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The Echo (Volume 1932) online

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alumnae association in touch with one another. Today we find it
a well established literary unit and outlet for the talents of the
literary inclined and as source of enjoyment for each G. C. student.



Page Eighty




The Message Staff



Mary Veal

Isabel Creech

Louise Efird

Frances Martin

Leta Gold Johnson

Elizabeth Jessup)

Katrine Smith (

Minnie Weaver (

Alma Vester )

Esther O'Brient /

Mary Elizabeth MorecockJ

Edna Garret }

Elizabeth Winn \

Eva Mae Lassiter /

Janie Taylor \



I ditor-in-Chief

Assistant Editor

Associate Editor

Art Editor

Exchange Editor

Literary Editors

Poetry Editors

Typists

Humor Editors



BUSINESS STAFF



Mary Towe
Cornelia Geer
Kathleen Craven
Mary Howard Clark
Lore Royall
Dr. Miller. Miss Ginn.



Miss Pegram



Business Manager

Assistant Business Manager

Associate Manager

Circulation Manager

Assistant Circulation Manager

Faculty Advisors



Page Etuhty-onc




Carol ink Rhodes
Editor



Laura Maie Smart
Business Manager



The Collegian

The Collegian is comparatively a new publication on our
campus, being published for the first time in 1926. Up until that
time The Message had done the work both of a literary magazine
and a newspaper. Since 1926. however. The Collegian has made
for itself a place in G. C. lives that could be filled by no other organ.
It serves to keep students and alumnae in touch with school news
and as an outlet for those students desiring journalistic training
and experience.



Page Eighty-two




The Collegian Staff

EDITORIAL STAFF

Caroline Rhodes Editor

[SABEL CREECH Managing Editor

Leta Gold Johnson Assistant Editor

MARION ERWIN Associate Editor

Elsie Ader Society Editor

Mary Brock Alumnae Editor

Mary Towe Joke Editor

Mary Haas Scarborough Joke Editor

Miss Mary L. Ginn Faculty Adviser

Eva Mae Lassiter Typist

BUSINESS STAFF

LAURA Mae SMART Business Manager

Mary FRANCES Bost Assistant Business Manager

KATRINE SMITH Assistant Business Manager

Florence Denning Circulation Manager

Imogene BOYLES Assistant Circulation Manager

LOUISE TAYLOR Exchange Manager

FLORENCE Davis Assistant Exchange Manager

REPORTERS' CLUB

Mary Nelson Hoyle Vera Falls Mary Farmi r

Ruth Clark Alma Vester Mary H. Scarborough

Cabell Campen Eva Mae Lassiter Elizabeth Winn

Louise Efird Madeline Winn Lovera Richie

Page [iiyhty-threc



.1




r~ 1 1









Top Row— Smathers, Scarborough, Manning, Smith, Robertson, Taylor, Gwyk, Boyles, Erwin, Hi
n, ■,,„„/ Row Lassiter, Sills, Foreman, Bruton, Edward Molitore, Molitore, Womble, Clapp, Stai
Front Row Barrow, Johnson, Worrell, M. Royall, Wilson, L,. Royall, Pender.



Edward Molitore
Audrey Bruton



Glee Club



Director
Accompanist



FIRST SOPRANO:

Alice Barrow
Dorothy Franklin
Camilia Foreman
Jacque Gwyn
Leta Gold Johnson
Phyllis Clapp
Gladys Stroud
Linda Womble
Francina Worrell
Margaret Staton



SECOND SOPRANO:

Ruth Maynard
Helen Manning
Margaret Neece
Lorraine Sills
Katie Sue Taylor
Mary Belle Wilson
Mary Haas Scarborough



ALTO:

Isabel Boyles
Marion Erwin
Cody Hipps
Ruth Pender
Grace Robertson
Mildred Royal
Lore Royal
Mary Veal




