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at the Florida Ballet Arts School
on a Ford Foundation Grant. She
was a member of the Florida Ballet
Company and performed in such
ballets as SWAN LAKE, GISELLE,



128 BALLET




LES SYLPHIDES, COPPELIA,
LES FAVORITES, and CIN-
DERELLA. Mrs. Westbrook
has taught in Florida at the
Ballet Arts School and Mer-
cer University, Macon,
Georgia. She holds an As-
sociate Licentiate degree
from the Imperial Society
of Teachers of Dancing in
London, England.
From June 25 - July 26, Miss
Jean Spear, Artistic Director
of the Jean Spear Ballet Com-
pany of Sarasota, Florida,
will conduct her annual
school



v:'!\Kis




BALLET 129




130 BALLET



r



\



•'^M^t'*'*'






7





of classical ballet on the Greensboro
College campus. Miss Spear was born
in Montreal, Canada, and had her initial
ballet training with the National Ballet
of Canada. This noted dancer/choreo-
grapher is a Fellow and Examiner of
the "Imperial Society" in London, Eng-
land, and is sent to examine students of
ballet from coast to coast. Miss Spear
is known as a "Teacher of teachers"
and has taught throughout Canada, United
States, and England. She was the prin-
cipal of the Florida Arts School and the
co-founder of the Florida Ballet Arts
Foundation. Her dancers are acclaim-
ed, going onto successful careers with
the Major ballet companies in the coun-
try, and have the technical strength and
theatrical direction to please audiences
from every walk of life.

Assisting Miss Spear in her Summer
School of Classical Ballet at G.C. , will
be Richard Sals, a choreographer dancer
in the National Ballet Company of Cana-
da, and JoAnn Westbrook. Participants
in Miss Spear's School will come from
throughout the United States and Canada.
Several professional dancers will be in
residence for performance during this
time.

The week of July 27 - August 4, Ms.
01 ga Fricker of Los Angeles, California,
and Mr. William Glass tone of London,
England, will be in residence to ad-
minister examiniations and evaluate
qualifying students of the Graded Cec-
chetti Syllabus. Both Ms. Fricker and
Mr. Glasstone are qualified examiners
from the Imperial Society of Teachers
of Dance.



BALLET 131




132 CHEERLEADERS




CHEERLEADERS 133




134 CHEERLEADERS




CHEERLEADERS 135



Basketball



Soccer



Joe Alston

Rick Ballard

Clarence Caldwell

Stanley Edwards

John Gentry

Terrence Hart

James Hanna

Freddie Johnson

Blaxton Mabry

Keith Morrell

Vernon Shanks

David Skeels

Danny Stubbs

Coach Milton Reece

Assistant Coach Bill McClain

Manager Tony Villareal



Tennis

Lucan Abel

John Gentry

Jeff Jeffers

Eddie Lowe

Ronnie Melton

John MuUer

Brent Perkins

Bruce Tiso

Tommy Williamson

Coach William S. Arial



Johnny Barnes
Mark Brealey
Tommy Bray
Rudy Cordon
Herk DeGraw
Mark Enfield
Mark Gerety
Marty Gilpatrick
Kevin Green
Steve Hod gin
Lee Holliday
Jeff Jeffers
Christian King
Paul March
Carter Pate
Lewis Pate
Bruce Tiso
Rick Vellucci
Tony Villareal
Tommy Williamson
Coach Tim Crawford



Golf



Harry Barbin

Bill Clark

Rick Cobb

Kevin Green

Lee Holliday

Ben Hynson

Wade Taylor

Joe Wilson

Coach James H. Locke



Girl's Volleyball



Girl's Basketball



Elaine Armstrong

Ruth Barr

Debra Harris

Cathie Herron

Cindy Jones

Mary Margaret Nicholson

Lynda Spann

Hess Stuart

Trudy Wade

Coach Linda McCleod



Cindy Beal
Randy Geoffrey
Cathie Herron
Pat Tuttle
Trudy Wade
Guida Wakefield
Coach Harvey Webb






o
3




Adminis
tration



137




A CANDID
CONVERSATION

WITH

DR. HOWARD

C. WILKINSON

President,
Greensboro College





"THOSE STUDENTS WHO
HAVE BEEN DISCIPLINED
BY THE COURT SYSTEMS

THEY HAD THE
COURAGE TO STAND UP
AND DEFEND WHAT THEY
BELIEVED."



