, and corresponding weeks of the
seyen previons years pursuant to the Com Betums Act, 1882.



Average Price.




Vesk sadad 5th October, 1907



Gorfs^oadtng week in—

1900 ...

1901 ...

1902 ...
1908 ...
1904...
1906 ...
1906...



t.


d.


#.


d.


82


6


25


6


28


9


26


2


25


9


26


6


25


5


26


2


25


10


23


8


30


2


26


6


26


9


24


9


26


1


25






s. d
17 9



17
17
17
15
15
16
16



* Section 8 of the Com Betums Act, 1882, proyides that where returns of
purchases of British Com are made to the local inq>eotor of Com Betums in any
other measure tlum the Imperial bushel or bj weight or by a weighed measure that
officer shall conyeri such returns into the Imperial bushel, and in the case of weight
or weighed measure the conyeision is to be made at the rate of sixty Imperial
pounds for eyery bushel of wheat, fifty Imperial pounds for eyeiy bushel of barley,
sod tUrty-nine Imperial pounds for eyery bu^el of oats.



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90



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



[Oct 10, 1907.



Importi of Agrionltnral Prodnoe into tho United Kingdom.
Aeeonnft showing the Quantities of certain kinds of l^enltnral PFodnoe
imported into the Unitod Kingdom in the week ended 5th October, 1907,
together with the quantities imported in the corresponding week of the
previous year.



Weekended

6th Oct.,

1907.



Corrttpofkii'

mg WMin

1906.



Animftlw, liring : —

Oxen, bnlle, cows, and calyes

Sheep and lambs

Swine

Hones

Fresh Meat :—

Beef (including refrigerated and froien)

Mutton „ „

„foric „

Baited or preserred meat : —

Bacon

Beef

Hams

Pork

Meat, unenumerated, fresh

„ M SaibCQ ••* ...

„ preeerred othertrise than by salting
(mduding tinned and canned)
Dairy produce and substitutes:—

Butter

Margarine

Cheese

Milk, fteahf in cans or drums

„ cream

„ condensed

„ preseryed, other kinds . . .

Bggf

Poultry

Ckune ...

Rabbits, dead (fresh and frosen)

Lard

Oorn. grain, meal, and flour :—

Wheat

Wheat meal and flour

Barley

Oats

Peas

Beans

Maise or Indian com

Fruit, raw : —

Apples

Apricots and peaches

Bananas ... ...

Cherries

Currants

(Gooseberries

Grapes



Oranges

Pears

Plums ...

Strawberries

Unenumerated

Hay

Straw

Moss Litter

Hops

Locost Beans
Vegetables, raw :—

^ions

Potatoes

Tomatoes

Unenumerated ...
YejEeUbles, dried ...

Preserved by canning



Number.



Ots.



(>Krts.



OwtM.



Grt.rfnndr.
Value £

Owts.



Cwti.



Owts.

Bunches.
Cwto.



Tons.



Oi»..



Bushels.
Cwti.

Value £
Owts.



8,776
1,806

481

109,520
82,353
12,522

84,022
1,964

17,361
4,139

10,468
1,701
6,948



66,127
13,955
40,243

""88

20,236

49

364,695

4,293

8,240

43,713

28,815

1,806,000
332,700
474,400
147,100
51,830
37,880
878,200

61,767

23

84,414



55,358
11,938

7,622
29,530

3,340

12,023
1,384
1,924
1,208
4,394

12,900

278,493

89,854

22,419

1,807

3,226

16,889



6fi39

3S2

118,876
71^
11,7U

106,7Si

3^18

17fi4S

3,445

14^2

6fit4



86fi71

£2,736

66,766

31

64

20,467

290

S99fi38

1^13

3^326

34^61

44,^0

1^8,100
346,700
608,900
184^
84fi60
38,240
692,700

96,461

143,490



74^
11^32
14^2
21,382
33rl97

1£,862
2,799
lfi76
U892

4/yn

48^90

210p91

22J963

12,899

3/)69

6fi03

6fi91



/Google



Oct 10, 1907.1 THE BOABD OF TRADE JOUENAL. 91

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS.

TSADI BBTUBNS OF THB XTNITED KnTQDOX.

The Monthly Aooounts relating to the Trade and Navigation of
the United Kingdom for the month of September, 1907, have been
pnbliBhed. The acconntB, which are issned on the 7tli or 8th of
each month, may be purchased at a coet, in the present instance,
of Is. 2d. per copy, either directly or through any bookseller, from
Messrs. Wyman & Sons, Fetter Lane, E.G., and 32, Abingdon
Street, S.W. ; or Messrs. Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh ; or Edward
Ponsonby, 116, Grafton Street, Dublin.

Attention is further called to. the &c^ that the ''Annual
Statement of the Trade of the United Kingdom with Foreign
Countries and British Possessions" for the year 1906, in two
volumes, may be purchased at a cost of 6«. 8d. for the first,



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 17 of 112)