Copyright
Great Britain. Board of Trade.

Board of Trade journal, Volume 59 online

. (page 62 of 112)
Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 62 of 112)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


steadily each year. In 1899 this percentage was 28 ; in 1900 it
was 25-15; in 1901, 2568; in 1902,2709; in 1903,28-18; in
1904, 28-78; in 1905, 88-69; and in 1906, 351.

Of the 10,212 maclunes in use in 1906, 5,911, or 58 per cent.,
were of the pick or puncher type; 4,144, or 40*5 per cent., were
chain breast machines, and 157, or 1*5 per cent., were long wall.

The United States Geological Survey also report the total value
of the graphite produced in the United States
Graphite in 1906 as 340,239 dols., an increase of

FroductioiL 22,028 dols. over the value of the 1905 output,
but a decrease in quantity. The production
included 5,887,982 lb. of crystalline graphite and 16,853 net tons of
amorphous graphite, a decrease of 148,585 lb. of the former and of
5,100 tons of the latter variety, as compared with 1905. All the
crystalline graphite reported in 1906 was produced in the States of
Pennsylvania and New York and was valued at 238,064 dols. The
statistics of production fail, however, to indicate fully the activity
of the crystalline graphite industry. Four companies in Penn-
sylvania have reported development and construction work which
is expected largely to increase the output of that State in 1907.
Specimens of high grade crystalline graphite from Virginia give
some promise of that State being added to the list of producers.

The production of artificial graphite has steadily increased since
its introduction in 1897. The quantity manufactured in 1906
amounted to 5,074,757 lb, valued at 337,204 dols., which is the
largest quantity produced in any year since its first introduction on
the market. Of the total output, 2,766,000 lb. was ground to a fine
powder and this product was valued at 94,578 dols.



YARNS AND TEXTILES.

CHINA.

H.M. Consul-General at Shanghai (Sir P. Warren, K.C.M.G.) has

— p^ - forwarded an extract from the " North China

Tr tm t f Daily News " containing an account of a secret

.p^ . p., process by which ramie fibre, as purchased on

^ ' * the market, or received from the decorticating

machines, can be converted into a soft filasse, suitable for spinning

or weaving, within the shert space of ten minutes. The possibilities

of ramie for the manufacture of textile fabrics, the ** News "

remarks, have long been realised, but hitherto the de-gumming and



Digitized by VjOOQIC



876 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. [NoT. «1, 1«©7.

Yams and Texiihs,

softening of the fibre have proved such an expensive and tedious
process Uiat ramie has not come into general use. In Germany
and France it has been used to a limited degree as weft on woollen
or cotton yams, but owing to the inelasticity of the fibre it has
been found difficult to weave a pure ramie warp. The new process,
however, bids fair to revolutionise the manufacture of textile fabrics.
The process is exceedingly simple. The fibre is placed in a cauldron
of boiling water, to which some secret composition is added. In five
minutes it is removed from the pot, and after bleaching and washing, a
beautiful white filasse, very similar in appearance to silk, is product.
The celerity and economy of the process, and the fact that the fibre
is absolutely uninjured, show that it has tremendous possibilities.
Specimens of ramie woven with wool, cotton, linen, and silk, as
well as pure ramie cloth, threads and cords were exhibited.
Perhaps it is when combined with silk that ramie shows to the
best advantage: it strengthens the fabric and takes dye equally
well, while, except to the expert eye, there is no difference in the
appearance of the material. It is understood that it is intended
shortly to float a local company to acquire the rights in the new
process for China, Korea and Japan. The owner of the process
has also, it is said, invented a decorticating machine, in which
the company will acquire similar rights.



AGRICULTURE.

UNITED KINGDOM.

The prices of British com per quarter of 8 bushels, as received
from the inspectors and officers of Excise
Com Prices. in the week ended the 16th November, 1907,
were as follows : —

Wheat ••• 358. Id.

Barley 27«. 8d.

Oats 18«. 8ei.

For further particulars see p. 383.

