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)re are also coalfields covering a considerable area in the
ice of Hizen, while in the Island of Amakusa, which forms
\{ the province of Higo, there are several mines producing

quantities of anthracite. (Foreign Office, Miscelianeous
, 666.)



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278 THE BOABD OF TRADE JOURNAL. [Not. 7, 1961.

AGRICULTURE.

UNITED KINGDOM.

The prices of British com per quarter of 8 bushels, as received
from the inspectors and officers of Excise
Com Prices. in the week ended the 2nd November, 1907,
were as follows : —
Wheat ••• ... ... ••• 36«. Sd.

Barley 27«. 7A

Oats 188, 10(2.

For further particulars see p. 286.

A statement is published on p. 287, showing the quantities of

T rtn f A •- *'^® various descriptions of agricultural produce

S!!?i ^.^^* imported into the United Kingdom during the

cultural produce, ^^j^ ^^^^ ^^^ gnd November, 1907, as well

as of the imports during the corresponding week of 1906.

NATAL.

The Board of Trade Correspondent at Durban (Mr. A. D.C. Agilew)
has forwarded a sample of " Landolphia" rubber,

Sample of Rubber, of which 876 lb. was recently shipped to
London. The rubber in question comes from

Amatongaland, where the shippers hold a lease of 600 square miles

from the Natal Government for the purpose of cultivating and

collecting rubber. It is understood that they expect to make

monthly shipments of about half a ton.

The sample may be seen and further particulars obtained at the

Commercial Intelligence Branch of the Board of Trade, 73,

Basinghall Street, E.C.

Mr. Agnew also reports that large quantities of maize are being

«, . f # 8^^* forward for shipment from that port.

iSiJ During the period 1st July to 10th October the

following quantities have been shipped : —

14,966,237 lb. to the United Kingdom, 12,965,315 lb. to the

Continent, 8,047,626 lb. to Cape Ports, and 188,615 lb. to other

places.

NYASALAND PROTECTORATE.

The following particulars of agricultural industries in the Nyasa-

, . ,. , land (British Central Africa) Protectorate are

PI ^ . . taken from the Report on the Protectorate for

inauBines. 1906.7, just published by the Colonial Office

(Anniuil, No, 537) : —

Cotton heads the list of exports from the Protectorate for the
second year in succession, in spite of the extremely dry season
and of the fact that the acreage under cultivation was much
less than the previous year. The amount exported — 526,119 lb.,



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7, 1907.J THE BOABD OF TRADB JOXTBNAL. 279

AgrieuUure.

NYASALAND PROTRCTORATB-continued.

ed at 15,345Z. — was far below expectations, being 250,000 lb.

than last year's output, which was 776,621 lb., valued atl6,180Z.

es compensated to some extent for the poor result, lid. and

)er lb. having been obtained for choice lots, whilst American

" gWands has fetched as much as SJd. per lb.

lotton in 1906-7 was 7,017 acres, about 3,000

preceding year, and less than one-third the

1 in 1904-5. At that time large acreages were

ich regard to the variety sown, soil, or the

conditions. The results obtained under these

so disappointing that many planters felt

binue its cultivation, and devote their attention

ext season it may be anticipated that more

anted as many are awaiting a favourable

iking a fresh start with this product. The

are getting acclimatised year by year, so that

become more firmly established.

s estimated at 850 tons (unginned), against
) from the 1906 crop.

that the amount of cotton produced by native
the year under report shows an increase over
77 J tons of unginned cotton having been
live cultivators as against 67 J tons. The price
nged from fd. to Id. per lb. The Report
from the disinclination of the African native
ovation, there will always be a difl5culty in the
>rate of making cotton-growing general, owing
neans of transport and communication, which
g districts.

f tobacco is becoming more and more popular ;
derably increased, and a much Improved type
iform quality, is being turned out. The area
in 1907 (2,330 acres) produced a crop of
at 6,889Z., the corresponding figures for 1906
'8,9941b., and 3,31 7Z.

ives exceedingly well in the Mlauje district, no

1 made to cultivate it in other districts ; yet
i a climate well saited for this product. The
jrop is not expensive ; the chief reason why it
3 to be the necessity of expending capital, upon
obtained for five or six years.

nning to recognise that the cultivation of fibres,
is a sound investment, and many ai-e planting
Eiuritius hemps as rapidly as possible, but the



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280 THE BOAEll OF TBADB JOTTBNAL. [Nov. 7, 1907.