"Greensboro College is one of the finest colleges
in the area for a small college. We are because
the quality of students present make this so. "



State. Coach Sloan replied that he didn't know
really and didn't care as long as he continued to
play as he has been at State. "



"They bring with them, their own air of back-
ground combined with their distinct person-
alities and their ideals and opinions. As long
as Greensboro College can continue to attract
students like these, we will never be in trou-
ble". "



"I'm not saying that all Greensboro College stu-
dents are perfect students and they never make
mistakes. Those students that have been disci-
plined by the court systems here on campus are
some of the most respected students in my
opinion. They had the courage to stand up and
defend themselves for what they believed in and
this is the most important thing in life. "



"The faculty and administration can not take all
the credit for these outstanding students because
they were outstanding to begin with, we only aid
them in their direction and purpose of life. "



"Coach Norm Sloan, from North Carolina State
University, was once asked if David Thompson
was a fine basketball player when he came to



"We are primarily interested in the two sidps of
the totem pole - that of grace and restoration. If
you stop with the broken ones and you send them
away, without the option to restore themselves,
we have failed. As long as I have been here, stu-
dents are always allowed to return with one con-
dition; that they spend one year at another insti-
tution in which their faculty approves them.
Then they are permitted to return to Greensboro
College. We will always welcome them back. "



ADMINISTRATION 139



"A CHRISTIAN SCHOOL IS
NOT A SEVEN-DAY
SUNDAY SCHOOL."




"In many incidents, we may never come to a full
agreement, but we have always had a mutual re-
spect for each other. No one knows what can be
accomplished if you do something without trying.
Any way, that's what a Christian school is all
about - not a seven-day Sunday School. "

"With the money situation as it is now, we could
increase the tuition here. Although some of the
students could continue to afford it - the majori-
ty of them could not. The Methodist Church con-
tributes about one tenth of the budget we need, so
we need to find money elsewhere. That's why we
are going to the state legislature. There's also
an historical answer to the question. At the be-
ginning of time, schools were all privately
owned. The states then intervened and decided to
aid colleges and universities in which they would
own and support. Some people opposed this idea
because they thought the state would give secular
education, destroying the fabric of education in
private and smaller schools. The state relied on
state money for their support as the private
schools did on the citizens and parents of the



schools. "

"Within the last 20 years, the state has inter-
rupted the private schools and their funding
by going to their citizens and parents of the
public schools. So, as a result, the state now
gathers the majority of the money - approxi-
mately 16 million dollars. Private schools can't
get money as readily because most of it has al-
ready been donated to the state schools. So, we
ended up going to the state legislature for the
money. "

"The Capital Fund Drive is a fund raising pro-
ject in which we hope to raise 2. 1 million dol-
lars. This idea originated last Spring after the
self-study report was done. This money would
be allocated to pay off the $60,000 debt on New
Women's Dorm, the rennovation of Odell Audi-
torium, Main Building and some minor land-
scaping to the front campus. "

"We have already reached one third of our mark.
Donations from the late Senator Everett Jordon



140 ADMINISTRATION



and Ms. Moore are to be used to rebuild Parlor
theater at their requests. The other money will
be used to allocate five professorships, loans
and scholarships. "

"The city of Greensboro has been surprisely
helpful and very cooperative. Some of the heads
of major businesses are on the fund raising
committees. "

