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G. C DAUGHTERS



First rm..: Carolyn Nelson, Boo Hunt, Marcile Johnson,
Martha Gardner, Nancy Thrasher, Lucy Bahnson, Mar-
j;aret McLeod, Rebecca Chambers.

SeconA tow: Jacque Yelverton, Ann Thompson. Elizabeth
Little, Nina Burris, Penny Niven, Eleanor Niven, Betty
Eckstein, Amoret Rogers, Rebecca Cheek, Sally Staples,
Laura Pcarce.




Special recofJiiitioii is t;i\en i.. ,iO\ t .. I,. _,n
whose mother or grandmother attended CJ. C. oi
Da\en|xirt College. These girls are elioible to Ix
members of the G. C'. Daughters' C'lub. This club



past tradition, yet looks forward to the future with
projects and work for the betterment of the college.



the importance of tradition.



P«ge Furty-ouc



IRVING SOCIETY



The Ir\ing Society . . . colors ol purple and
ou\d . . . svnibolic (it the pritlc ot an lr\inu . . .
always \iyacious and challenging . . . co-sponsor
of the Valentine Dance ... at last a winner in
the Emerson-Ir\'ini' hallhall "ame . . .



Ann Thomas, preside




The literary societies




Left to right: Thelma Williams Shirley
Woodley. Ann Thomas. Patsy Long, Lou
Richer. Carolvn Reid.



Sculvd: Kan Arthur, ( .luk.c Wilscn.
Slamliny.: Betty Edm.imlsim. LMuif F.iili
Al.lr^ l,.,u Meacham, Tcrrv Shull.





EMERSON SOCIETY

The Emerson Society • • . oreen and i^old colors
. . . representative of the warm and friendly spirit
of an Emerson . . . linalK' a winner on Decision
Night . . . co-sponsor (il the Valentine Dance
. . . great sports antl wonilerfiil talent . . .



Linda MiCJintv, ,,rcsk1c„t



vied for our support.



OFFICERS

Left lo right: Libby Ramsey, Alma Dean
Stack, Priscilla Crater, Linda McGinty, Nancy
Hcarn, Cyrctte Hiiliday. Betty Thompsiin,
Pat C. Lawson.





^l, ^1



MARSHALS
Seated: Mary McrrilL Laura Pearce.
Standing: Frankie McGehee, Carol Je
Eudy, Rachel Jessup, Eleanor Dover.




We became more indoctrinated with the
character of our roles as practice brought us
into an intimate association with the script.
We established our identity as seporote
individuals; we were no longer "one of the
new casL" Each port was a stereotype for
the individual who claimed it, but varied
personalities inevitably augmented the lines
of the script

In our practice, we were neither consistently
corrected nor repeatedly praised. An occasional
reprimanding became the guideline for
perfection, and an interspersed word of praise
pleased us when perfect practice eomed



She Brewer
I'lcsiilciil of tlie Sophomure Cla



PRACTICE FOR

THEN WE BECAME INDOCTRINATED



Sophomore Class Officers: Sara .Masliluiin. ( ouiicil Representative; Amorct
Rogers. Secretnrr: Sandra Wade. \'iee-l'icsideut. \o( i^icliired: Eleanor Do\er,
Trciistirer.




merits. We were shapinq our roles with the

guidance of authority, the experience oi

predecessors, and the freshness of individuality.

We learned the emotions of the G. C.

stage as temperaments clashed and paralleled

and blended. We experienced the trials of

production when we learned to identify with

our producers, and we knew the qualms of

behind-the-scene battles with self and

sister. We began to see through the grease

paint and cold cream ond to recognize love

and fear and hate and indifference in our

fellow players. It was a magnificent

production that we were buildingl




PRODUCTION

WITH THE CHARACTERISTICS OF OUR PARTS



Banam:




SOPHOMORES .




