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A. Jackson), not by the Commercial Attach6 at Madrid as stated
in the article ih question.



BRITISH TRADE ABROAD.

TurlMy. — It may be well to call attention to a statement in a
recent despatch from Mr. H. C. A. Eyres, H.M. Consul-General
at Constantinople, to tiie efiect that the only way to do business
with the Hecljaz Railway is by direct personal application to La
Haute Commission du Chemin de Per du Hedjaz, Constantinople.
Mr. Eyres emphasises the necessity for firms meaning serious



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, 552 THE BOABB OF TKADB JOTHUXAJs. [Dec. 19, 190T«

British Trade Abroad.



busineea to be represented by agents who are in personal toach
with the High Commission. The case, noted on p. 551 of the
"Board of Trade Journal " of 19th September last, of a call for
tendera, in which it would appear that the contractors were settled
prior to the publication of the call, illustrates this necessity.

Bagdad. — ^The Acting British Consul-General at Bagdad (Major
J. Ramsey, CLE.) writes as follows : — " In my opinion Bagdad
offers a very promising market for many kinds of British
manufactures. The chief difficulty of pushing the trade lies in
bringing buyers and sellers into such close relationship with each
other that each can understand the needs of the other. In certain
lines of business I can act as a medium of communication, but I
cannot supply detailed technical information, nor is it possible
accurately to describe in writing the advantages and disadvantages
attaching to Bagdad as a market.

** No Consular reports, however carefully prepared, can be as
useful as a personal knowledge of the market to be exploited, and
this is especially true of a country where no official statistics are
published, where foreigners enjoy privileges that are denied to
natives, and where the relations between the Governors and the
people are such as a resident of England would find it difficult to
realise.

** For these reasons I feel convinced that the best method of
pushing our trade is to persuade firms doing a large business to
send out their representatives to see things for themselves. . . .
An agent of a firm travelling to India could examine the market
not only at Bagdad but also at Beyrout and Aleppo (both im-
portant commercial centres) with the expenditure of a very little
money and time. ...

" Manufacturers well know that there is no difficulty in getting
from England to Constantinople or Port Said. From either of
these places there are numerous steamers running to Beyrout
From Beyrout to Aleppo there is a railway, and a branch from this
railway would enable a traveller to visit Damascus. From Aleppo
to Bagdad a service of post carriages has recently been started.*
These carriages do the journey in about eight or nine days. From
Bagdad to Busrah there are British steamers at least once a week,
and there are several Turkish steamers. From Busrah to Karachi
and Bombay there is the weekly mail steamer of the British India
Steam Navigation Company, as well as other steamers. . . .
The cost of a carriage from Aleppo to Bagdad is about 15{. sterling,
and a quarter of this sum for one seat. The cost of a first-class
ticket by steamer from Bagdad to Karachi is about lOL"

Names of British merchants in Bagdad and of local steamship
companies may be obtained on applica^iion at the Commercial
Intelligence Branch of the Board of Trade, 73, Basinghall Street,
London. E.C. ,

♦ See p. 478 of the •* Board of Trade Journal " of 5th December as to condi-
tions of the journey.



rGoogle



Dec. 19, 1907.J



THB BOABD OF TRADE TOUBNAL.



553



TRADE OP FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND BRITISH
POSSESSIONS.

The following snmmary table has been prepared at the Board
of Trade showing the total imports and exports of merchandise
of the principal countries for which the particulars can be given
up to September, 1907, inclusive, and referring in all cases to
the same period, viz., the nine months ended September. The
corresponding figures for 1906 and 1905 areadded for comparison: —



Imports («M NoTK below).
Nine Months ended September.



1905.



1906.



1907.



Exports (Domestic) {Me Non

below),
mne Months ended September.



1905.



1906.



1007.



I



I



• Value of prineipal articles only.



i Including bullion.



A comparison of the total figures for ten months ended
31 st October is possible for four countries, as follows, viz. : —



Imports («M Notk).
Ten Months ended October.



1905.



1906.