"Concerning new students, we wish we could get
more international students for they are better
than average in ability, possess a cosmopolitan
attitude and adjust better. We would rather take
good students to fill our quota of 650 students
than settle for less qualified ones, with a ma-
jority coming in from the North Carolina resi-
dents. "

"One thing that really distresses me is the fact,
that many of the state supported colleges and
universities have dropped their foreign lan-
guage in which we can communicate. How would



you like it if they decided to drop the English
language from their requirements? It's an in-
sult and they conclude that we really don't care
to take the time to learn their language. "

"The interest in athletics have grown tremen-
dously and I hope it continues. It just proves that
we can have eggheads and jockheads in the same
school. We could expand our facilities but right
now we don't have the money or the personnel. "

"I'm really concerned about the students and
their philosophy of life. There are alot of stu-
dents here that don't know where they are
going and what they want out of life. It's a shame
not to know where you're going and even worse,
not knowing how to get there. Students need to
clash with their books and other people to form
their own philosophy of life, no matter if it's on
front campus or 3 o'clock in the dorm with your
friends. Everything that we see, hear, taste,
smell and touch helps us form our philosophy of
life. "




"STUDENTS NEED TO
CLASH WITH THEIR
BOOKS AND OTHER
PEOPLE NO MATTER
IF IT'S ON FRONT
CAMPUS OR 3:00 IN THE
DORM."




DeanL.Y. Medlin Ms. Linda McLeod

Academic Dean Associate Director of Student Affairs



142 ADMINISTRATION




Don F. Gum

Director of Student Affairs



ADMINISTRATION 143



Dr. S. Laws Parks
Business Manager




144 ADMINISTRATION



Mr. James H. Locke
Financial Aid and Placement



Mr. Nathan B. Woodell
Assistant Business Manager




Mr. Calvin T. Leonard, Sr.
Director of News Bureau



Sallie G. McLarty
Director of Alumni Affairs



ADMINISTRATION 145



Sandy Wayt
Assistant Registrar



Jesse S. Pope
Assistant Accountant




Elizabeth Forester
Secretary to Business Office



Edna Kay Belton

Secretary to the Director of Admissions



146 ADMINISTRATION



HoUyce HLghfill
Secretary to President



Nancy Z. Proctor

Secretary to Director of Student Financial Aid




Margaret N. Leonard
Secretary to the Dean of Colle



Polly Bowman

Secretary to the Director

of Student Affairs



Judith Bohrer

Secretary of Arts and Sciences



ADMINISTRATION 147



Mrs. Ann P. Lojko
Accountant




148 ADMINISTRATION



Mrs. Florence Allen
Post Office



Mr. David Jensen
Librarian




laxine S. Earniiardt
.ibrarian



Charlotte Divitci
Librarian



Virginia D. Ransley
Librarian



ADMINISTRATION 149



Harry Johnson
College Physician



Vera Loman
College Nurse




Margaret Jenson
College Nurse



Lena Leach
Infirmary



John C. Wells

Director of Food Services



Tina Spruill
Supervisor of Soda Shop




Mr. Gary Gaupp

Men's Dorm Residence Director



Mrs. Gloria Shinn

New Women's Dorm Residence Director



Department of Art




1. RUTH ABBOTT CLARKE, Associate Professor in Art;
A. B. , M. F. , University of North Carolina at Greensboro;
Teachers' College, Columbia University; Art Students
League of New York; Hans Hoffmann School of Fine Arts.

2. ROBE RT KOWSKI, Instructor in Art; B. F. A. , M. F.A.,
University of Wis cons in -Milwaukee.




Behavioral Science and Education





152 FACULTY



3. WILLIAM C. DENMARK, Assistant Professor
of Behavioral Science and Education; Wake Forest
University; M. Ed. , University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill; University of North Carolina at
Greensboro.

4. MARY CATHERINE DUNN, Director of Cur-
riculum Materials and Audio Visuals; University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, B. A. ; University
of North Carolina at Greensboro, M. E.D.