Bkenda Alvis

Greensboro
Martha |ean Aiviium

Kinston
Martha Hope Basnight

.\hoskie
luLiA Becknell

Concord
Martha Best

tliiklshoro



Betty Jane Bonev

1 arboro
Florence Box

Elizabeth City
Sarah Lh Bradley

Lenoir
Ann Brannan

Charlotte
Carolyn Brett

/\h,)skie



I'w Brisson

St. Pauls
1 1 an Brower

Wadesboro
Linda Brown

Lineolnton
,\nne .Carr Bry.j

Roseboro
Linda Burcin

Marion



Ruth Burrv

Orange Lake, Fla

l\NV ByNIIM

Kinston

\ LLMA CarIER

Martinsville, V'a.
1'arbara Chavis

Charlotte
111 iiEccA Cheek

C.oldsuin



\'era /\nn Cooper

Lexinglon
She Dhda

lountain
|an Easier

1 rinity
Beity Edmondson

Larl'x)ro
LvNNE Eubank

Raleigh



Piige Forty-six



.19 6 2



Carol Jean Eudv
Gastonia

|aNE FlNCllER

Dcrita
Mary Ann Fortner

High Point
Gloria Garber

Arlington, Va.
Patsy Hall

Lauiinburg



I lopE Harrison

Fayetteville
Brenda FIay

Burlington
Nancy Hearne

Biscoe
Betty Jane I Iepler

I lopewell, Va.
Ann \ loLBRooKs

Concord



DwiGHT Holden

Greensboro
Pat Holland

Feaksville
|anice Holt

Burlington
|oAN 1 lOLT

Burlington
Miriam House

Mamers



Anita Howard

Greensboro
Martha Huckabee

Albemarle
Anndora Incle

N. WilkesKiro
Carolyn Ivey

Rowland
Rachel Jessup

Greensboro




Marcile Johnson

Henderson
Barbara Jordan

t;recnville. S. C.
Gail Kendrick

Monroe
Peccy Kern

Star
liiDY Lea

Greensboro





fs




Page Forty-seven



SOPHOMORES






v..



I Ielen Lewis

Red Springs
Elizabeth Little

Charlotte
Sue Masenc;ill

Fayette\ille
Sara Mashburn

Madison

1 RANKIE McGehEE

W'inston-Salem





f^ -^





Susan MlKlllar

Unulaiul
\I\RY Lou Meacham

I luntcrsville
Mary Merrill

Arlington, \'a.
Ellzabe'ih .Miller

C'.rccnsboro

I'LC.t.V McK K

Kinston






Sondra iM(K>ney

Chadbourn
\an Moriarty

I Limlct

IllDY MuLLIS

Belmont
I'li;gy Neill

Clreensboro
Mary |ane Payne

1 rinitv




Laura Pearce
C'.rccnsboro

Miriam Pearson
Fayetteville

C'oRiNE Phillips

I \NL r I'uii 1 n's
Ciicensboro

Carol Price
Lcaks\'ille



Vntla Reichard
Lincoln ton

\\II>RET RoCERS

I air llhifl

I' \ M U, Rol 1 INS

Durham
r.i n Y liosi

( harlotte
l'\ui A Sain

Crccnsboro



I'aiic Forty eiilhl



19 6 2



Gaynelle Scotton

Siler City
Terry Shutt

Mocksville
Teresa Sigmon
Denver

Nancy Stennett
Charlotte



Rebecca Taylor

Ellenboro
Doris Teague

Liberty
Ruth Thomas

VVinston-Salem
Ianice Thompson

Greensboro



SoNDRA Thompson

Waxhaw
Susan Todd

Graham
Linda Torrence

Greensboro
Carolyn Vaughn

H ickorv



Martha Wade

Kinston
Sandra Wade

New Bern
Janet Wescott

Manteo
Gaye Whitaker

Fayetteville




Fred Wilkie

Biuemont, Va.
Anne Wilson

Roseboro
Elizabeth Ann Wilson

Greensboro
Larry Wilson

llic.h Point




Pfl^e Forty-nine



A year of practice




Left to right: Gary M
Faye Harris (Presides



ATHLETIC
COMMISSION

Acting as a coordinating body, the
Athletic Commission attempts to regu-
late the poHcies and functions of athletic
(jrganizations on campus. Rotating about
this nucleus are the \\'omen's Recreation
Association and the Men's Athletic
Association.

