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of the deposit is small. The nodules are of very good quality,
giving 77*5 per cent, manganese dioxide and containing only 0*02
per cent, phosphoric anhydride, and 1*1 per cent, silica.

The '^Philippine Journal of Science" publishes also information as to
deposits of asbestos in the islands. The pro-
Asbestos. vince of Ilocos Norte contains the most im-

portant deposits. Two varieties occur, known
as the " parallel " and the " cross-fibre/* the former kind being the
more abundant. The local designation of " cross-fibre " is applied
to the true crysolite asbestos and by "parallel fibre" is meant
tremolitic or amphibole asbestos. In regard to the actual situation
of the deposits, mention may be made of occurrences in the
Dalumat and Baruyen schist areas in the northern part of tlie
province, and to a pocket formation on the Dungn-Dungan estate.
It appears as though these two occurrences are confined almost
entirely to shear zones in the rock and hence are likely to be of
only limited importance. In the shaft on property near Baruyen. a



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Oct 17, 1907.] THE BOABD OV TEADB JOUBNAL. 135

Minerals, MetaU^ and MaeUnery.

large pocket of rather inferior tremolitio asbestos has been met
wMi, but there are also several small veins of the '* cross-fibre "
variety which are very promising. At the present time actual
working c^ the deposits has not taken place, and no mineral has
been marketed.



JAPAN.

The Commercial Attache to H.M. Embassy at Tokio (Mr. E.

Oil Wrfl • ^' ^^^^) reports that the oil well in Gotsu

Ootsn Bfl.^ "^^y* ^^^ Naoetsu in Echigo, belonging to

^' the Japan Petroleujn Company, which began

to spout on the 30th August last, is now producing oil at the rate

of over 7 koku (1 koku = 397 gallons) per hour, making an

average of 160 koku per day. Trial boring was begun four years

ago and up to the date mentioned the amount produced had not

exceeded 5 koku a day. The quality of the oil is said to be good

and it should fetch about 8'30 yen per koku (say 17«. for 40 gallons).



AGRICULTURE.



UNITED KINGDOM.

The prices of British com per quarter of 8 bushels, as received
from the inspectors and officers of Excise in
Com Prices. the week ended the 12th October, 1907, were
as follows : —

Wheat 33«. Sd.

Barley 25«. 9d.

Oats 17^. lid.

For further particulars see p. 141.

A statement is published on p. 142, showing the quantities of

T •.i.i^ ^ A • *^® various descriptions of agricultural produce

1?!^ ^J^" imported into the United Kmgdom during the

ealtural Produce, ^^j^ ^^^^ ^j^^ j2th October, 1907, as weU

as of the imports during the corresponding week of 1906.

RHODESIA.

The Board of Trade's Correspondent at Cape Town (Mr. E. J.
ir • A M'W t ^^^^^^) reports that the maize and millet harvest

^**^*~. in Bhodesia has been a record one. In the

uarreit. Mazoe district the locusts have done very little

damage to the summer crop, but the majority of the winter white
straw crops have been destroyed, and little will be harvested.



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186



4BB BOASD OF TEADE JOtTBNAL. [Oct. 17, W©?.



AgrieuUure.



SPAIN.

The Commercial Attache to H.M. Embassy at Madrid (Mr. 8. P.
W 4 Oil Oockerell) has forwarded the following statistics,
A4i^^ « ^^ compiled from the reports of the Provincial
OU KoauctioiL Agricultural Service for 1906, regarding the

production of wine and olives in Spain in that year : —

Wine.



Area

ander

Vineyards.


Average
Production of

Grapes
per hectare.


Total

Production of

Grapes.


Grapes

destined to

Wine.


Wine
Produced.


Hectares.
1,898,770


Kilogs.
1,778


100 kilogs.
24,811,223


100 kilogs.
21,976,540


Hectolitres.
13,674,745





Olive Oil.




Area under
Olives.


Production of
Olives per Hectare.


Total Production
of OUves.


Total production
of OiL


• Hectares.
1,845,678


Kilogs.
530


Metric Tons.
713,360


Metric Tons.
133,665



The following table shows the production of olives and oil in
1906 in the three most important regions : —



Olives
Produced.



