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now completed — that is to say, the ground has been raised to a
proper level and the adjoining water ot the Elbe has been deepened
(proviBionally) to a depth of about 15 ft. The establishment is
already connected by road, and will shortly be also by railway,
with the other part of the Hamburg harbour road and railway
system. The total number of slips projected to be built is five ;
but for the present only two will be completely built, and a third
one will be partially built, the construction of the remainder being
postponed. These slips will be numbered 1 to 5 (counting from
Bast to West). On slip No. 1, the largest of the five, vessels will
be built measuring up to 1,000 ft. in length and 100 ft. in breadth,
and on slip No. 3 vessels measuring up to 650 and 700 ft. in
length.

'Hie number of dry docks is to be three, viz. : — one of 35,000
registered tons, one of 10,000, and one of 6,000 tons. The dry
dock of 11,000 tons has already been built at Stettin, and will
shortly be brought to Hamburg as it is not needed in the Baltic.
The dry dock of 6,000 tons will be built at once, whilst the dock of
85,000 tons register will be constructed at a later time.

It is the present intention of the ** Vulcan Company " to carry
out the construction of the entire building-yard in gradual stages,
and to take the yard into use in 1909. It is further stated that
for the present only vessels of a larger type will be built at the
** Vulcan's" building-yard at Hamburg, for which the Stettin
yard is not suited; and that ship's engines will be built at
Hamburg, and repairs of ships undertaken only when the Stettin
establishment is too busy to attend to the work.

ITALY.

H.M. Embassy at Rome have forwarded a copy of an abstract of
1-^^. , notices fespecting electrical enterprises author-

itertMS ^^^ ^^ ^*^^y '^^ ^^^^' ^^^^^^ ^y ^^® ItoXmn

th i? ^ • Ministry of Agriculture, Industry and Com-

** 1906 "^ merce, from which it appears that 239 plants

were authorised during the year, of which 114

were extensions of installations already existing, and 125 new ones

with generating stations of their own. Of the latter, 73 employ

hydraulic motor power, and 52 gas or steam motor power.

The more important plants, of which special mention is made,
comprise the following : —

In Northern Italy, that of the " Society Lombarda," Milan, for
the conveyance and distribution of about 15,000 kw. in the
Provinces of Sondrio, Como and Milan ; and that of the " Society
delle forze motrici deirAnza," for the conveyance and distribution
of about 7,200 kw. in the Province of Novara.

In Central Italy that of the *' Society mineraria ed elettrica del
Valdamo,*' for the conveyance and distribution of about 400 kw.
in the provinces of Arezzo, Firenze and Sicira ; that of the
** Societ^ della Valnerina," for the working of a calcium carbide



Digitized by VjOOQIC



176 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOITRNAL. L^ct. 24, 1»07.



MineralSf Metals, and Machinery.



VTPiXA^ —continued,

factory in the neighbourhood of Nami ; and that of the " Society
per imprese elettriche di Eoma," for the conveyance and distri-
bution of about 6,000 kw. in the suburban zone north of Rome.

In Southern Italy that of the firm Zeeca, Cauli. & Co., for the
conveyance and distribution of about 700 kw. in the province of
Chieti.

The following plants are also of importance in respect of the
quantity of power transmitted and the extent traversed by the
conducting wires : —

The conveyance of power from Pont Canavese to Rivarolo by the
"Society Manifattura de Rivarolo and San Giorgio Canavese;"
that from Bard to Carema of the Industrial Electrochemical
Society of Pont Saint Martin ; that of the Swiss Federal Railways
for the electric system between Iselle and Briga; those of the
" Society Conti," from Vigevaro to Pavi& and Novara ; that of the
Brescian Electric Society ivom Brescia to Cremona; not to
mention the plants of the " Society Bergamasca," of the province
of Bergamo ; of the *' Society OflScine Elettriche Genovesi,** along
the ** Riviera di Levante ; " that of the ** Society della Cellina," in
the provinces of Venice and Padova, and of the " Society
Marchigiana," for electrical firms in the province of Ancona.