1907.



Exports (Bomestio) {»ee Nots).
Ten Months ended October.



1905.



1906.



1907.



Belgium*

France

United States
United Kingdom



95,505,000
154,520.000
204,108,000
395,041,000



£

106,606,000
183,299,000
222,166,000
427,570,000



£
115,558,000
197,366,000



£

70,020,000
156,801,000



254,165,000 I 257,U08,000
453,673,000 | 271,763,000



£

83,999,000

171,462,000

292,506,000

811,289,000



£
86,607,000
182,917,000
310,040,000
357,601,000



* Value of principal articles only.

Note. — In the case of Germany, Belgium, France, Switzerland,
Austria-Hungary, Egypt, Japan, Canada, arid United Kingdom, the
import figures given in the above summaries represent imports
for home consumption. In all cases the export figures are in-
tended to represent exports of domestic produce. In most cases,
however, they include a certain amount of '* nationalised" goods,
i.e., goods originally imported for consumption, and which, if
dutiable, have been charged with duty, but which are subsequently
re-exported.



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^&1



THE BOABB OF TKADB JOXTBITAL.



[Bee. 19, 1907.



Trade of Foreign Oountries and BriHah Poseessums.

The lutest figures available as regards other coontiies from
rwhidi retxqrBS are recieived by theirBoard of Trade are as follow-: —





Importf.


Experts (DomMtic).




1905.


1906.


1907.


1905.


1906.


1907.


BimU* (7 months)...

Itatr (7 mootliB) ...

» Me^oof (8ttontlM) .

Auttnlian Oomman-

iPwltlit(8auMitht)

FoHngAl (ISmoittltf)


' £
32,812,000
45,128,000
11,571,000

adAatEHabte

1904.
18,960,000


£
36,654,000
58,043,600
16,767,000

29,013,000

1906.
13,653.000


£
41,499,000
66,578,000
16317|000

88,018,000

1900.
18,588,000


£
58,485,000
86,775,000
15,578,000

notairailable

1904.
6,910,000


£
56,440,000
43,096,000
W,088,000

98,919,000

1905.
6,518,000


£
51,828,000
4I,589,00»
17,845,000

1900.
6,883.00»



* European, Bosao-FinniBh and Black 8«ia Phmtiera.
i Inelndinc bullion and specie.

For detailed particnlars regarding the trade of the several
ooantriesy reference should be made to the '* Accounts relating to
the Trade and Commerce of certain Foreign Countries and Britii^
Possessions, inoltiding figures received up to 80th November,* to-
be obtained from Mesairs. Wyman & Sons, Limited, Fetter
Lane^ London, E.C.



MINERALS IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA.

The "Australian Mining Standard" publishes the following
notes on the metals and minerals of value occurrii^ in the State
of Western Australia, which have been prepared by Mr. K S.
Sim]>son, Government Mineralogist of that State : —

AiLtimony. — Workable lodes of this metal occur at Mosquito
Creek, Mallina Peewah, and Sherlock Crossing, in the North- West.
The latter are now being opened up. The others are not being
worked on account of distance from port and market, and irregular
price of the metal. Most of these ores are more or less gold
bearing.

Bismuth occurs at Yalgoo, but has never been worked for similar
reasons to those above.

Zinc. — This metal is now being raised for export at Mundijong.
It is known to occur also in important quantities at West Kim-
berley, Roeboume, Croydon, Northampton, Murrin, &c. Neglected
-at present owing to cost of placing on EuiK^ean m»*kets.
> ]Ia]iganese.-r-Very pure manganese ores occur on the Upper
Ashburton, at Pinyalling(Talgoo), at Ravensthorpe, and elsewhere
on the south coast, ^ese are well suited for use as a flux at
geperal smelting works or for the preparation of high quality iron
and steel from iron oresj Nothing is being done with any of them
at present so far as is known.



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D66.'l», 1907.} V&B BOAlU) ^F fBiADE ^(m&KlX^ 555

- Minerals in Western Atistralia.