A statement is published on p. 384, showing the quantities of

ImTiorts of Ami- *^® various descriptions of agricultural produce

«!♦« I j>^^^^^ imported into the United Kingdom during the

cultural woance. ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ November, 1907, as weU

as of the imports during the corresponding week of 1906.

QUEENSLAND.

Keporting under date of 12th October on the grain prospects in
Queensland, the Boa^d of Trade Correspondent

Grain Prospects, at Brisbane (Mr. M. Finucan) states that dry
weather had been prevailing throughout the

southern parts of the State for the previous two months, which



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Nov. 21, 1907.] THE BOABD OP TRADE JOtJBNAL. 377

Agriculture.



are the two most important months in the year as regards rainfall.
There were exceptionally good falls of rain during the winter
months, but the spring has been characterised by droughty con-
ditions. The result will probably be that the whole of the cereal
crops on the Darling Downs, the centre of the grain producing
area of Queensland, will be diminished by about one-half. Should
the droughty conditions continue it will xmdoubtedly be necessary
to import maize, wheat, flour and barley ; and this importation of
food stuffs will be a matter of considerable importance.

With regard to wheat, reports from the South are extremely
unsatisfactory, quotations at present (12th October) throughout
Australia being 4$. 6d. to 4«. 8d. per bushel, and for flour, nomin-
ally, 111, per ton of 2,000 lbs. It is estimated that the total wheat
crop of Queensland this year will amount to about 1,500,000
bushels.

Barley is also likely to be affected, and it is expected that not
more than 6,000 to 7,000 acres will be under crop this year. The
present conditions may affect British producers to the extent that
large quantities of brewers* malt will be needed for Australian use.
Great Britain and California are the chief sources of supply for this
article.

The nominal price of maize in all the States is Ss, 9d. to 4«. per
bushely and alreisuly enquiries are being made for quotations for
Argentine maize which, it is estimated, could be landed at Ss. 9d,
per bushel.



NATAL.

The ** Natal Government Gazette " of 22nd October contains a copy
At til • i of an Act (No. 27 of 1907) authorising the

Go^eAme^tLoL Goyernment to assist persons engaged in agri-
. aiit cultural and pastoral pursuits by loans, and to

AfTienltiiralifltfl. ^Ppoint a Board of Commissioners for the
^^ management and administration of a fund

created for that purpose. Advances may be made to farmers and
landowners (a) to pay off existing liabilities ; (b) to effect improve-
ments, including water pumping, storing, irrigation, fencing, clearing
land for cultivation, planting of orchards, &c., and farm buildings ;
(c) for purchase of live stock and plant— on security of freehold or
quit-rent land, land held from the Crown or land held under
private lease if the landlord becomes a joint mortgagor. Loans
are not to be granted for less than 50/. or more than 1,500Z.
Applications for advances of 500/. or under are to lave precedence
over those for a larger amount.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



378 THE BOAED OP TRADE JOTTBNAIrw [Nor. 21, 1107.

Ayticulture.

ZANZIBAR.

The British Vice-Consul at Zanzibar (Mr. H. A. Bicbards) reports

Q^^ that oranges grow plentifully and well in both

oronge Zanzibar and Pemba, and are noted tor their

uuiuvation. excellent quality. He thinks that it might be

worth the while of any one who is contemplating investing money

in those parts to consider the question of orange groves. * A very

good market is ready for this and other fresh fruit, all along

the east coast stretching from Cape Town to Aden, and no

doubt if the matter were taken up the steamship companies could

be induced to offer better facilities for the transport of this class of

produce than they do at present. (Foreign Office, Annual Series,

3,940.)

PORTUGAL-ANGOLA.

With reference to the notice on p. 621 ; of the '' Boasd of Trade

^^ . ^ Journal *' for 27th June last relating to. samples

tsamp 68 ^£ Angola root rubber and Pungo Andomro

f^ J'^kL robber, H.M. Consul at St. Paul de LoanSa

otner KuDDer. ^^^ jj q Jackie) has now forwarded a further

assortment of Angola root and other iiibber, which may be seen

at the Commercial Intelligence Branch of ^the Board of Trade,

73, Basinghall Street, B.C.

