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with headquarters in San Francisco.

* * *

New officers of the San Francisco
Junior Chamber of Commerce were

Herbert M. Cliisholm, advertising
manager of Blake, Moffitt & Towne, was
elected president; executive Nice-presi-
dent is William K. Ward of Gunn Carle
& Company; vice-president and treas-
urer, Robert H. Parsons of Johnson &
Higgins; vice-president, James G. Mar-
ket, E. S. Browning Company; secretary-
manager, Paul Naton.



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This report from the nation's capital is pre-
pared each week by Alexander von Hafften.
manager of the Washington Office of the San
Francisco Chamber of Commerce.




r f PUBLISHED BY THE



PUBLISHED BY THE

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE



Volume 5



Thursday, December 30, 1948



Number 53



IKeporli
ZJ-roni Uke L,liamber 5

WASHINGTON OFFICE



WEST COAST MARITIME STUDY

A report on Labor-Management Rela-
tions of the West Coast Maritime Indus-
try has just been issued by the Joint
Committee on Labor-Management Rela-
tions of the Congress of the United
States. This Joint Committee was cre-
ated pursuant to Section 401 of Public
Law 101 (80th Congress) which estab-
lished a Joint Congressional Committee
to be known as the Joint Committee on
Labor-Management Relations.

The report describes the industrial re-
lations in the Pacific Coast Maritime In-
dustry over the past fourteen years. It
traces the history of collective bargain-
ing agreements between labor and man-
agement and critically appraises the
causes of conflict.

The San Francisco Chamber's Wash-
ington Office will be glad to furnish
copies of this report to those who request
them.

ANHYDROUS AMMONIA

The Department of Commerce re-
ported thai nearlj 5.000 tons of Army-
produced anhydrous ammonia have been
allocated for shipment during the first
three months of 1949 to three fertilizer
plants which otherwise would be forced
to suspend or curtail operations for lack
of this product. The Farm Service Com-
pany of Oakland, California, and the
Columbia Metals Company of Seattle,
Washington, are two of the three plants
allocated this material.

The first quarter allocations were
granted under a provision of the Foreign
Aid Appropriations Act, which specifies
that 10'' 'r of Army-produced anhydrous
ammonia be distributed to domestic fer-
tilizer plants. In addition, the Act sets
forth a preference group among am-
monia sulphate producers whose needs
for anhydrous ammonia must first be
considered.



This report from the nation's capital is pre-
pared each week hy Alexander von Hafften.
mnnncer of the Washington Office of the San
Francisco Chamber of Commerce.



Northern California Research Conference
Will Feature Top Flight Speakers

Over 850 business leaders and industrialists hav-p been invited to attend
the forthcoming Northern California Research Conference at the Palace

Hotel, January 12.

Marine Exchange sponsored by chamber

. 1 Sponsored by the San Francisco Cham-

NOW Independent ber of Commerce, University of Califor-

nia, Stanford University and Stanford

Research Institute, this first annual con-
ference results from a growing interest
in industrial research and its application.

As a means of serving industry in this
area, the conference was conceived to
promote a better understanding of the
problems of research in industrial or-
ganizations, to explain both the benefits
and the ■ limitations of industrial re-
search, and to acquaint executives with
the research facilities of this area. To
achieve these goals the co-sponsors have
invited the participation of leaders in
business, industry and research.
SPEAKERS SCHEDULED

Speakers scheduled to address the con-
ference include Morrough P. O'Brien.
Dean, College of Engineering, University
of California; Maurice Holland, Indus-
trial Research Adviser, New York City;
Dr. J. E. Hobson, Executive Director,
Stanford Research Institute; Dr. Fred-
erick Terman, Dean, School of Engineer-
ing, Stanford University; Dr. Claude B.
Hutchinson, Dean, College of Agricul-
ture, University of California; H. G. Ves-
per, President, California Research
Corporation; Wallace B. Van Arsdel,
Assistant Director, Department of Agri-
culture Regional Laboratory; Fred W.
Twining, Twining Laboratories, Fresno;
and Fred Olsen, Director of Research,
Western Cartridge Company.

