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COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT




~ S K ETCHED FR© M^M'UHB BY H S CH ILE

Pubhsked and Cppjnghted bv M ScMle, I^ i^J6 Divtsion. Street N.York



To the Proprietors of Hotels and Boarding-Houses.



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PREFACE.



If there is any resort which can afford the much needed rest and recreation to one who
is worn out with the cares and troubles of a city life, surely it is the Catskill Mouisttains,
How delightful a pastime to roam in the free, balmy, spring-like air of a mountainous
country ! A luxury to all, but especially to those who constantly breathe the salt air
from the ocean. In tliis respect the Catskill Mountains arc unequaled.

Deservedly do the Americans call their treasure the "American Switzerland." And
above all, this perfect gem of Nature's beauty is situated in the immediate neighborhood
of the great metropolis. It seems as if the gods, in their inscrutable wisdom, had or
dained that this great city should grow up in the vicinity of the Catskills, that it might-
have within easy reach, a place of recreation unsurpassed in the splendor of its scenery.
The mountains are not only a source of pleasure to the city inhabitants, but of something
far more valuable, which money car.not buy, and that is a sound and healthy condition of
mind and body. We shall not dwell upon the beneficial effects of a mountainous climate
upon the constitution. Our judgment is of but little value, compared with the profes-
sional opinion of such renowned physicians as Doctors Hammond, Loomis, Sayre, etc.,
who have repeatedly borne testimony to the indisputable fact tliat a season spent in the
mountainous regions, in the midst of all that is beautiful, splendid and invigorating, can-
not be otherwise than beneficial. On all sides our eyes behold divine and awe-inspiring
beauty ; and we turn with a grateful heart to Him, the Supreme Architect of the Universe.

In submitting this work to the public, we believe we arc rendering them a service
which ought to secure us their good-will. We furnish the reader a safe guide-book upon
which he can implicitly rely. It is not published solely for the purpose of advertising,
but, on the contrary, to give the public an idea of tlie beautiful and romantic country so
near at hand. The illustrations furnished are ftiithful pictui-es from Nature, taken on
the spot.

This is not a mere picture-book containing illustrations, witiiout regard to the true
appearance of the objects they claim to represent. On the contrary, they are exact, hona
fide pictures of the respective scenery, just as Nature displays them. I have traveled
neaily all over the Catskill Mountain region, and all I have related in this work is the
honest statement of one who is prompted by no other motive than that of serving his
fellow-men, by calling attention to this lovely place, which is so easily reached and at
such a trifling exjiense ; and which affords the visitor pleasures of such magnitude and
variety, and benefits of such an eminent order and degree as are ecpnxled by no other
resort.

If the perusal of this work is attended with the same amount of pleasure as the pre-
paration afforded the author, lie will feel himself amply remunerated for the labor he has
bestowed upon it.

II. sen U.K.

New YoiiK. M;iv \<\, LSSL




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INDEX. •*►



Page.

Introductory, . . . • • . 5, (!, 7, 8

RAILWAY STATIONS.

Rondout, .......

West Hurley Station, ...... 11

Brown's Station, . . . • • .11

Broadhead's Bridge Station, ..... 11

Sliokan Station, . . . . • .11

Boyceville Station, . . . • ■ • H

Mount Pleasant Station, ...... 11

Phoenicia Station, ...... 13

Fox Hollow, ....... 13

Shandaken Station, ...... 15

Big Indian Station, ...... 15

Pine Hill Station, ...... 16

Summit Station, ...... 20

Griffin's Corner, ...... 20

Dean's Corner, or Arkville, ..... 21

Kelly's Corners, ...... 21

Ilalcottville, . . . . • • .21

Stratton's Falls, . . . ' . . • 22

Roxbury, ....... "'•'^

Grand Gorge, . . . . • • 23

Stamford. ....... 23



A Flying Trip into the Catskills, .... 25-37

Distances for Walking and Drivinsj-. . . . .38



INDEX
ULSTER COUNTY.

Page.

Bishop Fulls, . . , . . . . +1

The Creek, ....... 41

High Point, . . . . . . .42

A Graveyard in Ulster Co., ..... 43

Entrance into the Catskill Mountains, . . . .43

Panorama near Bushkill, . . . . . .45

Ketehnm Hollow, ....... 45

Monnt Pleasant, . . . . . . .40

View from Mount Pleasant, ..... 50

Entrance to Stony Clove, . . . . . .50

Mount Sheridan, ...... 53

To the Slide Mountain, . . . . . .54



DELAWARE COUNTY.

The Old Toll-gate, ...... 59

Coming down to Clriffin's Corner, ..... 01

The Mountains of Grand Gorge, . . . . 01



GREENE COUNTY.