The abstract, which gives details in the case of each plant, such
as the object of the plant, route of conducting wire, system of
curreiit, tension of line, nature and quantity of motor power, and
power of electric generators, may be seen at the Commercial
Intelligence Branch of the Board of Trade, 73, Basinghall Street,
London, E.C. •

The British Vice-Consul at Spezia (Mr. E. M. de Garston) reports
that coal has been known to exist in the valley-
Coal near Spesia. of the Magra (Lunigiana) for some time, and
that it was only on account of the low cost at
which better British coal could be obtained hitherto that it was
not considered suflBciently profitable to take up the working of the
local seams. Now, however, owing to the extraordinary and sus-
tained increase in the price of British coal, it has been judged
worth while to exploit the Magra valley coal deposits, and to that
end a company has been formed among the coal merchants and
importers of Spezia, styled the Societd Anonima Carbonifera LfinenBer
to extract and deal in the coal obtainable from the neighbourhood
of Spezia. It appears that this coal is suitable for industrial pur-
poses, and it is said to resemble in appearance a fair quality
Newcastle. The managers of the new undertaking are making
strenuous efforts to obtain the grant of the ** exceptional tariff
from the State Railways, who, it appears, have so far only granted
them the special facilities provided for in the local tariffs.



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Oct. 24, 1907,] THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



177



Minerals, Meialsy and Machinery.



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

The Acting British Consul-General at San Francisco (Mr. W.
Moore) has forwarded a report on the mining
lOiing in Nerada. discoveries and developments that have
occurred in the State of Nevada in recent
years. Mr. Moore states that these discoveries have attracted a
good deal of attention and exaggerated accounts of the productive-
ness of the mines have appeared in the newspapers : his own
report, however, is based on statistics collected by the United
States Geological Survey.

Previous to the year 1900 nearly all the mining had been
carried on in the northern and western parts of the State, but in
1900 discoveries were made in the southern part, and since that
time ail the important disco verie.s have been made in that district.
There were altogether 155 producing mines in Nevada in 1906, of
which 143 were deep mines and 12 phicers. Of the deep mines,
75 have gold as the predominant metal, 3i silver, 6 copper, 26 lead
and 2 zinc lead.

The following table shows the production of gold, silver and
associated metals in the State during the last two years : —





1905.


' . 1906.




Quantity.


Valae. Quantity.


Value.


Gold, fine oz.

SHtct

^' ::: ::: '"::

Zinc


254,927
6,482,081

413.285
8,457,124

697,757


Dollars.
5.269,819
3,916,177

64,465
162,485

41,168


506,620
6,770,611
1,626,985
3,823,617
2,886,828


DolUrs.

10,470.704

4,536,310

313,813

217,549

176,066


Total valae





9,453,114





15,714,442



The complete report, which is too long to quote in extenso, may
be seen by persons interested at the Commercial Intelligence
Branch of the Board of Trade, 73, Basinghall Street, E.G.

UNITED STATES AND CANADA.

The "Iron Age" (New York) of the 26th September publishes

Prod c« f statistics (compiled by the United States Geo-

n on logical Survey) of the production of chromic

"*^ • iron ore or chroraite in the United States in

1906, which amounted to 107 gross tons, valued at 1,800 dols.

The production in 1905 amounted to only 22 tons, valued at

375 dels. Tl:e oitput of this product in the United States.



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178



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



[Oct. 24» 1907.



Minerals^ Metals^ and Machinery.



supplies only a very small proportion of the requirement, which
is met chiefly by importations. The quantity imported in 1906
amounted to 43,d41 tons, valued at 557,594 dols. — somewhat less
than the importations in 1905. These figures are exclusive of the
chromium salts of various kinds imported during the year.

The production of chromite in Canada, according to the " Iron
Age,^ has increased rapidly in the last few years, having risen from
900 tons, valued at 13,000 dols., in 1902 to 8750 tons, valued at
92,100 dels., in 1906. The prices reported for the Canadian
product are somewhat lower than those in the United States.



YARNS AND TEXTILES.

UNITED KINGDOM.

On p. 187 will be found a reference to a report issued by the
Board of Agriculture and Fisheries on the
production of wool in Great Britain in 1905
and 1906.



