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Next outline the frame, taking care to leave here a little
space between the outline and the sides of your box frame,
so as to make a firm edge when the cement is poured in.
Fill up this space carefully and the " setting " is done.

Now, first being perfectly certain that all your pieces
touch the glass evenly, wet the entire rough back by pass-
ing a wet brush over it, the object of this being to prevent
the porous earthenware from sucking the water too quickly
out of the cement. The tile is then ready for the final and
most critical operation. Pour a pint of water into a com-
mon earthen bowl, shaking in the powdered cement from
your package, letting the water damp it slowly, and then,
with an iron spoon mixing it in, till the whole is like smooth
thick custard. Take this by the spoonful and pour very
carefully over your tile, seeing that it sinks down well be-
tween the " tesserae." When this is done mix more cement
with the custard till it is quite thick and firm, and spread it
over this first thin coating till you have filled up to the level
of the frame. If it seems too liquid at the top, sift on some
dry cement which will absorb the water. Put the frame in
a dry, warm room, and in two or three days the cement will
be hard and white. Take out the pegs, remove the sides
and back very carefully, and the tile is before you. If the
first filling was not perfect, there will be little gaps and hol-
lows in your " tesserae," but these can be filled from the
front if done very carefully.

There is one very curious fact about Portland cement
which must be guarded against very carefully. If it is not
fresh it " dies," as the makers say ; that is, it will not co-



41 8 A NEW HOME INDUSTRY.

here, but falls to dust again. For this reason a packet
should never be opened until wanted, and what is left
should be put away in an air-tight box, though it is far
better to use it all up at once. The basin and spoon must
be cleaned at once to keep the cement from hardening on
them, and in throwing away any that is left, remember not
to throw it down a sink, as it would harden and stop up the
pipe. You can have several frames, and thus fill a number
of tiles at once with the mixture, which is the most practical
way.

Tiles of this nature are not suitable for floors, since the
china might chip off if much walked upon. But for bath-
room walls, flower stands, dados, and fireplaces they are ad-
mirable, and patterns innumerable may be found in the
head- and tail-pieces of old books. The fact that the china
can not be cut very small or very evenly, prevents making
very elaborate designs, but this is no disadvantage. Walter
Crane's picture books have many conventional designs
which can easily be followed, and books of architectural
plates will give you old mosaic floors. Your own invention
will come to your aid, and you will find that tiles which are
now a luxury can be made so cheaply that they become
possible for those who have very little money. The work
itself seems to fascinate all who undertake it, and the effect
has none of the cheapness which might seem to result from
the use of such materials, but, when carefully done, looks
and is like good mosaic work. The frames may be larger
than the ordinary tile, but if too large may break. Nothing
can be prettier than these tiles in a bath-room, and if they
are to be set against a wall, the backs must be roughened
with a knife before the cement is entirely dry. Do this by
simply cutting lines with the back of a knife. It is better
to keep them some time before using them, and their uses



MOSAIC WORK TN BROKEtf CHINA. 419

are countless. As a finish above the kitchen sink, nothing
could be cleaner or more easily cared for, and whoever be-
gins to utilize them will discover many places where they
" fill a long-felt want " as nothing else has or can. In
short, I should like to begin some with you at once, regard-
ing the inventor as a genuine benefactor, and believing
that you will agree with me when your first set is finished.



420 COOKING-CLUBS AND WORK IN GENERAL.



CHAPTER XXIII.

COOKING-CLUBS AND WORK IN GENERA

COOKING-CLUBS have been formed at so many points all
over the country, and are always so popular, that they need
little description, and certainly no recommendation. What-
ever helps to interest one in the best preparation of food is
certainly a benefit. But the best is by no means the richest ;
nor is it to be limited to cakes, creams, and salads. As these
clubs are generally organized, they include from six to a
dozen girls, whose object is to prepare dishes elaborate
enough to form, when finished, a lunch for the party. This
is all very well : yet it results, usually, in two or three cakes,
oysters in some form, and a salad ; bread being bought, or
provided beforehand.

It is much easier to scallop oysters than to make good
bread, to make a cake than to boil a potato perfectly ; and
chocolate bears being poorly made much better than tea or
coffee, which demand just the right handling to give the best
return.