Oil
Produced.



Catalonia
East Andalusia
West Andalusia



Metric Tons.
120,879
107331
244,849



Metric Tons.
20,092
17,444
45,231



West Andalusia includes the two most important oil-producing
provinces, viz., Cordova, with a production of 24,782 metric tons
in 1906, and Seville, which produced 16,410 metric tons.

ITALY-SICILY.

H.M. Consul at Palermo (Mr. S. J. A. Churchill, M.V.O.) has
forwarded the following information regarding
Vintage. vintage prospects in Sicily : —

At Riposto, in the province of Catania, the
vintage is very abundant, so much so that there has been a dearth of
barrels and jars to store the produce. The quality has suffered by
the quantity, which is in excess of last year's output by about one-
third. Wines of 14-15 degrees of alcohol will not be obtainable



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Oct 17, 1907.] THB BOAXD OF TRAPS JOUBKAL. 137



Agriculture.

in quantity this season. During September 6,191 hectolitres of
wine was exported iirom Riposto, principally to Italian ports, an
increase on the figures of the previous year of 1,126 hectolitres,
fiain has interfered with the vintage in the province of Siracosa.
At Milazzo, in the province of Messina, the conditions are the same
as at Riposto. At Castellammare, in Trapani, tlie recent scirocco
has depreciated the quality of the vintage.

The British Vice-Consnl at Marsala (Mr. 0. F. Gray) reports
that the vintage there began early in September and had to be
postponed on several occasions on account of thunderstorms and
heavy rains, which continued, with some intervals, from the 12th
to the 25th of that month. The first rains did some good towards
ripening the grapes, but the very heavy rainfall afterwards caused
large quantities of grapes to rot, and unless there is some fine, hot
weather now most of the new wine will be less luscious and
alcoholic than was expected at the beginning of the vintage. The
total production is expected to be rather less than last year, as
although the earlier planted American vines, as also such of the old
Sicilian vines as have still been able to resist the phylloxera, will
yield considerably more than last year, this increase will not make
up for the deficiency caused by the large quantities of old Sicilian
vines that have been destroyed by phylloxera since last vintage.
As the planting of American vines in the Marsala district was
begun much later than in other parts of the Island an average
vintage cannot be expected for two or three years. Prices of
grapes and must continue to be inordinately high.

ITALIAN EAST AFRICA.

The "Bollettino della Society Africana dltalia" for July, 1907

Gotto contains a notice stating that experiments have

Cnlti ti beenmade by SignorOarpanetti in thecultivation

Titaon. ^f cotton in the district of Goscia, a valley

below the Juba river, which indicate that the district is well

suited for this purpose. Several varieties such as '^Mit afifi,"

"Abassi** and "Cavaroni" have given splendid results both as

regards the quality and the quantity produced. The yield of the

plants is in no way inferior to that obtained in Egypt, and the

special conditions of the district admit of the cultivation of all the

most varied and valuable species.

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.

With reference to the notice on p. 85 of last week's issue of the

Aiiw« a;i n» " Board of Trade Journal " respecting the olive

iT^ta^^ oil crop of Dalmatia, H.M. Consul at Trieste

*•*"*• ^r^ j^ B^ Spence) reports that the production

of olive oil in Istria amounted during 1905 to 845 tons, and during

1906 to 526 tons. Regarding this year's crop, the information

received at the Consulate is that it is not a prolific one — the olive

trees having sufiered through the persistant drought.



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138



THE BOABD OF tEADB JOURNAL.



[Oct. 17, 1907.



MISCELLANEOUS.

UNITED KINGDOM.

The number of bales of cotton imported into the United Kingdom

daring the week ended- the 10th October, 1907,

Cotton StaUsticg. ' was 53,419 (including 103 bales British West

Indian and 322 bales British West African) and

the number imported during the forty-one weeks ended the 10th

October was 3,387,066 (including 5,732 bales British West Indian

and 8,789 bales British West African). As regards exports, the

figures are, for the week ended the 10th October, 5,137 bales, and

for the forty-one weeks, 405,547 bales.

For further details see p. 141.