At Christmas the Athletic Commis-
sion co-sponsors, with the Day Students'
.Association, the Christmas Dance. In ad-
dition to this annual function the Ath-
letic Commission is always alert for new
ideas to stimulate and increase recrea-
tional interest on campus.



WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION



Each woman student, as a member of the Women's
Recreation Association, is given the opportunity to par-
ticipate in various ac.i\ities. This organization sponsors
hallball, ping pong, archery, basketball, softball, volley-
ball, and tennis tournaments between the classes. Also



under the sjxinsorship of the W. R. A. are the Modern
Dance Club, the I lorseback Riding Club, and the Bridge
Club, as well as the annual basketball, hallball and
Softball games between the societies. The \V. R. A. is
sponsored b\' the .Athletic Commission.




Page Vifty



GIRLS' ATHLETICS




A lull n-M-h j:



.|h^^lH,ll .




Il.illhull-,



pupular sport



broadened our interests;



One of the newest and most popular sports is hallball.
This sport, played during the fall season, is a modified
football game, although there is no tackling or running
with the ball. A tournament is lukl lulwcen the classes
with spirit running high.

Volleyball, which is now a spring activity on the Ci. C
campus, brings shouts of enthusiasin b\ .ill. I his sport



was found to be playable even with the rain and mud.
^hlnv new talents ha\e been discovered in this field.

1 he annual Enierson-lr\ing basketball game is one of
the highlights of the season. Although the Emersons have
been continuously the \'ictors, the Irvings have given
them ,1 good game down to the last second. Cheerleaders
fnim both societies add that e.\tra spark.



Ihc I iiicrsoiilniiii! Basketball Cauic: An Iniii'j, shot hli)ckcd



•^ %



we learned a greater appreciation





n|




PI


wS^


j^


jT^^^^^r^'^^


^


i 1


1




1



MEN'S ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION



This year the M. A. A. has become an ussoeiatiuii
in fact, not just in name. It replaces the Men's
Basketball team. A program of individual and dual
sports, as well as team sports, has been organized
for the men. Its program is based U[wn the idea
that the primary importance of a college athletic
program should not be intercollegiate activities, but
r.ither the development of a keen interest in dif-
ferent pliases of athletics that can be enjoyed many
ye.irs after the students lea\e Greensboro College
campus.



luchucd: jnl,„ t;..rh.M.,. VVcdsiii



Tlic lluruuihiy Uniucis uud ihe Cahau- d




^1^ \^





of athletic endeavors



TENNIS



LcMi'is Wicker. Ray Ledford, Harold
Garris, and Cletes Pope eniiage iu <;
vigormis game of douhles.




What a rebound!




BASKETBALL



The mail tliat s.oi away






B


^^H^#^


lA^^ W^^^^l


^^^^^^^^ \^


^^\ % ~^^^^l


^^H ^ id


ft^^^v ^^^^^^^^^1


^^^^H ^ J^


■ ^^1





Vi




■mJ^s^



MUSIC

EDUCATION

CLUB

I lie Music tcluc\itinn Club is a
member of the Music Education Na-
tional Conference.

Membership in the club is limited
to those students planning to teach
music. The club enables the members
In yain new ideas as well as practice
in their major field. Manv of their
programs present people of local im-
portance in the field of music. The
yroup participates with other similar
organizations in giving musical pro-
grams during the year.



;„.( run. Helen Yarbur.,. M.L\inu ll..r^v,.„a. la^ic Miller, |,.>u
St'coiiii row. Betsy Walker, iNancy Mapp, Pat C Lawson, Alma 1
Johnson, Nancy Hearn. Sealed on desk: Mr. Garreth M. McDonald.