Agri&ulture.

NYASALAKD PROTECTORATE-<^^<i»»«4.

cultivation of this and similar product^ must be to a great extent
dependent on whether cheaper means of transporting and shipping
the pi^oduce will be available in the future. Ramie fibre is only
grown experimentally on a few estates at present, and the prospects
of this excellent fibre in the Protectorate are not good.

The possibilities of Oeara rubber are generally recognised, and
many estates are planting on a larger scale, as several samples
sent home for examination and valuation have been favourably
reported upon. -

BARBADOS.

The Acting Governor of Barbados, in his recent report, states that
the cotton industry still continues to make
Cotton Industry, satisfiskctory progress. In 1906 it was estimated
that 5,000 acres were imder this crop, and it is
estimated that about 1,600 bales containing 800,000 lb. of lint will
be exported therefrom. Although, owing to the unfavourable
weather conditions during the last season, tne cotton crop has been
short, yet as the prices obtained were good the planters have still,
in most instances, realised a profit from the crop ; consequently it
is not likely that the area planted this season will be less than the
last. {Colonial Reports, Annual, No. 544.)

PRANCE- ALGERIA.

The Acting British Consul-General at Algiers (Hon. H. C.

Dundas) states that the Director of the

Cotton Philippeville College of Agriculture, in his

Coltivation. annual report, expresses the opinion, based on

a series of experiments extending over a period
of three years, that the cultivation of cotton — even on non-irrigated
lands — in Algeria is certainly possible, and would be remunerative.
The plants beet adapted to this climate appear to be those of the
Egyptian varieties known as ** Mit Afifi " and ** Yanovitch," the
former especially being most suitable for the district round
Philippeville. Great stress is laid upon the fact that the best results
have been obtained by employing the seed of the second generation,
i.e., seed already acclimatised, from the points of view of its
germinative quality and the value of the fibre harvested therefrom.
(Foreign Office, Annual Seties, 3,935.)

PORTUGAL.

H.M. Charg6 d' Affaires at Lisbon reports that the most important

W f P rt recent legislation in Portugal has been the

. "^^ . prohibition to import into the Douro region full-

lype gr bodied wines not grown within it (see " Board

• p"iu«r ""^ ^"^^^ Joumal" of 6bh June last, p. 463).

ormgaL ^ number of growers in the centre and south

are thus deprived of their principal market and are now looking



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7, 1907. J THB BOAAD OF TEADS JOUXNAL. 281

AgrieuUure.

other outlets for their wines of the same type as port
lously exported after or without manipulation from Villa Nova
raia, Leixoes and Oporto. These wines are generally of less
lolic strength and are much cheaper than port, but are stated
) equal, if not superior, to the so-called ** Spanish ports " in
h a large business is done with Great Britain.

CONGO FREE STATE.

rding to the official " Bulletin " of the Congo Free State, the
GottA Congo Government have been studying the

-V? 3 best cx)nditions under which not only native,

^ but also foreign varieties of cotton may be

n in the State. As a result of a year's experiments carried out
1 experienced American grower, the following decisions have
arrived at : —

The sowing should be done in January or February, according
e rains.

The early variety should be cultivated on table lands, and the
variety in damp valleys.