Wool ProductioR
iR 1905 and 1906.



BRITISH INDIA.



and Weaving
Returns.



The Board of Trade have receiv^ a copy of the monthly return

r ttA S * • issued by the Indian Government, showing the

touon pinning quantity of cotton yam spun, and of cotton

woven goods produced, in each Province in

British India, and in the Native States, during

the four months, April to July, of each of the years 1905, 1906,

and 1907.

The following is a summarised statement extracted from the
above return, giving particulars for the four months, ended July,
1905, 1906, and 1907 :—





Four months ended July.




1906.


1906. 1907.


British India, Bebab, and Native
States.

Cotton jam spun Lbe.

Grey and bleached piece f „
goods X Yards

Coloured piece goods ... j yiudA
Grey and coloured goods 1 t.
(other than piece goods) J

Hosierr „

Hisce) aneous goods ... „


231,943,264

45,342,616

191,638,040

) Lbs.
V 8,667,604

109,726
766,366


227,672,394
46,091,692

201,172,578
f ♦7,469,315
\ 80,626,714

/ 444,321

180,630
122,708


218,067,534
60,188.208

220,296,578
•8,3.30,297
33,962,167

697,381

188,654
90,743



• The quantities of ** coloured piece goods " and of '* grey and coloured goods
(other than piece goods)'* produced in the Natite States^ not being separately
stated, the total amounts are included in the figures given for ** coloured piece
goods.*'



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OfU2i,lW.]



T^£ BOikBD OiP TEAB£ JOmtNAJL.



179



AGRICULTURE.



UNITED KINGDOM.

The pncee of British com per quarter of 8 bushels, as received
from the inspectors and officers of Excise
Com Prices. in the week ended the 19th October* 1907,
were as follows : —

Wheat 34«. 4d.

Barley ••• 26#. Sd,

Oats 18«. Od.

For farther particulars see p. 184.

A statement is published on p. 185, showing the quantities of
the various descriptions of agricultural produce
Imports of Agn- in^popted into the United Kingdom during the
ddtoral Produce, ^^j^ ^^^^ ^^ jg^h October, 1907, as well
as of the imports during the corresponding week of 1906.

ITALY.

H.M. Consal-General at Genoa (Mr. W. Keene) reports that the
annual production of Italian olive oil shows
great fluctuations, owing partly to the alterna-
tions of full and meagre years' crops, and partly

to the ravages of the oil fly.
The production during the five years

estimated as follows : —



Olive Oil
Production.



1901-2 to 1905-6 is





Hectolitres.


1901-2


3,200,000


1902-3


1,800,000


1903-4


3,200,000


1904^5


1,700,000


1905-6


3,400,000



The most-prized qualities are those produced in Tuscany (Lucca,
Pisa), the Ligurian Riviera, and the Pugli (Bari, Bitonto,
Gallipoli). The Marches, Umbria and Latium also produce good
oils, but the very abundant products of Sicily are less reputed.

Prices vary so much according to quality, and fluctuate so
largely according to supply and demand, that it would be mis-
leading to give any average price ; but the 488,582 quintals of oil*
exported from Italy in 1906 were provisionally t valued by the
Customs for statistical purposes at 130 lire (25 lire = IZ.) per
qaintal, or 63,515,660 lire in all. The principal countries to which
oil is exported are Argentina, United States, France, Russia,
and the United Kingdom.

» Exclosive of exports of sulphur oil (an inferior olive oil) which are con-
siderable. , , .. , X , ^- 1- . i. 1

t The definitive value has since been hxetl at i2o lire per quintal.



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180 THE BOABD OF TEADE J0T7XKAL. [Oct. 24, 1907.

Agrictdture.



TURKEY.

The Acting British CJonsul-General at Salonica (Mr. E. H. Mnlock)
/v 11 T Ik i» ^*® forwarded a translation of a despatch from
iS- the Acting British Vice-Consul at Cavalla (the

^^' . centre of the tobacco trade in the Salonica
consular district), reporting that the tobacco crop of 1906 in the
Cavalla district, including Drama, Serres,Xanthi, &c., was of average
quantity (i.e., 12,000,000 kilos, per annum), below the average in
quality and above the average in price, relatively to the low quality.
The 1907 crop is of average quantity and above the average in
quality ; it is impossible to make any statement as to prices, as
the sales do not begin till November and December. The stock
of tobacco held by merchants in Turkey is said to be below the
average.