A statement showing the number of receiving orders and of

•D v^ 4- administration orders under Sec. 125 (Deceased

^r?Jg^ Debtors' Estates) of the Act of 1883 gazetted in

BtatlBUCS. England and Wales during the month and

nine months ending 30th September will be found on pp. 143-4.

llie following statement shows the quantity and value of fish
lis li Stfttifltiei ^^"^^®^ ^" ^® English and Welsh, Scottish,
o f'^i^ ioat' ^^^ Ivisli Coasts during the month and nine
September, l»07. ^^^^ ended 30th September, 1907, compared
with the corresponding periods of the year 1906 :—





Month of September.






1907.


190$,


1907.


1908,




Qoan-
titj.


Value.


Uty,


Fo/m.


Quan-
tity.


Value.


Qmm-


Tolm,


England and Walti—
Fish, ezdttding shell

fish

Shell flah


Cwta.
1,264,564




£

669,915
98,961


Cwta.
8,782,165


£

5,548,255
245,929


OmU.

7,990fiH


£
S,1U4SB

issju


Total Value...


-


729,498


__


698^66


-


5,794,184


-


5.jw.rw


Scotland-
FlB^ exduding aheU

SheU flah .'.*.'


567,SSS


171,777
6,642


UifiH




U7f7S7
8417


8,249,458


2.786,627
55477


MM.4M


;'V*


Total Value...


-


178,419




iS3,97f


-


2,841,904


-


i.0l9,7ii


Ireland—

Fi^exduding shell

SheU flah ".'


48,281


20,769
2,767


60,6^


19,718
1,688


457,868


198,828
14,980


m,ui


»03J17
IIM*


Total Value...





23,586j -


tl.^


-


218,808





iUJSt



NoTB. — AU the aboTe flguree axe ■ubj«ct to ooneotion in the annual retnma.



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Opt. 17, 1907.] THE BOAJtD OF TKABS JOUBNAI- 139^

Mitedlaneoui.



UNITED KinQUOM-continued.

According to a report in the " Board of Trade Labour Gazette ** for
^, , -,• October,* based on 6,471 statistical returns,

T Tw/* w v«f ^^'* 2,701 returns from trade unions and 3,770
to SOTtMibor ^^'^^'^ ^^ employers (i-elating to 1,087,093
H^PWmDer. workpeople, employed in coal and iron mining,
the cotton, woollen, worsted and otiier textile trades, the building
trades, the boot and shoe and other clothing trades, and the paper
and glass trades), besides a large number of returns of a non-
statistical character received from employers* associations, trade
nnions, local correspondents and other sources, employment in
September was on the whole worse than in August. The ship-
building and engineering trades continued to decline, and there
was also some falling off in the building trades and in the
famishing trades. The coal mining and tin plate industries
remained very brisk.

As compai^ed with a year ago, there was some improvement in
coal mining and in all the textile industries, and a decline in the
engineering, shipbuilding, printing and bookbinding trades.

In the 273 trade unions, with a total membership of 631,241,
making returns, 28,914 (or 4*6 per cent.) were reported as un-
employed at the end of September, 1907, compared with 4*0 per
cent, at the end of August, 1907, and 3*8 per cent, at the end of
September, 1906.

GERMANY.

H.M. Embassy at Berlin have forwarded a report of the recent

BonraA Law • meeting of German bankers at Hamburg. The

"^^ • most important and interesting portion of the

, , , proceedings from a general point of view was

the discussion on the reform of the Bourse Law.

It was urged that the entire fundamental idea of the present

Bourse Law was false, as time bargains were essential for the corn

market, for the money market, for the state finances, for the

agpicultnrist, the exporter and the importer, all of whom require time

bargains, not in order to speculate, but to insure themselves against

speculation. It was asserted that the Bourse Law had caused the

concentration of power and capital in the big banks, and the

consequent decline of the small banks, that it had outlawed

legitimate business and allowed illegitimate speculation in American

and African shares to flourish for the benefit of the foreigner.

Another speaker spoke of the Bourse Law in connexion with

financial readiness for war. Military experts suggested all

sorts of violent financial measures in case of war, but one

ought (the speaker said) to do as much as possible by means

* For list uf principal contents, see p. 145.



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140



THE BOABD OF TRADE JOUBNAL.



