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Hardy Bertram McCall.

Memoirs of my ancestors; a collection of genealogical memoranda respecting several old Scottish families; with an app. ... genealogy of the McCall family online

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Gc M. L.

929.2 '

M124-01m

1733200



REYNOLnc uJicTORiCAL
GeNEALOGY COLLECTtOW



..fLLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBBARV



3 1833 00854 6365



Digitized by tine Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center



http://www.archive.org/details/memoirsofmyancesOOmcca



MEMOIRS OF MY ^VNCESTORS/



COLLECTION OF GENEALOGlCAl, MEMORANDA
RESPECTING SEVERAL

OLD SCOTTISH FAMILIES.

WITH

AN APPENDIX CONSISTING OF
A

GENEALOGY OF THE McCALL FAMILY.



BY

HAEDY BERTEAM McCALL.



KIItMIXUIIAM-

rKivATj:i,v i'i;iNTi:i) uy watson a call.

1SS4.



5'^3



l-'^3?c00



":>-^:d




TO

TlIK MOST Xoin.K

WILLIAM Iir.XnV AVALTKU MOXTA* ;r DOUOLAS-SCOTT,
Di'KK ov lUccr.Krcii ami <,il'ki:n'siii:ury ;

JIaIIQUESS ok I)CMIRIKS-Sim!K :

Eaul iiF DiiiMi.wrni;, rJriri.Kuiii, SAXQiiiAi; ami ]IaI/Keith;

ViSrOlIXT XlTII, TlICIItTIIOEWIJl.II AMI ItoSS ;

Eaiuin Dounr.As (U- Kinmiunt, Miihilebif,, DmiNOcK,

Sc'iiTT (ir AViii re iii>'ii:it and I'skhai.e;

Kafii, dp [)<)Nia>ti;k, amj Dauhx Tynhai.e :

Kmciit i>r THE most am'ihxt ami most noui.e Okiiek of the Thistee ;

LoIHl-LlEFlENANT OF I >rM FKI ESSHIKE,
i-nC, Elr. ETC.

THIS VOLUMK,

BY

HIS GlIACKS STKCIAL P KK M ISS I O.X .

IS

MUST KLSlMrTI-TLLV 1 XSClJl lUll).



KNi. urNiiiaoi) AMI FiKiv Copies ok iiii.s wcikk

AUK riHNTF.O I'Ol! I'lUVATK CIllCULATIOX, OF WHICH
THIS IS No. Q^^ A COPY MAY HI-: SEEN IX THE
I.IPKAHY OF THE BRITISH MrSECM, LONDON, AND IN
THE ADVOCATES' LIliKAKY, EDINBl'IUiH. THE COi'Y-
IIK.HT IS RESERVED.



CONTENTS.



CHAl'TER I.
THE JtcCALLS. — Probable origin of tlie family and Burname — Early notices
of the name in Dumfries-shire — Aneoilotes of John McCall, the strong
man of Glenmanna— Daviil McCall, of Edinburgh, and James McCall,
in New England in the 17th century .. .. .. .. page 1.

CHAPTER n.

GENEALOGICAL HISTORY OF THE MrCALLS.— The McCalls of Gutfock-
land and Kello-side — The iHindasses of Dundas and of Arniston — •
George McCall emigrates to Philadelphia — Samuel of Glasgow, with his
family — John McCall of the Black House, Glasgow — William, a mer-
chant in Liverpool, and afterwards of Maidenhill. Penrith — lolm
McCall of Walthamstow, with his family — The Family Arms, Ac. page 7.

CHAPTER III.
Margaret Adam, of the house of Adam of Tour— Helen Cross and the

Thomsons, with the arms of tlie last mentioiV'd f.iniily .. pnge 17.

CHAPTER IV.
THE LISTONS. — Tradition as to Norman descent — Early notices of the
name at Saint Andrews, in Linlithgowshire, and elsewhere — William
Liston, of Ovemewliston — Patrick, of Longton and Wheatlands,
identities himself with the Covenanters — The Wilkies — Mr. John
Liston, minister of Aberdour — Patrick, minister of Ayr — Tlie Rt. Hon.
Sir Robert Liston, G.C.B.. Tuikish .Ambassador— Mr. Robert Li-ton
succeeds his father in the njinistry of Aberdour, Moderator of General
Assembly, Ac. — His family — The family arm-. .. .. page 19.