H.M. Consul has also forwarded three samples of St. Thom^ cocoa,
o 1 ^ c* Referring to this product in his annual report

tSSTcSLT ^^'^'^ ^^'' ^^'^'^ ^"^' 3'^28), Mr.
vww». Mackie gives the production of cocoa in St.

Thom6 during the years 1905-6 as 25,511 metric tons and 24,447
metric tons respectively. The production, he remarks, has trebled
itself in 10 years, while its value is stated to have increased two-
fold. Out of a total area of 416 square miles, 190 are under culti-
vation. There is, therefore, plenty of scope for further expansion.

The plantations near the town are well irrigated, but the soil is
poor, and chemical manure is used. Fertilisers might possibly be
more extensively employed if their eflScacious properties were
brought more prominently before the notice of the cocoa growers.
Trials locally conducted with nitrate of soda, potash salts, Thomas
phosphates, &c., might stimulate a demand for fertilisers through-
out the island.

The trees of the more modern plantations yield fruit after the
third year, but only in small quantities ; they do not properly
mature until the fifth year, and bear profusely between the ninth
and twelfth years.

As regards methods of cultivation, the British Consular Agent
at St. Thorn 6 states they are of a primitive description.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Not. 21, 1907.] THE BOAED OF TEADE JOURNAL. 379

Agriculture.

PORTUGAlA-AUGOluA-oontinued.

A sample of Almadeina resin has also been forwarded by Mr
Mackie. This gum was worked at Mossamedes,

Almadeina Gum. but has now ceased to be exported ; 6d. per lb.
for two samples sent to a leading rubber firm

was quoted. The shrub from which it is extracted grows in

profusion in many districts.

The samples of cocoa and Almadeina gum may also be inspected
by British firms interested, at the (Commercial Intelligence Branch.



BULGARIA.

H.M. Vice-Consul at Sofia (Mr. G. O'B. Toulmin) reports
Affricaltiiral ^^^^ regard to the agricultural outlook in
■^V-^^, Bulgaria that a too severe winter, followed by a

period of abnormal drought, caused the spring
crops of 1907 to be a failure, with the exception of rye which was
feirly good. Maize, plentifully sown to replace ploughed-up crc^s,
has suffered from the excessive dryness of the summer and present
autumn season. For the same reason there will be a considerable
shortage in the wheat crop, though the quality of the grain is said
to be good. Forage is so scarce that it is doubtful whether the
peasants will be able to keep sufficient cattle through the coming
winter to do the spring ploughing; while, owing to the hard
and dry state of the soil, no colza seed could be sown this autumn.
The harvest of 1907, therefore, promises to>be but a very moderate
one, and will doubtless tend to diminish the import trade of the
year.

BRAZIL.

In reporting on the trade of Santos in 1906, H.M. Consul there

Kaa^abeira ^^^' ^' Casement, C.M.G.) gives the exports of

Ti«wSr^ «^* Mangabeira rubber from that port in 1906 as

fr^ r3^ 88,535 kilos., valued at 334,337 milreis, as

irom »anxo8. compared with 95,190 kilos, valued at 339,300

milreis in 1905, and remarks that the export seems to be stationary,

although from a recent report dealing with local trade during the

first three months of 1907, the export of this commodity during

that period showed a large increase over the same period of 1906.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



380



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



[Nov. 21, 1907.



State of the

Labour ICarlcet

in October.



MISCELLANEOUS.
UNITED KINGDOM.

According to a report in the " Board of Trade Labour Gazette *' for
November,* based on 6,497 statistical returns,
viz., 2,700 returns from trade unions and 3,797
returns from employers (relating to 1,113,594
workpeople, employed in coal and iron mining,
the cotton, woollen, worsted and other textile ti*ades, the building
trades, the boot and shoe and other clothing trades, and the paper
and glass trades), besides a large number of returns of a non-
statistical character received from employers' associations, trade
unions, local correspondents and other sources, employment in
October was on the whole not quite so good as in September.
ITiere was a decline in the metal and engineering industries, but
some improvement in the woollen and worsted trades and in the
boot and shoe trade. Coal mining continued very busy and the
building trades dull.