Special luncheon speaker will be Dud-
ley E. Chambers, Executive Engineer,
General Electric Research Laboratories.
Schenectady, New York. Chambers will
speak on problems in the development
of industrial applications of atomic
energy.



Establishment of the Marine Exchange
as an independent, non-profit organiza-
tion was jointly announced today by
W. P. Fuller Brawner, President of the
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce,
and A. E. Kihn, President of the Ex-
change.

The Exchange has previously been a
part of the San Francisco Chamber. It
was founded in 1851, became a depart-
ment of the Chamber in 1924 and later
became an autonomous body under the
Chamber.

INDEPENDENT CORPORATION

The latest move makes the Exchange
an independent corporation. Offices will
remain at 318 California Street.

Commenting on the change, Brawner
said: "This action paves the way for ex-
panded area-wide Exchange service to
all terminals of the port area, as well as
clearing the way for joint action to meet
the aggressive and growing competition
of other ports."

Explaining the new position of the Ex-
change, Kihn said: "Many new develop-
ments are in store for Bay Area shipping
in the next few years. Not only are new
ship designs on the drawing boards, but
stepped-up efficiency in handling cargo
is overdue. Competition between carriers
and ports for business is bound to bring
other changes that can now be visual-
ized.

"To keep San Francisco Bay ports
ahead of the tide the Marine Exchange,
around which much of the Bay Area
shipping activities revolve, has inaugu-
rated a program developed by its mem-
bers during the past several years.

"The first step is to incorporate the
Exchange and to include in its board of
directors maritime business executives
representative of the Bay Area."



BAY REGION BUSINESS



Thursday, December 30, 1948



Report by the Research Department



General Business Activity



TREND

Consumer backlogs and new de-
mands maintained business in San
Francisco and the nation at record-
breaking levels in 1948 in most
fields. At the same time industrial
disputes, rising prices, increased
cost of consumer goods left some
indelible marks on this year's eco-
nomic pattern which may be useful
in appraising the outlook for 1949.

San Francisco with its roundly diversi-
fied economy and substantial backlog of
facility requirements, both in the city
and the area, such as housing, schools,
office buildings, industrial establish-
ments, street, highway and bridge proj-
ects, etc., will provide opportunities, not
just for next year but for several years
ahead. Latest reports on San Francisco's
actual position as we pause on the
threshold of another year reveal the 11
months' trend of 1948 against the same
period last year. In rounded figures the
improvements are — building permits
total value of $59 million are up 45% ;
residential building permits value $32
million up 59% ; non-residential permits
value $15 million up 57%. Bank debits
totaling $25 billion are up 11%. Market
value of Stock Exchange transactions
totaled $170 million for a gain of 16%.
Tourist and settler inquiries rose 8% ;
Golden Gate vehicle crossings 7%; Bay
Bridge vehicle crossings 1% ; and general
business conditions up 5%. Ten months'
payrolls in retail trade rose 11%; in
wholesale trade 11%; in hotels 4%; and
in the manufacturing industries 1% ; air-
port plane traffic soared 16% ; air mail
loaded 4%; air express loaded 8%; and
imports (9 months) gained 36%.

Activities which slipped below the 11
months' level of last year include — real
estate sales of $178 million, though a
sizeable amount, were 15% below last
year. Postal receipts of $17 million
dropped 4%. Freight car movements of
199,000 cars were off 19%. Airport pas-
sengers (for 10 months) 748,000— off 5%.
Ship arrivals totaling 3,069 were off 8% ;
exports (9 months) $235 million — oT
27% ; electrical energy sales 1.5% ; in-
dustrial and commercial gas sales 1.4%;
livestock slaughtered 4% ; fruit and veg-
etable receipts 3% ; and industrial and
commercial placements 15%.

