Hilaire Belloc.

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October 1789, 92-93 ; effect of
Jacobins on, 96-98 ; first general
attack on him in Parliament, 100 ;
quarrel of, with Beaumetz, 107 ;
growing popularity of, 108-109 ;
St. Just first introduced to, 120 ;
enters the household of Duplay,
140-145 ; character of his posi-
tion during Legislative, 152-153;
revisits native province, 156-157 ;
opposes war and Brissot, 163,
181-183 ; is absorbed by Paris,
196, 198 ; elected to Paris, 204 ;
causes of his opposition to rivals,

209 ; and of his later position,

210 ; great attack upon, 213-218 ;
Condorcet's description of, 219 ;
demands death of the King, 225 ;
and votes for, 229 ; enters the
Committee of Public Safety, 256-
257 ; saves the, 73, 265-266 ;
abandons the Moderates and
Desmoulins, 283-286 ; last dinner
with Danton, 292 ; abandons
Danton, 295 ; his idolaters in
Duplay's house, 300-303 ; in the
Feast of the Deity, 308-309 ; his
last speech, 321-322 ; last morn-



ing of, 330; fatal error of, on
loth Thermidor, 345 ; arrested,
349 ; joins the Revolt, 358 ; re-
fuses insurrection, 362 ; is shot,
363 ; is guillotined, 365

Roland, Madame, 143, and n., 235

"Rosati," 60

Rosicrucians, lodge of, at Arras, 45

Rousseau, his theory, character,
and effect of, 24-27

Roux, communist, 251 n.

St. Faegeau, see " Lepelletier "
St. Just, enters into Revolution,
120 ; his appeal to the Gironde
in the King's trial, 228, and n. ;
enters Committee of Public
Safety, 253 ; prepares Robes-
pierre's entry thereto, 256 ;
his report on the imprisoned
Girondins, 258 ; notes received
from Robespierre in report on
Danton, 294 ; estranged from
Robespierre, 293 ; during night
of 8th Thermidor, 327-329; his
attempt to save Robespierre on
9th Thermidor, 332-334 ; is ar-
rested, 349
Social Contract, nature of theory
of, 18-24 > Rousseau's pamphlet
on, 25-27

Tallibn, his mistress arrested,
311 ; attacks Robespierre in Ther-
midor, 334

Temple, Robespierre deputed to
guard, 203

Terror, Robespierre's reluctance to
face, 256 ; Danton troubled at>
257 ; Robespierre admits, 270 et
seq.

Th^ot, Catherine, 307

Therasson, proposes public meetings
of the great Committee, 261 n.

Theresa, see " Cabarrus"



INDEX



Z^7



Thuriot, in Thermidor, 348, 349
TrcTCs, see " Elector "

Vadiee, in Thermidor, 343-344
Valenciennes, besieged, 248 ; fall

of, 259 ; Briez and, 264
Vendee, rising of, 237, 240
Vendome, Place, "Place des

Piques," 202, 361
Verdun, besieged, 203
Vergniaud, his speech at King's

trial, 227 ; attitude in March '93,

239 ; death of, 268
Versailles, Robespierre enters, 69;

ill suited to him, 71, 93-96
Vieux Cordelier, 277, 278, 283-285,

28S



Vilate and Robespierre, 309
Virtues, of Robespierre, 34, &c.
Vivier, at Jacobins on loth Ther-
midor, 359
Voice, of Robespierre, 10



Waast, St., see "Abbey"

War, declaration of great, against
Austria, 174-175 ; against Eng-
land and Holland, 234

Wattiguies, 261

Wimpfen, his reply to the CcDren-
tion, 25i8



TVES do Robespierre, 41



BY HILAIRE BELLOC

DANTON

A Study* 440 pages. With portrait and notes, 8<vo, $2,50





CONTENTS




Preface


I.


The Revolution


II.


The Youth of Danton


III.


Danton at the Cordeliers


IV.


The Fall of the Monarchy


V.


The Republic


VL


The Terror


VII.


The Death of Danton


VIII.


Robespierre




Appendices




Index



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS
From The Saturday Review

*'Mr. Belloc's book is a most brilliant production, full of
verve and eloquence, containing some passages of high literary
merit. He makes his readers love Danton even if they cannot
admire or believe in him. ' '

From Literature
"Mr. Belloc has two qualifications for his task: First, he
understands and loves France as no Englishman can under-
stand and few love it — we would go so far as to say that he
is the only English historian who has made the history of the
Revolution and the character of the French people engaged in
it real for us ; Secondly, he is a marvelous portrait painter."

From The Spectator
" A i)iece of real tragedy, given with admirable restraint and
eloquence."

From The Times
" Brilliant ... of exceptional merit ... a book
which is to be read with pleasure, and of which the author
may be proud."



DANTON, BY HILAIRE BELLOC



From The Nation
" Mr. Belloc's essay is unmistakably a clever piece of com-
position in the broad style. It is always impulsive, often
eloquent. ... It brings together in close combination the
learning of the schools and a generous enthusiasm of youth,
which warms to the aspirations of that ' tender-eyed, wandering,
unfortunate Rousseau who died of persecution. ' "

From The Dial
" Mr. Belloc's ' Study ' of Danton is a more important con-
tribution to the subject, for by his own independent investi-
gations he has been able to control and occasionally to supple-
ment his French predecessors. His treatment reveals vigorous
thinking and clear conceptions of many of the characteristic
features of the great struggle. There are passages of remark-
able descriptive power."

From The New York Tribune
"It is on his record as a politician that he is honored in this
book, and it is of a brave, skillful and sane struggle against
circumstance that Mr. Belloc gives us, first and last, a vivid
impression."

From The Chicago Times-Herald
*' Mr. Belloc has produced the first searching, exhaustive and
profound study of Danton' s character and the reciprocal influ-
ence existing between that character and its times and sur-
roundings that has appeared in the English language. He
has done more. He has written one of the most fascinating
and at the same time well-rounded and masterful historical
studies in existence — a monumental work that will be the last
word and aji authority for many years to come."

From The Brooklyn Eagle
* 'A great story, admirably told. . . . Forms much the most
notable contribution recently made to the now enormous mass
of literature dealing with the greatest of modern epochs. To
say that Mr. Belloc has painted a recognizable portrait of a
remarkable man would be a totally inadequate estimate of his
work. He has done far more. The figure on his canvas stands
out in such bold outline and broad relief that we instinctively
feel ourselves close to a great man."



CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, NEW YORK

Lh%'30






Online LibraryHilaire BellocRobespierre → online text (page 32 of 32)