Harold Edgar Young.

A perambulation of the Hundred of Wirral in the county of Chester, with an account of the principal highways and byways, old halls, ancient churches, and interesting villages situated between the rivers Mersey and Dee .. online

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\MBULATION
;IE HUNDRED
WIRRAL




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



A PERAMBULATION OF THE
HUNDRED OF WIRRAL



A
PERAMBULATION

OF THE

HUNDRED OF WIRRAL

IN THE

COUNTY OF CHESTER



WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE PRINCIPAL HIGHWAYS AND BYWAYS, OLD HALLS

ANCIENT CHURCHES, AND INTERESTING VILLAGES SITUATED

BETWEEN THE RIVERS MERSEY AND DEE



BY

HAROLD EDGAR YOUNG

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY

WM. FERGUSSON IRVINE, M.A., F.S.A.
ILLUSTRATED WITH MAP, AND FIFTY-NINE PLATES



" Oh, piper, let us be up and gonef
We'll follow you quick if you II pipe us on,
For all of us want to go there."



LIVERPOOL

HENRY YOUNG SONS
1909



First Edition, October 1909
Second Impression, October 1909
Third Impression, November 1909



C6Y7



DEDICATION

MY "DEAR FATHER, A good deal of water has
flowed down the Dee since you held me by
the hand and took me for my first walk in
the Hundred of Wirral, and gave me my first
swimming lesson in the Dee. Since those days
I have wandered far in Europe, America, and
Asia, yet have always returned to mine own land
with a greater love for it and its characteristic
scenery. In this little book I have attempted to
describe a small but interesting tract of country
in my close neighbourhood. Perhaps my reach
has exceeded my grasp, but I have done my best.
I have been fortunate in having the advice of
William Fergusson Irvine, Esq., M.A., F.S.A.,
who has done so much for Wirral history, and
who has generously allowed me to consult him
on some matters which were obscure to me. I
know I should have done better had I consulted
him more freely, but I desired to sail as far as
possible under my own flag. For his kindly
help he has already heard my thanks.



SC8655



DEDICATION

I have also been fortunate in receiving the
valuable assistance of Alexander Reid, Esq., of
West Kirby, who has supplied me with many of
the illustrations for my book. He has accom-
panied me wherever I have asked him, and has
taken the utmost pains with his pictures, develop-
ing and printing them with his own hand. I need
not tell you for he is an old friend of yours
that his work has been entirely a labour of love,
and I owe him a deep debt of gratitude for it.

My thanks are also due to Arthur D. Holland,
Esq., of Hooton ; J. H. Clayton, Esq., of Willas-
ton ; the Rev. F. Sanders, M.A., F.S.A., Vicar
of Hoylake; John R. Logan, Esq., M.B., C.M.,
of Liverpool ; J. Fleming Stark, Esq., of Brom-
borough ; Mr. G. T. Shaw, Chief Librarian of
the City of Liverpool ; and Mr. J. Harding,
Librarian of the Mayer Free Library.

It is but natural that I should dedicate this
book to you, even if affection did not impose it
upon me, for you have other and outstanding
claims. Seventy-three years ago you came, as a
small boy, outside a stage-coach, rattling through
the Hundred of Wirral before the era of the
steam locomotive, finishing your long journey
from Cornwall to Liverpool ; and in your seventy-
fifth year you rode your bicycle 75! miles in a



DEDICATION

day, completing the last stage of the journey on
the very road over which you had travelled in the
stage-coach as a boy ; and in your eighty-seventh
year, accompanied by one of your grandsons, you
rode your bicycle 43 miles in a day through, and
round and about Wirral.

If this work meets with your approval I shall
consider my labour amply rewarded.

I am, your affectionate Son,

HAROLD E. YOUNG.



SANDGATE, BLUNDELLSANDS,
September 1909.



