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Harriet N. (Harriet Nancy) Dunn.

Records of the Guthrie family, of Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Virginia, with ancestry of those who have intermarried with the family online

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Online LibraryHarriet N. (Harriet Nancy) DunnRecords of the Guthrie family, of Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Virginia, with ancestry of those who have intermarried with the family → online text (page 1 of 15)
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COPYRIGHT JULY, 1 898.
BY

H. N. AND E. G. DUNN

CHICAGO.



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tNUX AND ,
FOUND/STIONS.




MISS EVELINE GUTHRIE Di



Ip^reface-



Appreciating to the full the kindness of all who have
assisted us in collecting these records, we wish especially to
tender our thanks to Mrs. M. Harriet Griffin and Mrs. H. M.
Martin, of Chicago, also Miss Harriette Mary Tugby, of
Frampton, Cotterell, England, for much valuable aid.
Other data of the Guthrie family we have reluctantly been
obliged to forego the pleasure of incorporating in this publi-
cation by reason of indefinite connections. We trust at no far
distant date to issue a second edition, also to publish a his-
torical record of the Dunn family, and shall be pleased to
receive communications from any who may be interested.




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English.




Scotch.
£X UNITATE INCREMENTUM.




Scotch.
DITATETALIT.



GUTHRIE CRESTS.






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The name of Guthrie is an ancient and honorable one, the
name of a family of great antiquity in Scotland like the
most ancient is of local origin, being assumed by the Chief
when such designations were adopted from his lands in
Forfarshire.

In the year 1299, after the great Sir William Wallace had
resigned the guardianship of Scotland and retired to France,
the Northern Lords of that Kingdom sent Squire Guthrie
to desire his return, that he might assist in opposing the
English. Guthrie embarked at Aberbrothock, landed at
Sluis from whence they conveyed Wallace and his retinue
back to Montrose. — Life of Sir William Wallace.

Crawford in his lives of the officers of State says, "That
the Guthiies held the Baron}' of Guthrie by Charter from
Kinpr David the II.; but that thev were men of rank and
property long before the reign of James II., is manifest by
the fact that Master Alexander of Guthrie, is a witness, in a
charter granted by Alexander Seaton, Lord of Gorden, to
William Lord Keith, afterward Earl Marshall, dated Aug. i,
1442. and that he obtained the lands of Kilkandrum in the
Barony c;f Lower Leslie, and Sheriffdom of Forfar, to him-
self and Marjory Guthrie, his spouse, by charter from
George, Lord Leslie, of Leven, the Superior, dated April
10, 1457. B}' the above-mentioned Marjory, he had three
sons, David, James, and William, of whom the eldest. Sir
David Guthrie, Baron of Guthrie, was Sheriff of Forfar in
1457. He held the situation of Armour Bearer to King
James III., and was constituted Lord Treasurer of Scotland
in 1461; in which post he continued until 1467, when he was
appointed CcMnptroller of the Exchequer."



In 1469 he was made Lord Register of Scotland; and in
1472, we find him one of the embassadors on the part of
Scotland, who met those of England on April 25, in that
year, at New Castle, and concluded a truce until the month
of July, 1473. In 1473 he was constituted Lord Chief Jus-
tice of Scotland. — From Burkes History of the Landed
Gentry.

Guthrie Castle is still entire; an enshrined bell is pre-
served within the castle.

Anderson, in his "History of Scotland in Early Christian
Times," describes the bell as follows:

"The other example of an enshrined bell is that pre-
served in Guthrie Castle in Forfarshire; the Church of
Guthrie having been a dependency of the Cathedral of
Brechin.

"The bell is of hammered iron, measures S% inches high
including the handle, and 5^x4^ inches across the mouth.
The decorations of the shrine or case which is of bronze or
brass, consists of silver work, and niello with traces of gild-
ing, and the remains of settings of precious stones; it pos-
sesses none of the zoomorphic features which distinguish
earlier work.