[Oct. 17, 1907.



MiseeUaneoui.



which would not unnecessarily disturb the ordinary conditions:
such means were the war-chest in the Juliusturm, increase of
taxation, decrease of expenditure for social objects, subscriptions
by communities and individuals and finally loans. For this (the
speaker continued) a strong Bourse is required and that has been
wantonly destroyed : the big banks alone cannot provide for the
huge logins which would be required ; numerous private banks and
strong speculation are wanted to find the loans, llie possession
of foreign stocks is an important reserve in case of war as it
strengthens ouq's political and commercial position. A strong
resolution was passed unanimously, condemning the Bourse Law,
demanding that time bargains should once more be allowed
and urging that, in place of the present tax levied on foreign stocks
on their importation into Germany,* no tax should be paid until
they are placed on the home market.

ITALY-SICILY.

With reference to the notice on p. 477 of the



Sumach Trade.



Board of Trade
Journal " of 5th September respecting sumach
prospects in Sicily, H.M. Consul at Palermo
(Mr. S. J. A. Churchill, M.V.O.) reports that,
according to the *• Giomale di Sicilia," the local sumach trade is
very calm, with small foreign demand and few buyers. This state
of affairs is attributed to.the employment of substitutes for sumach
in tanning. Local prices are quoted as follows : —

Mascolino for shipping, 23 to 23-50 lire per 100 kilos.
„ grinding, 22-50 to 23 lire per 100 kilos.

Femminello, 18 to 19 lire per 100 kilos.

MANCHURIA.

The British Vice-Consul at Dairen (Mr. H. G. Parlett) has for-
warded a remmS of the trade returns of that
Trade of Dairen. port for the first three months of 1907, from
which the following figures showing the total

value of the imports and exports during that period are taken : —



From and To


Imports.


Exports.


Japan

China and other foreign countries


891,021
185,120


275,636
184,446


Total


676,141


410,081



The values of some of the chief articles of import were : —
Cotton goods, 146,081Z.; flour, 60,224Z. ; firearms, &c., 31, 736f.;
timber, 23,362Z.; fruit, 16,932Z.; rice, 16,908Z. ; kerosene, 14,9841. ;
sakd, 13,3461.; iron, &c., 12,832Z.; tobacco, 12,517Z. ; sugar,
12,389Z.; and cotton yam, 11,533Z.



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Oct 17, 1907.]



THE BOABD OF TRADE JOUBNAL.



141



STATIST ICAL TABLES.

Cotton Betunia.
lefton of the MmnbeF of B9lm of Cotton Imported and Exported at the
Tariona Ports of the United Kingdom doling the Week and 41 Weeks
ended 10th October, 1907 i^





Weekended

10th Oct.,

1907.


41 Weeks
ended

10th Oct,
1907.


Week ended

10th Oct.,

1907.


41 Weeks
ended

10th Oct,
1907.




IMPOBIB.

(Bales.)


rfxPOBTS.

(Bales.)


American

Brftiilian

BMt Indian

Bf^tian

MiaraUaneons


No.
35,986
583
7,918
4,841
4,101*


No.
2,526,127
183,486
187,672
364,025
125,766t


.No.
3,735

487
440
391

84


No.
208,552

16,078

61,866
107,856

11,200


Total


53,419


3,387,066


5,137


405,547



* Indnding 103 bales British West Indian and 322 bales British West African,
t rt 5,732 „ „ „ )) 8,789 „ „ „



Com Prioes.
Average Priee of Brltiih



showing the Average Priee of Brltiih Com, per quarter of
8 bnshels, Imperial Measure.* as received from the Inspectors and Officers of
Excise in the week ended 12th October, 1907, and corresponding weeks of the
seven preyions years pursuant to the Com Betums Act, 1882.



Average Prioe.




Week ended 12th Cetoher, 1007

Oenreepniding week in—
1900



1901 ...

1902 ...
1908...
1904 ...
1906 ...
1906...



#.


d.


#.


d.