Sandra He
II Stack. 1



GLEE CLUB



and the more ciiltiiral aspects



First row: Myra Stowe, Betsy Walker, Rita Ann Untz. Sue
Brewer, Sarah Lu Bradley. Alma Dean Stack, Mr. Williams.
Second row: Barbara D. RoRers, Pat Troxler, Judy Odell, Grace
West, Marian Ashe, Bibba Whisenant, Hilda Casle. Third row:
Judv Crissman, Nancy Mapp, Lura Smith. Elizabeth Miller.
Ilulda Ferguson, Pat Lawson. Lucv Bahnson. fourlh row: Miriam
House, Ma.xine Harwood, Joyce Gift (Pres.). Margaret McLeod.
lanice Polster, Nancv Hearn. FiftI' row: Linda Bursin, lulia
Becknell. Brenda Womble, Ruth Thompson, Pat Goodwni.
Martha Barham. Sixth row: Janet W'cscott, Car.il V\'hite, Letitia
McGoogan, Dot Calvert. Bell> Lhompson. |ack'e Miller. Carol
Meyers.



Interest in music is llie major requirement for mem-
bership in tlic Cllee Club. This organization offers the
oppirtunity lor choral music training, fellowship, and
travel. The Cilee C'lub participates in two concert tours
during the year, one in the fall to southern states and one
in the spring to northern states. In addition to perform-
ances elsewhere, the Cilee Club gives two annual con-
certs on campus. Major works included in this year's per-
lormances were Naoiiii and Ruth by Mario Castelnuovo-
Icdcsco and the Maonificat by Carl Parrish.





CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

ComluclinR: Mr. Don Hansen. Imide iemi-circle: Mrs. Hansen.
Mrs. Mary Ann Speiqht, Marjorie Locke, Elliot Weisgarber, Paul
Frick, T. Spencer Meyer. Outside semicircle: Clifton Stedman.
Anne Star Minton, Eugene Shaw, Sandra Bennett, Gail Lam-
bert, Paula Sain, Eleanor Smith, Mary Ann Batson, Bobbv Atkins,
Annette Love, Frank Starbuck, Nancy Hearn, Betsy Walker.
Back row: Becky Hailev, Dwight Holden, Tina Orman, Mr.
Robert Wold, Pat Lavvson, Ann Miller, Carl Alexius.



of music,

MUSIC CLUB



I he Music Club is composed of music majors and
minors with a high academic standing, TTirough student

Virst row: Jackie Miller, Nancy Mapp, Pat
Paula Sain. Secoyid row: Sandra Bennett, [o>
G. Yarboro, Bibba Whisenant. Third row:
Betn- Hepler, Pat Goodwin, Carolvn Vaughn
Foicrdl row: Jim M.irtin. Ai a Grjncll. Bett^



The Chamber Orchestra presents two chapel programs
and two e\ening concerts each year. Anyone is eligible
to become a member. It is composed of students, faculty
members, and a few townspeople. Mr, Don Hansen con-
ducts the orchestra which meets cverv Tuesday and
Thursday.



reports, guest artists and speakers, and conventions, the
club promotes a greater appreciation of the art of music.
The Music Club is a member of the North Carolina
Federation of Music Clubs,



C. Lawson, Alma Dean Stack, Dot Von Cannon,
•ce Gift, Donna Johnson, Maxine Harwood, Helen
Elizabeth Miller, Charlotte Mi.xon, Carol Meyers,
, Rebecca Tavlor, Florence Edw.irds, I ind.i Iniruin.
Thomnson, Carol White.




WRITERS" CLUB

Oftentimes a student \\lici li^is clone some writ
ing is just a little apprehensive about a sound
ing board for his material. The Writers' Club
offers a sympathetic ear and many wise criti-
cisms to the students interested in the \arious
forms of writing. Members of this organization
do not hax'e to be v\'riters; the only requisite is
that thc\ be interested in stimulating discussions
on [xietry and the many lorms ot prose.




Left to rrjii^ .\iii, iJislur. lJ.iMd U.ivis, Pennv Nil
Ed Peunf.iy, Pat Brounins..



literature and art.



ART CLUB



The Art Club is composed of (he artists, the
dabblers in oils, and the Siind.ix alternouii painters
on this campus. Miss C'ullis Icatls the group on their



iourney from Michelangelo to Sahador Dali and
then on to the expression of their thoughts and
ideas with the use of jiaints. clay, and cnergv.