"In the centre of the front of the shrine is a representa-
tion of the crucifixion in the style of the thirteenth and
fourteenth centuries.

"Above the crucified figure is a representation of God
the Father in the manner in which He was usually repre-
sented as King in the fourteenth century, viz: — Crowned
and bearded and half length. On each side is the figure of
a bishop robed and mitred.

"One figure on the side of the shrine is in a much ruder
style of art than the others, and may have belonged to an
earlier covering than that which now encloses the bell. At
the bottom of the case is an inscription in lettering, appar-
ently of the fourteenth century:"

" yoha7mes Alexa?idn Me Fieri Fecit."
The Rev. Thomas Guthrie in his autobiography says:
"The name of Guthrie is an ancient one; the name of a
very old family in Forfarshire." Greater honor still in

these words:

" Famous Guthrie's Head."

It stands on the Martyr's Monument in the Greyfriars
Church-yard of Edinburg, being, with the exception of







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^tHeve Iks nit^'Dcl the duft of f}v>ff wlio ftood
'Gainft perjury, refifimg unto blood;
Acliierino to tlie Covenants, and laws
Eftabliflriug tlw fame, which -was the Crtijfe
Their lives were facrific'd unto the kift
I ^ ^Of Pielatifts abjui'd. Thoiigh here tlKir dirf<
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^^ W'hom juificr ,ju[*ly did to death 'pui^fue.'
Rut ,\f. for thclm. nu c awle 'VrjK to he fovmd
"Worthy of de,it!i , hut l>i\1 ^ ^hey were- tbund.
Couftant aiid Ucdr,iit. Zf.ilcus. wi»nrfliu"< .
For the Prerog.n.vt.s of CHHIS*? ihrir' KING.
N'^ Kich Tnitho -wtix ftidrl by f.^oiis Gllthric'S hear.
V^.AaJ oil .h.ng- to Mr. Reawick's blord,
"•jTht)' difl cndur€ tlie \\-i ath of enemies,
vcproiiche.^. torment.';, dtathi .\nd injuries,
jut yet tlicx-rc tholt -vvJici horn luch iroublc5 ctaae.
And nov '.laimphui glory ■n-llh the LAMB.



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mARm'S idOMX QREYPRIAI^S 0HURck-»U)D,EDINBUR6H. 197. Wt^.



Argyle's, and Renwick's, the only name of the eighteen
thousand who perished in the days of the Covenant that has
the honor of standing on that famous and sacred stone.

Chambers' describes Greyfriars Church-yard, Edinburgh,
in the following manner:

'•This old cemetery, — the burial-place of Buchanan,
George Jameson, the painter. Dr. Blair, and many other
men of note, — whose walls are a circle of aristocratic sepul-
chers, will ever be memorable as the scene of the Signing of
the Covenant; the document having first been produced in
the church, after a sermon by Alexander Henderson, and
signed by all the congregation from the Earl of Sutherland
downward, after which it was handed out to the multitudes
assembled in the kirk-yard, and signed on the flat monu-
ments amidst tears, prayers, and aspirations, which could
find no words; some writing with their blood. Near by,
resting well from all these struggles, lies the preacher under
a square obelisk-like monument; near also rest in equal
peace, the Covenant's enemy. Sir George Mackenzie.

" The inscriptions on Henderson's stone was ordered by
Parliament, to be erased at the restoration, and small de-
pressions are pointed out in it. as having been inflicted by
bullets from the soldier\- when executing this order. With
the 88 came a new order of things, and the inscriptions were
then quietly reinstated."

James Guthrie was described by Oliver Cromwell as "The
short man that would not bow."

Chambers in his " History of Eminent Scotsmen," says:
"James Guthrie, the Mart\'r, one of the most zealous of the
protesters as they were called during the religious troubles
of the seventeenth centur}', was the son of the Laird of
Guthrie. He became teacher of philosophy, and was much
esteemed, as well for the equanimity of his temper as for
his erudition.