Our General Business Activity Index
established a new November high of
248.4, 2.7% above last November. The
11 months' average of 237.4 was up 5.3%
compared to a year ago.

CONSTRUCTION AND REAL ESTATE

The eleven months building permits
numbered 8,334 and were valued at $59,-



255,047. Of this amount 2,513 were resi-
dential permits valued at $32,111,925
which provided for 3,745 dwelling units,
of which 2,110 were single-family units
valued at $19,248,298. There were 225
non-residential permits valued at $15,-
205,042. Additions, alterations and re-
pairs accounted for 5,595 permits valued
at $11,456,077. Total permits value rose
$19 million above last year; residential
permits value rose $12 million; non-resi-
dential rose $5,600,000; and additions,
alterations and repairs $500,000. The 11
months real estate sales of 14,517
amounting to $177,730,978 were off one-
sixth compared to 17,381 sales valued at
$209,320,734 a year ago. Mortgages and
deeds of trust issued against San Fran-
cisco real estate numbered 16,075
amounting to $134,033,827 were off
10.8% in number and 17.6% in amount
compared to a year ago.
TRADE

Retail department store sales index in
San Francisco averaged 251 for the 11
months compared to 242 a year ago and
100 in 1939.

Pacific Coast wholesaler sales during
the first 10 months (latest available)
were up 8%, identical to the trend in
the United States as a whole. Electrical
goods were up 21% ; furniture and house
furnishings 10% ; hardware 6% ; jewelry
5%; lumber 29%; drugs and sundries
1%; dry goods 14%; and tobacco 1%.
Automotive sales were off 9%; clothing
and furnishings 23%; and shoes 14%.
The three lines reported off were in di-
rect contrast to the trend in the nation,
but all other lines closely paralleled the
national trend except dry goods which
almost doubled the national gain and
furniture which was about one-half that
of the national gain.
FINANCE

Bank clearings during the first 11
months totaled $25,389,339,000 and was
$2,400,000,000 above the same period last
year. Postal receipts amounted to $17-.
342,554 compared to $18,033 937 a yea-
ago. San Francisco Stock Exchange
transactions for the 11 months totaled
11,106.012 shares with market value of
$169,557,906 compared to 9 655 .365
shares with market value of $145,934,69")
a year ago. There were 73 commercia'
failures in the first 11 months compared
to 43 a year ago. Liabilities were up only
one-third while assets were up 82.7%-.

EMPLOYMENT

During the first 11 months 35,611
placements were made in San Francisco.
of which 25,621 were industrial and 9.990
commercial. During November the lo^al
demand continued for competent stenog-
raphers, typists and comptometer opera-
tors qualified in all operations; also for




S O n D



engineers, draftsmen, and pharmacists.
In the industrial field there were de-
mands for fully qualified machinists,
sheet metal workers, and sewing ma-
chine operators with factory experience.
Bi-monthly reports from 174 San Fran-
cisco firms to the California State
Employment Service revealed total em-
ployment in these firms remained practi-
cally unchanged between September and
November but the number of employees
in the wholesale and retail trade in-
creased about 4% during this period.
Banks and insurance companies were
about the only other major industry
group to report increases over Septem-
ber and anticipated slight gains during
the next two months.

Manufacturing employment remained
almost at the high September level as
the durable goods industry continued to
add workers with large gains in the fab-
ricated metals and machinery fields,
while service, transportation, communi-
cations, and utilities showed slight de-
creases in employment, according to the
C.S.E.S. Reports from the same 174
establishments anticipated 2% average
loss in employment over the next two
months period, largely due to the retail
trade group curtailments at the end of
the holiday season; however, 50 firms
expect to add workers and 82 hope to
maintain the current level of employ-
ment.