Tungsten. — A metal largely used for alloying with steel to give
exceptionally hard and tottgh metal for projectiles, armotir plate,
lathe-tools, &c. Its two ores (wolfram and scheelite) are in con-
stantly increasing demand in Europe and America at prices rang*
ing about 170Z. per ton. Ores which should pay to work at present
rates are known to occur at Mosqaito, Wodgina, Northampton,
Ooolgardie, Higginsville, Southern Cross, Brooktouj and Bavens*
Irhorpe. A small parcel of ore has recently been exported ftx)in the '
last-named place, but elsewhere it has been neglected, largely '
owing to a lack of knowledge of its value.

Aluminimn. — Large deposits of ^bauxite, the ore from which alu-
minium i^ smelted, occur amongst the so-called ironstone gravels of
the Darling Ranges, from Wongan Hills on the nordi to Bridge-
town on the south. These will no doubt be utilised At no very
distant date.

Tantalum. — Ores of this metal are probably more abundant in
Western Australia than anjrwhere else in the world. As the use
of this metal is in the experimental stages, the demand is very
irregular as yet.

Kolybdenum is another rare metal in constant demand for
hardening steel. It is known to occur at several localities, ^^.,
Toodyay and Wagin.

.ABbeito|.T-True chrysqtile asbestos of the highest quality, worth
up to $0Z. a ton, occurs in quantities near TamboUrah, and is now
i^bout to be exploited. Lower grades of this mineral are abundant-
in very many parts of the Sfcate, and though in the past valueless,
will shortly be of much value for paper making, the demand for
this purpose increasing daily.

Kca. — Mica of excellent quality occurs on the Gasooyne, and
will be opened up when t**ansport is not so difficult as at present. -
Mica has also in the past been raised for export at Bindoon,
Mullalyup, and Londonderry.

Infuiorial Earth. — ^This material, worth from 4Z. to 61. per ton,
is very abundant in the Swan district, in the valley of the IrWin
Biver, and on the south coast. It is used for making dynamite,
disinfectant, and fire-proof materials.

Monazite.— ^A constant demand exists for this mineral for the'
preparation of incandescent lights. It is now known to occur at
Moolyella with the tin ore. It is there of exceptionally high grade
of a presetat value of 1201, per ton.
• Copper is very widely distributed throughout the State.

Iron Ore.-^lTie Tampi Sound iron ore is extremely jnire', and
similar to that at the Weld Kanges. It should be possibte tp ex-
port ore from Yampi at a profit, as the deposit is right on Urn
coast, '

Lead is abundant in the North- West and Nortliampton districts.



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536 THB BOABD OF TEADB JOXnUTAI.. [Deo. 19, 1S07.

INDO^HINESE-TDRKESTAN TRADE VIA LADAKH

IN 1906-7.

A supplement to the '* Indian Trade Journal " contains a report
by the Special Assistant for Chinese Affairs to the Resident in
Kashmir (Mr. G. Macartney) on Indo-Chinese-Turkestan Trade
vid Ladakh* for the year ending 31st March, 1907.

Under the heading " Imports from India into Chinese Turkestan "
the report states that cottoiL quilts are in moderate demand.
Owing to the weight and bulk of this material, the cost of its
transport takes away much from the profit of its sale.

Germany appears to have supplied a certain amount of flaimelettei,
the demand for which is good, and promises well for the future.
Khotan dyers buy this material and, colouring it red or black,
sell it at about double price as broadcloth.

The imports of European manufactured silk piece-goodi con-
sisted chiefly of velvets of German make, the demand for which
is yearly on the increase. In former years such materials were
used in Kashgharia for hats only ; now, however, with the extrava-
gance noticeable in the towns, their use has largely been extended
to dress generally. Most of the velvets imported from India
had stamped on them in gold Arabic letters the towns in Chinese
Turkestan where the special sort was in demand. Thus the pieces
bore such inscriptions as : ** Yarkandmen-Bab," *' Aksu-men-Bab/'
*' Khotan-men-Bab."