CONTENTS



CHAPTER I

PAGE

Leland's Description of Wirral Books about Wirral
Situation and Description of Wirral State of Roads
Architecture . . i



CHAPTER II

Birkenhead Priory Tranmere Hall Rock Ferry and

Nathaniel Hawthorne Port Sunlight . . -15

CHAPTER III

Bebington The Bebingtons and Flodden Field Mayer
Museum Cow Charity Bromborough Pool Court
House A Model Village Battle of Brunanburh . 28

CHAPTER IV

Eastham Hooton Hall The Stanleys of Hooton
Edward Stanley Sir William Stanley The Old
Hall Last of the Wirral Stanleys . . . -47

CHAPTER V

Poole Hall The Poole Family Overpool Ellesmere
Port Stanlaw Point Stanlaw Abbey The Cister-
cians . . . ... . . . .60

ix



CONTENTS



CHAPTER VI

PAGE

Stoke in 1816 Whitby Stanney Stoke TheBunbury
Family Chorlton and George Ormerod Backford
The Birkenhead Family Lea Mollington
Blacon Point Great Saughall Mrs. Mary Davies 74

CHAPTER VII

Shotwick The Church The Castle Puddington Old
Hall The Massey Family William Massey and
the Pretender The Fight The Escape A Gallant
Ride The Lofty Seat of Puddington Capenhurst 90

CHAPTER VIII

Willaston The Old Hall Red Lion Inn The Wirral
Stone Burton and the Congreves The Bishop of
Sodor and Man Burton Parish Registers Burton
Woods Quakers' Graves Nesse Lady Hamilton 103

CHAPTER IX

Neston A Great Funeral The New Quay Neston
Coaches The Church Burne-Jones Windows
Parkgate The Smugglers A Friend of Milton
Theophilus Gibber Charles Kingsley Raby Mere 120

CHAPTER X

Wirral Footpaths Association Prenton An Ancient
Road Storeton Storeton Hall The Quarries
Brimstage Hall Brimstage Village Gayton Hall . 142



CONTENTS



CHAPTER XI

PAGE

Heswall Oldfield Over the Fields to Thurstaston
Thor's Stone Thurstaston Hall Dawpool, Hall
and T. H. Ismay The Church Irby Hall
Landican 157

CHAPTER XII

Oxton Over the Fields to Woodchurch The Church
Curious Charity Rent of the Farms Upton
Bidston Bidston Hall The Derby Family
James, 7th Earl of Derby Bidston Hill Wallasey
Church Early Marriages The Racecourse . .169

CHAPTER XIII

New Brighton Leasowe Castle Leasowe Racecourse
and Lord Derby Horse-racing The Lighthouse
Meols Stocks Dove Spit Encroachment of the
Sea Hoylake Duke of Schomberg's Army A
King at Hoylake The Hoyle Lake Rev. F.
Sanders, M.A., F.S.A. . . . , . .181

CHAPTER XIV

In the Footsteps of the Pilgrims A Cell of Monks
Pilgrims Pilgrims in Japan The Constable's
Sands Hilbre West Kirby Ships and Shipping
in the Reign of King Henry VIII. West Kirby
Church Grange The Glegg Family On Going
Home . . 201



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

HILBRE ISLAND Frontispiece

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

THE WIRRAL HORN 12

BlRKENHEAD PRIORY facing 15

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

TRANMERE HALL 19

From an engraving.

PORTION OF WINDOW, TRANMERE HALL .... 20
PORT SUNLIGHT facing 27

From a photograph lent by Messrs. Lever Bros.

BY STORETON QUARRIES 28

Photographed by the Author.

BEBINGTON CHURCH 30

From a photograph lent by the Trustees of the Mayer
Free Library.

COURT HOUSE, BROMBOROUGH POOL . . 37

Photographed by the Author.

ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, LION AND CROWN, DRAGON 37
BROMBOROUGH POOL . 41

From a drawing lent by J. Fleming Stark.

BROMBOROUGH CROSS 45

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

THE OLD HALL, HOOTON 57

From' an engraving.

HOOTON HALL: PRESENT DAY 58

Photographed by the A uthor.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PACK

POOLE HALL : SOUTH FRONT facing 58

Photographed by the Author.

POOLE HALL 60

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

FARM AND SITE OF STANLAW ABBEY . . 66

Photographed by the Author.

ANCIENT DOORWAY, STANLAW ABBEY . . 71

Photographed by J. R. Logan, M.B., C.M.

SUBTERRANEAN PASSAGE, STANLAW ABBEY . . 71

Photographed by J. R. Logan, M.B., C.M.