Compared with October, 1906, there was some decline in the
building, and metal, engineering and shipbuilding trades, and an
improvement in the textile trades, and in the boot and shoe trade.
In the 272 trade unions, with a net membership of 688,788,
making returns, 30,079 (or 4*7 per cent.) were reported as un-
employed at the end of October, 1907, compared with 4*6 per
cent, at the end of September, 1907, and 4*4 per cent, at the end
October, 1906.

• For list of principal contents see p. 386.

The following statement shows the quantity and value of fish

IK 1. fl* ♦; ♦; landed on the English and Welsh, Scottish,

n^^ 1 a?S ' and Irish Coasts during the month and ten

OctoDer, 1807. months ended 31st October, 1907, compared

with the corresponding periods of the year 1906 : —





Month of October.


Ten Months ended Slst October.




1907.


190S.


1907.


im.




Quan-
tity.


Value.




Quan-
tity.


Value.




Talm.


England and Wales-
Fish, excluding sheU

BheUflih' ;." '.'.'.


Cwta.

2,235,6«


£ CSeti.

891,984 I,«5P,W7
83,534 -


£

985,798
33,512


Cwta.

11,017,803


£

6,440,239
279,463


Owt9,

9fil9,l6l


£

6,n9M€
£68,740


Total Value...


-


925,518j —


1,019,310


-


6,719,702


__


6,388,08$


Scotland-

Fish, ezduding shell

fUh

Shell flah


305,867


139,474
6,561


871^79


130,;50.
6,155^


8,555,820


2,926,101
61,838


7,163,359


S,7S5J16
6l,$31


Total Talue...


-


146,035


-


136,605


-


2,987,939


-


tJ86J47


Ireland—

Fish, exduding shell

flfih

Shellfish


48,777


19,567
834


39,856


18,697
86i

1


506,145


217.895
15,814


«tf,5«7


Jt,429


Total Value...





20,401





19,461


-


233,709


-


i34M3



KoTK. —All the alove figures nre subject to correction in the annual returns.

uigiiizea oy



oogle



Not. 21, 1907.1 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 381



MiseeUaneous.



UNITED KINGDOM-^^'n^i'M*^^.

The number of bales of cotton imported into the United Kingdom

daring the week ended the 14th November, 1907,

Cotton Statiftict. was 91,484 and the number imported during

the forty-six weeks ended the 14th November

was 3,856,406 (including 5,816 bales British West Indian and

9,917 bales British West Afiican). As regards exports, the figures

are, for the week ended the 14th November, 7,205 bales, and for

the forty-six weeks, 438,985 bales.

For further details see p. 383.

CAPE COLONY.

The " Cape of Good Hope Government Gazette ** of 25th October

CnstoniB Tariff announces the appointment of a Commission

Comnii a* *^ enquire into the existing South African

u>mmi8Sion. Customs Union Tariff, and to deal mth certain

other matters appertaining thereto, which will be more fully

detailed in the Letter of Instruction to be issued to the Commission.

The following gentlemen have been appointed members of this

Commission : — Mr. George Whitaker, Mr. Charles Frederick

Kayser, Mr. Charles Edward Tod, Dr. Anthony Gysbert Viljoen,

Mr. John Pjott, Mr. George Adie Scott, and Mr. John Harlow.

UNITED STATES OP AMERICA-

H.M. Consul at Boston (Mr. W. Wyndham) reports that recently

L hti Tr»A ^^^^ foreign (Norwegian) sailing vessels arrived

,^™ ^^ . at that port, chartered to load Inmber for

mdT^ piS ^^^®^ ^^^^ P^^- ^^ *^^^®' ^^^^ *^® Consul,
p , has previously been carried on to a great

^ *• extent by British vessels, but merchants at

Boston being unable to secure British vessels, the trade is passing

to foreign shipowners. Mr. Wyndham adds that the rates of

freight at present (16th October) are high, varying from 9 dollars

25 cents (11. IBs. 2d,) per 1,000 lineal ft. for large ships to

9 dollars 50 cents (XL VJs. 2d,) for smaller vessels.