Apart from velvets Germany supplied a sort of black satin
(glossy silk surface on a cotton foundation). This material has
found a ready sale not only in Kashgharia, but also in the lii
country where it is in demand amongst the Chinese for the making
of the outer garment known as the " Ma-kuatsu."

Regarding manufactured woollen piece-goods there was a small
quantity of Kashmir ** shal " imported. The fiishion has set in
somewhat for natives of Turkestan to wear this material as a turban
in cold weather. Those pieces of " shal" which have embroidered
flowers at the two ends do not appear to find favour, bat, in
Mr. Macartney^s opinion, if the pieces were made in lengths of
about four yards in a snuff colour and with the ends finished off
with a simple blue stripe, they would suit the market conditions
of the country better. In addition to *' shals " some 30 maundsof
German broadcloth and flannels were imported. The demand hr
these was active.

Alluding to the methods which the Russians are now employing
for the encouragement of their trade with Kashgharia, Mr.
Macartney says : — *' These would appear to be of a threefold natare
— (1) bounties on imports such as cotton piece-goods, matches^
petroleum, and sugar; (2) improved transport arrangements;

• For reference to previoas report on this trade, see ** Board of Trade Jonmal "
of 2Sth March last, pp. 686-8.



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Dec. 19, 1907.J THE BOASD OF TEADE TOUBNAL. 557

Indo'Chinese'Turkesian Trade via Ladakh in 1906-7.

and (3) credit &ciUties. As regards transport, the new cart-road,
now all but completed between Kashghar and Narin, and
in course of construction between Narin and the rail head
of Andijan, should improve the situation considerably. The
present freight from Moscow to Kashghar by the Osh route should
work out at about nine roubles a maund ; but with the establish-
ment of wheel traffic between Kashghar and Andijan, a significant
fall in the transport charges is certain to follow. Moreover,
transport work will probably, in a short time, be taken out of the
hands of individual native carriers ; already one of the great
Russian carrying companies is in negotiation with traders with
Russia for the fixing of a rate between Kashghar and Osh, and for
the monopoly of the carriage of their goods. As regards credit,
the Russians, realising that the natives can command little or no
ready cash, have initiated a system, in concert with the Russo-
Chinese Bank at Kashghar, whereby a man's trading capital may
practically become doubled. This system can be best explained
by an example. An exi)orting merchant, we will suppose, pur-
chases wool at Khotan for 100 roubles. This wool brought to
Kashghar will have had its value increased to, say,! 10 roubles.
The merchant wishes to raise a loan in order to buy more goods.
He hands over to the Bank, as security, the wool he has, and the
Bank advances him, say, a sum of 100 roubles, charging him its
usual interest at 8 per cent, per annum. But the wool already
bought must be sent to Russia. The Bank as Commission Agent
makes the necessary transport arrangements on behalf of the ex-
porter — nay more — holds itself responsible for the safe arrival of
the goods. At the town of destination in Russia the wool is
handed back to the exporter on his refunding his indebtedness to
the Bank. In the converse case of the importing of Russian goods
to Kashghar, the Bank is equally helpful. It effects purchases as a
Commission Agent, and makes all arrangements, at its own risk,
for the despatch of goods to Kashghar."

In the matter of imports to Kashgharia, it cannot be denied, says
Mr. Macartney, that English cotton piece-goods have suffered con-
siderably through Russian competition : roughly, the present
consignments have been reduced to less than one-half of what they
were ten years ago.



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558



T&E'B0'A3tB OF TRXDE'JOXmi^XL.



[Dec 19", lMr«



PROPOSED TARIFF CHANGES.
PROTEGTORATB OP SOUTHERN NIGBRIA.



The



PropoeedFree
ImportatioA of

certain
' foodstnfEii.



* Southern Nigeria Government Grazette** for 16th October
last contains copy of a Bill which is abont to be
introduced into the Legislative Council to
amend the "Customs Amendment Proclama-
tion, 1905." The Bill, which it is stated is
published for general information, provides for
the free importation, from Ist t^uary, 1908, of the following
articles in the Protectorate of Southern Nigeria : —
Sugar Beef

Flour Pork

Bread Pish, salted and cured.