CHAPTER V.

THE SCOT.S, uf Thirlstane — Probable origin of the surname — Anciently
designated of Howpaisb'y — Early lineage — John Scot has a giant of
augmentation to his arms by James V. — Robert, warden of the west
border, marries a daughter of the Bucclcueh family — Sir John, a
zealous royalist, fought for the Stuaits under Montrose — Francis Scot
lost the family estates — Patrick Scot, of TawnlawhiU, the ancestor of
Lord Napier — The family arms, Ac. .. .. .. ... jiage 24.



vni.

THE SCOTTS, of Rucileucli. — Lineage aud outline liistory. fioiii Sii Uiehard
le Scot, anno. I'-'C.o, to Marv;aret Seott, wlio mairied to Rol)ert Scot,
of Tliirlstanc— The descent of tlie Duke- of Biiccleuch . . page ,30.

CH.VPTEK VI.
THE .\LL.iXS. — nigliland descent — Origin of surname explained — Captain
liobert .\llan banislied and tied to Holland — }Iistory of his descendants
in Edinljuigh — David Allan niari'iis the hiiress of lianken, of
Colden — Roliert .\llan, F.K.S.K., iVc, sur>.'eon in Edniburgli — The family
anns, Ac. . . . . . . . . . . page .37.

CH.M'TER VII.

THE HARDIES.— Of French extraction— Supposed origin of the surname
and arms — The Hardies, of Cargarse. for several centuries the chieftains
of this surname and family — Rev. Henry Hardie, minister of Cnlross
—Rev. Prof. Thomas Hardy, D.D.. of Charlestield, with his family—
The family arms, Ac.

THE HALKERSTONS. — Of Danish extraction — David Ilack'ston, of
Katliillet, a iiromincnt leader in the covenanters insurrection, executed
in 1C80 for the murder of the Archbishop of Saint Andrews — .John
Halkerston, of Halkerston Death, town clerk of Culross — The Rankins,
of Colden, Ac... .. ... .. .. .. Page 45.

CHAPTER VIII.
THE ANCESTORS of Agnes Young (Mrs. Dr. Hardy.)— Lineage and history
of the Youngs, ministers of Glasgow and of Hutton. Dumfries-shire —
The Meins — The Orrs — Alexamkr Orr. of Beith. a prominent cov-
enanter—The Cranl'urds, of Auchinames, lineage and sketch liistory,
dating from Sir Reginald Craniurd, temp. William, the Lion — The
Dalrymples, of 'Waterside — The families of Hemes, JIcGill,
Copland, <S-c page r,G.

■ CHAl'TER IX.
On the armorial hearings of the several familiis mentioned in the preceeding
part of the work, with some explanations as to origin and signi-
ficance . . . . . . ■ . . . . page 73.

APPENDIX.
A pedigree or genealogy of the descendants of 'William XleCall and

Marion Dundas .. .. ... .. .. page 81.



PREFACE.



Family History i? a study which everyone pursues to
a greater or lesser extent ; everybody likes to know some-
thing about his ancestors : nearly everybodv. I suppose,
repeats to his chiliiren some tales or stories about their fore-
fathers which he has heard from his parents, and if only the
practice of making careful records of such traditions became
more general than it is at present, stores of interesting
information might be preserved for posterity which are now
steadily gliding into oblivion. Such a rcconl is what is aimed
at in the following pages, and they profess to be no more
than this. They are, in fact, simply a collection of such
notes, upon the pedigree of my own family, as I liave, from
time to time been able to gather from various sources, and
arranged into something like readable form.

The most pleasant duty I have in writing tliese few pre-
faratory lines, is to return my since and cordial thanks for the
uniform kindness and assistance which I ha\'e experienced
from a wide circle of relatives and friends, without whose aid
my funily memoirs could not have contained half the infor-
mation which, thus favored, I ha\-e been able to bring
together; and also to acknowledge with ecjual candour and
gratitude the assistance which I have received from the
researches of other writers, amongst which ma\' be mentioned
the works of Nisbct, Douglas, Scot,* Stodart,t &c.

• yiu<ti EccU.ua Sojticaii.c. Ijy the Ilcv. H.-.v Scot. DA).
t Scotliili Arms. Ijy It. 1!. Stoaart. D.'i.i., .if llif Lyoii orUcr.