NICARAGUA.

H.M. Consul at Greytown (Mr. H. F. Bingham) has forwarded a
HAtch and Wax ^^^ ^^^ translation of a Nicaraguan
V^bk Mononol^ Presidential Decree declaring the sale of
vena Aonopoy. nj^tches and wax vestas a government
monopoly from the 1st of January, next.

The annual value of the matches imported into Nicaragua,
according to the latest official returas, was 2,100Z., imported from
the following countries : — Germany, l,659i. ; United States of
America, 387Z. ; France, 481. ; and United Kingdom, 61.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



382 THE BOARD OF TEADE JOmBlNAL, [Nov. 21, 1907.



Miscellaneous.



CHILE.

H.M. Legation at Santiago have forwarded a copy and translatioit

, - -.- of the New Chilian Law of Economic Reform

ew w which has recently been promulgated.

EconomicReform. ^j^j^ j ^^ ^^^^ ^a^ p^^j^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^

ment in gold of import duties and storage dues. (See " Board
of Trade Journal" for the 24th October, p. 172.)

Article 2 provides that the '* Ofioina de Emision " shall issue
notes of legal tender at the rate of one peso for each eighteen
pence, against deposits of bullion in Santiago or London. These
deposits may only be withdrawn after thirty days' notice, and will
be exclusively destined for the exchange of notes.

Articles 4-12 provide for the establishment of a Nitrate Credit
Bank ('* Caja de Credito Salitrero ") issuing bonds in gold secured
by mortgage on nitrate grounds belonging to persons resideut in
CSiile or to Societies constituted in accordance with the Laws of
Chile whose directors are domiciled in that country. The Council
of the Bank shall lay down the conditions which must be fulfilled
by the properties offered for mortgage, both as regards the working
of the properties, the exportation of the products, and the redemp-
tion of the mortgage.

Article 13 provides that the remitting abroad of funds intended
for the conversion of paper money shall cease as long as the rate of
exchange is below seventeen pence.

It is provided in Article 14 that the President of the Republic
shall issue in thirty days' time 30,000,000 pesos in notes of legal
tender.

By Article 15 the President is authorised until 1st January,
1910, to contract a loan abroad up to 4,500,000Z. sterling, to be
used exclusively for guaranteeing the paper money issued by the
State.

He is also authorised under Article 16 within the period of two
years to contract a loan amounting to 3,000,0002. sterling of the
proceeds of which 1,100,000Z. sterling shall be destined for the
works on the port of Valparaiso, and the remainder devoted to
the construction of a double line on the Central Railway, to the
purchase of materials for harbour works, to the construction of a
transversal (north and south, i.e., transverse as regards the majority
of existing lines) railway, &c.

The text of the Law and the translation may be seen by perscms
interested, at the Commercial Intelligence Branch of the Board of
Trade, 73, Basinghall Street, London, B.C.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Nov. 21, 1907. J



THE BOABD OF TRADE JOUENAL.



383



STATIST ICAL TABLES.

Cotton Returns.

Retom of the Mambev of Balei of Ctotton ImpoFted and Exported at the
Yarioni Ports of the United Kingdom dnring the Week and 46 Weeks
ended 14th November, 1907 :^





Weekended

14th Nov.,

1907.


46 Weeks
ended

14th Nov.,
1907.


Week ended

14th Nov.,

1907.


46 Weeks
ended

14th Nov.,
1907.




IMPOBIB.
(Bales.)


Exports.
(Bales.)


American

Braiilian

East Indian

Egyptian

Ifiscellaneons


No.

65,106

322

1,164

24,496

406


No.
2,889,647
191,192
198,724
436,015
140,928*


No.
3,400

219
1,691
1,735

160


No.
222,198

17,276

76,719
110,954

11,838


Total


91,484


3,856,406


7,206


438,986



* IncludiDg 5,816 bales British West Indian and 9,917 bales British West African.