■ J "

CRETE.

The British Vice-Consul at Canea (Mr. E. C. Wyldbore-Smith)
has forwarded a report on the state of the crops
Crop Prospects, in Crete. Ee says that agriculture in that
island is at present in a very backward condi-
tion, but the soil is exceedingly fertile, and with a continuance of
the present state of tranquillity, the improvement of internal
communications and the introduction of more modem methods of
cultivation, considerable development in the agricultural industry
may be expected.

Cereals. — ^The crop was not exceptional, in spite of abundant
rains in March and April. In any case, however, not enough seed
is sown at present to provide a suflScient quantity of corn for the
population's needs. The soil, especially in the eastern part of the
island, being well adapted for the vine, the greater part of available
land is devoted to the culture of that plant rather than to corn.
Large quantities of corn are imported annually from Anatolia and
Benghazi, but this year the price of corn from both these sources
ruled high, owing to a poor harvest, consequently a demand for
European com has now arisen. Local prices of com are as
follows : — barley, 6«. 8d. per cwt. ; wheat, ll/». Sd. per cwt. ; oats,
6s. 3d. per cwt.

Olives. — In the western and eastern portions of the island the
crop promises to be good, but in the districts of the centre, reports
point only to a moderate harvest. The late rains of last April did
a great deal of harm, coming as they did just when the leaves were
sprouting. The fruit in the eastern districts is said to be very
fine, and although not so abundant as in 1905, when there was a
splendid crop, the output of oil will probably be heavier than in
that year. The local quotation for this product is 28«. 4d. per cwt.

The Yintage shows every sign of being good, although the late
rains in May did some damage. Vine-growers are looking forward



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Oct. 24, 1907.1 THB BOABD OF TEADE JOtTBNAL. 181



Agriculture,



to obtaining good prices for their raisins, as the crop in Asia Minor
is reported to have been rained by rains. It is therefore expected
that raisins will fetch about 14«. 8d. per cwt. The price of wine,
however, will probably be low on account of the good vintages
which are expected in Italy and Spain.

Ourobf. — In the western and centre districts the crop is good
and the fruit fine. The local price is 3«. 9d. per cwt.

Tallonia. — Caterpillars have caused a great deal of damage to the
trees, and the harvest will in consequence be poor ; local prices are
ruling high (September) and are quoted at 6^. id. per cwt.



MISCBLLANBOUSt



UNITED KINGDOM.

The number of bales of cotton imported into the United Kingdom

during the week ended the 17th October,

Cotton Statiftics. 1907, was 93,177 and the number imported

during the forty-two weeks ended the 17th

October was 3,480,243 (including 5»732 bales British West

Indian and 8,789 bales British West African). As regards

exports, the figures are, for the week ended the 17th October,

3,295 bales, and for the forty-two weeks, 408,842 bales.

For further details see p. 184.



BRITISH INDIA.

The following statistics of the foreign sea-borne trade of the

p.p.. Province of Eastern Bengal and Assam (com-

^^^Ka^f ^ prising the trade of the chief port, Chittagong,

•p ♦**^^^ 1 ^^^ *^® subordinate ports, Narayanganj,* Nilla

Eastern JJcngai ^^^ ^^.^ g^^^. ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ "EiQ^vt

andAisam. ^^^ jg^g^^ ^^ ^j^^ Collector of Customs at
Chittagong : —




1905. 6


1 1906-7






t


Imports-
Merchandise
Treasure ...


i Rs.
80,07,944

Total 30.07,944


' lis.
37,89,988
75,594

38 65,582


BxporU —

Indian merchandise , 2,87,67,947

Foreign merchandise re.exiK)rted j 562


1

! 3,90,21,994

t 650




Total 1 2,87,68,499

1


3,90,22,544

1


• Narayanganj was abolished as a port on 12th May,es, showing an increase
of 87 in the number of fatal accidents and !\ decrease of 29 in
the number of lives lost as compared with 1905.