TRANSPORTATION

Freight car movements during the
first 11 months numbered 198,613 in the
San Francisco switching limits, com-
pared to 243,768 a year ago and were
off 18.5%. San Francisco Airport plane
traffic during the first 10 months (latest
available) amounted to 63,833 planes in
and out and 747,832 passengers on and
off; during the same period last year
54,948 planes reported in and out and
785,236 passengers on and off; air mail
loaded amounted to 5,089,429 lbs. com-
pared to 4,915,825 last year.



Thursday, December 30, 1948



BAY REGION BUSINESS



Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco

November, 1948



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY

GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY

S. F. C. of C. Index 1935-39 Avg.=100

CONSTRUCTION PERMITS

Total (number)

(value)

Residential, New (number)

(value)

Dwelling Units (number)

Single Family Dwellings, New (number)

(value)

Non-Residential, New (number)

(value)

Additions, Alterations and Repairs (number)

(value)

REAL ESTATE

Sales (number)

(value)

Mortgages and Deeds of Trust (number)

(amount)

RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES
San Francisco (index)

FINANCE

Bank Debits ($000)

Bank Clearings <S00O)

Postal Receipts ($)

San Francisco Stock Exchange (no. shares traded)

(market value)

COMMERCIAL FAILURES (number)

Liabilities _($)

Assets ($)

EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLLS— Bay Area (5 Co's.) (a)

Employment (index)

Payrolls (index)

NON-MFG. INDUSTRIES— (5 Co's.) (a)

Laundering. Cleaning, Dyeing (payroll)

Wholesale Trade (payroll)

Retail Trade (payroll)

Hotels (payroll)

PLACEMENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO— C.S.E.S. (total)

Industrial Placements (number)

Commercial Placements (number)

TRANSPORTATION

Freight Car Movements (number)

San Francisco Airport Traffic (no. planes)

(no. passengers)

Express Shipments — Rail (number)

Air (number)

Air Mail Loaded (pounds)

Air Express Loaded < pounds!

Air Freight Loaded ( pounds i

WORLD TRADE

Vessel Arrivals with Cargo (number)

(net registered tons)

Vessel Departures with Cargo (number)

(net registered tons)

Exports (Value millions of dollars)

Imports (Value millions of dollars)

UTILITIES

Electric Energy Sales Index (k.w.hrs. )

Industrial and Commercial Gas Sales (cu. ft.) ^

Water Consumers (net gain)

NEW DEVELOPMENTS

Tourist and Settler Inquiries (number)

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings (number)

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings (number)

DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS & VEGETABLES

Butter (pounds)

Cheese (pounds)

Eggs (cases)

Poultry'. Dressed (pounds)

Fruits and Vegetables (carlots)

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (b) (total number)

Cattle (number)

Calves (number)

Sheep and Lambs (number)

Hogs (number)

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Avg.=100

Food (Index)

Apparel (index)

Rent (index)

Fuel. Electricity and Ice (e) (index)

Gas and Electricity (index)

Other Fuel and Ice (index)

House Furnishing Goods (index)

Miscellaneous (index)

All Items (index)



248.4
605

3.2K3.M82

135

1,758,150

153

109

1,116,600

16

626,950

454

898,782

1,097

12,875.308

1,337

9.57S.S92

316

2,231,060

l.i,.;:; omi

1,606.559

824,885

14,760,727



154. led)
232.7(d)
234.7(d)
265.1(d)
2.999
2,304
695

18.149
6.871(d)
79.152(d)

201.793

17.236

570,8031 d)

414.246(d)

1, 099.150(d)

146
725.559

147
767.225

13.1(f)

2.6(f)



318

2.192.471
652.924

1,736.823
1,761.935

67.578

3.245.911

1.742

153.579

33.142

11,805

71.381

37,251

224.1(h)
196.7(h)
115.31 hi
B3. 1(h)
72.7' In
126.9(h)
165.21 h'
162.4(h)
177.1i)n



241.8

2,659.950

161

1,589,387

190

134

1,171,487

15

235,188

466

835,375

1,384

15,444,227

1,471

12,933,020

319

2,096.351

i.bss.wih

1.477,214

776.418

12,256,531



167.3(d)
217.71 d l
222.5(d)