1. SARAH J. FARRIOR, Assistant Professor of Behavorial
Science and Education, A.B. , Greensboro College; M.A. , T.
Ed.D. , Duke University.

2. NANCY FIELDS, Instructor of Special Education, B.A.,
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, M. S. , Rad-
ford College, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

3. KENNETH M. IDE, Instructor of Special Education,
.A., M.A., Michigan State University, Duke University.

4. JOYCE LANE, Instructor of Special Education, A.B. ,
Elon College, M.Ed., American University.

5. SUSAN SCHUMACHER, Instructor of Behavioral Science
and Education, A.B. , Muhlenberg College, M.A., Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.



Department of Business Administration,
Economics and Sociology




154 FACULTY



1. NOLAN BARKER, Instructor of Economics;
B.S. , University of Delaware; Virginia Poly
Technic. Institute.

2. WILLIAM R. FRAZIER, Professor of Eco-
nomics and Business Administration; B.S. , Uni-
versity of North Carolina; M.S. Virginia Poly-
technic Institute; Certified Public Accountant,
State of North Carolina.

3. LILLIAN JOHNSON; Assistant Professor of
Sociology; A. A. Peace College; B. R. E. , Pres-
byterian School of Christian Education, Rich-
mond, Virginia; M. S. &Ph. D. North Carolina
State University.

4. ISABELLE R. POWELL; Assistant Professor
of Sociology; B.S. , Mansfield Teacher's College;
PhD. , University of North Carolina at Greens-
boro. , ,




Department
of English




I



1. EDWARD O. COLEMAN, JR., Assistant Professor of English;
A.B., M.A., University of South Carolina; University of Minne-
sota.

2. JOHN HENDERSON LONG, Professor of English; A. B. , M.A.,
Ph.D. , University of Florida; Georgetown University.

3. BENJAMIN HARRISON WILSON, JR., Professor of English; B.S.
West Virginia Wesleyan College; M. A. , University of Pittsburgh;
Ph.D. , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.



FACULTY 155




Department of ^^^ \
Foreign Languages ^^



1. ANISIA M. GONZALEZ, Assistant
Professor of Spanish; M. A. , Ph. D. ,
Florida State University.

2. CAMILLA HOY, Professor of French,
A.B. , M.A., University of South
Carolina; Ph.D. , Bryn Mawr College;
University of Paris; Middleburg
College.

3. HELEN E. MISENHEIMER, Assis-
tant Professor of French; A. B. , Elon
College; M.A., Duke University;
Universite de Paris; University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

4. FRANCES]. SHAMBERG, Instruc-
tor in Spanish; A.B., Muhlenburg
College; M.A., University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.



156 FACULTY




Department of History
and Political Science




Department
of Music




1. FREDERICK H. BEYER, Associate Professor of Music:
A.B., Harvard University; M.A., Columbia University;
D.M., Florida State University.

2. HAROLD G. ANDREWS, Jr. , Professor of Organ and
Church Music: B.M., M.Mus. , Oberlin Conservatory of
Music, D.M.A., Boston University.

3. JAMES B. DECKER, Assistant Professor (part-time)
of Brasses and Woodwinds: B.M.Ed., B. Applied Music,
DePaul University; M.Mus. Ed., Northwestern Uni-
versity.

4. DAVE) L. FOSTER, Assistant Professor of Organ: B.
Mus. , Oberlin College; M. Mus. , Indiana University; D.
Mus. , Northwestern University.




158 FACULTY




1. DONW. HANSEN, Pro-
fessor of Music: B,M. , M.
Mus., Northwestern University;
Eastman School of Music.

2. JO PLUM HANSEN, Assist-
ant Professor (part-time) of
Stringed Instruments: B.M. ,
M. Mus. , Northwestern Uni-
versity.




\t»iililf



/



3. HENRY B. INGRAM JR., Associate Professor
of Piano: B. M. , Eastman School of Music; M.
Mus., Yale University; D.M. A. , University of
Southern California.