THROUGH EASTERN WIRRAL THE SHIP CANAL . 73

Photographed by the Author.

STOKE CHURCH 79

Photographed by the Author.

CHORLTON HALL 80

From a photograph lent by W. H. Walker.

MOLLINGTON HALL ,,83

Photographed by the Author.

BLACON POINT ,,85

Photographed by the Author.

PORTRAIT OF MRS. MARY DAVIES 87

SHOTWICK HALL facing 9

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

SHOTWICK CHURCH >, 92

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

INTERIOR OF SHOTWICK CHURCH . . 93

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

SITE OF SHOTWICK CASTLE 94

Photographed by the Author.

PUDDINGTON OLD HALL 96

Photographed by the Author.

WILLASTON HALL 103

Photographed by the Author.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PACK

RED LION INN, WILLASTON .... facing 104

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

THE WIRRAL STONE ...'.... 106

Photographed by the Author.

BURTON HALL 108

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

DR. THOMAS WILSON, BISHOP OF SODOR AND MAN in

from] an engraving.

BIRTHPLACE OF BISHOP WILSON, BURTON . 112

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

QUAKERS' GRAVES, BURTON WOODS. . . . iiS

Photographed by the Author.

PARKGATE 129

Photographed by the Author.

A RELIC OF OLD PARKGATE . . _._/ . 132

Photographed by the Author.

RABY MERE 139

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

WHEAT SHEAF INN, RABY ,,140

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

DlBBENSDALE 141

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

ANCIENT ROAD, PRENTON ,,146

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

STORETON HALL THE HOME OF THE STANLEYS . 148

Photographed by the Author.

BRIMSTAGE HALL ,,151

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

GAYTON HALL 155

Photographed by the Author.

HESWALL CHURCH 157

Photographed by the Author.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PACK

DAWPOOL HALL facing 161

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

THOR'S STONE . 162

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

IRBY HALL . . 167

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

HARVEST TIME, NEAR IRBY ... . .. . 168

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

WOODCHURCH 170

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

BIDSTON HALL . 174

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

JAMES STANLEY, 7TH EARL OF DERBY, HIS COUNTESS

AND CHILD 176

From an engraving.

LEASOWE CASTLE 1850-60 ,,184

From an engraving.

THE SUBMARINE FOREST 189

From a photograph lent by Rev. F. Sanders, M.A.

VIEW FROM CALDY HILL 208

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

WEST KIRBY CHURCH 211

Photographed by Alexander Reid.

CALDY 213

Photographed by Alexander Reid,

SKETCH MAP OF THE HUNDRED OF WIRRAL, SHOW-
ING THE AUTHOR'S ROUTE . at end



INTRODUCTION

WHEN Sir Gawayne sought for the Green
Knight, we are told that he came in his wander-
ings into "the wyldrenesse of Wyrale," but no
one had heard of the object of his quest, and
so he left this wild and pitiless region ; a land
that, in the words of the Petition of the " poor
Commonalty of Wyrall " in 1376, "had suffered
great harm, damage, and destruction " from the
beasts of the forest, so that even the Churches
were desolate and Divine services withheld.
When Mr. Ormerod wrote his history a hundred
years ago, he saw but little change from this
dreary picture if we are to give full weight to his
words, for he speaks of nearly every village as
barren, desolate, dreary.

With such thoughts in mind, the reader who
takes up Mr. Young's book is as one who passes
from the gloom of a' cave into the full blaze of
midsummer sun. Truly the nineteenth must
have been a century of miracles to have wrought
such a change, and yet those who know this
delectable land will not quarrel with Mr. Young
for the warmth of his praise. Few large centres

xvii {,



INTRODUCTION

of population can, like Liverpool, boast of such
delightful and largely unspoilt country lying at
the very door ; country, moreover, that has
historical associations so full of interesting and
picturesque incident.

It is perhaps somewhat of a reflection on the
dwellers between Mersey and Dee that it is left
to a man from Lancashire to discover and tell
all the charm of the Peninsula of Wirral ; but
it is travellers who write the best descriptions of
the countries through which they wander, for most
objects are so familiar to the dwellers there that
they have long ago forgotten to notice them.
So coming from South-west Lancashire, where
the natural objects include Bootle, Widnes, St.
Helens, and other centres of industry, the fresh
green fields and flowery country lanes of the
Cheshire peninsula and the varied views of
mountain and sea have so inspired Mr. Young's
pen that he cannot but tell the things he has
seen and heard.

