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thereof

G. Gutlerj, hardware, implements
and instruments

D. Electrical goods and apparatus
(other thitn machinery and tele-
graph and telephone wire)

£. MacidneTy

P. Ships (new)

0. Manufactures of wood and
timber (including furniture)

H. Tarns and textile fabrics—

1. Gotton

2. Wool

S. Other materials

1. Apparel

J. Ghemioals, drugs, dyes and

eolours

K. Leatherand manufactures thereof
(inetndiag boots and shoes and




L. Saxthenware and glass ...

M. Paper

N. MisoeUaneous

Total, caass m.

lY.—MlBOollamwna and Unclaiai-
flod (indnding Pared Post) <

Total £



£ ' 4 I £
2,538,967 2,357,866 2,841,481

815,708 1,219,8041 1,214,851
13,493,565 14,858,1^, 15,682,747

808,316 966.580 1,147,001



17,741 ,646' 19.402.370 20,886,080



£

483,615

4,953

824,627

180,421



£
+ 307,514
+ 399,053
+ 2,189,182
+ 248,685



+ 1,483,710



+ 3,144,434



23,868,088

428.170

104,»19

71,636

2.325,741
146,744

2,882,088

1,084,873

492,125

1,761,324



38,265,788



29,008,229
540,840
155,430
83,642


38.437,749
547,701
178.470
103,030


+ 9,42),5«0
+ 6,861
+ 23,040
+ 19,388


+14,569,661
+ 119,531
+ 73,521
+ 81,394


2,633,776 3,077,203
102,505 206,406


+ 438,427
+ 52,901


+ 751,462
+ 58;662


2,589,072 3^172,611

2,055,742 1,712,112

054.863 702,206

1,860.916 2.376,582


+ 583,538
- 343,630
+ 47,342
+ 515,666


+ 790,523
+ 27,239
+ 210,060
+ 615.258


«9J40,015! 50,513.060


4- 16,778,064


+ 17,247,331



29,153,627
8,141,337
4,670,238

2,333,214
21,140,838
5,157,187

1,118,916

83,^,643
26,604,955
ll,961»381
5,539^908

13.403,200



5,150,565

2,M4,128

1,789,779

23,181,548



245,946,533



36,306,027: a.426,490
9.262,253 10,975,717
5,387,1461 5,935,554



2,289,176. 2,360,251
24,400,081 29,011,565
8,211,837 9,528,873

1,183,496 1,291,212

I

91,231,876 101,615,474

29,168,992 31.605,114

13,611,425 15,323.503

6,295,444 6,671,776

14,248,279' 15,812,085



5,864,239; 6,107,335

3,362,897 3,788,461

1,896,320] 2,152,863

27,282,508' 30,771,166



280,041,995 316,327,389



+ 7,030,463
+ 1,713,464
+ 548,408



+ 121,075
-I- 4,611,484
+ 1,317,036

+ 107,716

•t 10,383,598
+ 2,436,122
+ 1,712,078
+ 376,333

+ 1,563,756



+ 243,096
+ 875,564
+ 256,543
+ 3,488,658



+36,285,391



+14.272,863
+ 3,834,380
+ 1,265,316



+ 27,087
+ 7,870,727
+ 4,371,686

+ 172,296

+17,979,831
-C 5,000,159
+ 8,342,122
+ 1,131,868

+ 2,406,766



+ 956.770
+ 794,333
+ 363,084
+ 7,589,618



4,417,356



8014>71.>78



5,079.358



5,736,322



344,268.7»i3M,m8<0



+ 656,964



+4ia9M22



-1-70,380.856



+ 1,318,966



^nmjsfi



Exports of Foreign and Colonial Merchandise.^



Total Talue ...



£
70,705,412



£
77,357,653



£
85,252,109



£
+ 7,894,516



£
+14,546,757



* The Talues of the Exports represent the cost and the charges of deliTering the goods on board
the ship and are known as the "free on board " yalnes.



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504 TUB BOABB OF TRADE 70UBNAL. [Dec. 12, 1907.

F(yi*eign Trade of the United Kingdom in November, 1907.

Y.-SHippiHa nr novsmbeb, im?.