And so, while it will still be well to include something
savory and desirable in the list of dishes, a cooking-club which
decides in the very beginning to devote its chief energies to
the simple things, really the most abused and hopelessly
ruined articles that come on our tables, will do far better work.
The club that will offer a prize for the best loaf of bread both
white and brown, the best pan of rolls, the mealiest potato,
the clearest coffee, will have laid a foundation for good food



COOKING-CLUBS AND WORK IN GENERAL. 421

at home ; and, when the power to succeed always in these
articles is gained, any fancy dishes may take their place.
Bread will perhaps be less interesting than cake ; and yet
I have known many girls who became fascinated with its
making, and who prided themselves at last on the perfectly
baked, golden-brown loaves, with something of the feeling
they had had for a good drawing, or a bit of successful paint-
ing. Blunders will be made at first ; and often there is great
objection to the occupation of the kitchen, made, sometimes
by the cook, and as often by the busy mother, who dreads
waste, and loss of time, and sundry other evils, not one of
which can compare for a moment in importance with the loss
of such knowledge. Many a bride has wept very bitter tears
over her own ignorance of how to prepare even the simplest
meal ; but a season with a persevering and enthusiastic cook-
ing-club would make the way easy.

And it is far more possible to make money from such an
accomplishment than is generally supposed. In small vil*
lages this is not the case perhaps, though even there the
advent of some wandering baker's-cart is hailed with delight.
But in towns and cities there is immediate demand, and any
article perfect of its kind sells at once. It cannot be out of
order to speak of one lady, whose cakes are now known in all
our large cities, being kept by every prominent grocer. Miss
Martin took up this occupation as a resource when her health
had failed from teaching, and began with simply filling the
orders of friends. Within a year the demand so increased,
that she had to secure special quarters ; and her income now
is six times what even the best teaching at present secures.
Her sister has had equal success in canning, pickling and
preserving, and supervises personally every detail of the
operations. It is this personal supervision that means the
delightful "home-made" quality all bakers fail to give; and



422 COOKING-CLUBS AND WORK IN GENERAL

it is always possible for any girl of good judgment and some
training to take up this industry, and not only dignify it, but
earn, when known, a handsome livelihood. Where it is con-
fined to a village or town, there should be, in all cases, a labor
exchange, which may mean simply power to display articles
prepared for sale in a portion of some good store, or a room
in some accessible house. Let it be known that this or that
one, with a peculiar gift in certain directions, will either make
for pay, or will exchange for some needed thing in which she
has less skill, and there will soon be a demand.

Of many other occupations for pleasure or profit, there is
no room to speak ; but a final word on some possibilities of
village-life must be said. For most of them there is a stag-
nation which paralyzes thought, and drives both sons and
daughters out into the world as soon as they are old enough
to take such a step. Yet there might be a far different life,
if families would band together, recognke that recreation is
as much a necessity as is toil, and seek every means of bring-
ing people into a better knowledge of one another. Caste
is often as sharply defined in a New-England village as if
all were Brahmins. Sects are numerous : everybody cleaves
to his or her " doxy," and any concerted action is impossible.

A "village improvement society" might be the first organ-
ized effort. Perhaps the cemetery is an eyesore, overgrown
with weeds and nettles ; perhaps the yards of the houses are
shrubless or treeless, and nobody has time to think how bare
and forlorn it all is. Every possibility of work in such direc-
tions is given in a delightful little book, called " Villages and
Village Life," by Nathaniel Hillyer Eggleston, the full title
of which is on p. 412, and which holds not only hints, but the
fullest and plainest directions, for beautifying and improving
outward surroundings, and this with no extravagant outlay
of either time or money.



COOKING-CLUBS AND WORK .IN GENERAL, 423

If life is to be passed in the remote and quiet country,
and many a tired dweller in cities will tell you it is the only
peaceful one, refuse to let it be shut in, and barren of
interest. Apathy and inertia often settle down upon one.
Drive them away by constant intercourse with others. Plan
a village library, a reading-club, some form of entertainment
in which all can join, a magic-lantern, a stereopticon, any
thing that will bring about a working-together and a feeling
of common interests arid purposes.