Mr. Young brings to his task the trained eye
of a man who has travelled and observed, and
he is able to take a wider view than the mere
historical student, for he has an intimate know-
ledge of the work that has already been done
in dealing with the history, geology, flora, and
entomology of Wirral, and, what is better, has
formed a shrewd estimate of the relative values



INTRODUCTION

of the different writers, and so is able to know
where to turn for his facts, and how much weight
to attach to each authority. Mr. Young does
not only address those who are interested in the
history and archaeology of the district, but the far
wider circle of readers who wish to know about
the district in which they live. At the same
time he has exercised such a wise discretion in
selecting and such care in checking his infor-
mation that the student of local history will often
find him a more trustworthy guide than more
pretentious authors.

WM. FERGUSSON IRVINE.



XIX



A PERAMBULATION OF
WIRRAL

CHAPTER I
LELAND'S DESCRIPTION OF WIRRAL

IT is only in comparatively recent years that the
Hundred of Wirral has received the serious atten-
tion of the county historians it so richly deserves.
Leland and the early itinerants describe it
briefly, and it has been questioned whether the
great Camden ever visited Wirral at all. The
industrious antiquary, John Leland, who was
born in London in the year 1506, and in 1533
was appointed by Henry VIII. to be "the
King's Antiquary," and given authority to
describe " all England's antiquities," wandered
through England in his arduous search for many
years, and a precious relic had to be well shel-
tered to escape his ever-watchful eye. So one
day about the years 1536-1539 he came into
Wirral, and describes it thus :

" Wyrale begynnith lesse then a. quarter of a
mile of the very cite self of Chester, and withyn

X A



LELAND'S DESCRIPTION OF WIRRAL

a 2. bow shottes of the suburbe without the northe
gate at a litle brooket caullid Flokars Broke that
ther cummith ynto Dee Ryver, and ther is a dok
wherat at spring tide a ship may ly, and this place
is caullid Porte Poole.

" Half a myle lower ys Blaken Hedde, as an
armelet of the grounde pointing oute. At this is
an olde manor place longging to the Erie of
Oxforde, and theryn lyith sumtyme Syr Gul.
Norres.

" A mile be water lower hard on the shore is
a litle village caullid Sauheho (Saughall).

" Lesse then a mile lower is Crabho (Crabhall).

"A myle lower is Shottewik Castelle on the
very shore longging to the King : and therby ys
a park.

" Shottewike townelet is a 3. quarters of a myle
lower.

" And 2. mile lower is a rode in D(ee) caullid
Salthouse, wher again it (on the) shore is a salt
house cotage.

" Then is Burton hedde, whereby is a village
almost a mile lower than Salt (House).

"ii. myles lower and more is Denwale Rode,
and agayne it a farme place caullid Denwaulle
Haul. It longith to Mr. Smithe, and more up
into the land is Denwaulle (Denhall) village.

" ii. miles and more lower is Neston Rode, and
ynward a mile ynto the land is Neston village.

" About a 3. miles lower is a place caullid the

2



LELAND'S DESCRIPTION OF WIRRAL

Redde Bank, and ther half a mile withyn the
land is a village caullid Thrustington (Thurs-
taston).

" A mile and more lower is Weste Kirkeby
a village hard on the shore.

"And half a mile lower is Hillebyri, (Hilbre
Point) as the very point of Wyrale.

"This Hillebyri at the floode is al environid
with water as an isle, and than the trajectus is a
quarter of a mile over and 4. fadome depe of
water, and at ebbe a man may go over the sand.
It is about a mile in cumpace, and the grounde
is sandy and hath conies. There was a celle of
monkes of Chestre, and a pilgrimage of our Lady
of Hilbyri.

" The barre caullid Chester Barre that is at
(the) very mouth of the sandes spuid oute of
Dee Ryver is an 8. or 10. mile west south west
from Hilbyri.