;>,.«<• nUysix




HUT BOARD



i Uv I kit Biiaicis aim is to provide G. C. stii
dents uith a place where they may enjoy social
activities on campus. The committee is composed
of six members and a chairman who work to
make the Hut the center of recreation and
pleasure through providing T.V., records, ping
pong, dancing and cooking facilities for all
students. Student hostesses help to provide an
atmosphere of welcome to students and their
dates on the weekends.



Ir„„t i« h.iLk: l.st.i Anil Buchanan, chciirmaiii evrctto l|..liid,n
Paula Lee Overton; Betty Lou Hardin; Marti Wade; Betty EUini
Ion, (rertsiirer.



]Ve experienced co-operation
and the distinction of recognition.



JUNIOR HONOR SOCIETY



Membership in the Junior 1 lonor Sciciet) is open to
^-'lected freshmen ;Lnd sophomores. Eligible students
Tust have at least an ,i\erage of ninetx in their scholastic



wcirk and must be approved as members by the faculty.
I his society «as organized in 1938. Each spring students
h.iving the i|ualific.itions are invited to become members.




Sc<ltf,J o.l floor; liettv Hcpkr. |anc W .ikton, .\l.irv t'.itlurnn- Nick. Stvr.,,./ rmr: .\nn B.irnette. Rebecca T.lvN.r. Bcikv (. h.imbers, Caro-
lyn Vaughn, Sara iMashburn. Jackie Bridges, Pauline Satterfield, Ann Cooper, Or. Madeline Stinson. Thni nnv: Jack Wall, Lynn
Niven, Lula Thome, Elaine Bell, Martha Frye, Anne Bailey, Doris Teaguc, Lynne Eubank, Cookie Wilson, Sarah Lu Bradley, Janice
Thompson.

Pa^e Fifty-seven




Integrity inspired us to work. We could no
longer consider ourselves disinterested
poorticipants in an irrelevant drama. We had
become an intimate part of that with which we
worked. Oiten our personalities became so
deluged with purpose that we could accept
a momentary loss oi identity to further a group
ideaL Then there were the solo lines when we
stood out from the group to speak from our
experience, and the gratifying realization of
recognition brought us into the spotlight
briefly. The hope of perfection became the
unconscious motivation, for we realized that
with a short span of time we would be plunged
into performing what we had so diligently
practiced, and producers cues would have
become a memory and no longer a guide.




DRESS



INTEGRITY INSPIRED



Bntldiiis. Goren




We began to reach beyond ourselves, as

>e realized that our performance was not so

much for oxa seli-gratiiication as for others'

benefit. The laurels of perfection became

subordinate to the pleasure of those outside

the cast. The staff of critics would inevitably

move from producer to public.

We had had ample time to familiarize

ourselves with various phases of the role we

played. We knew our contemporaries by

character instead of by name, and our interests

began to stabilize as we identified with

personality and purpose. The ideals which we

had established were to be the basis for

success in our final performance.




Ruth Baker I Hint
President of tlie junior C/iiss



REHEARSAL

us TO WORK.



Junior Class Officers: Carolyn Nelsim, Treasurer; Carolyn Holt, Secretary; Nancy
Hcarn, V''icc-Preri(fc»f. Not Pictured: Betsy Gibson, Council Representative.




J u



N



I O R S



Lucille Allhed

Burgaw
Lynn Almond

Albemarle
Louise Anderson

Cleveland, Ohio
Ann Arter

Shaker I kiyhtx Oh



Marian Ashe

Durham
Saundra Ball

New Bern
Martha Barham

Franklin, Va.

Nancy Beck
Thomasvillc



Ann Bisher

Denton
EvEL^Tsi Brown

Elizabeth City
Pat Browning

Black Mountain

Ed Bryant
Richmond, Va.



Linda Brymer

Fieldale, Va,
EsTA Ann Buchanan

Asheville
Nancy Blickner

Belmont

I liLDA Cagle
t'arthage



Donor iiv C'ai.veri

Hichmonil, Va.
Elizabeiii C'arringion

San ford
Betsy Carroll

Aslicboro

Elaine Cooke
Belmont














I*«^e Sixty



9 6





tfid^A






m%wfk^>^




Becky Correli.