Dramatic Club



Cabell Campen
Anna Belle Hicks.
Virginia Peyatt



OFFICERS

President
Vice-President
Business Manager
IMOGENE BOYLES Assistant Business Manager

ROWENA BUNN Publicity Manager

MARY LITTLE FLETCHER Assistant Publicity Manager

Ruth Davis Secretary

Mary Fowler Wardrobe Mistress

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . Assistant Wardrobe Mistress

Dramatics have taken a long step forward since the good old days at
G. F. C. when acting was considered quite outside the pale of decency: the
days when "The Merchant of Venice" was presented ( with much unfavorable
comment) in Shakespearean costumes from the waist up only, in order that
the long skirts of the day might furnish the necessary decency.



Page Eighty-Kv




Page I ighty six




Athletic Association

OFFICERS

Ann HlNKLE President

LOUISE Tate Vice-President

SUSAN EXUM Secretary

Margaret Williams Treasurer

Mary Little Fleti her Custodian

Cornelia Geer Cheer Leader

Athletics at G. C. have taken a king step forward since the days when
undergraduates indulged in the strenuous sport, croquet, hampered in their
progress by too numerous petticoats and too long skirts.

Today, under the guiding hand of Miss Noma Dobson. each student is
a member of the Athletic Association and takes part whole-heartedly (know-
ing full well the advantages to her mentally, morally, and physically) in such
sports as tennis, basketball, soccer, track, horseback riding, and folk dancing.



Pagi 1 ighty-nine




Basket Ball

Three cheers for the Sophs and their championship
basket ball team! The invigorating freshness of the early
morning November air seemed to spur them on Field Day.
and as the score rolled up slowly but surely in their favor,
the opposing team of plucky Freshmen, turned necessarily
to the defensive. When the timer blew the whistle and a
hard-fought game ended 15 to 5. the Freshmen slapped
their victors on the backs and said with a grin, "good go-
ing! But just wait until spring field day."







Soccer

Encouraged by their basket ball victory, the Sophs
took their places opposite the rival Juniors. Far down the
field loomed the white goal post, and as the whistle blew,
every girl became alert and concentrated her efforts in that
direction. It was a hard game, and both teams fought hard
to carry their team to victory.

No score! The game must end a scoreless tie! A Sopho-
more sends it through the goal post! Deafening cheers!
Breathless moments! The shrill sound of the timer's
whistle, and the Sophs are champions!



Page Ninety-one




Bailfy Webb. Emily Cole
First Place Winners. Doubles




Tennis



Tennis, the ever popular sport:
as popular in the days of our
grandmothers as it is today. In-
terest is never as keen as it is on
Field Day. And on this fall Field
Day, particularly, competition ran
high. Both games were hotly con-
tested, but at last the Sophomores
came through victorious in singles.
while the rival Junior class won
the doubles.



Eva M \i i \sm 1 1 b

First Place Winner, Singles



Page Ninety two




(i. C. Sports



Seemingly going back to the days of her grand-
mother, many a G. C. girl has become this fall and
spring an ardent devotee of that ancient and honor-
able game, croquet. And again at that time of year
the thoughts of many a girl turn from motor cars to
that old but ever new sport, horseback riding. Per-
haps she is reminded of that day long ago when great
grandfather hitched old Dobbin to the buggy, tied
the trunk on behind and therewith deposited grand-
mother at the door of G. F. C.

Even though, however, we do turn back, we can-
not forget our favorite sports, born of a more modern
day: soccer, basket ball, track, tennis, swimming, etc.



Pugc Nmely-thc




Eva Mae Lassiter. '34

"Miss G. C."

Each Field Day the title "Miss G. C." is given to
that student winning the greatest number of points.
This fall, Eva Mae Lassiter, with forty points to her
credit, replaced Margaret Williams, who won the title
last spring. Eva Mac proved her versatility when her
points were found to have been made in five different
sports: tennis, basket ball, soccer, baseball, and javelin
throw.