It is decnioi] unnecessary liere to expatiate upon tlie pleasure
or profit to be deriN'ed from enquir%- into family history, because
it is presLinieil that all who ha\e referred to these pajjes have
already felt some interest in the subject. " It is wise for us,"
as Webster tells us, " to recur to the history of our ancestors.
"Those who do not look upon themscKes as links connecting
" the past with the future do not fulfil their duty in the
"world." Thus it has been in\- aim, as one link in the lon<:
chain of life, to pa\' a tribute of respect to the memory of those
who have gone before, at the same time discharging an obliga-
tion due to those who shall come after ; and I earnestly hope
that mv endeavour to do justice to the subject ma\' be taken
in good part b\- all, and in the spirit in which it is made, and
the pleasure which I myself have found in the work will be
greatly enhanced, if it should in any way contribute to the
edification of others.

HARDY BERTRAM McCALL.
Edgb.\ston-,

Nkar Birmingham,
April ISS4.



A CIIPtMNOLO*; :CAL
LIST OF Tin; KlNtlS OF SCOTLAND,



WITH THE



DATKS OF TIIEIi; SUCCESSION.



Malcolm III.
Eiir.Aii -
Alkx.\niikr I.
IiAvir, I.
.Malcolm IV.

WiLLUM I. -
Al.KXAMiKK II.

Alkxanhii; III,

MAP.dARKT

Jons IUli.iol
Rom;m I.
lUvii. II. -



1057


RODERT II.


10117


IlOBF.KT III.


1107


James I.


1121


James II.


1153


J.AMES III.


1165


JA^^ES IV.


1211


James V.


1219


Mary -


12SG


James VI.


1292


Charles I.


l.TOC


Charles II


1329


James VII.



1371
1390
1400
1437
14C0
148.S
1513
1512
1507
1025
1649
16S5



ERRATA.



On p. 2, line 32, for 2(jth July, 1G38, read " 2Gth July, 1638."

On p. 17, line 20, for 2!ith December, 17.52, read " 2'Jth December, 1750."

On p. 33, line 31, for 17tli April, 1547, read " 17tli April, 1571."

On p. 41, line 5, for Owen's College, Shellieki, read " Wesley College, Sliellield,

and at the Sheffield Medical School."
On p. 57, line 21, for 2Gth March, 1509, read " 2Gth March, 1C59."
On p. 59, line 8, for September, 1793, read "September, 1736."
On p. 61, line 2G, for H'illitiiu read " Al,\T'indi-r."
On p. 70. line 32. for Mr. .\lesander Orr found it necessary to sell Waterside,

read " Mr. Alexander Orr's executors found it necessary,"

etc. ^[r. Orr died in 1771.
On p. 89, line 23,"for /f^nuu/ C/., read '■Hubert Ci."



CHAPTER I.



PROBABLE ORIGIN AND EARLY NOTICES OF THE
McCALL FAMILY.



THE McCALLS of Dmnfries-shirc arc ijcnernlly believed
to be descended from the Highland clan MacAulay. Such is
the tradition at the present time held by man)- of the name in
Dumfries-shire, and the similarity of the armorial bearings of
the famil_\- to those of the Mac.\iilay's (as explained on
page 73) may be taken as a confirmation iif the supposition.

The Mac.\ulays, or Mc.Mlas, were a highland clan of great
antiquit}-, their earliest chieftains ha\ing been designated de
Ardincapill, from the name of their residence in Dumbarton-
shire, which had been in their possession eyer since the days
of King Robert I. They considered themselyes a branch or
sept of the clan Gregor, and in a bond of manrent, or deed of
clanship, entered into 27th Ma_\', 1591, between the MacGregor
of Glenstrae and Mac.\ula\- of .\rdincaplc, tliey describe them-
selyes as originally descended from the same stock, — '■ the
McAlpins of auld;"' frcjm which it would appear that a Celtic
deriyation ma\- be claimed fur the larjuh, although some have
considered that the MacAulays \sere desceiided from a joungcr
son of one of the ancient liarls of Lennox.