As I write I seem to see the heavy, uninterested, self-con-
scious faces I have ached over in many a village church, but
I see also the sudden brightening as any live word reached
them ; and I know that for every life there is the power of
enjoyment, which can be cultivated as thoroughly as any
other power, and which grows in making others enjoy. And
so, my girls, for whom I would gladly do far more than the
limits of this book allow, open your eyes. See what is wait-
ing for every one of you. Find out your bent, and follow it ;
or if you have no bent, and can only jog along from day to
day, jog cheerfully, and think of brave, sweet words Charles
Kingsley wrote for just such lives as yours :

* Be good, sweet child, and let who will be clever ;
Do noble things, not dream them, all day long :
And so make life, death, and that vast forever
One grand, sweet song."



AUTHORITIES



CONSULTED IN PREPARING THE AMERICAN GIRL'S HOME BOOK OF
WORK AND PLAY.



THE GIRL'S OWN BOOK OF AMUSEMENTS, STUDIES, AND EMPLOY-
MENTS. By Mrs. L. VALENTINE and others.

THE GIRL'S OWN TREASURY ; specially designed for the Amusement
and Instruction of Young Ladies.

EVERY GIRL'S BOOK. A Compendium of Entertaining Amusements
for Recreation in Home Circles. By LOUISA LAWFORD.

THE HOME BOOK FOR YOUNG LADIES. Edited by Mrs. VALENTINE.

EVERY GIRL'S ANNUAL. Edited by Miss ALICIA A. LEITH.

THE GIRL'S OWN ANNUAL.

EVENING AMUSEMENTS; OR, MERRY HOURS FOR MANY PEOPLE.

FOOTLIGHT FROLICS. Entertainments for Home and School; com-
prising School Opera, Charades, Plays, Christmas Capers, etc. By Mrs.
CHARLES F. FERNALD.

DICK'S PARLOR EXHIBITIONS.

How TO AMUSE AN EVENING PARTY. A Complete Collection of
Home Recreations. Illustrated.

THE LADIES' GUIDE TO NEEDLEWORK, EMBROIDERY, ETC. By S.
ANNIE FROST.

HOUSEHOLD ELEGANCIES. By HENRY T. WILLIAMS and Mrs. C. S.
JONES.

LADIES' FANCY WORK.

A SEWING-PRIMER. By Mrs. LOUISE J. KIRKWOOD of the Wilson
Industrial School, New York.

AMATEUR WORK. Illustrated.

MONEY-MAKING FOR LADIES. By ELLA RODMAN CHURCH.

42$



426 AUTHORITIES CONSULTED.

VILLAGES AND VILLAGE LIFE. With Hints for their Improvement
By NATHANIEL HILLYER EGLESTON.

WOOD-WORKING TOOLS. How to use them.

THE YOUNG MECHANIC : Containing Directions for the Use of Aft
Kinds of Tools, and for the Construction of Steam-Engines and Mechani-
cal Models, including the Art of Turning in Wood and Metal. By the
Author of " The Lathe and its Uses," etc. From the English edition with
Corrections, etc.

THE FAMILY AQUARIUM; OR, AQUA VIVARIUM. A New Pleasure
for the Domestic Circle. By HENRY D. BUTLER.

THE ILLUSTRATED NATURAL HISTORY. By the Rev. J. G. WOOD.
3 vols., 1,500 Illustrations.

GYMNASTICS AND PHYSICAL CULTURE.

MORAL, INTELLECTUAL, AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. Professor F. G,
WELCH,

THE NEW GYMNASTICS. Dr. Dio LEWIS.

OUR GIRLS. Dr. Dio LEWIS.

A MILITARY SYSTEM OF GYMNASTIC EXERCISES, AND A SYSTEM OP
SWIMMING. By EDWARD S. FARROW, United-States Military Academy.

THE WITCHERY OF ARCHERY. By MAURICE THOMPSON.

FOR GIRLS. A Special Physiology ; being a Supplement to the Study
of General Physiology. By Mrs. E. R. SHEPHERD.

WHAT OUR GIRLS OUGHT TO KNOW. By Dr. MARY J. STCJDLEY.

REARING AND TRAINING OF THE CANARY.