Cauterskill Clove, . . . . . . fiC

Rip Van Winkle's House, ..... 6(1

The Catskill Mountain House, ..... OO

Sunset Eock, . . . . . . 07

South Lake, . . . . . . .09

Hunter ....... 70

Panorama viewed from Bhiek Dome, . . . . .70

Deep Notch from Wcstkill to Shandaken. ... 73

Conclusion, ...... 75, 7''>

Directory . ...... 78. 7!t

Advertisements, . . . . . .80



INDEX.



ILLUSTRATIONS.



>S])i"iiigtinie in the Catskills,

Panorama of the Catskills,

The Weather Witch,

A Wilderness in the Catskills,

Ivondout,

Overlook Mountain,

\'iew between Phuniieia & Fox Hollow,

AVoodland Valley,

Esopus Creek,

Old Butternut Tree,

Pine Hill Station,

Grand View between Pine Hill and Big Indian,

View from Guigou House, .

Pine Hill, and Summit.

Horse-Shoe Bend, from Pine Hill Station,

Griffin's Corner,

Roxbuiy, ...

Stamford, ....

A Romantic Spot in the Catskills,

Cauterskill Clove and Profile Roci<.

Artists' Grotto, near Toll-gate,

Cauterskill Brook at Dawn,

Kaaterskill Fall, ....

Haines and Five Cascades Falls,

Soutli and North Lake, with view of Cauterskill Hotel,

Coming through the Notch,

Cauterskill Clove, between High Peak and South Mountain,

Storm in Cauterskill Clove,

Brook in the Catskills,

Colonel Chair and Hunter Mountain,

View in Stony Clove, between Ulster and Greene Counties

Frontispiece to Interesting Places,

Bishop Falls, .....

The Creek beneath Bisho]) Falls.



Page.

2

4

7

S



10

12

J3

14

15

k;

17
IS
19
20
21
22
23
24
20

Between pages 20 »& 27

2S
30
31
32
34

Between pages 34 cS: 3o

35
37
30
40
41



INDEX.

Page.

Graveyard, Ulster County, . • . • • • 42

Entrance into the Catskill Mountains, . . . .43

Panorama near Bushkill, ..... 44

Catholic Church on the road to Shandaken, . . . .45

Mount Pleasant, ...... 40

View from Mount Pleasant, . . • . .47

La Dew Farm, ...... 48

Mount Cornell, . • ■ • • • .49

Entrance to Stony Clove from Ulster County, ... 51

Mount Sheridan with View of Shandaken Valley, . . .52

'' " " " " Woodland Valley. ... 53

Mount Wittenburg, . . • • • .55

Slide Mountain in Winter, ..... 56

AVinter in Big Indian Valley, . • • .57

View from Piazza of Grand Hotel, . . • . 58

The Old Toll-gate, . • • • • .59

Coming down Griffin's Corner, ..... 60

Delaware County as viewed from Summit, . . . .61

Montgomery Hollow, . . • • • .02

Grand Gorge, . • • • . . 03

Margaretvillc, . • • • ■ .04

Iiip Van Winkle's House, ..... 05

Tiie Catskill Mountain House, . . ■ ■ , • .07

Sunset Rock, . • '»§
South and North Lakes, .-•••■ ^'^^

Panorama as viewed from Black Dome, . . 71

Westkill— Deo Brothers, . . . • .72

Farming in Greene County, ..... 73

New York's Philanthropist, . . . .77



THE PANORAMA OF THE

CATSKILL MOUNTAINS,

VIEWED FROM THE HUDSON,



|UCH has been said in praise of the beautiful Hudson, and her picturesque High-
lands. This river is deservedly called the "Rhine of America." But the tourist
Hiust not lose sight of the gorgeous Catskills ! The overwhelming influence of
the beauty one's eye encounters, in descending the Hudson is, for a time, agree-
ably set to rest by the gentle hills of Nevvburg, thus varying the effect produced
by the ever-recurring Highlands, but almost leading one to forget that the most impres-
sive scene of the Hudson shores is soon to appear : that the Catskill mountains are nigh !
No person who desires to take this trip, should neglect to secure, before reaching Rondout,
a good position on the steamer's deck, from which he may obtain a comprehensive view of
the splendor and sublimity of these grand old Catskills, which loom up before his eyes !
Nature displays her pompous beauty in its fullest grandeur. It matters not how often
one has beheld this magnificent picture, at every succeeding view it reveals new charms
and new beauties : the form of the mountains remains ever the same, and the impression
they convey is engraved on our minds in a manner never to be effaced, never to be for-
gotten.