Boa/rd of Agriculture and Fisheries. Report on ths Production of
Wool in Great Britain in 1905 wnd 1906.

Taking the average of the returns received for the two years,
1905 and 1906, the following may, according to this Report, be
regarded as an approximate estimate of the total production of
wool in the United Kingdom : —

Lbs.

Sheep shorn 87,838,000

„ slaughtered 30,250,000

Lambs shorn 2,000,000

slaughtered 1,000,000



Total for Great Britain . . . 121,088,000
Ireland 12,000,000

Total for United Kingdom ... 183,088,000



Digitized by VjOOQIC



188 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. [Oct. 24, 1«07.



Government PuMieaJtumi.



The average quantity of imported wool (sheep's, lambs' and
alpaca) retained for home consumption in the two years 1905-6
was 860,000,000 lbs. Of the total supply of raw wool used in this
country, therefore, it appears that British and Irish flockmasters
are responsible for about 27 per cent.

Passengers to and from places out of Europe, September. [Cd,
3,335-VIII.] Price \d.

This return shows the numbers and nationalities of' the pas-
sengers that left, or arrived in, the United Kingdom for or from
places out of Europe, and the net balance of such passengers
outward or inward, during the month and nine months ended
30th September, 1907, compared with the corresponding periods
in 1906.

During the nine months ended 30th September, 1907, the total
number (provisional) of passengers that left the United Kingdom
for places out of Europe was 506,461, as compared with 446,128
during the corresponding period of 1906, and the total number
(provisional) that arnved in the United Kingdom from places out
of Europe during the first nine months of 1907 was 207,958, as
compared with 178,353 during the corresponding period of 1906.
The balance of the total movement shows that the number of pas-
sengers that left the United Kingdom for places out of Europe
exceeded the number of passengers that aiTived in the United
Kingdom from places out of Europe by 298,503 during the first
nine months of 1907, as compared with a similar excess of 267,775
during the corresponding period of 1906.

Agriculiurcd St<t,tisiicSy Ireland, 1906-7. Beiurn of Prices of
Crops, Live Stock, and other Irish Agricultural P'oduds. [O/,
3,775.] Price Is. 2d,

This publication, which has been prepared in the Department of
Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland, contains returns
of the average prices of cereals, dairy produce, meat, cattle, &c., in
the various provinces of Ireland during each quarter of 1906-7,
and tables showing the average prices of the same products since
1887. Diagiams are appended, illustrating the general tendency
of the price levels of the various commodities and animals
enumerated^



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Oct. 24, 19070



THE BOARD OF TRADE J0X7RNAL.



189



Government Publications.



Um OF FORBIOH OFFICE REPORTS.

Thb following Reports of H.M. Diplomatic and Consular Officers,
which have been issued in the Animal and MiscellaneoiUl Series since
the Ist January, 1907, may be obtained from Messrs. Wyman & Sons,
Fetter Lane, E.G.



No.



H900
3899
3859
663



3752
3918

ese



664

3741

3746

3862
6^9



3812
3783
3791
3886
S779
3780
3848
3763
3891
3908



S807
8904
8806
3759
3866
8840
8764
8778
8877
8870
8808



Place.



Price' 1 No.



EUROPE—

Aogtria-Hungary :

A ustria-Hungary ... J 906

Fiume 1906

Trieste 1906

State encouragement to
Induttry in Hungary



Belgiom:

Antwerp — Shipping and
Navigation 1906

Belgium ... 19067

Precaution* taken in Bel-
gium to combat Anky-
loitomioiii

OhiI Mining InduMtry in
Belgium 16^//.



nd.

Id.
2d.

lid



2\d.
id.



nd.



Denmark:

Denmark— Finances, 1903-4
and 1904-6

Denmark— Trade and Ship-
ping (supplementary) 1905

Denmark 1906

Danish syttem of Taxation

France and Colonies:

Bordeaux 1906

Calais 1906

Cherbourg 1906

Cochin-China 1906

Corsica 1906

Dunkirk 1906

French Budget for 1907
French West Africa, 1906-6

Harre 1906

Lyons, St. Etienne, and



Qrenoble
Madagascar ...
MarseiUes
Martinique

Nantes

New Caledonia
Nice

B<
B(
81
81



...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
nl906
...1906



I



Id,

U.