4. GARRETH M. McDONALD., Associate Pro-
fessor of Music Education; B.M.Ed. , University
of Nebraska; University of Colorado; M.Mus. ,
Northwestern University.




FACULTY 159




1. DAVID C. PINNIX, Associate
Professor of Piano; B. M. , Ober-
lin College; M. M. Eastman
School of Music; D. M. A. , Uni-
versity of Rochester.

2. ELBERT L. WILLIAMS,
Professor of Voice; A.B. , Cen-
tral State College; M. M. , Okla-
homa University: JuUiard School
of Music; New York University.

3. ANNE WOODARD, Assistant
Professor of Voice; B. M. ,
Greensboro College; M.A.
Teachers' College, Columbia
University.




160 FACULTY



Department of
Physical Education



1. WILLIAM S. ARIAL, Professor of Physical
Education and Director of Athletics: A
Wofford College; M. S. , University of Tenn-
essee.

2. LINDA McLEOD, Instructor in Physical
Education (part-time): B.S. , M.S., Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro.




3. MILTON E. REECE, Assistant Professor
of Physical Education: A.B. , Earlham College;
M. Ed. , East Carolina University; University
of North Carolina at Greensboro.

4. WILLIE LEE TAYLOR, Associate Professor
of Physical Education: B. S. , Longwood College;
M. S. , University of Tennessee; University of
Georgia.





Department of Religion
and Philosophy



162 FACULTY



1. MONSIGNOR HUGH
DOLAN, Adjunct Professor
of Religion and Philosophy,
A.B, , Mount Saint Mary's
College; M. Th. , Mount
Saint Mary's Seminary.

2. JAMES E. HULL, Profes-
sor of Philosophy and Re-
ligion, A.B. , Southern
Methodist University; M.
Div., Perkins School of
Theology, Southern Metho-
dist University; Ph. D. ,
University of Edinburgh.

3. R. TERRY RUSSELL,
Assistant Professor of
Religion and Philosophy.
B.A., Ohio State University;
M. Div., M.R.E., Metho-
dist Theological School; Ohio
State University,

4. W. BARNES TATUM,
Associate Professor of
Religion and Philosophy,
A.B. , BirmLngham -South-
ern College, University of
Saint Andrews, B. D., Ph.D.
Duke University.

5.

RABBI ARNOLD TASK.

Adjunct Professor of Re-
ligion and Philosophy, A.B. ,
University of Chicago,
B.A.H.L., M.A.H.L.,
Hebrew Union College.




Departments of
Science and Math



1. KEMPER L. CALLAHAN, Professor of Biology
B.S, , Waynesburg College; M.S. , West Virginia
University; Ph.D. , University of Wisconsin.

2. MYRTIS DAVIS, Professor of Mathematics; A.
Birmingham-Southern College; M.A., Louisiana
State University; M.A., University of Kansas.



3. JAMES E. GARNER, Assistant Professor of
Mathematics; A. B. , University of Mississippi;
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.




FACULTY 163



Department of Science ^



1. RAYMOND E. KADUNCE, Associ-
ate Professor of Chemistry; B.S. ,
Grove City College; M. S. , Ph. D. ,
University of Maine; Duquesne Uni-
versity.

2. ARNOLD F. VAN PELT, JR.,
Professor of Biology; A.B. , Swath-
more College; Ph.D. , University of
Tennessee.

3. LEONARD HART, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Speech and Drama; B.S, ,
Auburn University; M.A, , Louisiana
State University; University of
Denver.




