Harriet Beecher Stowe.

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UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.




PHILADELPHIA :

Protestant Episcopal Book Society,
No. 1224 Chestnut Street.



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LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



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UNCLE TOM'S CABIN,



PHILADELPHIA :

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL BOOK SOCIETY,

No. 1234 Chestnut Street.



UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.



" WHAT are you reading so "busily T y in-
quired Willie Thorn, as he, on a fine
morning in spring, found one of his
friends laying on the grass in the park,
deeply engaged with a book, of whose
pages half had been lost, and the other
half appeared far from clean.

"The most interesting book, sir, I
ever read in my life," replied Tom
Waters, looking up. " It's all about a
.slave, such a fine fellow, too ! who



4 UNCLE TOM S CABIN.

lived somewhere a great way off ; I sup-
pose we have no slaves here."

" And what have you read about
him?"

" Ob, sir, how they treated him ! He
had a master ten times worse than a
tiger, who forced him to work from morn-
ing till night. Master Legree had no
mercy at all in him, non ! He beat
and ill-used his slaves till at last two of
them determined to run away two wo-
men, sir !"

" And did they manage to escape ?"

" Oh ! they managed it very cleverly ;
but the worst of it was that poor Uncle
Tom, that was the name of the good
old slave, knew where they were hid-
den and would not tell : no, though his



TINGLE TOM'S CABIN. 5

master ; beat him and beat him, he would
not tell. It was very dreadful, for the cruel
wicked man, really killed him at last !
Oh, I am glad that we have no such
masters here'.!"

41 Are you quite sure of that, Tom ?"

"I never heard of any so bad," said
Tom, in surprise at the question. " We
have no slaves here; and if any one
killed tho poorest man, why, he would
be hanged for murder, to be sure !"

" Yet/' said Willie Thorn, " I was a
slave once myself, and to a worse mas-
ter than the one of whom you have been
telling me."

Tom opened his eyes very wide.

" He made me serve him from morn-
ing till night, never had any pity upon



6 UNCLE TOM 3 CABINS

me, and had resolved, if he could, to
destroy me at last."

" Why did you not run away ?" cried
the boy.

" I could not run away if no one
helped me ; I was too much in my mas-
ter's power."

" And how did you escape at last ?' r
cried the astonished Tom.

" I was bought by another Master,
who set me free at once j who loved me,
cared for me, clothed me, fed me, and
called me his own son \"

" Bless him !" exclaimed Tom. " But
I can hardly fancy, sir, that you ever
really were bought !"

" You will be more surprised when I



UNCLE TOM S CABIN. 7

tell you the price that my Deliverer paid,
and willingly paid for me."

" Pray, tell me, sir, what be paid."

u He bought me with Ms own blood !
he offered himself to suffer instead of
me, he bore my stripes, he was re-
viled, he was scourged, he was spit
upon, all that he might set poor slaves
free, take them to his home, and make
them his own dear children !"

t( How they must love him V cried
Tom. " To bear their stripes, to suffer
instead of them, and then to set them
free ! Why, I never heard anything
like that before ! It must be quite a
pleasure to serve such a master !"

"It is a pleasure," replied Thorn,
earnestly.



UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.

" And all his slaves, I mean his
freed men, serve him gladly, do they
not, sir?"

' : Alas ! too many of them take the
fir.-'t opportunity of running back to their
old master !"

li Oh, sir, that is quite impossible !

i>-ve a kind, generous master, who paid

such a price for them, to serve a cruel,

hard-hearted tyrant ! Oh ! you must be

:;eu that cannot be I can never

that! And you said, too. that

the wicked master sometimes killed his

poor slaves at last ?"

" lAfaoaySj if they do not escape from
him in tin

DEATT ''ft of Gd '< >

life. tkrwK ist our IsjnJ."



UNCLE TOM'S CABIN. 9

Tom looked as if he could not under-
stand wL at he meant; then gradually
his face grew brighter, and he said,
" Ah, sir, I see your meaning quite
plain now ! Sin is the cruel master
whom people serve j and the kind
Friend who freed the slaves, and loved
them, and suffered for them, is the Lord
Jesus Christ."

" Eight. He is a friend indeed, and
saves us from worse bondage than any
that man ever inflicted."

l( I can hardly think that it could be
u-orse than what I have been reading
about. I cannot make out that sin is a
more cruel master than Legree."

" Even in this world it is a very cruel
master, Tom. Look at Jenn Payne.



10 UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.

When I knew him first he was in a re-
spectable lodging, with regular work and
a fair character. Then he took to drink-
ing, lost his situation, lost his character,
lost his health. Surely, sin was a cruel
master to him ?"

"Yes; and Jack Hobbs, too, that
was sent to prison for stealing ; and Rob
Carter, who lost his eye in prize-fighting.
Certainly sin was a cruel master to them;
but not to every one, do you think, sir ?"

" Yes, to every one. He robs us of
peace here and heaven hereafter. "What
would you say to a master who promised
to you for wages a burning fiery fur-
nace at the end of your service ?"

" That would be a dreadful master
indeed ! But I do not quite understand



UNCLE TOM r S CABIN. 11

liow the Lord Jesus Christ sets us free
from sin."

" First, He sets us free from its pun-
uhment; he bore our stripes for us, he
shed his precious blood that we might
be freely forgiven. Then he saves us
from its power ; for he gives us his Holy
Spirit, if we pray for it, that we may
never be the slaves of sin again."

" I am afraid that I have often been
running back to my old master," said
Tom, thoughtfully. " Many and many
a time have I followed sin instead of
serving the Lord."

il Perhaps," observed Willie Thorn,
" you have not tried to keep out of temp-
tation."



12 UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.

"Why, no sir; I can't say that I
have."

" When the slaves escaped from the
cruel Legree, did they come back to the
edge of his plantation just to look about
and wonder if he could seize them
again ?"

" Oh, no ; they could not have been
so mad ! They ran away as far from
him as they could get. They never
wanted to see his face ao'ain, I am cer-
tain of that."

" So those who have truly repented
of their former sins should keep out of
the way of temptation. They should
shun bad company, and never walk near
the edge of the path which leadeth to
destruction. Shall I tell you of three



UNCLE TOM r S CABIN. IB

safeguards which every one should try,
that he may never fall again into- the
power of sin T'

" Pray, tell me them, sir ; and as you
speak I will consider whether I have
them or not/'

" They are first, PRAYER. Do you
pray to God every night and morning I"

Tom hung down his head.

" The second safeguard is READING
THE BIBLE. Do you love your Bible ?'*

Tom looked grave and was silent.

u The third is, KEEPING GOD'S DAY

HOLY, AND ATTENDING IN HIS HOUSE.

I never see you in church, Tom."

" I'm afraid/' said Tom, after a pause,
ct that I am obeying my old tyrant rather
than my new Ma&ter."



14 UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.

fi Turn then from sin from this hour,
my boy ; choose at once whom you will
serve. The Lord is calling you to him-
self. He says, Cease to do evil,
learn to d well. He has bought you
with his blood, and you are by right
his, soul and body] Take his yoke
upon you, and learn of him. Oh, re-
member, that they who will not serve
him on earth will not rejoice with him
in heaven I that as you choose now,
so will your portion be for ever ! The
wages of sin is -death ; but the gift of
God is eternal life through Jesns Christ
vur Lord" (Rom. vi. 23.)



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Online LibraryHarriet Beecher StoweUncle Tom's cabin → online text (page 1 of 1)