Guy de Maupassant.

The complete short stories of Guy de Maupassant online

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HARVARD
COLLEGE
LIBRARY




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COMPLETE
SHORT STORIES

GUT DE MAUPASSANT



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The
Complete Short Stories

of

yGu_y De
MaupassanP^

Ten Volumes in One



lie



WALTER J. BLACK INC.

171 Madison Avenue

NEW YORK, N. Y,



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^•/^x7>/. -?3



{/



HAKVAJRD COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF
RAOCUFFE COLLEGE LIBRARY



Copyrighted, 1003, by

M. WALTER DUNNE

Entered at Stationers' Hall. London.



PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA



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Contents

V.olume I



I

f <IALIr<^-FAT V *, ^ ^ . /TS

^"HE DIAMOND NECKLACE... 28 (

\ PIECE OF STRING ^.^^ i..:..;....i. 34

rHE STORY OF A FARM-GIRL 38

m THE MOONLIGHT 51

ifME. TELUER'S EXCURSION 54

VE ....» 71'

E. FIFI /7S

. NSIEUR PARENT Jl

USELESS BEAUTY (m)

,AN AFFAIR OF STATE 121-

BABETTE 127

I A COCK CROWED J32

ULIE LALA : : 135

A VAGABOND ; , 138

THE MOUNTEBANKS ..; 146

UGLY 149

THE DEBT 152

A NORMANDY JOKE ^

THE FATHER 15Q

THE ARTIST 164

FALSE ALARM 167

THATyiG OF A MORIN , (m^



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Volume II



MISS HARRIET 181

THE HOLE 195

THE INN 199

A FAMILY 208

BELLFLOWER ^..^...JU

IN THE WOOD .'.« ;.., u:

THE MARQUIS DE FUMEROL 21V

SAVED u 2m

THE SIGNAL ^...;..;.i:,: 221

THE DEVIL ;.... ;.f^

THE VENUS OF BRANIZA .....;.........,. 236-

THE RABBIT fJ.^..... 238

LA MORILLONNE 243-

EPIPHANY .....;.... ^24^

SIMON'S PAPA 75?

WAITER, A BOCK! ; 2^

THE SEQUEL TO A DIVORCE , 264

j THE CLOWN ^.....- 268 ,

"i THE MAD W0M4N ^ J^. JTb

MADEMOISELLE 273

• . J



Volume III



A BAD ERROR m

THE PORT .\ ^ 280

CHAU *:. ?36

JEROBOAM ^ ^ 2W



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VIRTUE IN THE BALLET 296

THE DOUBLE PINS , 300

HOW HE GOT THE LEGION OF HONOR 303

A CRISIS ' 307

GRAVEYARD SIRENS 311

GROWING OLD ^ , 316

A FRENCH ENOCH ARDEN .^T; 319

JULIE ROMAIN 323

AN UNREASONABLE WOMAN 328

ROSALIE PRUDENT 332

HIPPOLYTE'S CLAIM 335

BENOIST .:.•.•::::... .- • .-. - 338

FECUNDriY 342

A WAY TO WEALTH , 348

AM I INSANE? .;..;..:...;..; ',.,.:.., $52

FORBIDDEN FRUIT 354

THE CHARM DISPELLED , 3SS

MADAME PARISSE .....:.... :.. 361

MAKING A CONVERT............ 366



Volume IV



y

A LITTLE WALK 371

A WIFE'S CONFESSION 374

A DEAD WOMAN'S SECRET 378

LOVE'S AWAKENING 381

BESO NO. 29 , 385^

MARROCA 392

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A PHILOSOPIBER 398

A MISTAKE 402,

FLORENTINE 406

CONSIDERATION 410

WOMAN'S WILES 414

MOONLIGHT 418

DOUBTFUL HAPPINESS 421

HUMILIATION 425

THE WEDDING NIGHT 429

THE NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER 434

IN THE COURT ROOM 438

A PECULIAR CASE. 441

A PRACTICAL JOKE ; ; 446

A STRANGE FANCY..... 448

AFTER DEATH , 453

ON CATS , 458

ROOM NO. ELEVEN..... 462

ONE PHASE OF LOVE 466

GOOD REASONS 471

A FAIR EXCHANGE. ; 474

THE TOBACCO SHOP 479

A POOR GIRL ; 484

THE SUBSTITUTE 488

A PASSION „. 491



Volume V

CAUGHT.... ..; ;.. 497

THE ORDERLY ;..;;.u...; ;;.....;;..;....... ; ^99

JOSEPH 5ttl



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REGRET ^^

THE DEAF-MUTE 510

MAGNETISM 51f

IN VARIOUS ROLES 519

THE FALSE GEMS....: .^..J. '...f..:..'..:.!.^, 523^

COUNTESS SATAN 527

A USEFUL HOUSE ..:. - : 531

THE COLONEL'S IDEAS 533

l-WO LITTLE SOLDIERS 537

GHOSTS • • • 542

WAS IT A DREAM? 545

THE NEW SENSATIOK 549

VIRTUE! ' •••• : 551

THE THIEF 554^

THE DIARY OF A MADMAN 557

ON PERFUMES , • 560

THE WILL.... r-(^l)