Speech and Drama



164 FACULTY



Matha Anderson
Sarah Anderson
Patricia Apple
Elaine Armstrong
Ruth Barr



Bob Bass
Kathy Black
Carol Blakely
Hollie Boger
Betsy Boggs




Freshmen



Cindy Brooks
Ginger Caldwell
Larry Callahan
Anne Carraway



Gail Carroll
Nancy Cheek
Beth Colbert
Kathy Davis



Paul Delcastillo
Joy Duncan
Denise Dunn
Stanley Edwards




166 FRESHMEN




FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS LEFT TO RIGHT - Cindy Reece, President; Brenda
Tice, Treasurer; Terrie Johnson, Vice-President. NOT PICTURED - Ruth Barr,
Secretary,




Kevin Green

Kathy Gregg

It^Sr^ Joel Grigsby

Colette Guthrie
"!!< Susan Hamilton



Bonnie Hartley
Teresa Hawfield
Daniese Hedrick
Lee HoUiday
Mike Hudson



Kim Hudspeth
Ben Hynson
Terrie Johnson
John Keenan
Debbie Kelley



FRESHMEN 167



Marc Lawrence
Eddie Lowe
Keena Lowe
Sue Manning
Betsy McCaffree



Susanne McDermott
Pam Meadows
Beth Medlin
Caron Melton
Elizabeth Mooney



Susie Owen
Patty Pate
Nona Phillips
Monica Powers
Karolyn PuUen





168 FRESHMEN




Alan Wilson



Jim Reaves
Cindy Reece
Beth Rogers
Kathy Rudd
Wanda Russell



Bobby Sledge
Carol Snyder
Brad Stalder
Lorraine Stinson
Karen Suggs



Helen Taylor
Brenda Tice
Anne Tucker
Rick Vellucci
Angela Ward



Walt West
Jana Whitaker



FRESHMEN 169



Sue Albright
Jan Alexander
Barbara Anderson
Kathy Arnold



Susan Berry
Brenda Brake
Deborah Broughton
Susie Carter



Carol Chilton
Mary Beth Clark
Betsy Cloud
Katherine Conant




Sophomores



Jeff Davis
Kathy Duncan
Lola Elliott
Pam Elloitt
Ca±y Freeman



Marjorie Gilley
Linda Haber
Jane Harbison
Sabina Virginia

Hayes
Sally Heathcote





SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS LEFT TO RIGHT - Jeff Jenkins, Vice-President; Gloria Foster, Trea-
surer; Sallie Woodard, Secretary; Ronnie Melton, President.

Darlene Henry
Steve Hill
Jean Hughes
LouAnne Hutchins




Jeff Jenkins
Fred Kelly
Cathy Lawrence
Anne LeQuier



SOPHOMORES 171



Sandra McCrary
Sheila Mabe
JoAnne Marcone
Janie Mason
Ronnie Melton



Marilyn Monroe
Ruth Moss
Pat Nagle
Beverly Neely
Blair Nicholson



Steve Nisbet
Sally Parkman



Barbara Risely
John Roach



Dwight Robinson
Marty Ross



172 SOPHOMORES





Bruce Shipman
Walter Simmons



Marty Simpson
Jane Smith
Patrice Spillane
Ginny Starnes
Alice Steed



Carol Thomas
Karen Truesdell
Nonie Turrentine
Rick Webb
Delwood West



Elin Widdifield
Mary Wilkerson
Karen Williams
Carol Wilson
Sallie Woodard



SOPHOMORES 173



Rick Adams
Faye Andrews
Bill Anderson
Johnny Barnes
Crysty Bartleson



Cynthia Boone
Cindy Bowers
Rita Bryant
Wayne Burgess
Claudia Beyers



Libby Cecil
Tony Chrissman
Emily Cockman
Julia Cooper
Debbie Craft




a



Juniors I



Judy Crawford
Jane Creech
Denise DeCourcy
Diana Eastwood



Derek Foxx
George Freeman
Deloris Gilchrist
Barry Goldman



174 JUNIORS





JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS LEFT TO RIGHT - Peggy Markey, Treasurer; Johnny Barnes, President;
Claudia Beyers, Secretary; Martha Pennington, Vice-President,