83


3


25


9


28


4


26


5


25


10


26


8


25


1


26


1


25


8


23


9


30


5


25


4


26


11


24


10


26


3


25


8



#. d.
17 11



16 11

17 8



17
16
15
16
16



* Section 8 of the Com Betums Act, 1882, provides that where returns of
purehsses of British Com are made to the local inspector of Com Betums in any
other measure than the Imperial bushel or by weight or by a weighed measure that
officer shall convert such returns into the Imperial bushel, and in the case of weight
or we ighed measure the conversion is to be made at the rate of sixty Imp^ial
povnds for every bushel of wheat, fifty Imperial pounds for every bushel of barley,
a«d thiity-nine Imperial pounds for every bushel of oats.



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142



THB BOABD OF TKADB J0I7Bjr.AL.



[Oct. 17, 1907.



Imports of Afrieultnnl Prodvoo into tlio United yfayflfft^,
Acoount showing the Qiuuititias of oertain klndi of. Ifrieultiiral PvodvM
imported into the United Klngdem in the we^ ended 12th October, 1907,
together with the qoAntities imported in the oorresponding week of tbe
prerioos jrear.



Week ended

12th Oct.,

1907.



Correntmd-

img wmkin

1906.



Animals, living:—
OoBtn, bulls, oowi, end calves

Sheep ead lambs

Swine ... •^

Horses ^

Fresh Meit :—
Beef (indnding refrigerated andtwsnj
Mutton „ „ „

Salted or preserved meat : —

Bacon

Beef

Hams

Pork

Heat, unenumerated, freph

ff I , »»lted

„ preserved other trise than by salting
(including tinned and canned)
Dairy produce and subsiitutes: —

Butter

Margarine

Cheese

Milk, fredi, in cans or drums



„ condensed

„ preserved, other kinds...

Eggs

Poultry

Game

Babbits, dead (fresh and frosen)

Lard

Com, grain, meal, and flour : —

Wncat

Wheat ineal and flour

Barley

Oats

Peas

Beans

Maise or Indian com

Fruit, raw : —

Apples

Apricots and peaches



Cherries ... ... ...

Currants

Gooseberries

Grapes

Lemons

Oranges ... ... „,

Pears

Plums

Strawberries

Unenumerated

Hay

Straw .„

Moss Litter

Hops

Locust Beans

Vegetables, raw :—

Onions

Pototoes

Tomatoes

Unenumerated

Yeseubles, dried

rreservod by canning ...



Number.



Cwts.



Cwts.



Cwts.



Ghrt.tfundr.
Value £

Cwts.



Cwts,



Cwts.

Buncnei

CwU.



Tons.



Cwts.



Bushels.
Owte.

Value £
Cftts.



8,869
872

246

120,475
66,699
14,298

83.720
4,222

14,200
4,478

11,489
1,228
6,781



61,849
14,278
78,460

79

16,062

92

460,286

2,696

2,804

26,678

82,247

2,279,700
216,400
622.200
289,400
62,880
77,690
988,600

186,667

84

71,297



62,061
12,671

4,924
26,748

1,762

10,101

680

1,618

1,183

4,407



179,678

89,U89

16,664

8,018

6,616

12,174



12fi78

198

100^7

118416

9^1

97,910
2,780

IBfiSe
8^14

llfill

7,146



78^14
21,461
81,846



19,188

880

484,160

2,142

1^1

86fiOS

22fiS9

780,100

875,700

466,700

199^600

804)10

6fi40

l,lllfiOO

lOOfiOO

119fi09



67^79

7^8

6^688

18^689

82fi40

7,786
8,808
1J904
1.884
4,689
10,100

178,489
24,967
14J668

2^79
16fi72

4^1



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Oct 17, 1907.] THB BOASD OV TBADB JOTJXNAL.



143



Bankruptoj.^Biiglftiid and Wales.



Hninber of BeceiYing Orders and Administration Orders nnder
Sec. 125 (Deceased Debtors' Estates) of the Act of 1883 gazetted
in the undermentioned Principal Trades and Occupations during
the periods indicated : —





September.


Nine Months
ended 80th Sept




1907.


1906.


1907.


1906,




No.


No.


Nc


No.


Total gftietted...


268


$84


8,006


3,387


Namber gaaetted m principal trades and oconpa-










tiona:—










Builders


20


21


217


224


Grocera, 4c.»