Biennial cultivation is recommended with a view ,to pre-
ag the plants from dryness.
Green manure is recommended.

e '* Bulletin " states further that the government intend to put
practice the same method of cultivation as that employed by
Iritish Cotton Growing Association at Lagos, namely, that of
^ing the natives to devote themselves to cotton growing, and
tnteeing the purchase of the crops at a remunerative price.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Consul at Portland, Oregon (Mr. J. Laidlaw) reports that
- . ^ although the hops in his district have been
^^ , hai-vested some time, there is a very large varia-

*h^^Jf^ tion in the estimates made by dealers who should

M ngw . ^^^ 1^^ ^l^j^ ^ determine closely the yield,
lates made this time last year were fully 25 per cent, under
ctual outturn, as proved by deliveries later. The quality of
hops is said to be generally very fine, as mouldy or deficient
were left unpicked in consequence of low prices and poor
ects for realizing even the cost of picking. Some dealers
ate there was on the poles a crop of 1(50,000 to 175,000 bales
J5 lb.) in Oregon, and 50,000 in Washington, of which one-
was not picked.

dng the average of thirteen estimates, the following is the
: — Oregon, 115,200 bales, or 189,955 cwt. ; Washington,
bales, or 62,768 cwt. Several firms in the trade believe
verage to be 10 per cent, too low. Should prices continue
here will be a reduced area cultivated next season.



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282



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



[Nov. 7, 1907,



MISCELLANEOUS.

UNITED KINGDOM.

, The number of bales of cotton imported into the United Kingdom

dming the week ended the Slst October, 1907,

CottoiL Statiflticf. was 88,169 and the number imported during

the forty-four weeks ended the 31st October

was 3,653,802 (including 5,749 bales British West Indian and

8,858 bales British West African). As regards exports, the figures

are, for the week ended the 3l8t October, 7,080 bales, and for

the forty-four weeks, 421,819 bales.

For further details see p. 286.

The Board of Trade have received from Lloyd's* Register of British

xr 1 m ^ ^^^ Foreign Shipping a Report of the Society's

vessels Classed ^j^rations during the year 1906-7. From

'?.^^ * this it appears that at the close of the year

•^^ ended 30th June last, 10,285 merchant vessels,

registering about 19f million tons gross, held classes assigned by

the Committee of Lloyd's Register.

The following table shows the vessels classed in Lloyd's Register
Book on 30th June 1907 :—



Material of


Description.


British.


Foreign.


Total.


Conetruction.


No.


Tonnage.


No.


Tonnage.


No.


Tonnage.


Iron and (
steel 1
Wood and
composite


Steam ...
Sail

Steam and
Sail

Total ...


6,980
625

220


11,825,226
997,449

32,670


3,723
721

16


6,869,486
993,116

6,883


8,708
1,346

236


17,694,711
1,990,664

39,463




6,825


12,865,246


3,460


6,869,483


10,286


19,724,728



BRITISH INDIA.

The Report for 1906-7 on the External Land Trade of the
Punjab gives the following statistics showing
the average annual value of the trade (exclud-
ing treasure) of that Province during the three
years 1904-5 to 1906-7, with comparative

figures for the preceding triennium : —



External Land

Trade of the

PoBjab.



From and To—


Ayerage annnal value, ,
1901-2 to 1903-4. 1

1


Average annnal valne,
1904-6 to 1906-7.




Imports.


1
Exports. 1


1
Imports. 1 Exports.


Afghanistan

Kashmir

Ladakh

Chinese Tibet


Rs.

38,816

1,01,07,286

6,79,585

2,26,946


Bs.
37,627
89,24,426

2,87,660
48,219


Rs.

81,497

1,29,47,690

7,48,168

1,23,620


Rs.

82,613

80,56,587

1,66,015

46,990


Total


1,10,47,633


92,97,921 L


,M^^^


^\h^



r, 1907.] THE B0.4RD OP TRADE JOITRNAL. 283

Misedlaneoiu.

iring the last three years (1904-5 to 1906-7) the exports have
ily grown in value from 72 lakhs of rupees in 1904-5 to
Jdis in the next year and to 92 lakhs in 1906-7. Cotton
-goods (European and Indian), fruits, brass and copper, iron,
refined sugar, Indian black tea and tobacco are the chief
ee of export. As regards imports the value was in 1904-5
akhs of rupees, in 1905-6 133 lakhs and in 1906-7 171 lakhs,
most important items of the import trade are charas, fruits,
hides and skins, raw silk, stone and marble, timber and
ifactured woollen piece-goods.