" He was minister at Stirling and executed on account of
his writings in Edinburgh June i, i66i."

On account of the religious persecutions under which the
family suffered, James, John and Robert Guthrie decided to
leave Edinburgh and seek security and repose in the New
World.



They first settled in Boston. The earliest record of James
Guthrie we find from Suff. Pro. VL 416, in the will of John
Richardson, dated May 7, 1683, in which he says, " I give
and bequeath unto James Guthrie all 1 have in the world
except twenty shillings to buy John Harris a ring and ten
shillings to buy John Kyte a ring."

( John Raynsford.
Witness <

I John Ramsey.

John Guthrie removed from Boston to Litchfield Co.,
Conn., where he died about 1730.

2.

John Guthrie, son of John, removed from Durham, Conn.,
to Stratford, Conn., where he purchased the homestead of
Samuel Beardsley, Nov. i, 1726. He returned to Durham
about 1734, later to Woodbury, Conn., where he became an
honored and wealthy citizen, owning large tracts of land in
Woodbury and adjoining towns. He married first, Abigail
Coe, of Stratford, in June, 1727. He married second, Susan-

an . Abigail Coe was born Nov. ii, 1702, and was the

daughter of John and Mar)- (Hawley) Coe. She united with
the First Congregational church in Stratford, in 1726; her
rather. Captain John Coe, son of Robert and Susanna Coe,
was born in Stratford, May lo, 1658; married Mary Hawley,
Dec. 20, 1682. He became a distinguished citizen of Strat-
ford, was appointed by General Assembly respectiveh': En-
sign, Lieutenant and Captain, and was a Deputy from 170
to 171 5. He died April 19, 1741, aged 83 years.

Robert Coe, father of Captain John Coe. and grand-father
of Abigail (Coe) Guthrie, was born in 1627, in England, mar-
ried at Hempstead, L. L, Susanna . He died in 165Q.

The following lines were written at the time of his death, by
the Rev. Abraham Pierson, of Branford, Conn., the father of
the first president of Yale College:

" Rest blessed Coe, upon thy bed of ease,
r the quiet grave with thee is no decease,




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH,
Stratford, Conn.



5

All, all our anguish hath its period fixed,
Ere hence we go; not any joy but mixed.
Rear grace which makes the life of man the best,
This young man lived to God, and now is blest.
Come parallel this saint; now far exceed,
Omit no means that may true goodness breed.
Our trials come, bestowed for days of need?
The Lord his widow bless and take his seed."

— -From Hawley Genealogy.



Robert Coe, Sr., father of Robert Coe, and great grand-
father of Abigail (Coe) Guthrie, was born in Suffolkshire.
England, in 1596; sailed for Boston, Mass., with his wife,
Anna, April 10, 1634, in Ship Francis. He was one of the
Weathersfield Company that bought the plantation of Stam-
ford, Conn. He was Deputy from Stamford in 1644, and
Commissioner for Jamaica in 1664. His wife Anna was
born in 1591.

The following is the inscription on the tombstones of

Capt. John and Mary (Hawley) Coe standing in the old

Congregational Church-yard at Stratford, Conn.:

Here lyes Buried Here lyes Buried

Ye body of Ye body of Mrs.

Capt. John Coe, Mary Coe, wife

who died April 19, 1741, to Capt. John Coe,
83 Year of His age. who died Sept. 9, 1731,

69 Year of Her age.

Mary Hawley Coe, died Sept, 9, 1731. She was the
daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Birdseye) Hawley.
Joseph Hawley, grand-father of Abigail (Coe) Guthrie, on
her maternal side was Deputy to the General Assembly of
Connecticut for Stratford, from 1665 to 1689. Was Town
Clerk and Recorder sixteen years, and Treasurer of the town.
He was Deacon of the First Congregational church.

Joseph Hawley was born in Derbyshire in 1603, and died
in Stratford, Conn., in 1690.