Biscuits



TARIFF CHANGES

AND CUSTOMS REGULATIONS.

DOMINION OF CANADA.

A copy of a Customs Memorandum (No. 1»446b), dated 274
-. , November, 1907, has been received, notifying.

unitoms ^j^^^ under section 286 of the Customs Act,

^^^•"- the following articles used as materials in

Canadian manufactures shall, on importation into the Dominion

of Canada, be classed for duty as follows : —



TarMt
Item.



^ticles.



Bates of Dstj.



712

713
714



716



716



Coal tar base or salt, for nfeln (f)iezdsiiiifa6t«xeK>f ooal
tar dyes ... ... ... ... ... ... . ,.•

Crude bromides, for the prodnction of bromine

Lenses and shntterSf when imported by mana£sctiiren
of cameras or kedi^ for use only In the matufaoliwe
of cameras or kodaks ... .^. .a

Special parts of brass and alnminiom, in the rough,
when Imported by manufacturers of cameras or
kodaks, for use only in the manufacture of cameras
or kodaks—

Under the British Preferential Tariff

„ Intermediate Tariff

„ Oeneral Tariff .«.

Iron tubing, lacquered or brass coTcred, not otct 2 in.
in diameter, in the rough, for use only in the manu-
facture of extension rods for windows, when imported
by manufacturers of such rods



Free



Free



7*96 -
7196 «



Free



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Dec. 19, 1907.} ' "HIH^ ^illU> Of^ l^ftABB fCWJBi^AL!/'*'^^ '* 559

^ Iktrijf 'Changes and CuiMM'El^^

AUSTRALIAN OOMMOM WEALTH.

."With refer^ce to the regulations 'which, have from tini^^-^^e

Kethod of ^^^ published in the " Board of Trade Journal"

Pftyment of Dutr ^^P^**^? *^^® method of paynxent of such duties

onAdvertifliU^ ^ *"^ leviable on advertising matter* imported

.. hotter ^^ *^® Australian Commonwealth, the Board of

Trade have now received a statement from the

Bepii^ntative of the Commonwealth in London setting fbrth the

regulations at present in force : — - -

The duty on such ^vertising matter as is now dutiable may be
paid by any of the methods specified hereunder: —

(a) The weight of any one mail may be bulked by the
consignor and duty at 6d, per lb. remitted in one sum to the
Deputy Postmaster-General of the State to which the cata-
logues, Ac., are addressed.

(b) Duty may be paid on total wei^t of any one mail by
consignor's agent in the CommonwealtL

,,:(c) By affixing fiscal, stamps to each package covering the
amount of duty payable on such package. Fiscal stamps can
be purchased at the Commonwealth Offices in London
(72, Victoria Street, S.W.),

Duiy stamps should be cancelled by writing or stamping
the date on the face of each before posting.

(d) By plaping in one package each series of packets for each
. State, stamping the package with the total amount, due on the

enclosures instead of stamping the enclosures themselves and
address the package to the Deputy Postmaster-General of the
State — ^the latter will see that the enclosures are duly dis-
tributed to the addressees.

Such packages should bear the endorsement ''For
distribution. Customs Duty prepaid."

(e) If neither of the above methods be followed duty will be
collected in Australia.

The Commonwealth Government further state that duty is
levied even on single copies addressed to individuals, provided
that the total duty payable on such single copies forwarded by
any one consignor by any one mail to any one- State of the Com-
monwealth does not exceed one shilling.

It may also be mentioned that duty is levied on "insets"
introduced in magazines, &c.
* — 'I I-

* The latA of dntj leyiable on adverting matter tinder the n^w Australian
Tariff (item (52) are specified in the preceding notice of Tariff amendments.



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560



THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL.



[Dec 19, 1907.



Tariff Changes and Customs Regtdations.



AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH-^^»i<*rf.