CANADA.

* London Gazette " of 5th November contains a proclamation

•. , f f '^y ^^^ Majesty establishing a branch of the

h Tth ^y^l Mint at Ottawa, Canada, at which gold

-^ - .^. . coins of the same denominations, designs,
^^^ weights, and fineness as are coined at the Mint

^^^^* in England may be coined at Ottawa. These

will be current and a legal tender as if they had been issued
igland. It is also provided that the deputy master of the
ra branch mint shall coin any gold, silver, bronze, or other
pv'hich the Governor-General of the Dominion requires to be
d, and which is for the time being a coin of the Dominion ;
rach coins " shall not, for the purposes of the Coinage Act,

be deemed to be coins made at or issued from our Mint."
>roclamation will come in force on 9th November.



NEWFOUNDLAND,

Following figures, showing the values of the imports and
exports (including re-exports) of Newfoundland

8 in 1906-7. for the year ended 30fli June last, have been
received from the Assistant Collector of

ims at Port of St. John's. The corresponding figures for the

iing year have been added for purposes of comparison : —



g'rom and To—



Kingdom
Colonies

States
coantries

ptal ...



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284



THE BOAED OF TRAI)£ J0TJK17AL. [Not. 7, 1907.



MiieMatuoui.



BARBADOS.

The foUowinfjf figures showing the values of the total imports and

exports (local produce) of Barbados in the

Trade in 1006. years 1905 and 1906 are taken from the report

on the Colony recently issued by the Colonial

Office. {Annual, No, 544) : —





Countries.


Imports.


Exports.


1905.


1906.


1905.


1906.


United Kingdom

Britiih Colonies

Uaited States

Other countries


£

445,455

221,416

336,706

38,985


£

482,116

240,790

404,334

65,088


£

124,528

312,1*62

246.991

18,353


£ .
158,693
315,230
149,586

6,809


Total


1,042,662


1,192,328


696.829


629,318





BAHAMAS.

The following figures showing the value of the trade of the

Bahamas in 1906, as compared with 1905,

Trade in 1006. are extracted from the annual report recently

issued by the Colonial Office (Annrud, No.

548) :—



From and to —


Imports (excluding specie).


Exports of Colonial
Produce.


1905.


1906.


1P05.


1906.


United Kingdom

United States

Other Countries


£

62,978

217,054

11,921


£

54,970

247,697

15,777




£

12,520

141,149

50,624


£

16,499

126,381

67,896


Total


291,953


318,444 204,298 j 210,775



SOMALILAND PROTECTORATE.

The following figures showing the value of the import and export
trade of the British Somaliland Protectorate

Trade in 1006-7. are taken from the report recently issued by
the Colonial Office (Annual, No, 542) : —





1905-6.


IOnA-7


'




Imports

Exports


Bb.
39,27,414
30,40,980


Rs.
41,68,829
31,80,886



Google



, 1907.] THE BOABD OF T&ADB JOU&NAL. 285



MiudUmeoui.



SPAIN.

Consul at Malaga (Mr. J. 6. Haggard) reports that the trade

Ififtf K t ^^ ^^^ P^^ ^^ palm-leaf hats continues with
"^ -J. , the United States of America, that market

^^ taking the entire production, which has been
ear about 250,000 dozen. The cheapness of this class of hat
s ranging generally between \s, and "Is. per dozen) ought,
ilr. Haggard, to make it an interesting article for the Colonies,
b is surprising that trials have not been made by colonial
jrs. The hats are not only cheap but very durable, and,
J wide brims, are a great protection to labourers in hot
bes. (Foreign Office, Annual Series, 3,937.)



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.



* Reichsgesetzblatt " of 31st October contains a copy of a
Dac m Decree which is to come into force on 10th

November, amending the spirit tax regulations
^^^5^®^ of 21st July, 1899, and establishing a new
' tT^l general denaturing material as follows : —

* • A mixture of 19 parts of wood spirit,
arts of Pyridinebase, 2*5 parts of Benzol and 1 part of an
onal substance, the composition of which is to be fixed by
Ministry of Finance.