MANUAL OF CAGE-BIRDS.
CANARY-BIRDS. Pamphlet.
BOOK OF HOUSEHOLD PETS.

SILK-CULTURE.

MANUAL OF INSTRUCTION, BOOKS, AND PAMPHLETS to be procured
at the office of the Woman's Silk-Culture Association of the United States,
1328 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Penn.

BEE-KEEPING.

THE A B C OF BEE-CULTURE : a Cyclopaedia of Every Thing pertain-
ing to the Care of the Honey-Bee. By A. I. ROOT.
THE BLESSED BEES. By JOHN ALLEN.



AUTHORITIES CONSULTED. 427

QUINBY'S NEW BEE-KEEPING.

THE NEW BEE-KEEPER'S TEXT-BOOK. A. J. KING.
LANGSTROTH ON THE HONEY-BEE. Manual of the Apiary. Pro-
fessor COOK.

POULTRY.

WRIGHT'S PRACTICAL POULTRY-KEEPER. L. WRIGHT.
TEGETMEIER'S POULTRY-BOOK. W. B. TEGETMEIER.
GEYELIN'S POULTRY-BREEDING IN A COMMERCIAL POINT OF VIEW.
GEORGE KENNEDY GEYELIN.

STRAWBERRIES AND SMALL FRUITS.

SUCCESS WITH SMALL FRUITS. E. P. ROE.

GARDENING FOR PROFIT. PETER HENDERSON.

COLE'S AMERICAN FRUIT-BOOK.

BARNARD'S GARDENING FOR MONEY. CHARLES BARNARD.

THE SMALL FRUIT CULTURIST. ANDREW S. FULLER.

CANNED FRUIT, PRESERVES, AND PICKLES.

COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD. MARION HARLAND.
THE EASIEST WAY IN HOUSEKEEPING AND COOKING. HELEN
CAMPBELL.

DRAWING AND DESIGNING.

SERIES OF DRAWING-BOOKS. By WALTER SMITH.

ELEMENTS OF ART-CRITICISM. G. W. SAMSON.

A HANDBOOK OF ART-CULTURE. Rev. W. H. PLATT. Selections
ffom Ruskin.

GREAT LIGHTS IN SCULPTURE AND PAINTING. S. D. DOREMUS.

BOOKS ON ART, by Mrs. SUSAN N. CARTER ; and THE ART INTER-
CHANGE, a Household Journal, New-York City.

ART EDUCATION APPLIED TO INDUSTRY. GEORGE WARD NICHOLS.

WINDOW-GARDENING AND FLORICULTURE.

GARDENING FOR PLEASURE: A Guide to the Amateur in the Fruit,
Vegetable, and Flower Garden, with full Directions for the Greenhouse,
Conservatory, and Window-Garden. PETER HENDERSON.

THE NEW BOOK OF FLOWERS. JOSEPH BRECK.

WINTER GREENERIES AT HOME. Rev. E. A. JOHNSON.

BursT's FLOWER-GARDEN DIRECTORY.



INDEX.



Amusements, rainy day, for young
children: a picture - puzzle, 4; col-
oring pictures, 2; cork -work, 12;
cocked hats, 14; home newspapers,
20; home post-offices, 20; keeping
store, 17; making scrap-books, 3;
paper dolls and furniture, 4; paper
bed, 6 ; paper bureau, 10 ; paper re-
ception-chair, 5; paper rocking-
chair, 8; paper ottomans, 8; paper
sofa, 7 ; paper table, 9 ; paper wash-
stand, n; paper boats, 15; paper
fly-boxes, 13; pricking pictures, 16;
soap - bubbles, 16.

Aquarium, the, 215; aquarium cement,
215; aquarium, marine, 217; aqua-
rium, short rules for, 222.

Archery, 175; the bowstring, 177; the
arrow, 178; how to shoot, 180; rules
for target-shooting, 181 ; the target,
179.

Autumn leaves, preserving, 294.

Ballads in action: Auld Robin Gray,
102; Lord Ullin's Daughter, 109;
The Mistletoe-bough, 104; Villikins
and his Dinah, 106.

Badminton, 184.

Billiards, lawn, 187.