The tonnage of vessels entered at ports in the United Kingdom
from foreign countries and British possessions, with cargoes, during
November, 1907, amounted to 3,402,010 tons, and die tonnage
cleared to 5,038,215 tons, as against 3,395,644 tons entered, and
4,719,704 tons cleared during November, 1906. With regard to
the coasting trade, the tonnage entered with cargoes during
November, 1907, amounted to 2,561,228 tons, and the tonnage
cleared to 2,533,661 tons, as against 2,707,484 tons entered, ani
2,677,917 tons cleared in November, 1906.

VL-ELEYEN MOITTHS' SHIFPIHa ( JAHTJABT-NOVEMBEB).

The tonnage of vessels entered at ports in the United Kingdom
from foreign countries and British possessions, with cargoes
during the eleven months ended 30th November, 1907, amounted
to 37,946,189 tons, and the tonnage cleared to 53,021,348 tons, as
against 38,544,524 tons entered and 50,075,385 tons cleared during
the corresponding period of 1906. With regard to the coasting
trade, the tonnage entered with cargoes during the eleven months
ended 30th November, 1907, amounted to 28,696,973 tons, and
the tonnage cleared to 28,351,832 tons, as against 30,205,892 tons
entered and 29,798,830 tons cleared during the corresponding
period of 1906.



REGISTRATION OP TRADE MARKS IN MEXICO.

In view of the manu&cture and sale in Mexico of imitations of
various British products, under the original names and trade marks,
the Acting British Consul at Mexico City (Mr. H. W. Wilson) calls
attention to the necessity of British merchants registering their
trade marks in that country and of fully complying with Article 9
of the Mexican Law of Industrial and Commercial Marks, a copy
of which, with a translation of the more important articles, may be
consulted at the Commercial Intelligence Branch of the Board of
Trade, 73, Basmghall Street, London, E.C.



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Dec. 12, 1907.]



TIIB BOABD OF TRADE JOXnUTAL.



505



NOTICE UNDER THE WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

ACT. 1904.

The following is a copy of a Notice (No. 58) giving the result

of the examination and testing of a weighing instrament for use

in trade that has been submitted to the Board of Trade under the

provisions of Section 6 of the Weights and Measures Act, 1904 : —

(58)




^ PULL SIZE. i FULL SIZE*

A. Screw which must be removed before sliiling piece can be taken out of
bracket.

B. Balancinf^ box screwed on to pan support bj two Ecrcwe.

C. Detachable pan support.

The Board of Trade have examined and tested a pattern of a
circular spring balance (capacity 20 lb. by ounces) of the form
herewith shown, and have issued a cei*tificate under the provisions
of Section 6 of the above Act that the pattern is not such as to
facilitate the perpetration of fraud. The goods pan is below the
spring, and the balance is provided with means for permanent
suspension. j



506



THE BOASD 07 TEADE JOTJUSAL.



[Dec 12, 1907.



READY-MADE CLOTHING TRADE IN EGYPT.

The following particalars of the ready-made clothing tnule in
Egypt are extracted from the " Journal of the British Chamber of
Commerce of Egypt " : —

The BtatisticB dealing with the imports of ready-made clothing
into Egypt during the paet five years clearly demonstrate that the
trade is steadily increasing in volume year by year, and that Great
Britain has only a very insignificant share of the market, despite
the fact that she ranks third on the list of competing countries.
It will also be observed that whilst Austria doe« 65 per cent, of the
trade, her nearest rival (France) is credited with only 16*7 per
cent.

Imports of Beady-Made Clothing into Egypt





1902.


1903.


1904.


1905.


1906.




£E.


£E.


£E.


£E.


£E.


Austria-Hungary


144,471


186,447


201,526


218,044


230,093


France


23,459


48,412


45,650


56,409


59.139


United Kingdom


21,112*


22,341


22,238


27,610


39,588


Turkey


7,015


7,911


11,020


9,833


10,424


Italy


1,279


2,843


3,455


3,045


2,908


Germapy


1,918


2,031


4,329


5,000


4.706


Belgium


838


1,014


1,298


1,426


1,587


Other countries


2,712


3,542


3,408


4,346


4,952


Total


202,804


268,071


292,924


325,713


353,897



A feature in favour of Austria is the fact that the trade in
Egypt is more or less in the hands of three or four big firms,
which have houses in Vienna, and so import direct. They have
their own branches in the larger Egyptian towns, and, it is under-
stood, some of them are also interested in the smaller clothing
shops in the villages. The combination is so strong that, although
both England and Germany have attempted to get a footing, t£e
efforts they have made in this direction have so far been unsuc-
cessful.