) general denaturing material may only be produced in places

lly authorised ; and will only be sent out directly to persons

'ing it, and who have applied for permission to denature

with the general denaturing material.

) general denaturing material is to be mixed with the spirit

denatured in the proportion of 2*5 litres to 100 litres of pure

)1.

) "Reichsgesetzblatt" may be seen at the Commercial

igence Branch of the Board of Trade, 73, Basinghall Street,



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Conaul-Greneral at Chicago (Mr. A. Finn) reports that an

-J, , Italian Chamber of Commerce has been started

^ 'in that city. The Chamber is to have a sample

'^^^^^ room or museum connected with the Italian

^^ ' Consulate, conducted under the direction of the

J advised by a board of directors. It will have as its objects

educate people in Italian products ; (2) to establish firmer

ercial relations between the United States and Italy; (3)

mp out spurious goods now sold as Italian.



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286



THE BOASD OF TRADE J0T7ENAL.



[Nov. 7, 1907.



STATIST ICAL TABLES.

Cotton Betnrns.
Retarn of the MmnbeF of Balei of Ckitton ImpoFtod and BzpoFtod at the
Yarioni Porta of the United Kingdom during the Week and 44 Weeks
ended 3l8t October, 1907 :^ «





Weekended

31st Oct.,

1907.


44 Weeks
ended

3l8t Oct.,
1907.


Week ended

Slat Oct.,

1907.


44 Weeks
ended

8l8t Oct.,
1907.




iMPOBTfl.

(Bales.)


BXPOBTS,

(Bales.)


American

Braiilian

East Indian

Egyptian

Miscellaneoos


No.
61,152

9,114

17,695

208


No.
2,731,377

187,683

201,074

401,277

♦132,391


No.
1,881

84

4,641

467

£7


No.
215,624

17,067

68,908
108,809

11,521


ToUl


88,169


3,663,802


7,080


421,819



* Including 5,749 bales British West Indiaii and 8,868 bales British West African.



Corn Prieei.
Statement showing the Iverage Prleo of British Corn, per quarter of
8 bushels. Imperial Measure.* as reoeiyed from the Inspectors and Officers of
Excise in the week ended 2nd November, 1907, and corresponding weeks of the
seven previous years pursuant to the Com Returns Act, 1882.



Average Prioe.




Week ended 2nd Movembep, 1007



Go]



iraetponding week In-

1900

1901

1902

1909 ••• ••• t

1904 ••• ••• «

1906 ... ••• «
1906 ••• ••• .



f.


d.


t.


d.


36


3


27


7


27


3


25


11


26


6


27





25


1


26


3


26


4


24


3


80


6


25





27


10


24


9


26


7


24


8



<. d.

18 10



16 10

17 8



17
15
16
17



16 11



* Section 8 of the Com Returns Act, 1882, provides that where returns of
purchases of British Com are made to the local inspector of Com Returns in any
other measure than the Imperial bushel or by weight or by a weighed measure that
officer shall convert such returns into the Imperial bushel, and in the case of weight
or weighed measure the conversion is to be made at the rate of sixty Imperial
pounds for every bushel of wheat, fifty Imperial pounds for every bushel of barley,
and thirty-nine Imperial pounds for eveiy bushel of oats«



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907.]



THE BOABD OF TRADE JOtJBNAL.



287



ports of Agrienltiiral Produce into the United Kingdom.

Bhowinff the Quantities of oertain kinds of IMenltiiral Prodaoa
Tted into the United Kingdom in the week ended 2nd Noyember, 1907,
ther with the quantities imported in the coriesponding week of the
ions year.



Week ended

2nd Nov.,

1907.



Carrupond'

ing Welkin

1906.



iving: —

alls, cows, and calves

nd lambe



4:—

dading refrigerated and frozen)



iresenred meat :—



lenumerated, fresh

., salted

»erved other frise than by salting
ilnding tinned and canned)
luce and sabstitntes: —



38h, in cans or drams



mdensed

reserved, other kinds


If

Grt. ]£mdr.
yalae£


ead (fresh and frozen)


Cwts.