263.51 d i
4,456
3.447
1,009

19.662
6.519(d)

S5 295i (1 i
257.602

18,106
460.447(d)
626.142(d)



279
1,285,449

1,363,140

36.71 f i
15.6(f)

204

1.197.599.800

235

352

2,104,881
607,131

1.566.625

1,780.063

73,841

3,610,782

1,725

164.741

36.622

13.398

73.593

41.128

210.4(h)
178.8(h)
110.4(h)
82 7(h)
72.7(h)



— 16.1

10.6

—19.5

—18.7



20.4

600.0

2.639.3

3,715.6



^7.7
—43.6
—50.0
^3.7
—64.3
—83.3

0.0



lis



Ch)



157. 1 1 h i
150.8(h)
165.7(h)



237.4

8.334
59,255.047

2,513
32,111,928

3,745

2,110

19,248,298

225

15,2115,012

5.595
11,456,077

14,518

177,730,978

16.075

i:;i,o;;:;.s27

251

25,389,339
18,915,863
17,342,554
11.106.012
169,557,906
73



157.6(e)

228.8(CI

223.8(e)
255.6(e)
35.611
25,621
9,990

198,613

63.833(e)
747.832(e)
2,417,097
202.622
5,089,4291 e i
3.882,631( e I
6,697,858(e)

3,069
14,733. 1S6

3.042
14,685.178

235.3(g)

161.1(g)

192

13.366.214.200

2.765

5.916

24.024.009
7,689,690

25.624,964

17.726. 7S6

965.588

14.044.416

2(i.(>2.s

1,859,103

404.606

144,291

891.982

372.926

219.7(10

190.9( k)
114. 2(k)
82.9(k)
72.7(k)

123.5( k i

163.0(k)

158.K k>
173.3. k i



225.4

7,826

40,776.788

21). 2111. Mi..
2.630
1.969

15. 765. 1 165

224

9,658.585

5,357

10,907,338

17,381

2( 19. .-(20.734
18,013

162.76(1.156

242

22.953,602
17.695.425
18,033.937
9.655,366
145,934,695
43



169.1(e)
205, ((e)
202.1(e)

246.8(e)
41,830
31.362
10.46S

243.768

54.948(e)
785.236(e)

3.038.284

197.521

4,915,825

;;, 6io, 512



15.41S.005
3.444

15.629. 66S

320.6(g)
118.3(g)

195

13.549.936.800

3,166

5,486

23.734,660
7.217.077

27,650.441

18.084.294

1,056.741

18.089.353

21.185

1.935.924

461,508

152,7:: 1

874.934

475.670

203.7. k.
176.3i k l
109.0. ki
82.7(k)
72.7. ki
117.0. k i
153.71 k i
148.6(k)
161.91 k i



45.3

11.9
58.9
42.4



-16.5
-15.1
10 8

-17.6



16.2
69.8
33.2



—11.7

—6.0

—26.6

36.1



—8.6

—22.4
—2.6



(a) These data are based on reports submitted to the Division of Labor
Statistics and Research. State of California 1940 = 100 index.

(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District.

(e) Gas costs have declined since 1925 and electricity costs since 1921.
.,i. (let. .her- -latest available



111 months cumulation

September

9 months cumulation

September latest available

3 quarter



Acknowledgement is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons. Dun & Bradstreet. Inc.. local utilities, private organizations. Federal
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. California State Departments of Industrial Relations. Agriculture, and Employment, and the United
States Departments of Labor. Agriculture and Commerce, and the United States Bureau of the Census, for the basic data each con-
tributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce



BAY REGION BUSINESS



Thursday, December 30, 1943



Industrial
Expansion



NOVEMBER

Fifty-seven new and expanded plants
in Northern California in November ac-
counted for a capital investment of
$5,953,800, it was announced today by
the Industrial Department of the San
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. Nine-
teen expansions representing $3,240,000
and 38 new plants for $2,713,800 were
listed.