Boating for Girls, 196; parts of a boat,
197; short rules fpr rowing, 198;
towing, 202.



Bread, 408.

Canary-birds, their rearing and train-
ing, 380 ; diseases, 383 ; feeding, 381 ;
food, 382; hatching, 382; pairing,
380; training, 382.

Cardboard and its uses, 290; card-
board cottage, 290; crosses, 293;
perforated card, 292.

Carpentering, light, 339.

Charades, 116; acting charades, 120;
a stitch in time saves nine, 118;
bookcase, 122; childhood, 118; dra-
matic, 117; helpmate, 126; hunger
is the best sauce, 119; illustrated
poems, 127; incautious, 126; Jack
and the beanstalk, 127; mischief,
123; Mortality, 125; petticoat, 121;
post-chaise, 122; postman, 122; ring-
let, 120; wardrobe, 124; wedlock,
123; Woodstock, 125.

Christmas gifts, fifty for small fin-
gers: autumn leaves, 271; baby's
blanket, 268 ; barrel - chair, 273 ,-
bean-bags, 268; birchbark presents,
259; book-covers, 265; bureau cov-
ers, 253; cabin-bags, 266; candles,
decorated, 273; Christmas - pie, 273;
coseys, tea and egg, 274; drawn-
work, 253 ; fern-work, 272 ; feather
screens, 261; garters, 250; glove-box,
270 ; hemlock pillow, 268 ; linen, ^m-



43<>



broidered, 269; napkin-bands, 269;
penwipers (baby -shoe, 248; bird's-
nest, 270; broom, 274; leaf, 249;
parasol, 258) ; pincushion, pansy,
258; "Polly put the kettle on," 251 ;
sachet for linen-closet, 268 ; sand-
bags for windows, 267 ; scent-cases
for trunks, 265; scent-cases, pretty,
252; shaving-pa per case, 250; shadow
pictures, 264; spectacle-wipers, 248;
shoe - cases, 267 ; shawl - bags, 270 ;
summer blankets, 269; spatter-work,
263 ; straw wall - baskets, 260 ; tooth-
brush rack, 266 ; turtle cloves, 251 ;
walnut boats, 253 ; scent-cases, 252 ;
work-cases, 259.

Cooking-clubs, 407.

Compost, 399.

Collections, Hints on making small,
204 ; butterflies and moths, 205 ; cat-
erpillars, 206; mounting, 212; pins,

212.

Croquet, 183.

Croquet-pool, 183.

Designing : doll's dress-making, 234 ;
apron for, 242 ; boy dolls, 244 ; doll's
chemise, 239; doll's drawers, 240;
china dolls, 243 ; costume dolls, 245 ;
knickerbockers, 244; doll's night-
gown, 239; Italian peasant, 246;
Normandy peasant, 245; marquise
dress, 247 ; Spanish dancer, 247.

Doll's houses, 276; beds, 278; chairs,
281; home-made furniture, 281;
tomato-can box houses, 276.

Doll's housekeeping, 276.

Drawing, 403; art manuals, 406; geo-
metrical drawing, 404 ; sketching,
405 ; paper, 403 ; pencils, 403.

Enigmas, literary, 147.

Fifty forfeits, 41.

Fruit, canning, 371; canning, 373;



glass cans, 371; jelly, 372; pre-
serves, 374 ; profits, 375.

Fruit, small, culture of, 367 ; land,
367; pruning, 367; profits, 369;
raspberries, 368.

Floriculture, 394; dress, 394; plants,
396; preparing ground, 394; seeds,
396.

Games: bachelor's kitchen, 82; bal
loons, 84; buff, 27; bonbons, 84
consequences, 63; Easter eggs, 83
French blind man's buff, 82; galoo,
8 1 ; German dwarf, 32 ; girofle, giro-
fla, 70; gooiSday, Cecilia, 73; grab-
bag, 85 ; " how do you like it ? when
do you like it? where do you like
it?" 28; how to guess any number
thought of, 67; here I bake, and
here I brew, 67; how two children
may stand on a handkerchief without
touching one another, 82 ; house that
Jack built, 36; Kentucky giant and
Kentucky giant's wife, 34; magic
music, 28; magic lantern, 35; many
words in one, 59; little Miss Muffet,
39; paper bags, 85; scissor pres-
ents, 85 ; shadow buff., 52 ; sowing
oats, 78; stage-coach, 24; the black
art, 8 1 ; the elements, 55; the em-
peror of Morocco, 31 ; the elephant,
35; the merchants, 62; the new
French fashion, 76; the puzzle wall,
68; thus says the grand mufti, 31 ; to
put three children through the key-
hole, 82.