" It is by estimation a XVI. mile from the
point of Hilbery to crosse strait over to the next
shore in Lancastershire.

" For Lyrpoole (Liverpool) lyith a X. miles
into the lande from the mouthe of Mersey Water,
and lytle lak of XX. from the very barre of
Mersey that lyith in the mayne se.

" From the poynt of Hylbyri to Lirpoole as it
lyith withyn the lande a X. mile.

" From Hilbyri to cumpace about the shore of
Wyral on Mersey side to Walesey (Wallasey)

3



KING'S VALE-ROYALL

village on the very shore, wher men use much to
salten hering taken at the se by the mouth of
Mersey, is a seven or eight miles.

" Thens a 2. myles to the fery house on Wyrale
shore, and there is the trajectus proximus to Lyr-
pole a 3. miles over.

" Aboute half a quarter of (a) mile upward hard
on Wyral shore is Byrk(et) a late a priory of a
XVI. monkes as a celle to Chester without any
village by it.

" Al the shore grounde of Wyral apon De
side ys highe bankid, but not veri hilly grounde.
And so ys the bank of Wyrale onto Briket on
Mersey side.

" The trajectus from Hillebyri directely over-
thwart bytwixt Flint and Basingwark is at the
ful se a VII. miles over."

The first printed work exclusively dedicated to
Cheshire antiquities was " The Vale-Royall of
England, or the County Palatine of Chester Illus-
trated, Performed by William Smith and William
Webb," published by Daniel King in the year
1656. It was in three parts ; the second by Wil-
liam Webb includes a most interesting Itinerary
of each Hundred, written in the latter part of
1621. The Rev. Daniel Lysons published his
excellent work entitled " Magna Britannia " in
1810, and devoted the whole of the second part
of volume 2 to the County Palatine of Chester.

4



BOOKS ABOUT WIRRAL

The year 1819 was an important one for the
Hundred of Wirral, for it was in that year
Ormerod, whose great History of the County of
Cheshire is a perpetual monument to his anti-
quarian and historical knowledge, published his
book, and bestowed great attention to the Wirral
peninsula. In 1847 Mr. William Williams Mor-
timer printed his history of the Hundred of
Wirral, a most excellent work, but now unfor-
tunately difficult to obtain; whilst in 1889 Mr.
Philip Sulley published a very good and useful
work entitled " The Hundred of Wirral," which
was illustrated, and contained a map. In recent
years Mr. W. Fergusson Irvine, M.A., F.S.A.,
the Rev. F. Sanders, M.A., F.S.A., Mr. Ronald
Stewart Brown, M.A., and Mr. F. C. Beazley,
F.S.A., have all written upon the Hundred, and
all of them have produced notable works.

But though all of these books are excellent, and
should be freely consulted by every one seriously
interested in the history of the Hundred, there
has not hitherto appeared any work which can
be used by those wishing to explore some of the
highways and byways of this interesting locality,
in which they would find something more than is
to be found in the ordinary guide-books of the
appearance of the Hundred, a description of its
principal roads, the interest attaching to its vil-
lages, its domestic architecture, old halls, inte-
resting churches, and a general description of the

5



SCOPE OF THE WORK

appearance of the surrounding country. It is
true that Mrs. Hilda Gamlin produced her book
entitled "Twixt Mersey and Dee," but that
again only partly described the Hundred, and it
would probably have been rewritten, had not
Death laid his icy hand upon the authoress some
years after she had published her work.

It is to supply this deficiency that the present
work has been undertaken, and although the
author can lay no claim to any profound anti-
quarian knowledge of the Hundred, he has freely
consulted the principal works written about it,
and he possesses an intimate knowledge of its
highways and byways, the result of nearly forty
years close acquaintance with the district. It
has been his good fortune to tramp the roads
when they were strangers to the motor-car, and
when the horses shied at the tall spider bicycles
which were occasionally to be found on the high-
ways ; and although he has seen the Hundred
alter greatly in population, and means of locomo-
tion, yet despite its close proximity to the ever
growing port and city of Liverpool, there are
still portions of the district which are terra incog-
nita to thousands of people ; for it is still possible
in little more than a half-hour's journey from
Liverpool to find highways and byways, hills,
meadows and woods little altered in appearance
from what they were when the great Domesday
Book was prepared ; to see the hawk hovering,

6



SITUATION OF WIRRAL

to hear the nightjar, to see the squirrel leap from
tree to tree ; to wander by meadows and wood-
sides full of sweet-singing birds, and to pause
on some hill to admire the noble sea views ;
or to stoop to pick some pretty and interesting
wild flowers, for the flora of the Hundred is
good.