The Bay Region (12 counties) ac-
counted for all the listed expansions —
19 with expenditures of $3,240,000; and
37 new ventures with outlays totaling
$2,513,800.

San Francisco had nine expansions
listed during November with an expendi-
ture of $2,953,000, and 10 new ventures
costing $395,300.

Tabulations for 1948 through Novem-
ber show:
San Francisco

77 expansions ....$13,354,000 1,504 jobs

66 new plants .... 2,152,800 627 jobs



143 new projects..$15,506,800 2,131 jobs
Bay Region (12 Counties)

208 expansions ....$63,657,700
259 new plants .... 22,853,400



467 new projects..$86,511,100
Northern California

230 expansions ....$72,369,700
286 new plants 29,528,400



516 new projects $101,898,100
November developments included :
The Continental- Vogue Luggage Co. is
moving from 199 Second Street to 585-87
Howard. The move will be an expansion.
Of interest is a new wholesale luggage
repair department, reportedly the only
one of its type in San Francisco.

The new building of the West States
Products Co. on the corner of 17th and
Mississippi will expand the operations of
this concern with an approximate invest-
ment of $75,000.

The Pacific Coast Paper Company's
expansion at 17th and Texas Streets will
give it approximately 70,000 sq. ft. of
production area. The expenditure will be
close to $1,000,000.

Herbert's Coats & Suits — Herbert
Hurwitz and Nathan Burke, owners, is
a new apparel plant located at 709 Mis-
sion Street.

The Mar-Wenz Manufacturing Com-
pany at 691 Minna Street has a new
plant soon to begin production of a novel
and revolutionary hand truck.



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Re -examination Of Housing Needs Urged
By Chamber; Two Basic Issues Cited

A critical re-examination of all major factors related to housing needs
and housing developments in California was urged this week by the San

Francisco Chamber of Commerce.



Districts Awarded
Contest Trophies

Twenty-eight San Francisco dis-
tricts received Christmas Decora-
tion awards Tuesday, December 28.

Awards were made at the West
Portal School auditorium, Taraval
and Claremont Streets.

The ceremony concluded the second
annual district Christmas decorations
contest sponsored by the Chamber.

First prize winners, the West Portal
district was host to the other districts
at the Tuesday function. The program
included brief remarks by Chamber Di-
rector William E. Gallagher; presenta-
tion of awards by Superior Judge The-
resa Meikle; and an entertaining twenty-
minute motion picture.

Music was supplied by members of
Cub Pack 68 sponsored by Epiphany
Catholic Church.



Superior Electrocast
Hits Steady Production

Superior Electrocast Foundry Com-
pany, the only steel foundry on the San
Francisco peninsula, has reached steady
production, according to word received
this week from Charles Hoehn, Jr., firm
president. The first casting was shipped
October 22.

Work was begun on the company's
new building at East Grand Avenue,
South San Francisco, last June. The
main building covers 15,000 square feet
with separate office and storage build-
ing adjacent.

Modern foundry equipment has been
installed to provide strict quality control
of the product which includes carbon
and alloy steel castings.

Present employment is 25 and will in-
crease as additional work is undertaken,
Hoehn said.



In response to a request for views by
Gerald J. O'Gara, chairman of the State
Interim Committee on Redevelopment
and Housing, G. L. Fox, Chamber gen-
eral manager, cited two basic issues in-
volved in the housing situation:
TWO ISSUES

1. Actual housing requirements by-
types and numbers of dwelling units.

2. The long-range community develop-
ment and slum clearance program.

Following is the partial text of the
Fox letter:

"Each issue presents entirely different
problems and care should be exercised to
keep them separate.

"The solution to the first issue is
closely related to possession of authentic



Online LibraryGreensboro CollegeBay region business v.5 (1948) (Volume v.5 (1948)) → online text (page 46 of 47)