It must also be remembered that Austria has been in the
Egyptian clothing trade for the last 40 or 50 yean*, and therefore
thoroughly understands the requirements of the market. Her
Government, too, encourages the industry as far as possible by
waiving all import duties on materials brought into the country
and afterwards exported in the form of clothing.
' The main centre for the trade in Austria is Vienna, with some
35 villages in the neighbourhood. After the goods are finished
they are packed for export in strong wooden cases, each some 1*20
metres (47 inches) long by 1 metre (39 inches) high, and costing
about 5a. 6<2. The cases (which are sometimes lined with water-
f^roof paper) usually contain clothes to the value of about £E 100.

The following is the range of retail prices in Alexandria for
Awtrian ready-made clothing : —



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Dec 12, 1907.] THB BOAXD OF TRMDW^ JOVWJUm 507

Ready-made Chthvng Trade in Egypt

Men's suits for summer wear, from ... 15 to 70 francsi
Boys' suits „ „ „ ... 7 to 40 „

Men's suits for winter wear „ ... 25 to 80 „
Boys' suits „ „ ., ... 15 to 45 „

Long overcoats for meii „ ... 24 to 80 9,

England supplies Austoia with a very large part of the
raw material, such as serge, black alpaca, tennis flannel, apd
the cloths for the very dieapest class of goods. Practically
the whole of the khahi used by Austria comes from England.
Apropoa of khaki, a prominent firm in Egypt recently estimated
that the Egyptian Government takes about one million yards of it
per annum in connexion with the uniforms for the army, police,
coastguards, railways, and so forth. Although some of the con-
tracts go to Austria, the whole of the raw material is supplied by
England.

Frames, — The principal imports are the more expensive clothes
for ladies. France also sends the very cheapest form of work-
men's clothing, such as smocks, &c.

Germany, — Germany has made sundry attempts to secure a share
of the trade, but without much resfult. She does a little through
commission agents, but she cannot compete with the cheap Austrian
labour.

Turkey. — ^The cheapest imported goods, made without much
regard for cut, workmanship and materials employed, come from
Turkey, the chief centres being Smyrna and Constantinople. It is
stated that the cloth used for the goods in question is mainly
supplied by Eneland, but the fact remains that clothes can be sent
to Egypt at such a price that even Austria cannot compete.

Local. — The remarks last made apply with even greater force to
the goods turned out by the numerous small tailors who abound in
Alexandria and Cairo. These men, for example, can turn out a full
length overcoat at about 8^. and 6ell it in their shops for lOs. The
account works out thus : —

*. d.
2| yards of English material at Is, lOd. a yard ... 4 7

Linings and buttons 1 5

Workmen 2

8
Oeneral. — At the present time the double-breasted coats having
two or three buttons are the ones mainly in vogue in Egypt
amongst purchasers of ready-made clothing. The coats h«ve two
inside pockets but no breast ones. The goods are made in all
colours with patterns. A single coloar cloth with no design on it
is not much good to the Arabs, who, by the way, are the largest
buyers*



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508



TU BOASO 07 TRIDB JOUBNIL.



[Dec 12, 1107.



TRADE OF SWITZERLAND IN 1906.

The following particulars are extracted from a preliminary
report on the trade of Switzerland for the year 1906, that h^
b^n forwarded by the British Vice-Consul at Zurich (Mr. J. C.
Milligan) : —

The new Swiss Customs Tariff came into operation on 1st January,
1906. Owing to the remodelling of the statistics upon the basifl
of the new tariff, which increased to a very considerable extent the
number of duties leviable, it has been in some instances difficult to
make a comparison between the trade done in 1906 and that of
the previous year. The statistical results, however, clearly show a
material increase both in the prodaction and in the purchasing
power of Switzerland, and that the country has kept pace with the
development of commerce and industry in other parts of the
world.