16


18


184


249


Pablicana and hotel keepers, 4c




18


166


197


Fanners and graziers


10


14


122


186


Batchers


10


11


101


106


Decorators, painters, plnmbers, *c.


12


8


86


87


Greengrocers, fmiterers, 4c




11


80


106


Bakers •




11


79


96


Tailors, 4c




4


72


67


Boot and shoe mannfactarers and dealers




7


66


88


Drapers, haberdashers, 4c




4


64


67


Coal and coke merchants and dealers




3


56


69


Fishmongers, poulterers, 4c




6


49


62


Confectioners . ...




1


40


19


Clerks, commercial and general




2


87


60


Jewellers, watchmakers, silyersmtths, 4c. ...




I


87


38


Carriers ,carmen, lightermen, and hauliers ...




I


86


33






4


82


36


Agents,oommiBsion and general




6


81


38


TraTellers, oommensial




1


81


26


Cab, omnibus and fly proprietors




2


28


28


C^neral dealers


2





28


23


Furniture dealers and makers p.


8


1


27


20


Bicycle, 4o., mannf actnrers and dealers


2


6


26


34


Com, floor, seed, hay, and straw merchants and










dealers ••• —• ... ••• ••• ••





2


26


24


Provision merchants, 4c


4


1


25


31


Dairymen, oowkeepeiB. 4c





2


24


23


Merchants, general


2


2


24


19


Printers, booksellers, and publishers


1


2

1


28


23



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144



THE BOABD Of TRADE JOtTBNAL. [Oct. 17, 1907-



Bankrapt^^.— Bnglaad aaid Wales— con^intied.





September.


Nine Months
ended 80th Sept.




1907.


1906.


1907.


i9oe.




No.


No.


No.


No.


Number gasetted io principal trades and oooopa-










tionB—eonUmued,










Tobacconists, Ao


4


3


22


33


Gardeners, florists, &o. ...


8


1


21


12


Bngineers and founders, Ac


2


3


20


2S




8


1


20


23


Ohemists,dmgfrists and chemical mannfactoierB


1





20


21


Oarriage, Ac, boilders





1


20


IS


Restaurant, coffee and eating-bonse keepers ...


1


3


20


IS


Lodging-honse keepers


2





20


14


Solicitors ... ••• ... ••• ••• ...


1


2


18


19


Blacksmiths, farriers, 4c.


2


3


18


17


Brokers, stock and share


8


1


18


17


Ohina, glass, and earthenware, 4c., dealers ..


4





18


9


Doctors of medicine, physicians, 4c.


8





17


18


Oarpenters and joiners


1


3


16


u


Contractors


4





16


17


W^heelwrighU


6


2


16


13


Ironmongers





2


16


21


Clothiers, outfitters, 4o


5


3


16


21


Stationers


2


3


15


20




2





16


12


Siddlers and harness makeis





3


14


IS


Stone, marble and monumental maacns, 4c. ...


8


1


14


14


Architects and surreyors ..


1


1


14


12


Directors and promoters of pabUc ccmpanies ...


2


2


14


10


Officers in Army





2


18


18


Cattle and pig dealers


1


2


18


IS


Wine and spirit merchants, 4c. ... .«.


2


1


18


9


Hilliners, dressmakers, 4c


8


4


12


19


Hairdressers ^





4


12


18


Woollen merchants and manufaotorers...


1


1


11


18


Hosiers, gloTcrs, 4o.


1





n


13


Millers








9


16


Timber merchants


1


2


9


8


Curriers, tanners, and leather merohanti





3


7


9


Cotton spinners and manufacturers


«—





_


4


nshingsmack owners, and masters








3



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Oct 17, 1907.] iTHB BOABD OF TSADE JOTIBNAL. 145

GOVERNMBNT PUBLICATIONS.

TRADE RETUENS OF THE UHITED KINGDOM.

The Monthly Acooxmts relating to the Trade and Navigation of
the United Kingdom for the month of September, 1907, have been
published. The acconnts, which are issned on the 7tb or 8th of
each month, may be purchased at a cost, in the present instance,
of Is. 2d. per copy, either directly or through any bookseller, from



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 26 of 112)