Information has been received from the Representative of the

Commonwealth in London to the effect that the

^•"" new Customs Tariff has now passed the Com-

Amendments. monwealth House of Representatives. The

following are the remaining tariff items which have been amended

80 as to read as in the annexed table : —



Tariff
Item.



153
153
154



294



308

309

309(a)

313

314
815
316
317
818
319
320
321

322
323



824



325



Articles.



General
Tariil.



Taxiir on goods

the ivoduoe or

manufBotare of

the United

KingdoBL



Division VI.

Stripper harvesters each

Strippers ^

Metal parts of stripper harvesters and
strippers per lb.

Division IX.
Perfumery, &c ad vaL

Division X.
Bmshmakers' woodware and

turnery ad val.

Tool handles, unattached ... „

Axe, scythe and bentwood handles „
Buggy shafts, bent but not

dressed »

Buggy shafts, bent and dressed... „
Shafts, n.e.i., in the rough ... „

Shafts, n.e.i., dressed „

Bent poles, rough n

Bent poles, dressed n

Whiffle-tree bars »

Shaft bars »

Casks, barrels and vats, n.e.i.,

empty , «*

Hogsheads, secondhand, empty... „
Shooks<-

Hogshead, secondhand each

(The remaining portion of item 323
was passed without alteration).
Buckets and tubs, wooden ...ad vaL

Division XI.
Fancy goods ; including card cases ;
snuif and match boxes ; purses, n.e.i.,
wallets ; thimbles ; serviette rings ;
button-books ; shoe-horns and lifts ;
glove stretchers ; toys, other than dolls
undressed ; ivory and other ornamental
figures ; feather dusters ; paper para-
sols; articles used for outdoor and
indoor games ; fishing appliances,
n.e.i., and articles, n.e.i., Qscd for
ornamental purposes, or partly for use
and .partly for ornament, including
fancy ground and cut glass bottles of
over 5 drams of fluid capacity, con-
taining goods not subject to ad valorem
duty, and stoppers for such bottles

ad val.



£12^
l}d.5

so%tt



30 96
2096
16 %»

30%*
30%*
30%*
30%*
80%*
30%*
80%*
80%*

85%

86%*

6*.*



30%*



80%*



£i:



J?

Ud.^



2B%tt



28%*
18%*
15%*

25%*
2B%*
28%*
28%*
2B%*
25%*
25%*
25%*

20%*
20%*

5*.*



25%*



25%



* With effect from 7th December, 1907.

% With effect from 18th December, 1907.

1 1 With effect from 5th December, 1907. The rates given in the •• Board of Trade
Journal" for 12th December last were cabled in error by the OommonwealtA
Government.

uigiiizea oy vj v^ v_/ -v l v.



Dec. 19, 1907.]



THE BOABD OF T&ADE JOUBXAL.



561



Tariff Changes and Ctistoms Regvlabions*
AUSTRALIAN GOMMONWEALTH-^<^^>»«^^-



Tariff
Itenu



Articles.



General
Tariff.



Tariflongood*

tlie produce or

maauf actore o(

the United

Xingdonu.



325 (a)
326

327



328
381



332



334



384 («)

335
338



Division 'Kl.— continued,

Dolls, andreseed

Combe (toilet) and shaving sets, not

included under item 384 ...ad val.

Pencils of wood bat not including

pencils with metal or other clamps or

attachments, also penholders of wood

(including metal attachments for nibs)

[In this item the only alteration is

in the text.*]

School pen and pencil sets and boxes ...

Jewellery, unfinished, being settings

and mounts for bracelets, brooches,

necklets and rings unset or set with

imitation stones ad val.

[In the above item the rates of duty
remain as originally proposed, but
the text has been modified.*]
Jewellery commonly known as rolled
gold ; and jewellery under 9 carat

adval.

[In the above item the rates of duty

remain as originally proposed, but

the text has been modified.*]

Jewellery, n.e.i., including bolt and

split rings ; swivels ; ear wires ; bars



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