There has been a marked development in the watch making,
machinery, and embroidery and other textile industries, both in the
home and foreign markets, and at the close of the year many
branches of industry had contracts still on hand for delivery in
1907.

The following comparative table for the years 1905 and 1906
shows the respective values of the imports and exports (special
trade) : —





Imports.


Exports.




19U5.


1906.


1905.


1906.


Raw materials

Foodatuils

Manu&ctured articles


£
19,150,700
16,450,800
19,692,500


£
23,598,000
15,590,400
19.674,000


£
4,383.000
5,131,000
2<J,308,800


£

5,263,200

5,919,400

81,812,100


Total (excluding specie)...


55,194,000


58,762,400


38,772,800 j 42,994,700



The imports of manufactured goods in 1906 from all countries
show a slight decrease in value as compared with the previous
year (1905, 19,592,500/.; 1906, 19,574,000Z.), and in the weight
a decrease of upwards of 85,000 tons, but this reduction is
explained by the fact that the imports of 1905 reached abnormal
dimensions owing to the general desire to replenish stocks before
the operation of Qie new tariff.

The share of the United Kingdom in the imports into
Switzerland of all classes of goods in 1 906 amounted to 3,348,5001*
as compared with 2,752,100Z. in the previous year, thus showing an
increase of 596,400i. In dividing these imports under the three
chief divisions, the proportion was as follows : —



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Dec. 12, 1907.] THB BOABD OT TXADB JOVUSAL.



509



Trade of Switzerland in 1906.


Importf from the United EingdonL





1905.

£
558,700
47,200
2,146,200


1906.


Increase.


Decrease.


Baw materials.

FoodstuflFs

Manufactured articles


£
751,600
44,900
2,662,000


£
192,900

406,800


£
2,800


Total ...


2,762,100


8,848,600


598,700


2,300



The principal articles under the category of raw materials
imported from the United Kingdom were : — Raw iron, 465,000/. ;
copper, tin and other non-precious metals, 124,000/.; gold and
silver, not worked, 31,000/. ; and coal, 86,000/.

The chief articles under the category of foodstuffs were : — Fish
(fresh, salted and dried), 16,000/. (total imports 211,000/.); fruit
preserves, confectionery, &c., 10,000/. (total imports 35,000/.) ;
preserved meats and extracts of meat, 4,000/. (total imports
133,000/.).

The value of the imports of manufactures from the United
Kingdom amounted to 2,552,000/., or an increase of 406,000/. on
the imports in 1905. This increase is, however, solely due to the
continual growth in the imports of British cotton yams and
textiles, and if the value of these be deducted, the total imports
of all other manufactures show a decline in value, as indicated in
the following summary : —



Imports of Manufactured Ctoods from the United Kingdom.





1905.


1906.





Cotton yams and textiles
All other manufactures


£
1,242,0(»0
904,000


£
1,688,000
864,000


Increase : £446,000
Decrease: £40,000



The imports of cotton yams and textiles from the United
Kingdom in 1906 were 64 per cent, of the total imports under
that category. The total value of the imports of manufactures
other than cotton goods from the United Kingdom amounted only
to 864,000/., as compared with 16,938,000/. imported £ix)m all
countries.

The following classes show a material increase in the value
imported from the United Kingdom in 1906, as compared with
that of 1905 :—



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510



THB BOASD OF TBAOE fOVRVAJL, [Dec- 13, 1107.



Trade of Switzerland in 1906.




Value.




Description.














Imports in 1906.


Increase on 1905.




£




£


Cotton yams and goods


1,688,600




446,000


Leather Koodfi

Chemicali


69,400
68,400




17,600
2,000


Beadj-made articles of clothing


62,400




6,000


Glass, pottery and porcelain


23,200




3.000


Paper and ] >aper goods

Straw and indiarubber goods


22,200




6,000


21,200




2,000


Goods of metals other than iron


13,300




6,000


Books, pictores, photographs, writing
materials, toys,- scientific and musical








instruments


34,300




12,000


A decrease in the imports from the United Kingdom occmred


in the following : —






Description.