2id.

Id,



Sid.

2\d.

Bd,

Id,

Id,

2d,

2ld.

2d.

3d.

l\d.

id,

2id.

Id.

U,

Id,

Id.

Id.

Id.

\t

Id.
Id.



' 3846

I 8770

3819

3847

I 3796

' 3889

I 3765

3810

3766

661



3786

3806
3821
3809

8785
3818



3926
3781
3795
8902
3920
3799
3768
I 3778
3744
3912



H894
3887
3820
3833



3928
8754
8790
8743
8909
8811
8762



Place.



EUROPE— (roni<«tfrrf) —

German Empire:

Baden 1906

Chemnitz 1906

Dantzig 1906

Frankfort 1906

Germany 1906

Hamburg 1906

Leipzig 1906

Pomerania 1906

Wurtemburg 1906

Vine culture and Wim
trade of Oermatiy ...

Greece :

Corfu, Cephalonia, and

Zante 1906

Cyclades 1906

Greece— Finances ...1906
Morca, ^tolia ami

Acamania 1906

Piraeus 1906

Thessaly 1906



Italy :

Florence

Genoa

Italy — Finances

Lecce

Leghorn
Lombardy

Rome

Sicily

South Italy



South Italy (Supple-



...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906



mentary)



...1906



2d.
\d.
2d,
\\d.



Netherlands and Colonies

CunM?oa ... 1905-6

Dutch Guiana 1906

Java 1906

Rotterdam 1906

Portugal and Colonies:

Angola 1906 2\d.

Azores 1906 \d,

Beira 1906 2d.

Goa 1905 Id.

Lonienco Marques ...1906 M.

Madeira 1906 Id.

Oporto 1906 \d.

II



Price



\d.
h\d,
2d.
U.
Q^d.
4i//.
Id,
2\d,
Id.

\\d.



2d,
\d,

M,

\{d,
2id.
\\d.



\\d.
2d.
3d.
2\d,

nd.

2d,
l^d,
2\d,
\\d,

2d,



Digitized by VjOOQIC



190



T&S BOA&D OV TEADB lOtJENAL. [Oct. 24, 1907.



OavemmerU PvhUeatiom.



No.



Place.



Price



No.



Place.



Price



8749
3787



3776
3885
3797
3884
3745
8915
3792
8852

3816



3836
8846
3831
3879
3804



3906
3814



8767
3838
3873
8865
3798
3830
3776
3828
8917
3851
3829
3771
3867
3921
3911
3919



8747
8869
3892

3750
3914
3827



EUROPE- ipoTUinuedy-

Roamania :

Boumania (supplementaTy)

1905

Boumania 1906



Batoum...
Finland
Moscow
Odessa...



Rusiia:



.1906
.1906
.1906
..1906



Poland and Lithuania.. 1906

Biga 1906

Bo8tov-on-Don ...1906

Bussia and District of i

St. Petersburg ...1906

Taganrog 1906



Spain:

Barcelona

Bilbao

Cadiz

Canary Islands



...1906
...1906
...1906
...1906



Galicia, Asturias and
Leon 1906



Sweden :

Oothenborg ...
Stockholm



...1906
...1906



Turkey :

Adrianople 1906

Aleppo 1906

Baghdad 1906

Basra 1906

Beirut ... 1906

Bengazi ... 1905-6

Constantinople ...1^06

Crete 1st 6 months of 1906

Damascus 1906

Erseroum 1906

Monastir 1906

Palestine 1906

Balonica 1906

Smyrna 1906

lYebizond 1906

Tripoli 1905



AFRICA—

Abyssinia ... 1905-6

Alexandria 1906

Dar-al-Baida ... 1906 and
part of 1907

Liberia 1906

Morocco 19d6

Port Said and Suez ...1906



\\d.



2d,



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 33 of 112)