2 Mr.MoiRs or Mv Anckstoks.

One of tliis race then (it is assumed), found his way to the
south in very earlv times and settleil in Dumfries-shire, where
his hij^'liiand apiieliation of .\farAula\- would gradually have
become changed to Macaul or McCaU. This is by no means
to be wondered at, when ^\•c consider tlie uncertain character
of tlie orthography of ancient days ; indeed in documents of
so recent date as tlie iSth century, Mr. Samuel McCall of
Glasgow, has himself spelled his name variously, McAulI,
McAall anil McCall. The last mode of spelling is now almost
universalis- adopted, although there are those \\-ho write their
name McAII, which would, indeed, seem the more correct way.

The surname is at least as old as the fifteenth century, for
we find mention made of a Gilbert McCaull — born about
1490-1500 — designed as of That Ilk, who died without male
issue, leaving three daughters co-heiresses, one of whom,
Marion, died before 15th October, 1590, when her grandson,
Thomas McCauIl, was served heir to her crown lands (not
named) in the barony of Tibbers, near Drumlanrig, in
Dumfries-shire.

In the course of the 17th century there were several of the
name in different parts of Dumfries-shire, as appears from
documents in the possession of the various branches of the
family, and also from the iniblic records of the nation. James
Makcaull, in Glenyne. had a charter of the lands of Harlabog,
in the baronv of San(julKir, 20th Jul\', 1624, from James
Crichtoun, of Carco, and Florence Maxwell, his spouse, — the
witnesses being .\ndrew McCaull, in Castle of Sanquhar, and
William McCaull. Ids sun; these lands were subsequently
renunciated bv the said James MakeauU to William, \'iscount
of Ayr, on 14th Maw iCijo. The wills of Johne McCaull, in
Castlemavnes, of Sancjuhar, and of Jonet Blaikloch, his spouse,
were botii [troved <in 20111 July, 165S ; and also on the same
date the will of John MrCaiill, ui Xcther-Dalpedder, also in



The McCaix Famit.y. 3

the parish of Sanquliar; a second John McCall, in Nether-
Dalpedder, died between 1659 and 1670, leavinf,' a son — also
John. Georpe McCall, or Makcall. in Drumdells, was heir of
his brother John, of the crown lands of Auchincheane, in
Glencairn parish, 4th September, 1646, and of his nephew
John, of Auchincheane, iSth May, 1647 : — James McCaulle in
Aucliintagg;art, in Sanquhar parish, died in 1654, Icavine; a
son Robert, and a daughter Helen, and was succeeded in
Auchintaggart by George ^[cCaull, whose eldest son, William,
was infefted in the merk-land of Aldcrv, in the barony of
Grenane, and Stewartry of Kirkcudbright, in consiileration
and securit}- of 1,300 mcrks borrowed from him by Alexander,
Earl of Galloway. Patrick McCall, in Airkinholme, died be-
fore 1659 ' ^^'illiam McCall, in Conricke, is mentioned in 1660,
and John McCaul was ' martyred ' at Irvine about 16S0, during
the time of the religious persecution on account of his con-
nection with the nonconformists" rebellion ; — Andrew McCall
in Walkm\lne of Glenquhoirs, Thomas in Nether Garoch.
with his son Robert, and John McCall, attorney in Furnetoun
— both in the parish of Kcllo — witness various sasines about
1680-4.

John McCall, in Glenmanna, in the parish of Penpont, was
a character still remembered b\- the country people of the
district on account of his great bodily strength. According
to popular legend, the first evidence of his strength was in the
year 1641, when he was only 20 },'ears of age, and was thus
obtained. During the summer nights his father's cattle were
kept in a fold, from which they frequentl)- broke out and
injured the corn. Early one morning his father sent him to
see if all was right, and he returned so soon that his father
would not believe that he had been, and ordered him to go
again ; he did so, and on his return said to his father, ' If you
go to the door you will now see whether I have been down to