Mark Gordon
Cathie Herron
Suzanne High
Rick Hovis
Lou Howard




Cindy Hudgins
Jeff Jeffers
Wendy Johnson
Rita Jones



JUNIORS 175




Marie King
David Krumbhaar
Kathy Lakoski
Sally Logue
Bennie Lupo



Debbie Lyerly
Peggy Markey
Amanda Minnix
Terry Neal
Stephanie Northen



Cindy Parks
Carter Pate
Martha Pennington
Donna Pierce
Cheryl Pilson



176 JUNIORS



Jackie Purvis
Anna Ralls
Leslie Scheviak
Hanna Shadia




Claude Shockley
Sally Sizemore
Donna Smith
Rebecca Stevens
Eva Ruth Tarkington



Martha Thompson
Jimmy Tucker
Linda Versnel
Pat Warlick
Harvey Webb



Lynn Welfare
Jerry Williams



sm<jS8 Rudolph Wilson

Rosemary Younts



JUNIORS 177



C/2

O
• I— I




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: LEFT TO RIGHT: Steve Hodge, Vice-President; Sally Challender,
Treasurer; Tony Villareal, President; Bruce Tiso, Secretary.




SHARON E. ALFORD
SPECIAL EDUCATION - E.D.
SCF 3; SCEC 3; Tutoring for
White Oaks 3; N.C. Central
School for the Deaf 3; SCEC
4; V.P. of the Dorm 4; Dorm
Council 4.

"Good things come in little
packages. "



DENISE BAKER

DRAMA & SPEECH

G.C. Players 1,2,3,4, Chorale 3,4.

"It is better to remain

silent and be thought a fool,

than to speak up and

remove all doubts. "




vm





CHARLES LEE HUTCHENS

RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY

"To be yourself

you have to find yourself

and to find yourself

you have to find God. "



HARRY E. RODENHIZER III
ECONOMICS

S.G.A. 1; Newspaper 1; G.C.
Players 2,3,4; Echo 2; Social
Life Comm. 2, Financial Ad-
visory Board 3.




ROSEMARY GARNER BARKER
EDUCATION 4-9. CONCENTRATION IN MATH
Library Assistant 1,2,3; Public Defender 2; Modern
Dance Club 2; Dean's List 2; SNEA 3; North Carolina
Council of Teachers of Math 3; Day Student's Associa-
tion 4.




GAIL COBB

EDUCATION 4-9 CONCENTRATION
IN LANGUAGE ARTS
Modern Dance Club 1; Recruitment
Committee 2,3; Curriculum Com-
mittee 2,3; Bookstore Clerk 1; S-
NEA 3.




THELMA LU MANDERHALL

SOCIOLOGY

Chorale 1,2; AKO 3,4; Dean's

list 1,2,3,4; Gamma Iota

Sigma 3,4;

"Education

is man's going forward

from cocksure ignorance

to thoughtful uncertainty. "



SARAH ANN McALISTER

ENGLISH

Dean's list 1.2,3,4; SNEA 4

Gamma lota Sigma 3,4;

"It takes less time

to do a thing right

than to explain why

you didn't. "



MARY DANIEL TURNER
FRENCH

Chorale 1,2,3,4; Aqua-
belles 1,2,3,4; Music Ed-
ucation Club 1;
"One great use of words
is to hide our thought. "
Voltaire.








CHESTER R. DIXON
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Day Students Association.





SENIORS ISl



DAVID R. MARION
ENGLISH AND BIOLOGY
Biology Club 4; Newspaper 1;
Dean's List 2, 3.





CAROL ENGEBRETSON
SPECIAL EDUCATION - M.R.
SNEA 4; SCEC 3.



ELIZABETH L. COLE
SPECIAL EDUCATION
Emerson 1,2; SGA 3; SNEA 4;
SCEC 4.



NANCY
DEDRICK
SOCIOLOGY
Emerson



1.2,3; ,X'. ,\


1 3 5 6

Online LibraryGreensboro CollegeThe Echo (Volume 1975) → online text (page 3 of 6)