By winning the highest number of points in her
class. Margaret Williams became '"Miss '33": Eva Mae
Lassiter. "Miss '34": and Freda and Elizabeth Strong,
Elizabeth Benbow and Mary Ellen Millard tied for
"Miss '35."



I'agc Nini'ty-four




at y a




uiperlatfo.ves




"Best -All '"Round
£Miss • llmu ■( esiei




SMost Striking
iMiss Imogene '•Boyle




Most -Popular
M,,- ■ (nn Hinkle




IMost efficient
miss Ssther O'Brient




SMosl ^Athletic

iMiss cMai gacel Williams




ZMost 'Personality
oWiss -Rmh 'Davis




cMosl Clever
Miss ( aroline %hodei




rtlost Charming
SWiss Cahvll Qampen




May Day, 1931

As the setting sun cast its golden shadows over the west
campus, warning notes from the bugles of two heralds brought a
hush over the waiting throng. Expectant eyes turned toward the
green hill slope where the maid of honor. Miss Evangeline Taylor,
gowned in orchid net over satin and carrying an arm bouquet of
varicolored spring flowers, was taking her place. 'Then by two's.
the ladies of the Court arranged themselves on either side of the
ivy twined throne until the green hill slope was transformed into
a garden of spring flowers. Misses Edith Floyd and Susan McLean,
gowned in blue, made a lovely pair: Misses Cabell Campen and
Helen Manning wore green, Misses Miriam Watkins and Lucille
Bivens. yellow, and Misses Grace Crocker and Christine Wilson.
pink.

Presenting a figure of queenly beauty, in white bridal satin,
with a train of white net. Miss Rachel Creech advanced and was
crowned Queen of the May by the maid of honor. She ruled over
the occasion with an air of regal graciousness.



Pa ii ' im Hundred .V




Mav Day Program



Playing Ball" — Lock Juniors

Court Jester" Tommy Louise Mitchell

Spring" — English Folk Dance

Hazel and Christine Smathers

At Dawning" ( Arr. by Miss Tate) LOUISE TATE

Hobo Dance" SOPHOMORES

To A Wild Rose" — Macdowell JUNIORS

Combat" (Warrior's Song I — Heller

Laura Smart and Mary Nelson Hoyle

Field Day Awards Ann HlNKLE

"Beautiful Blue Danube" — Strauss - - JANICE LANE

"Ballet" — Tschaikowsky

E. Ader, L. Mitchell, R. Clark, L. Ritchie, M. Elmore

May Pole - - - Freshmen



Page One Hundred Se



The Good Old Days At G. F. C.

I Extracts From College Catalogues )

"Parents having daughters fitting for college, will do well to
see that they are thoroughly trained upon spelling, reading, writ-
ing, geography, and arithmetic. Time spent upon the more ad-
vanced studies is frequently almost lost."

"Each pupil is supposed to be present at every recitation . . ..
once a week each one makes a report of her own delinquencies in
the presence of all the faculty and pupils assembled."

"The young ladies boarding in the college are permitted to
receive visits from no one but their nearest relatives . . ."

"Parents are requested not to send their daughters boxes and
food."

"Parents deposit in the hands of the president of the Gollcgc
as much money as they choose to have their daughters spend. Pur-
chases will be made by the teachers, and the direction of parents will
be strictly followed."

"Religious services will be had in the college chapel three times
every Sabbath day. so that there will be no occasion to visit the
town of Greensborough for public worship."

"No jewelry is allowed to be worn at any time . . ."

"The correspondence of the young ladies will be under the
direct supervision of the President. He allows no correspondence
with young gentlemen, except by permission of parents or
guardian."