IN HIS SWEETHEARTS LIVERY 565

AN UNFORTUNATE LIKENESS ...., 569

A NIGHT IN WHITECHAPEL , 571

LOST ...^ .- ...^ ' ••. 575

A COUNTRY EXCURSION....... 577

THE RELICS .:.. 584

A RUPTURE 1 ^ - 587

MARGOT'S TAPERS .; • • - 589

THE ACCENT : , 592

PROFITABLE BUSINESS • • ^^^

BERTHA - ' ^^^

THE LAST STEP - ^

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Volume VI



A MESALLIANCE 607

AN HONEST DEAL 612

^ THE LOG ; ; 615

DELILA 619

THE ILL-OMENED GROOM '.. 623

THE ODALISQUE OF SENICHOU 627

BRIC-A-BRAC 632

THE ARTISTS WIFE 635

IN THE SPRING 639

THE REAL ONE AND THE OTHER 643

THE CARTER'S WENCH 645

THE RENDEZVOUS 648

- SOLITUDE 652

THE MAN WITH THE BLUE EYES 656

AN ARTIFICE 659

THE SPECTER 662

THE RELIC ; 667

THE MARQUIS 670

A DEER PARK IN THE PROVINCES 674

' AN ADVENTURE 677

THE BED 680

UNDER THE YOKE ', 682

A FASHIONABLE WOMAN 685

WORDS OF LOVE 690 •

THE UPSTART 692

HAPPINESS f. 695

CHRISTMAS EVE 699

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THE AWAKENING 7Q2

THE WHITE LADY ^q^

MADAME BAPnSTE



709

REVENGE , L

713 ..

AN OLD MAID

717

COMPLICATION

722

FORGIVENESS

_ ' * 726

THE WHITE WOLF .,

'1 730

TOINE LLL^^,^

734^

AN ENTHUSIAST

739

THE TRAVELER'S STORY

• • 750



Volume VII

A JOLLY FELLOW.... 755

A LIVELY FRIEND : 760

THE BLIND MAN 764

THE IMPOLITE SEX 767

THE CORSICAN BANDIT. 771

THE DUEL ....: :...:..., 773

THE LOVE OF LONG AGO 779

THE FARMER'S WIFE ; 782

BESIDE A DEAD MAN 787

A QUEER NIGHT IN PARIS. 790

A DUEL 796-

THE UMBRELLA 800

THE QUESTION OF LATIN 806

MOTHER AND SONl!! ...,. 812

HE? 816



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Volume VIII



tHE AVENGER 821

THE CONSERVATORY 824

f LETTER FOUND ON A CORPSE ...^ 828

VhE little cask \.^,f^...i:LJ..lX ^.^»^ ^ 832

POOR ANDREW 836

A FISfflNG EXCURSION ^^^....V.... L.w 840

AFTER 843

THE SPASM 847

A MEETING 852

A NEW YEAR'S GIFT. 857^

MY UNCLE SOSTHENES 861

ALL OVER '. 866

MY LANDLADY 870

THE HORRIBLE 874

THE FIRST SNOWFALL 878

THE WOODEN SHOES ^^

BOITELLE 887

SELFISHNESS 803




Volume IX

WATCHDOG 897

DANCERS 900

CHRISTENING 903

A COSTLY OUTING 906

THE MAN WITH THE DOGS 909

A KING'S SON -. 914



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MOHAMMED FRIPOULI 919

"BELL" 924

THE VICTIM 927

THE ENGLISHMAN 930



Volume X



SENTIMENT 93S

FRANCIS 93S

THE ASSASSIN 942

%.SEMILLANTE 945

AjN the RIVER 94»