John and Abigail (Coe) Guthrie had eleven children:
3. — John, b. Feb. 25, 1728, in Stratford; m. Patience Knapp,

May 10, 1750, at Ancient Woodbury.
4. — James, b, July, 1729, at Stratford; d. in infancy.
5. — William, b. Dec. 30, 1730, in Stratford; m. Suse ; d.





d, 1806, in Jericho, N. Y.

6. — James, b. April, 1732. in Stratford; m. Abigail Betts,
July 17, 1755, in Woodbury; d. April 22, 1804, in Sher-
burne, N. Y.

7. — Joseph, b. June, 1733, in Stratford; m. ist Mrs. Carev;
2d Mrs. Kirby; 3d Mrs. Cogshell; d. May 30, 1808, 'in
Troy, Ohio.

From Stratford, they removed to Durham, where the fol-
lowing children were born, and baptized by the Rev-
Nathaniel Chauncey:

8 — Mary, b. Dec. 20, 1735; bap. Dec. 23, 1735; m. James
Calhoun, Dec. 31, 1754, in Washington; d. May i, 1809, m
Washington.

9. — Ephraim, b. March i, 1737; bap. March 5, 1737; m.
Thankful .

10. — Ebenezer, b. July 20, 1740; bap. July 29, 1740; m. ist
Hannah Richards, March 16, 1767, in Southbury; 2d Sarah
. N. Hawley, 1794, in Southbury.
II. — Abigail, b. May 3, 1742; bap. July 21, 1742.

From Durham, they removed to Woodbury, where the fol-
lowing children were born:
12. — Sarah, b. April 3, 1744; m. Reuben Murray in 1766.

13. — Lydia, b. July 1746; m. Eleazer Ingraham, Aug. 5, 1765,
in Washington, Conn.

ESTATE OF JOHN GUTHRIE.

At a Court of Probate held in Woodbury, Aug. ye 18,
1/56, William Guthrie appeared in court and exhibited the
last will of his honored father, John Guthrie, late of Wood-
bury, in order to its approbation, which being read and con-
sidered and no objection made against it, said will is ap-
proved and accepted to be recorded and is as foUoweth:

Willm. Guthrie and James Guthrie (sons of the above-
deceased) being in sd Testament appointed Executors of
sd Testament, sd Willm. Guthrie in Court declared his ac-
ceptance of said trust and acknowledged himself bound
unto this Court in the recognizance of one hundred pounds
in lawful money of the Colony, that he will be faithful unto
the above sd trust reposed in him.

Ma\- 4, 1757, James Guthrie accepted the as above and
himself under an equal bond.

As Attest, A. Stoddard, Register.



7

THE WILL.

In the name of God, Amen, I, John Guthrie, of Wood-
bury, in Litchfield County and Colony of Connecticut in
New England, being of perfect mind and memory thanks be
given to God, but calling to mind ye mortality of my body
and knowing that it is appointed for all men each to die
and willing that my estate be settled according to my
mind, do make and ordain this my last will and testament,
that is to say principally and first of all, I recommend my
soul unto God who gave it and my body I recommend to ye
earth when it shall please God to call me out of this world
to be buried in decent and Christian manner, at the discre-
tion of my executors, nothing doubting but at ye general
resurrection I shall receive the same again by the Almighty
power of God. And touching such worldly estate where-
with it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give,
devise, and dispose of the same in the following manner
and form:

Imprimis. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife,
Susanna Guthrie, my sorrel mare, my black cow and six of
my best sheep, all to be at her own dispose. I also give to
my said wife the kitchen-room of m}' house, to be solely for
her use during the time she remains my widow and no
longer. I also give to my said wife my chest with one
drawer, my best bed, bedstead, and sufficient bedding; a
table, three chairs; one iron pot and iron kettle; my warm-
ing-pan and box iron, to be at her own dispose forever and
further it is my will and pleasure that my said wife have
fifteen pounds per annum paid to her annually out of my
estate by my five sons, Willm,, James, Joseph, Ephraim and
Ebenezer, during the whole time she shall remain my widow
and no longer, which shall be at her own dispose forever.