I'agu Onv Hundred Eight




Page One Hundred Ni



Commencement Program, 1932



Friday, May 11
8:15 P. M. — Annual Concert

Saturday. May 28

3:00 P. M. — Annual Business Meeting of the Alumnae
Association

5:00 P. M. — Class Day Exercises

6:00 P. M. — Alumnae-Student Dinner

8:30 P. M. — Annual Guest Performance, by the Greens-
boro College Players

Sunday. May 29

[1:00 A.M. — Baccalaureate Sermon — Bishop Edwin D.
Mouzon. D.D.. Charlotte. N. C.

8:00 P. \I. — Anniversary Young Women's Christian
Association — Bishop Edwin D. Mouzon

Monday. May 30

[0:30 A.M. — Opening Exercises

Annual Address — Rev. Gilbert T. Rowe.
D.D.. Durham. N. C.

Graduating Exercises



■ ed Ten




Jokes am
Acts



I i

! !

GREENSBORO COLLEGE !



A Standard College For Women. Member of Association



Women in the State — Chartered 1838.

Confers the Degrees of Bachelor of

Arts and Bachelor of Music.







of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern I

States. The Oldest Chartered College For



In addition to the regular classical course, special atten- I
tion is called to the departments of Home Economics. Arts,
including Industrial and Commercial Art. Spoken English j
and Dramatic Art. Education, Sunday School Teacher (
Training. Piano Pedagogy, and to the complete School of
Music.



For further information, apply to

SAMUEL B. TURRENTINE, President

Greensboro, North Carolina



/',/,,■,■ One Hundred Twelve




n the foreground - Ft. Dearborn re-erected

in Grant Park on Chicago's lake front.
Illustration by Jahn 6- Oilier Art Studios.



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THE ECHO, 1932



Page One Hundred Fifteen




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Page One Hundred



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Page One Hundred Eighteen



Jokes



Mr. WATSON: "Why didn't you answer my question?"

MARIE: "I did. I shook my head."

Mr. WATSON: "Well, you don't expect me to hear it rattle from here,
do you?"



MISS RlCKETTS: "Well. Grace, and how do you like school?'
GRACE: "When it's closed."



Miss GlNN: "Give me a sentence using the word, 'miniature'
ESTHER PATE: "The miniature asleep you begin to snore."



VOICE OVER PHONE: "Mary says she isn't in. Is there any message.
OTHER END OF LINE: "Yes. tell her that 1 didn't call her."



THE CLASSES THAT
WE CUT



The classes we attended

Will never matter much I

Of knowledge that we gathered !

There's scarcely left a touch.

But oh. the leafy foot-paths.

Today we still can shut

Our eyes, and happy, dream
about

The classes that we cut!
— Mary Carolyn Davies.



i !
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One Hundred Nineteen



Jokes



LAURA: "I wonder if I shall ever live to be a hundred."
LETA GOLD: "Not if you remain twenty-two mueh longer.



MARY VEAL: "I suppose your home town is one of those where every-
one goes to meet the train."
BOST: "What train'"



WIFE: "Do you realize, dear, that it was twenty-five years ago that we
beeame engaged'"

ABSENT-MINDED PROEESSOR: "Twenty-five years! Bless my soul! You
should have reminded me before. It's certainly time we got married."



LIB.: "I have a terrible rumbling on my stomach. It's like a .wagon
going over a bridge."

Miss TURNER: "It's most likely that truck you ate this morning for
breakfast."



A certain member of the senior class was applying for a job in the big
city when she was put to the test by her prospective employer.

"Well. Miss, what would you do with a million dollars'" he asked.
"Oh glory! I don't know — I wasn't expecting that much at the start."



LITTLE JOHNNY: "Yah, I saw you kiss my sister."
Boy FRIEND (hurriedly): "Ah cr here's a quarter."

LITTLE JOHNNY: "And here's ten cents change. One price to all: that's
the way I do business."

Page < )ne Hundred I iventy



AUTOGRAPHS




FINIS





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Online LibraryGreensboro CollegeThe Echo (Volume 1932) → online text (page 3 of 3)