Mcbane
Margaret Cotton

Richlands
Priscilla Crater

Winston-Salem
IjEttv Ellington

l!)urhaiTi



|oHN Flincham
Greensboro

Valjean Fox
Cary

She liTSSELL
Rose Hill



P/ETSV Gibson
Ft. MePhers.



Ga.



Nancy Gilbert

Norfolk, Va.
Acnes Hamilton

Bre\ard
Frances Hammett

Greensboro
Pji; I 1 Y I, OH I Iaroin

I .lirinont



Carolyn Harris
Fountain

Nancy 1 Iearn

Kinston
I iiLDA Hemric

jonesx ille

r> AltliARA I llCKMAN

1 rov



Elsie I Iill

West End
Sarah Kay 1 Iinson

Salisbury

C YRLM t I loi I IDAY

1 hi>mas\'ille
Linda Blackard Holt
Greensboro



Pflge Sixty-one



JUNIORS



Carolyn 1 Iolt

Liberty
Ruth Baker Hunt

Pleasant Garden
Sallie Huss

Greensboro

Marv Lou Hutton
Ciivcnshdro



Frances Pvron Jomnson

Greensboro
Pecov Kirkman

Randleman
Gail Lambert

Richmond, Va.

Nancv Lambeth
Greensboro



Pat Claybrook Lavvson

Stoneville
Gail Lineback

Winston Salem
Mary Jane Manchester

Lenoir
Nancy Mapp

Warwick. \'a.



Linda McGinty

Belmont
Carolyn Nelson

New Bern

Penny Niven

Waxhavv
I Iarriet Norton

Seima



Pai Ogburn

C.reenslxiro
Sadako Okano

Chij^asaki. Japan
Beitie Anne Owen

Roxljoro
Cletes Pope

I liomasv illc
CiRA( a- Pol 1 1 II

VV. llailloid. Conn









Page Sixty-two



9 6







aii^






^^i^A




^1




g^^^^




Jii^iSi



Marian Surrat Powell
Oxford

LiBBY Ramsey
fligh Point

Lou Ellen Richey

Greensboro
jo Anne Rumbley

Greensboro



Iackie Scoggin

Greensboro
I'aiti Shehan

Spindale
I'jKTTY Jane Smithwick

New Bern
Ai ^^\ Dean Stack

Lcaksx ille



Amn Thomas
VV'inston-Salem

Anne Lane Thompson
Stantonsburg

SimiLEY Thompson
Rcidsville

Ijeisy Walker
Durham



She Wallace

1 roy
Barbara Joan Ward

tiainesville, Ga.

M\ry Powell Ward

Raleigh
Elizabeth West

Warsaw

!■! obence Whiteiuirst
Pmisniouth, Va.



Mary Williams

Raleigh
Dorothy Wilson

.Asheville
C'arolee Wood

Slier City
Lowell Young

Glade Hill, Va.
Donna Zacks

New Bern



Page Sixty-three



W^e began to




Vnmt U, hack: Ed Crvant. Cjn.li-i- W,„:d, lliitli Burrv. l\nnv Nnx-n, Luwi-ll L„t



STATE STUDENT
LEGISLATURE

I lie State Student Legislature, which
is enmposed of interested students from
\orth Carolina colleges, meets at the
Capitol in Raleigh once a year. Each of-
licial delegation draws up a bill prior to
the meeting and presents this bill to this
legislature of college students. The ses-
sions are conducted under parliamentary
procedures by elected student officials.
Bills are passed and resolutions made
which are referred to the State Legisla-
ture.

C. C. students take a great interest in
the State Student Legislature, and gain
\.du.iblc experience from their participa-
tion.



reach beyond ourselves.