Nextly. I give to my eldest son, John Guthrie, of Kent,
five shillings lawful money, to be paid to him by my execu-
tors out of my estate; which together with what I have here-
tofore given him will make his full portion of my estate.

Nextly. I give to my second son, Willm. Guthrie, a yoke
of oxen, the one colored black the other a brownish color;
also my bay mare with the white face and my pied cow and
the one-half of my dwelling-house; all to be his own for-
ever. I also give my said son, William, one- fifth part of all
my lands in Judea, in said Woodbur\-, to be equally divided
for quantity and quality between him and his four brethren;
to be freely possessed and enjoyed by him and his heirs for-
ever, provided he pa}' to my above said wife three pounds
lawful money per annum, annually, during the whole time



she shall reiiiaia m}^ widow. I also give to William, four
sheep to be at his own dispose forever.

Nextly. I give to my third son, James Guthrie, my small
pied cow; a year-old heifer and four sheep, all to be at his
own dispose forever. I also give to James ye east lower
room of my dwelling-house to be at his own dispose forever.
I also give my son, James, one-fifth part of all my land in
said Judea, to be equally divided for quantity and quality
between him and his four brethren to be freely possessed
and enjoyed by him and his heirs forever, provided he pay
to my said wife three pounds per annum, annually during
ye whole time she shall remain my widow and no longer.

Nextly. I give to Joseph Guthrie, my fourth son, one
yoke of oxen, one a dun color, the other a pied color; my
Dutch mare; two sows; one year-old heifer and four sheep;
all to be at his own dispose forevei. I also give to Joseph
one fifth part of all my lands in Judea to be divided as
above-mentioned and provided he pay m}^ said wife three
pounds lawful money per annum, annual!}', during the time
she shall remain my widow and no longer.

I give to my fifth son, Ephraim Guthrie, my yoke of
three-year old steers; my colt; two swine, one year-old
heifer and four sheep; all to be at his own dispose forever.
I also give to Ephraim one-fifth part of all my land in Judea
to be divided in manner as above-mentioned, to be freely
possessed and enjo}'ed by him and his heirs forever, pro-
vided he pay to my said wife three pounds lawful money
per annum, annually, during the time she shall remain my
widow and no longer.

I give to my youngest son, Ebenezer Guthrie, my other
yoke of three-year old steers; one yoke of one-year old
steers and four sheep; all to be at his own dispose forever.
I also give to Ebenezer one-fifth part of all my lands in
Judea, to be divided in manner as above-mentioned, to be
freely possessed and enjoyed by him and his heirs forever.
provided he pay to my said wife three pounds lawful money
per annum, annually, during the whole time she shall
remain my widow and no longer.

I give to my eldest daughter, Mary Calhoun, one looking-
glass; four chairs, and four sheep, to be at her own dis-
pose forever; which together with what I have heretofore
given her makes her full portion of my estate.

I give to my second daughter, Abigail Guthrie, a two-
year old heifer and one calf and four sheep; one bed a*'
bedding; one pot; one large brass kettle; one peel; pair of
tongs and trammel, a chest with drawers and warming-pan;
all to be at her own dispose forever.



I give to my third daughter, Sarah Guthrie, one yoke of
year-old steers and one calf and four sheep; a bed and bed-
ding, one pot and one kettle; one peel and tongs; one tram-
mel; a trunk, one warming-pan; all to be at her own dispose
forever.

Lastly. I give to my youngest daughter, I.ydia, two year-
old heifers and one calf and four sheep; one bed and bed-
ding; one pot and kettle; one peel and one pair of tongs,
and one trammel; one chest and a warming-pan; all to be
at her own dispose forever.