4 Mf.moirs or My Axcf.stors.

the fold.' The father went, and to the astonishment of all,
found the bull lyin^ bound with liis four legs tied to^^iether I
Another feat of his stren.[;th was his carryini; a tree upon his
shoulder. He asked the Duke of Oueensberry for a tree upon
the latter's estate, and the Duke havin,^' heard of McCall's
reputed strength said, " Vou may take such a one as you can
carry on your back.' He cut the tree so that it fell upon a
support in such a manner that he could get his shoulder under
it, and then carried it some distance, or as some say, threw it
over the park wall ; — the tree afterwards required eight horses
to drag it to Glenmanna, wheel carts not being at that time in
use, and there being no roads. This strong man was after-
wards the subject of a wager between the Duke and one of
his guests who prided himself on his powers at throwing the
cannon ball, which was a favorite pursuit in the 17th century.
This was at the time when Drumlanrig Castle was in course
of erection (completed in 1690), and McCall being sent for by
the Duke, the competitors were to try who could throw the
ball higher up the wall of the castle. A large number of
ladies and gentlemen, an<i man\- of the people from the neigh-
bourhood were present to witness this trial of strength, and
the gentleman, who threw first, succeeded in getting the
cannon ball a little more than half-way up the wall, when
Glenmanna, requesting the attendants to see that tliere was
no one on the other side, at once threw it right over. On
another occasion, a party of militar\- men, eleven in number,
who were scouring the country in search of nonconformist
ministers — or ' field preachers." as they were called — came to
Glenmanna and demanded food. It was at that time the
custom for the military to live like freebooters upon the
farmers and country people wherever they happenerl to be,
and ordinary entertainment would not iiave been denieil them,
but they ordered that a calf which they had seen in the byre



The McCali. Family. 5

should be killed for their breakfast, and beiii.L: .s^reatly provoked
by their assuming manners, and having' jireviously secured
their weapons, " the McCall seized them in pairs, and shook
" them together as they had been sheep, and binding their arms
" with a straw rope, he drove them, breakfastlcss, to Sanquhar,
" when he delivered them up to Colonel Douglas, to whom
" he was not a stranger." This is said to ha\e been the last
military e.xcursion made into the district of Scar-water. Many
other tales are told concerning tlie strong man of Glenmanna.
He is said to have pulled up a _\oung tree by the roots near
Mussleburgh, which was long kept as proof of his astonishing
strength ; he also carried a pack of wool (which would weigh
no less than 300 lbs.) across the grass market, at Edinburgh,
and to silence a sheep farmer who provoked him at Edinburgh,
he picked up a wether sheep from his tlock and threw it right
over the West Port ! The faculties of his mind are said to
have been of a superior cast equally with those of his body ;
he is described as of a placid disposition and jmous sentiments,
and he died in 1705, in his S5th jxar, being succeeded in
Glenmanna b\' his son.

The surname does not ajipear to have been numerous,
excepting about Dumfries-shire and Gallowa}-, though isolated
occurrences of it are not wanting in the records of other places.
There was a David McCaull. a merchant-burgess in Edinburgh,
who seems to ha\c been an influential person, and was con-
cerned in se\'eral public transactions about the year ifiio: he
died between 1^)38 and 164J, leaving three daughters, co-
heiresses, namely Christian, Jaiut and Katherine, married to
John Dcnniston, John Rvnd and Ninian Louis, respecti\'el\'.
James McCall made his appearance in New England about
1680, and was made a freeman of Marshfield, Mass., in March
1684; he was afterwards a leading citizen of that town and a
large landowner, holding also manv town offices, and his



Memoirs of Mv Ancestors.



descendants are still in that country. Georfje McCall, from
the parish of Sanquhar, cini.Ljrated to Philadelphia about 1701.
whose descendants have ever since been one of the leadinj;
families there, as is more particularly shown in the appendix
to this book.



CHAPTER II.



LINEAGE OF THE McCALL FAMILY.



But to pass from general notices of the surname to the
consideration of the iineat;c of that branch of tiie familv which
is to form the subject of the present chapter. The immediate
ancestor of this family would appear to be

PATRICK McCALL, who was laird of Guffockland, a small
estate or farm just above the village of Kirkconnel, in the
parish of Sanquhar,* and shire of Dumfries, of which he was
a crown vassal. He was succeeded by his son

JOHN McC.\LL, who had previously farmed the farms of
Spango and Corsebank, and seems to have succeeded to
Guffockland about the year iDio. although he was not formally
retoured his father's heir until 3rd October, 1629. He had at
least three sons and one daughter, namelv (i.) William of
Boghons, (ii.) Patrick, who witnessed a deed at Sanquhar, gth
June, 1594, liii.) Samuel : and (i.) a daughter, married to John
McMath, son of John McMath of Dalpedder. There is an old
deed by John McCall of Guffockland. discharging his eldest
son William of " certain greate summas of monev," and dis-
poning to the said William tive score sheep pasturing on his



* Guffockland is now Kirticonufl parish, which has been a separate parish since
1700, but at the time we speak of it was all included in Scnu/Hft.ir. This takes its
name from an an ancient castle, the remains of which are in tliat parish, the Celtic
words SiiH cliiur si^inifving oUI lort. llie same word may be seen in the name of
the pari:.h of Kfir. aud in O/'-r-laverock, the fort of I.ewarch-Cl;;;,' who is said to
have founded it in tlie lUh centuiy. The ruins of Suuquliar castle were searched
with fjreat care some .years ano liy order of Ills (liact- of Ifuccleuch. and many
interesting olijeets were f jund.