NATIONAL

STUDENT
ASSOCIATION

1 lie United States National Student
.Association is an organization ol more
than one million ^American studciits.
Student go\'ernmcnts at 400 colleges and
uni\ersities are affiliated with the \S.\.
1 lu' purpose of this organization is In
dis(.(i\er and to represent accurately the
interests, problems and .ispir.itinns ol
the .\merican student. I he loi.d .\S \
Boartl. working as a subsidiary agericv
ol the Coordinating Board, sixinsois
such activities as the Friday Forums and
special programs for Brotherhood Week
and .\cadeniit Freedom Week. Ser\i]i!;
as \S.\ Cnnrdin.ilni this \e,H weir
Butli 1 li()m|)son ,uid Xoini.i Sue Davis.




S,-„/iv/. ;./i u, irjil (. .itMKn 11.1
lii-ltv |j,u- Smitlnvick. Hulli liu




I. R. C.



FirsI roir: Elaine Nordan. Nancv Beck. Esia Ann Buchanan, Beth WiMiams. Eh^abeth Carringtun, Nancy
Lambeth. Doris Stephenson. Peggv Kirkman, Carolee V\'uod, Ju Clark. Dr. Skaggs. Second row. Myra Stowe.
Louise James, Anne Merrill. Carolvn Brett. Gail Lambert. Betty Lou Hardin. Sarah Kay Hinson. Lucy
Allred. Shirley Thompson. Saundra Ball. Third row. Carolyn Holt. Ed Bryant. Barbara Hickman. Hilda G.
Hemric. Linda Brvmer. Marcile Johnson. Carolyn Nelson. Penny Niven. Betty Jane Smithwick. Nancy
Gilbert. Foiirtli roie: Jim Martin. Sue Lutz. Carol Simpson. Mary Jane Payne. Nan Moriarty, Julia Becknell.
Ann Bisher. Laura Pearce. Terrv Shutt. Lvnne Eubank. Mary Lou Meacham.



"Iiitcin.iliiin.il is ;i wind nl niim c -nnotatlons in our
mdilcrn \\nihl. B.l^ic,llly. lln' wiiril \M)uld symbolize the
interaction between two oi more nations. With the advent
of the jet age we ean no longer visualize a simple contract
between two nations, e.xelusively. We must interest our-
selves with the problems of all nations, the attitudes and
emotions of iheir respective peoples, and the effect even
the smallest country li.is upon woild .ifl.iirs.

Meannhile we attempted



Functioning ujxDn our campus is the International Re-
lations Club; this organization seeks to educate the stu-
dents about the affairs of the world as well as train them
to take their places as useful citizens. Dr. Mar\in L.
Skaggs, advisor, with the help of the officers, attempts to
present stimulating programs which will provide a deeper
understanding of all nations and their activities.




MATH CLUB



i he Math Club has as its purpose
the increment of interest in mathematics;
lor through its meetings, members learn
the practicality of the subject, hear ex-
planations of fundamental concepts, and
discover math's applications in the busi-
ness field.

Ihe Math Club is open to both majors
and minors in math and other students
interested in mathematics.



Leil: Dr. Kankin. 1-aye Harris. Wiahl. (rot
Mooney. Jane Walston. Hie Ping Ting. Ba
Lewis, Lula Thorne, Janet Brasington.



Bettv Eckstein. Sondra
Nerine Hylton. Helen



Page Si.rt)-/ii'e



to stabilize our interests



CENEZOIC
CLUB



With the sensational debut uf Spiit
nik, science has taken on a new ama of
imixirtance. Even though additional em-
phasis has been placed on science educa-
tion, the field of science still possesses
a vast undiscovered horizon.

Organized for science majors and
minors of Greensboro College, the Cene-
zoic Club attempts to give these students
an opportunity to compare their ideas
with those of fellow members and au
thorities. During the year the group
makes field trips to points of interest;
social functions include parties and in
formal "get-togethers."




Seated: Martha Hope Basnight,
Kendrick. Sianduig: Patti Sheh,



.lock. EKit
Betty Delbridge.



kv Correll, Gail



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB



Membership in the Home Economics Club of Greensboro College is open to inter-
ested students as well as to majors in the field. One of the club's main interests is
the inipro\einent ul home and family life.




Seuied: Pat Walters, Pat Fear
ins, Barbara Page, Carol Oliver.
Linda Torrence. Standing.: Be\ -


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