Value.










Imports in 1906.


Decrease OB 1903.




£




£


Woollen yams and goods


828,300




20.000


Machinery and vehicles


72,000




65,000


Flax, hemp and jute goods


61,800




4,000


Ironware


30,000




5,000



The total export trade in 1906 amounted in round figures to
42,995,000t, an increase of 4,222,000/. on the previous year. By
far the greater part of this total consists of manufactured articles;
in 1906 the total value of manufactures amounted to 31,81 2,000i,
being 74 per cent, of the entire exports.

Next to Germany, the United Kingdom continues to be the
principal market for Switzerland's manufactures, taking last year
goods to the value of 5,896,400i.

The principal manufiactures comprised in these ezportB to the
United Kingdom were as follows : —

Silk goods, 2,981,0002. (a slight increase on the exports of 1905) |
cotton goods, 1,312,0002. (an increase of 77,000L) ; and watches,
703,0002. (an increase of 50,0002.). The exports to the Uaited
Kingdom of condensed milk were 596,0002. (a decrease of
80,0002.), and of chocolate, 508,0002. (an increase of 42,0002.).



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Dec. 12, I90r.]



TH8 SOARB OF TRADE JOXTENAL.



511



PROPOSED CONTINUATION BY GERMANY OF
MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT.

With reference to the notice on p. 594 of the ** Jounial " for
28th December, 1905, respecting the commercial relations between
this country and Germany, the Board of Trade are now in receipt,
through the Foreign Ofiice, of a copy of a Bill recently presented
to the Reichstag empowering the Federal Council to grant to the
subjects and products of the United Kingdom and British Colonies
and Foreign Possessions, for two years from 1st January next,
such advantages as are granted by the German Empii*e to the
subjects and products of the most favoured nation. ,



TARIFF CHANGES
AND CUSTOMS REGULATIONS.

AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH.

Information has been received from the Representative of the

rt, .^ , Commonwealth in London to the effect that the

A mnA ta following items in the new Customs Tariff, now

^™ under consideration by the Commonwealth

House of Representatives, have been amended so as to read as in

the annexed table : —









Tariff on i^oods


Tariff
Item.


Articles.


General
Tariff.


the produce or

maniifacture of

the United








Kingdom.




Division VI.






161


Tanners* measuring machines ...ad val.

. INote,— These machines have been
added to this item, for which see
" Board of Trade Journal " for
6th December, 1907, p. 462.]


20%*


20 %♦


186


Barbed wire ad val.

Division VIl.


§16%


10 %§


281


Graphite or plumbago, black lead, and








foundry black, in the bulk ...ad val.


20 %t


20 9<^.t


2U


Oilii-
In vessela not exceeding one gallon,
viz.—
(a) Quarter pints and smaller








sizes perdoz.


ls.t


»d.t




(d) Half pints and over quarter








pints perdoz.


28.t


lt.6d.t




(c} Pints and over a half pint








perdoz.


48.t


S^t




(<i) Quarts and over a pint per doz.


88.t


6B.t




(e) Over a quart ... per doz


2s.8d.t


a«.t



» With effect from 27th November, 1907.
t With effect from 8rd December, 1907.

§ Revised rates. Those given in the ** Board of Trade Journal ** for 6th Decem-
ber last were cabled in error by the Commonwealth Government.



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512 TITE BOABD OF TRADE JOUBNAL. [Dec 12, 1907.

Tariff Changes and Customs RegtdaUons.



AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH-«'"*ii««J.






Bcorifien and muffles ... Freef I Freef



t With effect from 3rd December, ]

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Dec. 12, 1907.]



THE BOABD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



513



Tariff Changes and Customs Regulations.



AUSTRALIAN COMMON WE ALTH-^<^'>«re</.









Tariff on goods


Tariff




General




Item.


Articles.


Tariff.


manufnotore of
the United
Kingdom.




Division VUl.^eontiHucd.






219


Glass, Tie.—
Bent, bevelled, heraldic, sand-blasted,
enamelled, embossed, etched, silvered
or brilliant cut; comers cat,
bevelled, or engraved ; panes,
prisms, and all glass framed with








metals ad val.