It is the author's intention to point the way to
these highways and byways, and to briefly de-
scribe some of the places of interest to which
they lead.

Wirral is somewhat singularly situated, for it
lies safely between two rivers one of them one
of the most important waterways in the world
which wash its shores on either side. Along its
western shore glides the silent Dee to its wide
sandy estuary, which, after passing Chester, shows
reach on reach of surprising beauty ; whilst on
the east the swiftly flowing Mersey hurries along,
bearing upon its broad bosom the largest and
swiftest steamers in the world. Away to the
north it is guarded by the Irish Sea; so that it
is a narrow peninsula of some eighteen miles in
length by about six miles in breadth, its southern
side ending in a low valley which spreads from
the River Dee through Mollington, Backford,
Chorlton, and Stoke to the river Mersey.

William Webb, M.A., clerk to the Mayor's
Courts of Chester, and Sheriff to Sir Richard
Lee, in his description of Wirral, written about

7



WEBB'S DESCRIPTION OF WIRRAL

the year 1621, and printed in King's Vale-Royall,
aptly describes it thus :

" I have laboured," he says, " to cast the
Hundred of Werral by the dimensions thereof
into some resemblance, and though, geometrically
considered, it comes nearest to the figure of a
long square, or rather a rhomboides, yet because
the long sides are not straight lines, nor the op-
posite ends equal in their distance, we must take
it as it is irregular, and the nearest resemblance
that I can give it, is the sole of a lady's left-foot
pantofle, for the farthest north-west end, com-
passed with the sea, falls somewhat round ; then
it narrows itself both ways, and between Bebbing-
ton on the east, and Oldfield on the west side,
falls narrow of the sole ; then it widens itself
either way to Stanney on one side and Burton on
the other, where it is broadest; then narrowing
again till it points with the tip of the toe upon
Chester liberties. Mr. Cambden fitly calls it
a languet of the land, and promontory of the
mainland, shooting into the sea, inclosed on
the one side with Dee-mouth, on the other side
with the Merzey. The Welsh Britons call it
Killgurry, because it is an angle. That it was
in old time a forest, I think cannot be doubted,
but that it should not be inhabited, or disafforested,
not till King Edward III.'s time, that I suppose
to be true but in part ; for the very antiquity

8



DESCRIPTION OF WIRRAL

of the church, some castles, monasteries, and
the very manurage of the most part of it yet
appearing, argue the contrary.

" But I will not contend, for it sufficeth me I
can boast in behalf of the inhabitants there now,
and of their industrious predecessors too, that it
is now one of the most fertile parts, and com-
parable, if not exceeding, any other so much in
quantity of the whole county besides. And this
will our weekly market of Chester for corn and
fish make good for me, and if I added flesh too,
I should not miss it much."

No, he would not miss it much ; for the pro-
duce of the Wirral farms still helps to supply the
markets of Chester, Birkenhead, and Liverpool
with corn and flesh.

Wirral is perhaps one of the pleasantest tracts
of land in the three kingdoms, situated so close
to a large and busy city ; and although no rivers
of any great size meander through its pleasant
meadows to flow by large, clean-looking, and
prosperous farm lands, it can still boast of two
streams the Birket, or Birken, and the Fender,
the former of which, rising in the neighbourhood
of Grange, flows in a somewhat meagre stream, it
must be admitted, for it makes its way slowly
and painfully across the plains to Moreton, whence
it used to empty itself into Wallasey Pool ; but
in late years its course has been diverted by the

9



DESCRIPTION OF WIRRAL


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Online LibraryHarold Edgar YoungA perambulation of the Hundred of Wirral in the county of Chester, with an account of the principal highways and byways, old halls, ancient churches, and interesting villages situated between the rivers Mersey and Dee .. → online text (page 1 of 13)