SUICIDES 952

A MIRACLE 955

THE ACCURSED BREAD 959

MY TWENTY-FIVE DAYS 962

A LUCKY BURGLAR. 967

AN ODD FEAST. 970 ^

SYMPATHY 972

A TRAVELER'S TALE 975

UTTLE LOUISE ROQUE 979



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COMPLETE
SHORT STORIES

GUT DE MAUPASSANT



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v^



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BALL-OF-PAT



For many days now the fag-end of
the army had been straggling through
the town. They were not troops, but a
disbanded horde. The beards of the
men were long and filthy, their uniforms
in tatters, and they advanced at an
easy pace without flag or regiment. All
seemed wom-out and back-broken, inca-
pable of a thought or a resolution,
inarching by habit solely, and falling
from fatigue as soon as they stopped. In
short, they were a mobilized, pacific peo-
ple, bending under the weight of the
gun; some little squads or* the alert, easy
to take alarm and prompt in enthusiasm,
ready to attack or to flee; and in the
midst of them, some red breeches, the
remains of a division broken up in a
great battle; some somber artillery men
in line with these varied kinds of foot
soldiers; and, sometimes the brilliant
helmet of a dragoon on foot who fol-
lowed with difficulty the shortest march
of the lines.

Some legions of free-shooters, imder
the heroic names of "Avengers of the
Defeat," "Citizens of the Tomb," "Par-
takers of Death,'* passed in their turn
with the air of bandits.
^ Their leaders were former cloth or
fgrain merchants, ex-merchants in tallow
\oT soap, warriors of circumstance, elected
officers on account of their escutcheons
and the length of their mustaches, cov-
ered with arms and with braid, speaking
in constrained voices, discussing plans of
campaign, and pretending to carry
agonized France alone on their swagger-



ing shoulders, but sometimes fearing
their own soldiers, prison-birds, that
were often brave at first and later
proved to be plunderers and debauchees.

It was said that the Prussians were
going to enter Rouen.

The National Guard who for two
months had been carefully reconnoiter-
ing in the neighboring woods, shooting
sometimes their own sentinels, and ready
for a combat whenever a little wolf
stirred in the thicket, had now returned
to their firesides. Their arms, their uni-
forms, all the murderous accoutrements
with which they had lately struck fear
into the national heart for three leagues
in every direction, had suddenly dis-
appeared.

The last French soldiers finally came
across the Seine to reach the Audemer
bridge through Saint-Sever and Bourg-
Achard; and, marching behind, on foot,
between two officers of ordnance, the
General, in despair, unable to do any-
thing with, these incongruous tatters,
himself lost in the breaking-up of a peo-
ple accustomed to conquer, and disas-
trously beaten, in spite of his legendary
bravery.

A profound calm, a frightful, silent
expectancy had spread over the city.
Many of the heavy citizens, emasculated
by commerce, anxiously awaited the con-
querors, trembling lest their roasting
spits or kitchen knives be considered
arms.

All life seemed stopped; shops were
closed, the streets dumb. Sometimes an



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WORKS OF GUYrDE. MAUPASSANT



idiabitant, intimidated by thissileQ^e,
moved rapidly along next the walls. The
agony of waiting made them wish the
enemy would come.

In the afternoon of the day which fol-
lowed the departure of the French
troops, some idilans, commg from one
knows not where, crossed the town with
celerity. Then, a little later, a black
mass descended the side of St. Catha-
rine, while two other invading bands ap-
peared by the way of Dametal and Bois-
guillaume. The advance guard of the
three bodies joined one another at the
same moment in Hotel de Ville square
and, by all the neighboring streets, the
German army continued to arrive,
spieading out its battalions, making the
pavement resound under their hard,
rhythmic step.

Some orders of the commander, in a
foreign, guttural voice, reached the
houses which seemed dead and deserted*
while behind dosed Gutters, eyes were
watching these victorious men, masters
of the city, of fortunes, of lives,
through the "rights of war." The in-
habitants, shut up in their rooms, were
visited with the kind of excitement that
a cataclysm, or some fatal upheaval of
the earth, brings to us, against which all
force is useless. For the same sensa-
tion is produced each time that the
established order of things is over-
turned, whe n security no lo nger exists,
and all that protect tne laws of
man and of nature find themselves at
the mercy of unreasoning, ferocious
brutality. The trembling of the earth
crushing the houses and burying an en-
tire people; a river ovei^owing its
banks and carrying in its course the



drowned peasants, carcasses of beeves,
and girders snatched from roofs, or a
glorious army massacring those trying
to defend themselves, leading others
prisoners, pillaging in the name of the
sword and thanking God to the soimd
of the cannon, all are alike frightful
scourges which disconnect all belief in
eternal justice, all the confidence that
we have in the protection of Heaven
and the reason of man.

Some detachments rapped at each
door, then disappeared into the houses.
It was occupation after invasion. Then
the duty commences for the conquered
to show themselves gracious toward the
conquerors.