80 %|


25 %§


250


Items (c) and (<0 deleted and the
following new sab-item inserted—
Polished and patent plate, not








exceeding 25 sup. ft


Frec§


Free§


231A


Glass cells for primary and secondary








electric batteries ad val.


5%§


Free^


252


Glassware —
Item 232 deleted and stated to fall
automatically into item 258.






253


Glasswarj, n.e.i., including smelling and
perfume bottles, glass stoppers and
fruit- jar caps ; also glass bottle marbles








ad val.


25 %§


20 %§


258


Bottle stoppers, n.e.i

[All stoppers other than glass or
rubber are now admitted under this
item.]


Free§


Free§


259


Bottles, empty —
(a) Bottles, n.e.i., flasks and jars.








empty ad val.

(ft) Bottles up to and including 5


35 %§


25 9£§










drams of fluid capacity


Free§


Free§


260


Bottles. n.e.i., flasks and ars, filled—
(a) Bottles up to and including a








capacity of 5 fluid drams

(V) Bottles of over 5 drams and not


Free§


Free§










exceeding 10 ozs., fluid capacity








per doEcn.


I4d.§


id.5




(r) Bottles of over 10 om. and not








exceeding 20 ozs. fluid capacity








per dozen.


2d.§


I4d.5




{d) Bottles of over 20 ozs. fluid








capacity per dozen


24d.§


2d.$


261


(a) Glue ad vaL

\b) Cements, n.e.i., including mucilage


35%


25 %§




and belting compounds

(e) Gelatine of all kinds per pound


30 %§


25 %§




2d.§


ljd.§


263


Dry gums, shellac, sandarac, dextrine,








and mastic


Frec§


Frec§


267


Roofing slates, n.e.i ad val.


25r;^§


20 %§


268


Stone and marble —
{a) Marble, unwrought, including
rough or scabbled from the pick








ad val.


10 %§


10 %5




{(h) Wrought, omamentaL








[Item deleted.]







§ With effect from 4th December, 1907.



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514



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOTTRIfAL.



[Dec 12, 1107.



Tarif Changes and Customs ReguUUions.



AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH-«<^<<mi^.



Tariff
Item.



27S
275

277

278



279

281
284



289
291



Articles.



Division IX.
{t) Acetates for the mannfActiire of

acetic acid

Ammonia, vis. — Oarbonate anhTdroos
liquid, mariatic and sulphate ai vaL

Carbide of calcium

Dpigs and chemicals, viz. ^
(a) Salicjlic and boric acids and
other food preservatives. n.e.i. ;
salicylate of soda; snlphites and
bisolphites of potassium; bisul-
phite of sodium, calcium, and
magnesium ; and foaming powders
and liquids, including maito-peptone
yeast food, yeast food preservatives,
yeast nourishment, qnillaya bark,
sapenarias, glycyrrhishi and its com*

pounds ad val.

[Note. — ^This item is the same as

originally proposed, with the

exception of slight verbal

alterations in the text.]

{h) Saccharin and other similar

substitutes for sugar, and substances

capable of conversion into such

substitutes for sugar per lb.

Cresylic acid, crude creosote oil and
tar oil, saponaceous mixture of

creosote and carbolic acid

(a) Crude napthaline

Cyanide of potassium, sodium, and

bromide salts

Fly papers, chemical and sticky
Thio sulphates (hyposulphites), and
hyposulphites oontaioing sine sulphite

and formaldehyde

[Hyposulphites substituted for
hydrosulphites.1
Tartaric acid, cream of tartar, and

citric acid

Medicines —
(a) Pharmaceutical preparations, kc. :
" Troches " and " plasters '* are to be
omitted from this item, the former
to be dutiable as medicated con-
fectionery under item 46a (General
Tariff 3d., United Kingdom Tariff
2M. per Ib.f ), and the latter to be
admitted free of dnty.f

[The item 891a thus amended
was passed.]



General
Tariff.



Tariir on goods

theprodooeor

manafactore of

tlie United

Kingdom.



16 96§



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Board of TradeBoard of Trade journal, Volume 59 → online text (page 91 of 112)