On the western shore is seen a beautiful hillocky land, covered with bush and thicket.
It extends for a distance of five miles, to the foot of the mountains ; so that looking in
the direction of Greene County, this large expanse of uneven ground reminds one of the
constantly heaving billows of a mighty sea, until at last the view is obstructed by the
abruptly-ascending mountains, which, crowned with the green of the forest, rise to
majestic heights, and are often veiled by misty clouds. The most delightful picture is
here presented ; the mountains are clothed in hues most beautifully varied, among which
blue is strongly predominant.

On the right bank of the stream are seen the Black Head, and the North Mount,
South Mount, the Round Top, and, ascending higher than any of these, the High Peak.
A deep and dark opening appears between these last-mentioned mountains. This dark
shadow is the Kauterskill Clove, whence the well-known Kauterskill pours forth, and,
winding its way through the hills, empties into the Hudson. On the northern side of the
South Mount one can, from the greatest distance, discern a little white spot, which looks
like a fairy chapel erected by the gods, to enable them to view with ease all the glories of
the surrounding country. This little white spot is the Mountain House. It gleams
brightly in the sun, as though extending a hearty welcome to the approaching stranger.



INTRODUCTORY.



On the same mountain, a little to the south and higher up, we can see the Kew Hotel,
which will soon become one of the landmarks of the Catskills. From this spot I witnessed
the grandest spectacle I ever had the good fortune to behold ; and that was a thunder
storm on the mountains ! Heavy, dark masses of clouds collected together ; they looked
like gigantic rocks illuminated with electricity, at another point the clouds shot with
lightning-like rapidity, first into the heights, then into the depths, as though tlie heavenly
powers were at war among themselves. With such a spectacle before his eyes, one
might well ask himself whether he is in heaven or on earth ! At another time, the
mountains appear as though asleeji ; content with the light and warmth of the sun. On
a bright day, the whole contour of the mountains is plainly v^ible. The hotels built
on their steep sides, seem to look down with friendly eyes, and as if by some magnetic
charm, one feels himself involuntarily drawn to them. There is yet another aspect of
the mountains, which the Indians have so appropriately termed " The Mountain in the
Sky." Their body is enveloped by a mist or fog, so that only their crests are visible
above this fog. One might imagine that fairies and ghosts were dancing around them.

Whoever desires to behold the wonders of Nature, and has an opportunity to do so
from this point, will easily understand the fairy tales and Indian legends related about
this place. Nature herself was the origin of those charming stories, for it is beyond the
power of expression to describe what gorgeous effects are produced by the illuminated
mist, fogs, and clouds.

The Catskills were called by the Dutch, " Kaatsberg," and by the Indians, ''Onit-
aras. " They abound in tales and legends, one of which I will relate.

"Once upon a time the children of the red men died away rapidly. They thought
some monster had come from the salt waters to kill their children. They also imagined
that by the aid of the Great Spirit, some old woman ruled over them for good or for
evil, and that her home was on the loftiest peaks of the mountains; that she hid herself in
her wigwam, and that according as her humor prompted her, she sent them good or bad
weather. They also believed that this old woman created new moons, remolded the old
ones, and hung them uji in the sky, and that she kept the winds locked up m groves,
whence she let them forth at will ; that at times she ascended and soared above mist and
fog, and seen thus by them, it was considered an ominous foreboding. They thought
that in times of dry weather, she used to spin light summer clouds out of cobwebs and
morning dew, and permitted them to descend from the mountains and float in the air
until dissolved by the rays of the sun.

" They firmly believed that she caused the blades of grass to grow in Spring, and that
the fruit ripened and the corn became abundant at her bidding, but that if for some
reason she feels that she has been offended, she grows angry, and fairly boiling in her
rage, the heavens assume their blackest hue, and, like a spider on her web, she rides u})-
on the summit of the clouds. If these clouds break. Woe ! to you, ye valleys !"

The second panoramic view of the Catskill mountains is taken from the steeple of
the City Hall at Kingston.' Viewed from this height, the effect is indeed wonderful.

But my first sight of the Catskills produced the deepest impression on me. This was
when the train from Eondout made its first stoppage at Wallkill Valley station. From
this point, one can distinguish the mountain chain, which extends in an oblique direction
from Overlook to the Catskill Mountain House. Any one who is an admirer of Nature,



INTRODUCTORY.




" Like a spicier on lier wel), she rides upon the summit of the clouds.

Woe ! to you, ye valleys."



If these clouds break.



and wislies to view the Catskills here, but has no opportunity to do so from the steeple,
should not neglect to look at this scenery from the station, and, if possible, at sunrise.

An excellent prospect is obtained from the steeple. Here, at the left, rises High
Point. From thence a zig-zag mountain chain extends in the direction of Overlook
mountain, which is also visible at the left.

The hilly ground in front obstructs the view of the broad expanse of land below
these mountain chains.

