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H. P. (Henry Plunkett) Grattan.

The Minerali, or, The dying gift : a romantic drama in two acts online

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PLUNKETT
The Mineral!



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FRENCH'S STANDARD DRAMA.

No. CLIL



THE MINERALI:



OR,



THE DYINa aiU'T.

A

ROMAN T.IC DRAMA,

IN TWO ACTS.
BT

HENRY GRATTAN PLUNKETT,

Author of " 2'Ae Corsair^s Reveyigc" '' Crime and Repentance, or the

Drunkard's Warning" "■Diana's Revenge,''^ '■'^ Joe Miller i^

" Faust" cjc.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED,

A Description of the Costume — Cast of the Characters — Entrances and |Exits—

Relative Positions of the Performers on the Stage, and the whole of the

Stage Business.

AS PERFORMED AT THE LONDON AND AMERICAN THEATRES.

NEW-YORK :
SAMUEL FRENCH,

122 Nassau-St.— Up Stairs,



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SANTA BARBARA



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©ostumcs.— (The Minerau.)



MARTELLT.— Broad red striped shirt, broad black and red braces,
skin cloak, black trunks, flesh arms and legs, buff lace boots, belt and
pouch.

FRANCISCO. — The same description of dress, but lighter and bet-
ter, with buff strap shoes.

MARCO AND ANTONIO. -As above, but different colors, and
much worn.

NICOLO.— Old man's handsome gray and black shape, buff shoes,
red rosettes, red stockings.

BARTOLO.— Old man's brown shape, blue rosettes, blue stockings.

RICARDO.— Handsome light blue shape, white silk stockincrs,
white shoes. °

PIETRO. — White and red comic shape, striped stockings, buff shoes,
rosettes.

LEILA. — Black boddice. blue shaped petticoat, blue stockimrs, blacl«
shoes, buckles. Second, White bridal dress. Third, The same as the
first.

ANNETTE. — Handsome peasant's dress of the .same description.



The Minerau (who are the principal persons in this drama) are a
set of men who gain a precarious existence by searching for gold in the
niountains,^ and are looked upon in no very favorable lio-ht by their more
prudent neighbors, the farmers of the surrounding valley.



THE MINEHALI.



ACT. I.

SCENK l.-Thc Valley Of An.asca.Co,tage -^-f^^'^^ J""''^*' ^"^^^'^
by dislanl view of a Village. I ime bunnse.

Enlet Francisco.

Fran "When the first beam of the warm sun gilds the mountain's

;tu'Tj;rir:tr.rai' :i. :t W.^ no .,,. of„,;>.ved Le»a,

LrirXtS^mu^t you wail' Nay a„,we, „o. ! She «ho

wMchmy eaie, feel hath flown along the path .hat lead, to thee

Lei. So thou hast ever said.
Fran And dost thou doubt me 1

Lei. Am I not Acre? what need of further answer

Mvi« None— none, my own fair girl ; but thy letter-

/irSoeaks of nee;ssi V to see thee ! Since the first happy hour

in wMcKe met "hLe much wished to speak to thee on what cor^.

cerns us iLh • no-no, I mean not that, but what affects 7ne closely
Fran aS has my heart been so misjudged by thine, that thou dost

't.l\7a5n^Taf ?m-here! Thou hast ever said, thou will be
present at my bridal day.

Fran. Aye ! and on it call thee mine

Lei. Hold!

Frayi. 1 swear

Lei I have believed thy oath too often.

£rYo?worf;'"„r™ a p,on,i.o, pe,h.p. a willing one, that .honl.
occasion-cause thy absence (as it hath often strangely done.)-" "«!>•



THE MIKERALI. O

line written by my hand, and left in the thin cleft of yonder rock, would
safely reach, and brinjj thee to me.

Fran. And have I failed 1

Lei. Now, thou hast not ; but one that loved would scarce neglect a
first request, or let a week elapse.

Fran. Leila, but yesternight, I found thy note.

Lei. Indeed !

F'ran. As I do live !

Lei. [Quickhj.] I do believe you. But 'tis strange — Eight days have
passed, since in that place a written wish I left to meet you here ; you
came not — and my heart grew sick, as day by day I watched ; 'till
weary thus of living upon hope, which still did grow the fainter — love
overswaved all that was due to pride, I — 1 wrote again.

Fran. Dearest Leila ! morn and eve, I toiled to reach the place. The
miser who has buried heart and gold in one lone spot, and lives but
while he -sees his treasure safe, did never seek with scrutinizing eye,
Keen made by hope and fear, the darling covert of his earth hid idol,
as I have watched for print of thy small tiny foot, where my heart longed
to find it.

Eci. Again I say, I do believe thee — but that letter ?

Fran. Nay, fear not, 1 will seek for it. But thy urgent wish to see
me now.

Lei. They have fixed a day for mv betrothal !

Fran. And that day 1

Lei. To-morrow !

Fran. What ill chance kept thy letter from me, this indeed is sudden..

Lei. Alas ! it is.

Fran. And they would have thee marry one, whom well they know
tb'/U lov'st not !

Lei. Even so ; though he hath been my playmate from my childhood
I love him not. I loved him not, when othsrs were not by, and now I
only hope I hate him not.

Fran. Still should'st thou be betrothed to-morrow, twelve months (so
custom wills it.) must have passed, ere thou canst wed ; there's hope
in that.

Lei. [Firmly^ None ! do not deceive thyself, or misjudge me : once
bethrothed, I bring no shame on those who gave me life, and if I find
not peace in the calm grave, ere those twelve months of misery are past,
the world shall see me at the altar's foot, and greet me as his bride as
one whose heart would break, ere she would break her faith !

\^Cros.'


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Online LibraryH. P. (Henry Plunkett) GrattanThe Minerali, or, The dying gift : a romantic drama in two acts → online text (page 1 of 3)