After some time, as soon as the first
terror disappears, a new calm is estab-
lished. In many families, the Prussian
ofl&cer eats at the table. He is some-
times well bred and, through politeness,
pities France, and speaks of his repug-
nance in taking part in this affair. One-
is grateful to him for this sentiment;
then, one may be, some day or other,
in need of his protection. By treating
him well, one has, perhaps, a less num-
ber of men to feed. And why should
we wound anyone on whom we are en-
tirely dependent? To act thus would
be less bravery than temerity. And
temerity is no longer a fault of the
conmioner of Rouen, as it was at the
time of the heroic defense, when their
city became famous. Finally, each told
himself that the highest judgment of
French urbanity required that they be
allowed to be polite to the strange sol-
dier in the house, provided they did not j \
show themselves familiar with him in | ^
public. Outside they would not make
themselves known to each other, but at



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BALL^GF^FA^



home they could chat freely, and tbe
German might remain longer each eve-
ning warming his feet at their hearth-
stones.

The town even took on, little by
little, its ordinary aspect. The French
scarcely went out, but the Prussian
soldiers grumbled in the streets. In
short, the officers of the Blue Hussars,
who dragged with arrogance their great
weapons of death up and down the
pavonent, seemed to have no more
grievous scorn for the simple citizens
than the officers or the sportsmen who,
the year before, drank in the same
cafis. ,_.^^ _ v^ \ — J.

^ There was rievfefthdess, Tsomethirig i^
the air, something subtle and unknown, I
a strange, intolerable atmosphere like a \
penetrating odor, the odor of invasion.
It filled the dwellings and the public '
];^ces, changed the taste of the food, ,
gave the impression of being on a/
journey, far away, among barbarous anc)
dangerous tribes. — .^

^ "Hie-Goncpierors-eitacted money, much
money. The inhabitants always paid
and they were rich enough to do it.
But the richer a trading Norman be-
comes the more he suffers at every
outlay, at each part of his fortune that
he sees pass from his hands into those
of another.

Therefore, two or three leagues be-
low the town, following the course of
the river toward Croisset, Dieppedalle,
or Biessart mariners and fishermen
often picked up the swollen corpse of a
German in imiform from the bottom of
the river, killed by the blow of a knife,
the head crushed with a stone, or per-
haps thrown into the water by a push
from the high bridge. The slime of the



ri/erkbed buried these obscure ven<*
geances, savage, but legitimate, im-
known heroisms, mute attacks more
perilous than the battles of broad day.
and without the echoing sound of glory.

For hatred of the foreigner always
arouses some intrepid ones, who are
ready to die for an idea.

Finally, as soon as the invaders had
brought the town quite imder subjec-
tion with their inflexible discipline,
without having been guilty of any of the
horrors for which they were famous
along their triumphal line of march,
people began to take courage, and the
need of trade put new heart into the
commerce of the country. Some had
large interests at Havre, which the
French army occupied, and they wished
to try and reach this port by going to
Dieppe by land and there embarking.

They used their influence with the
German soldiers with whom they had an
acquaintance, and finally, an authoriza-
tion of departure was obtained from the
General-in-chief.

Then, a large diligence, with four
horses, having been engaged for thi$
journey, and ten persons having en-
gaged seats in it, it was resolved to set
out on Tuesday morning before day-
light, in order to escape observation.

For some time before, the frost had
been hardening the earth and on Mon-
day, toward three o'clock, great black
clouds coming from the north brought
the snow which fell without interrup-
tion during the evening and all night.

At half past four in the morning, the
travelers met in the courtyard of Hotel
Normandie, where they were to take
the carriage.

They were still full of sleep, and



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WORKS OF GUy ^E MAUPASSANT



duvering with cold under theirrwraifcr
They could only see each other dimly in
the obscure light, and the accumulation
of heavy winter garments made them
all resemble fat curates in long cassocks.
Only two of the men were acquainted;
a third accosted them and they
chatted: "I'm going to take my wife,"
said one. "I too," said another. "And
I," said the third. The first added:
"We shall not return to Rouen, and if
the Prussians approach Havre, we shall
go over to England." All had the same
projects, being of the same mind.

As yet the horses were not harnessed.
A little lantern, carried by a stable boy,
went out one door from time to time,
to immediately appear at another. The
feet of the horses striking the floor
could be heard, although deadened by
the straw and litter, and the voice of a
man talking to the beasts, sometimes
swearing, came from the end of the
building. A light tinkling of bells an-
nounced that they were taking down the
harness; this murmur soon became a
dear and continuous rhythm by the
movement of the animal, stopping
sometimes, then breaking into a
brusque shake which was accompanied
by the dull stamp of a sabot upon the
hard earth.