Com Prices.
JLTorage Price of British



Statement showing the JLTcrage Price of British Ck>m, per quarter of
8 bushels, Imperial Measure.* as received from the Inspectors and Officers of
Bxdse in the week ended 16th November, 1907, and corresponding weeks of the
seven previous years pursuant to the Com Betums Act, 1882.



Average Price.




Veek ended leth MoTember, 1907



Gorrenonding

1900 ••.



week in—



1901 ...

1902 ..
1908 ..
1904 ..
1906. .,
1906 ...



#. i.


9. d.


36 1


27 8


27 2


26 10


27 1


26 10


24 11


26 6


26 9


24 3


80 2


24 6


28 7


24 6


26 4


24 4



«. d,

18 8



17

18 7
17 2

15 10 .

16

17 8
17 2



* Seotioii 8 of the Ck>m Betums Act, 1883, provides that where returns of
purchases of British Ck>m are made to the local inspector of Com Betums in any
other measure than the Imperial bushel or by weight or by a weighed measure tht^
officer shaU convert such retums into the Imperial bushel, and in the case of weight
or weighed measure the conversion is to be made at the rate of sixty Imperial
pounds for every bushel d wheat, fifty Imperial pounds for every bushel of barley,
and thirty-nine Imperial pounds for every bushel of oats.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



384



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



[Nov. 21, 1907.



Imports of Agrienltaral Produce into the United Kingdom.
Aeoonnt showinir the Quantities of cerUin kinds of Agrienltiipal Pvodaoe
imported into the United Kingdom in the week ended 16th Novemher, 1907,
together with the qaantities imported in the oorresponding week of the
previons year.



Weekended

16th Not.,

1907.



ing Wmki

isoe.



Animals, liring :—

Oxen, bnUs, cows, and calves

Sheep and lambs


Nnmber.


5,748


8,411
1^905


Swine


M





•—


Horses


n


277


240


Fresh Meat :—








Beef (induding refrigerated and frozen) ...
Mutton „ „ ,t


Cwts.


68,236
40,767


126,710


Pork „ „ „


n


12,340


Up78


Salted or preserved meat :—








Bacon


Cwts.


98,957


06,439


Beef


If


.¥11


6^7


Hams


ft


^^'!iS


11,706


Pork


ft


,f»??S


4jb6l


Meat, nnenumerated, fresh

„ ., salted


n


11,170
1,551


I 12,766


„ preserved otherwise than by ealting
(mclndiog tinned and canned)


n


7,902


4,247








Dairy produce and substitutes :—








Butter


Cats.


58,516


66^12


Margarine





14,614


24^3


Cheese ... ... ... ... ••• ...





40,816


63,236


Milk, fresh, in cans or drums


n








cream ... ... ... ... ...


If


94


98


„ condensed


n


17,618


16,880


„ preserved, other kinds


Grt. dnndr.


226


314


Eggs


400.125


426p93


Poultry


Value £


6,028


6,201


Game


ff


4,110


2,444


Rabbits, dead (fresh and frozen)


Cwts.


8,976


f^Vi


Lard


If


46,187


37^814


Com, grain, meal, and flour :—








Wheat


Cwts.


1,801,100


2,169,200


Wheat ineal and flour


n


1«6,200


266fi00


Barley


M


693,800


744fi00


Oats


ft


272,400


2O9^UO0


Peas


If


60,190


44fi90


Beans


It


27,290


10^20


Maize or Indian com


ti


1,547,700


643^


Fruit, raw :—








Apples


Cwts.


181,759


U6,737


Apricots and peaches


Bnnciiea.


17







128,161


129,424


Cherries


Cwts.








Currants










Gooseberries


If








Grapes


n


48,448


36,244


Lemons


f$


10,357


9,667


Oranges


n


120,113


38,780


Pears


ff


^>^


6,436


Plums




186


796


Strawberries ... .;.









Unenumerated ...




1,769


1^17


Hay


Tons.


^'^S2


3fi26


Straw


*'


586


1,180


Moss Litter




1,868


1,908


Hops


Cwts.


6,663


7f967


Locust Beans


ft


688


12,940



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 62 of 112)