1, meal, and floor :—

a€»l and flour


n

Cwts.
n


...











Indian com




and peaches -

••• ••• ••• ••• ••• •••


Cwts.

Bnnckies.
Cwts.


■•■ ••• ••• ••• ••• •••

rries


n
n



mes
erated



Number.



Cwts.



Cwts.



Cwts.



Tons.



Cwts.



Bnshels.
Cwts.

yala*e£
Cwts.



8,826
4,196

327

87,497
54,038
18,026

90,106
2,904

19,896
2,918

13,499
1,498

20,849



66,865
17,106
78,870

63

19,788

53

492,167

4,389

4,482

45,580

35,314

1,616,700

446,600

861,900

270,200

35,290

8,110

1,127,600

180,860

146

139,145



78,309

12,156

24,480

8,944

195

3,623
1,079
1,858
1,260
7,668
30,000

227,074

260,917

13,990

8,165

18,086

6,676



8,591
2^11

no

109,895
56,599
11,878

104,405

2,001

18,556

lfi65

18,055

7,937



71,227
22,831
63,\42

90

19,888

229

449,459

5fi76

2,521

32,162



1,004m
314,500
759,900
327,100
48,460
40,200
677,800

144,882

123,985



56,641
11,942



15,849
5,935

10,290

3,548

720

1,986

13,523

35,720

184J879

26,487

8,368

5,045

20,552

4,787



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288 THE BOABD OF TILADE JOUBNAL. [Not. 7,1907.

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS.

TRADE BBTXTBNS OF THE UNITED KIKODOM.

The Monthly AcoountB relating to the Trade and Navigation of
the United Emgdom for the month of September, 1907» have been
published. The accoonts, which are issued on the 7iJi or 8th of
each month, may be purchased at a cost, in the piieeent instance,
of Is. 2d. per copy, either directly or through any bookseller^ firom
Messrs. Wyman & Sons, Fetter Lane, E.C., and 82, Abingdon
Street, S.W. ; or Messrs. Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh ; or Edward
Ponsonby, 116, Qrafton Street, Dublin.

Attention is further called to the fact that the *' Annual
Statement of the Trade of the United Kingdom with Foreign
Countries and British Possessions" for the year 1906, in two
volumes, may be purchased at a cost of 6a. 8d. for the first,
and Ss. 42. for the second volume, at any of the addressee enu-
tnerated above. This publication, which contains much more
detailed and exhaustive information than can be given in the
Monthly Accounts, gives Abstract Tables for the years 1902-1906,
and detailed statements of imports and exports of each article
(from and to each country) in the first volume, and in the
second volume details as to customs revenue, transhipments,
and articles in bond, and particulars of the trade of the United
Kingdom with each foreign country.

BOABD OF TEADE LABOTTB GAZETTE.

The " Board of Trade Labour Oazette"* is published by the Board
of Trade on the 16th of each month. The following are among
the more important articles which appear in the October issue : —
State of the Labour Market in September ; Labour Disputes and
Conciliation and Arbitration Boards in 1906; Proceedings under
the Conciliation Act during 1905-7 ; Labour Statistics of the
United Kingdom ; Emigration in 1906; Earnings at Com Harvest;
and House Letting in Scotland.

rOBEIGN OFFICE BEPOBTS.

The following is a rSsumS of some of the more interesting sub-
jects dealt with in Consular Reports of the Annual and MiscellaneouB
Series issued since the last number of tJie " Board of Trade Journal."

ANinXAL SEBIES.
Ko. 3,030 Trade and Shipping of Constantsa for 1006.

Record year for trade. Progress of harbour con-

Petroleum industry. struction.

Comparative tables of import
and export.

* It oan be purohased through any newsagent, price Id.



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Nov. 7, 1907.] THE BOAED OF TKABE JOUENAL. 289



Government Publications.

Ko. 3,040. Trade of Zanzibar for 1006.

Decrease in value of both Comparative tables showing

imports and exports. value of imports and exports



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 47 of 112)