The mountains lying between the Overlook and the Catskill House, api^ear to have a
very peculiar coloring or tint, entirely different from the others, being of a bluish hue.
This is due to the fact that in the summer, inasmuch as the mountains to the left of the
Overlook receive the fullest light of the rising sun, the rays are thereby intercepted to a
great extent, and thus do not fall upon the mountains lying between. At the Overlook
Mountain House, the highest point of the mountain, the sun's rays diverge as if to spread
over the entire country. One gazes spellbound from this majestic height.



INTRODUCTORY.




A WILDERNESS IN THE CATSKILLS.



ExteiidJiig towards the riglit, over tlie Ciitskill Mountain House, to the loftiest peaks
of the distant mountains, the illumination is inexpressibly grand. The mountains
present a hazy appearance, and owing to their bluish tint, they seem to dissolve away in
the air. At this point the sun's rays fall everywhere with equal intensity on the moun-
tain chain, but from a distance it seems as if the shadow of one fell upon the other, thus
causing the bright light of the sun to appear of a bluish tinge, which gives rise to such
magical effects.

The contrast between the two great hotels is greatly emphasized by the fact that the
Overlook rises directly in front of us, and receives the full benefit of the sun, whereas
the hotel on the Catskill, being in the distance, gives the impression of a fairy dwelling
hanging in mid air.



THE CATSKILL MOUNTAINS




RONDOUT.



lioxDouT possesses a remarkably pretty little port, which carries on considerable
traffic, since it owns about thirty small steamers.

This port is situated between two mountains. The city lies to the right, while on the
left can be seen a beautiful landscape, dotted all over with pretty little cottages. The
streets of the city are very irregular and steep. They extend as far as Kingston, which
village, with Rondout, now forms the city of Kingston.

Right in front of the mountain is a cement mine, which is a source of interest to the
visitor. Several brick-kilns are also situated near by. Rondout is chiefly noted for her
extensive commerce in coal, limestone and cement, and every year this industry is becom-
ing more extensive.

At this point the railroad through the Catskills begins. Here is the first steep grade
of the railway, which extends to the highest point, viz : the Summit.

Kingston lies on the western banks of the Hudson. Tlie city was founded by the
Dutch, about two hundred years ago. Three times it was burned to the ground by the



■10



THE CATSKILL MOUNTAINS.




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Indians, from whose depredations it suffered severely. But the Dutch were alone respon-
sible for the hatred of the Indians, for cunning and cruelty marked all their dealings with
the red man. In the year 1777, three thousand British soldiers, led by General Yaughan,
ransacked tlie city.

The old adage, ''the mountains are tlic hearth of liberty" proved true again, for the
people in this region were full of love and devotion to the cause of freedom ! Here,
where the first State Constitution was drawn np, and where the first State Legislature
convened, met also- his death the first British spy captured on American soil. A carrier



THE CATSKILL MOUNT A IKS. 11



of a dispatch from Clinton proved a traitor, but he divulged his infamous secret to a
loyal heart ; the spy was arrested, and expiated his crime on the scafEold.

WEST HURLEY STATION.

This ii the first station on the way to the Overlook Mountain House.

It is elevated about 540 feet. A beautiful pathway leads from here through Wood-
stock, and thence up hill to Mead's House. From Mead's House we can obtain a
wonderfully picturesque view in all directions. In the back-ground rise the Twin Moun-
tains and Indian Heads. From Mead's House a steady up-hill road leads through the
forest directly to the Overlook Mountain House, and from here, a bird's-eye view of the
surrounding country can be had. The Hotel is situated right in front of the lofty peak
of the first mountain, thus affording a view of all the country below, as well as the distant
Hudson Highlands. In clear weather, the scenic effects arc grand beyond description.
From West Hurley Station, the Overlook Mountain House is jilainly visible, it being on
an elevation of 3,150 feet.

The next station, about three miles distant, is Olive Branch, the principal station
for the neighboring farmers. It lies at an elevation of 511 feet.

BROWN'S STATION.

It is about fifteen miles from the Hudson shore, and is situated at a height of about
525 feet above high water-mark. It is only Avithin six years that this neighborhood has
been visited as a summer resort. Mr. Lasher began at that time with four boarders.
Last year he had over fifty guests. This increase alone is sufficient evidence of the
popularity of the place.

Not far from Mr, Lasher's, are his neighbors, Messrs. Stratton, Dietrich & Brown, near
the station. This neighborhood is well adapted for organizing Hying trips into the Cat-
skills, for it contains excellent pathways, which run in all directions and, from its central
position, requires no traveling of any consequence.

BROADHEAD'S BRIDGE STATION.

This station, being the next in order, is about 5U0 feet above the level of the sea, and
at a distance of about seventeen miles from the Hudson, and one mile and a half from
Bishop'* Falls.

SHOKAN STATION,


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