8 Memoirs of Mv Ancestors.

lands at Bo^'hons, &c., executed at Guffockland, 5th May,
1610, and also of the same place and date, a discharge to his
son Patrick in respect of all b\-gone debts.

SAMUEL McCALL, who was the first farmer of the
name in Kelloch-side, is most probably the same Samuel who is
mentioned as son of the preceiiinj; John McCall of Guffock-
land. Kelloch-siile uiow Kello-side) is a neitjhbourin.g farm to
Guffockland, in the same parish of Kirkconnel, and situated,
as its name implies, on the banks or bv the silL- of the Kelloch
or Kello-water, a trilnitary of the river Nith. The old farm-
house which stood beside the stream is now in ruins, and
its site is occupied bv a lar,£;c dair\', the modern buildint,'
being at that end of the farm nearest to the village of Kirk-
connel from which it is about a mile distant. Samuel McCall
was succeeded as a tenant in Kello-side by his son

WILLIAM McCALL, who witnesses the marriage con-
tract of his son Samuel, jth August, 1707, and dying before
1714, was buried with his fathers in Sanquhar churchyard.
The sexton, then a \er_\- old man, pointed out the gravestone
to Robert McCall in iNi4. but it was then very much broken
and worn and no part o( the inscription was legible : there are
several of the name still living in the neighbourhood and many
are brought in from tlie surrounding districts to be buried in
Sanquhar churchwird to this daw

Mr. William McCall made what is called a good marriage.
About the \ear i'j79 he married Marion Dundas, daughter to
Sir James Dimi.Jas, the second baron of Arniston, one of the
Senators of the College of Justice.

The DunJiisses of Arniston derive their origin from a .voun<,'er son of
George Puntlas, of Dundas, who represented a family than which few in
Scotland can lioast a more illustrious descent, whether we consider the
hiyh antiiinity and s|!t/ndour to which heralds and genealogists have
assigned its oii^in, witli a lont; list of nolile alliances, or the production
of a series of men. eminently distinKuished for their services in the
highest ollicps in Scot'iind. If tlie pride of ancestry is ever allowaljle, as
Lord ■\Voodlioiislic tells us. it surelv is where those ancestors have adorned



The McCall Family. 9

the stations which they tilled by that genuine merit, which, independent
of rank, must have entitled them to the respect and esteem of their fellow
citizens.

The surname is of local ori.^'in, being tiiUi-n from the lands of Dundas
in West Lothian, which were obtained by Huttied de DunJas about the
end of the 11th century, from his father, Cospatrick, the grandfather of
Cospatrick, lat Earl of Dunbar and March, wlio is said to have been
descended from the Saxon I'linccs of Euglaml. The history and lineage
of the family may be seen in liurke's Ltiiidcd Gentry, and in almost every
other work on the same subject.

^^'illianl McCnIl and Marion Dundas are said to have had a
large family of sons and daui^diters.

(i.) Samuel was the eldest, of whom presently.

(ii.) George, emigrated in 1701 to the American Colonies,
where he purchased an estate of 15,000 acres of land
upon the Schuzekill rivcr, which he called ' Doiitrlas
Manor,' and there is an act of council, passed 24th
June, 1735, entitled ' .\n Act for more effectual vesting
and settling certain lands in George McCall.' He
married Ann, daughter to Jasper Yeates, Escp. of
Philadelphia, a memloer of the council (of English
descent), b\- his wife, Catherine Sandilands, a grand-
. daughter of Jiiran K}n, of Sweden, who arrived in
America from that countr\- in 1643, and founded
Upland, since called Chester, Pa.

(iii.) Archihald, succeeded his fither as tenant in Kello-side
and was the last of the name there ; he married
Marion Hair who sur\i\ed him, and was buried in
San(]uhar churcluard before 1732. It is said that


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