The door suddenly closed. All noise
ceased. The frozen citizens were silent;
they remained inunovable and stiff.

A curtain of uninterrupted white
flakes constantly sparkled in its de-
scent to the ground. It effaced forms,
and powdered everything with a downy
moss. And nothing could be heard in
the great silence. The town was calm,
and buried under the wintry frost, as
this fall of snow« unnamable and float-



iiig, a sensation rather than a sound
(trembling atoms which only seem to
fill all space), came to cover the earth.

The man reappeared with his lantern,
pulling at the end of a rope a sad horse
which would not come willingly. He
placed him against the pole, fastened
the traces, walked about a long time ad-
justing the harness, for he had the use
of but one hand, the other carrying the
lantern. As he went for the second
horse, he noticed the travelers, mo-
tionless, already white with snow, and
said to them: "Why not get into the
carriage? You will be imder cover, at
least"

They had evidently not thought of it,
and they hastened to do so. The three
men installed their wives at the back
and then followed them. Then the
other forms, undecided and veiled, took
in their turn the last places without ex-
changing a word.

The flooi was covered with straw, in
which the feet ensconced themselves.
The ladies at the back having brought
little copper foot stoves, with a carbon
fire, lighted them and, for some time, in
low voices, enumerated the advantages
of the appliances, repeating things that
they had known for a long time.

Finally, the carriage was harnessed
with six horses instead of four, because
the traveling was very bad, and a voice
called out:

*Ts everybody aboard?"

And a voice within answered: **Yes.**

They were off. The carriage moved
slowly, slowly for a little way. The
wheels were imbedded in the snow; the
whole body groaned with heavy crack-
ing soimds; the horses glistened, puffed,
and smoked; and the great whip of the



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BALL-OF-FAT



driver snapped without ceasing, hover-
ing about on all sides, knotting and un-
rolling itself like a, thin serpent, lash-
ing brusquely some horse on the re-
bound, which then put forth its most
violent effort

Now the day was imperceptibly
dawning. The light flakes, which one of
the travelers, a Rouenese by birth, said
looked like a shower of cotton, no
longer fell. A faint light filtered
throu^ the great dull clouds, which
rendered more brilliant the white of the
fields, where appeared a line of great
trees clothed in whiteness, or a chimney
with a cap of snow.

In the carriage, each looked at the
others curiously, in the sad light of this
dawn.

At the back, in the best places, Mr.
Loiseau, wholesale merchant of wine, of
G^d^Bont street, and Mrs. Loiseau
were sleeping opposite each other.
Loiseau had bought out his former pa-
tron who failed in business, and made
bis fortime. Hi* f;nH baH wiy^^ fit_a
goftd priqg__to ^small ret ailers in the
coimtry, and passed among Jiis,Urigids
and acquaintan^ces aSia knavish wag,
a true Norman full nf_ jieceit .and
jovialiti.

His reputation as a sharper was so
well established that one evening at the
residence of the prefect, Mr. Toumel,
author of some fables and songs, of
keen, satirical mind, a local celebrity,
having proposed to some ladies, who
seemed to be getting a little sleepy, that
they make up a game of "Loiseau
tridcs," the joke traversed the rooms of
the prefect, reached those of the town,
and then, in the months to come, made



many a face in the province expand
with laughter.

Loiseau was especially known for his
love of farce of every kind, for his
jokes, good and bad; and no one could
ever talk with him without thinking:
"He is invaluable, this Loiseau." Of—
tall figure, his balloon-shaped front was
surmounted by a ruddy face surroimded
by gray whiskers.

His wife, large, strong, and resolute,
with a quick, decisive manner, was the
order and arithmetic of this house of
commerce, while he was the life of it
through his joyous activity^ ^, .^

Beside them, Mr. €arr6-Lamadon
held himself with great dignify,' as if
belonging to a superior caste; a con-
siderable m^j in cottonSj_proprietor ol i
three mills, ofl&cer of the Legion of ',
Honor, and member of the General .
Council. He had remained, during the |
Empire, chief of the friendly opposi-
tion, famous for making the Emperor
pay more dear for rallying to the cause
than if he had combated it with blunted
arms, according to his own story.
Madame Carr^-Lamadon, much younger
than her husband, was the consolation
of oflScers of good family sent to Rouen
in garrison. She sat c^posite her hus-



Online LibraryGuy de MaupassantThe complete short stories of Guy de Maupassant → online text (page 1 of 125)