And it is my will that all my household goods herein
before not disposed of, shall be equally divided among my
three daughters, Abigail, Sarah, and Lydia, to be at then'
own dispose forever.

And further it is my will that all my husbandry tools shall
be divided equally among my five sons, William, James,
Ephraim, Joseph and Ebenezer, to be at their own dispose
forever.

And further it is my will that my executors make sale of
my Litchfield lot of land and with the money obtained by
such sale, to pay my just debts, funeral charges, etc., and
that the over-plus of such money (if any be), shall be
equally divided among all my children.

And I do hereby constitute and appoint my two sons,
William Guthrie and James Guthrie, to be sole executors of
this my last will and Testament; and I do disavow and
revoke all former wills and legacies and executors by me
heretofore made and named, and do ratify this and no other
to be my last will and testament in witness whereof I have
hereunto set my hand and seal this 29th day of June, Anno.
Dom. 1756. Signed, sealed, published, pronounced and
declared by ye said John Guthrie to be his last will and
testament.

(Signed)

John Guthrie.

In presence of:
Junia Ingraham,
Joseph Calhoun.
Increase Moseley.

3.

John Guthrie, son of John (2), was born Feb. 25, 1728, in
Stratford, Fairfield Co., Conn., married Patience Knapp, May
10, 1750, in Woodbury, removed to Kent, Conn.

The following served in the war of the American Revolu-



10

tion, enlisting in Fairfield Co.:
John Guthrie, May 12, 1775.
John Guthrie, F'eb., 1778.
Abel Guthrie. 1781.
Abraham Guthrie, Feb. 28, 1778.
Ensign Guthrie, April, 1 777.
James Guthrie, April 24, 1777.

5.

William Guthrie, son of John (2). was born in Stratford,
Dec. 30, 1730. United with the First Congregational church

in VVoodbur}' in 1752. He married Suse , and removed

to Jericho (now Bainbridge), Chenango Co., N. Y., where he
died in 1806.

Children of William and Suse Guthrie:

14. — William, b. Dec. 4, 1768; m. Sarah Whitney, Dec. 3,
1799; d. March 14, 1813.

15. — Eunice, m, Mr. Graham.

16. — Rhoda, m. Mr. Kelsey.

17. — Anna, m. Mr. Kirby.

18.— Mary, m. Mr. Moore.

19. — Sarah, m. Mr. Merwin.

20. — Jemime, m. Mr. Hyde.

21. — Ruth, m. Mr. Cooper

6.

James Guthrie, son of John (2), was born in Stratforc',
April, 1732, he removed to Durham, with liis i^arents, thenci;
to Woodbury, where he united with the First Congrega-
tional church in 1752. He married Abigail Betts, July 17,
1755. They removed in 1770 to Lenox, Berkshire Co.,
Mass., where they were received into the First Congrega-
tional church, Aug. 4, 1771. He settled on a farm of one
hundred and twenty-five acres he had bought of James
Dwight; his land was conveyed to him by Dwight's execu-
tors in 1775.

James Guthrie figured prominently in the stirring events
of his day. He drew up and was the signer of many impor-
tant documents, before, and during the American Revolu-
tion. Among them the historical document termed the



II

"Covenant," signed at Lenox, in 1774; and like his name-
sake, James Guthrie, the Martyr, he was one of the first to
step forward and sign his name.

On June 3, 1776, the following instructions were voted to
the Representatives of the Town:

These are to direct you to use your Best Endeavors to
suppress all the Tyrannical measures that have or may take
Place from Great Britain; and Likewise to take as much
care that you do not set up any thing of a Despotick Power
among ourselves; but let us have freedom at home, altho
we have war abroad. We do Further Direct you to use your
utmost abilities and interest with our Assembly, and they


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Online LibraryHarriet N. (Harriet Nancy) DunnRecords of the Guthrie family, of Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Virginia, with ancestry of those who have intermarried with the family → online text (page 1 of 15)