Gardening, parlor, 399; boxes, 400;
bulbs, 401 ; compost, 399 ; cuttings,
400; flowers, 400; hanging-baskets,
402.

Gymnastics, light, 230; dress, 230;
dumb-bells, 232 ; rings, 231 ; wands,
232.



INDEX.



431



Halloween : diving for apples, 145 ;
melting lead, 145 ; needle test, 145 ;
nut-burning, 144 ; snapdragon, 144 ;
the looking-glass test, 146.

Home-made candy, 407 ; cream for
candy, 407 ; chocolate creams, 408 ;
walnut creams, 408 ; pure delight,
408 ; cream candy, 409 ; nut or
chocolate creams, 410 ; peach or
ginger creams, 410 ; orange, lemon,
or peppermint creams, 41 1 ; almond
creams, 411 ; Georgia taffy, 412 ;
butter Scotch, 412 ; a perfect cara-
mel, 413.

Honey-bee, the, 384 ; eggs, 385 ; hives,
384 ; honey-making, 386 ; Italian
bees, 388 ; profits, 389 ; queen-bees,
384 ; queen-rearing, 385 ; swarming,
387.

Leather, what may be done with, 298 ;
convolvulus flowers and leaves, 304 ;
decorative leather, 316 ; large garden-
rose, 306 ; materials, 299 ; mouldings,
307 ; spray of ivy-leaves, 300 ; re-
demption of the tin can, 308 ; tools,
299 ; vine, leaf, and stalk, 303.

Mosaic work in broken china, 414.

New home industry, 414.

Parlor plays, hints for, 86 ; Caractacus,
100 ; execution of Joan of Arc, 94 ;
faith, peace, and glory, 93 ; ignorance
is bliss, 93 ; justice, mercy, and peace,
100 ; living statuary, 95 ; Maud Mul-
ler, 101 ; monumental group, 99 ;
Nydia, 100 ; plan for the frames, 91 ;
simple tableaux vivants and frame
pictures, 89 ; the angel of sleep, 99.

Preserving leaves, ferns, etc., 294 ;
drying flowers, 296 ; gathering ferns,

294 ; mounting, 298 ; pressing leaves,

295 ; skeletonizing leaves and flowers,
297.



Poultry, rearing of, 376 ; coops, 377 ;
eggs in winter, 379 ; food, 377 ; hatch-
ing, 376 ; profits, 379 ; roosts, 378.

Shells, mosses, pine-cones, etc, 335 ;
brackets, 335 ; cement, 335 ; cones,
336 ; lawn flower-box, 337 ; mosses,
336 ; shell pincushions, 336.

Silk culture : cocoons, 392 ; eggs, 390 ;
feeding, 391 ; hatching, 391 ; mul-
berry planting, 390 ; profits, 392 ;
shrubs, 397.

Strawberry culture, 362 ; ground, 362 ;
picking, 364 ; plants, 362 ; returns,
365 ; varieties, 363.

Swimming-school, home, 189 ; miscel-
laneous instructions, 193 ; swimming
on the chest, 191 ; swimming on the
side, 193.

Tennis, lawn, and its laws, 151 ; four-
handed games, 171 ; holding the
racket, 162 ; seaside tennis, 174 ;
strokes, 160 ; the serve, 162 ; the take
and the return, 165 ; volleys and half-
volleys, 169 ; winter tennis, 173.

Tissue-paper, what can be done with,

283 ; lamp-shades, 288 ; patterns,

284 ; tools, 283.
Walking-clubs, and camping out, 225 ;

dress, 227; camping, 228: shoes, 227 ;
rest, 227.

Wax flowers, 318 ; China rose, 326 ;
leaves, 322 ; patterns, 319 ; stephan-
otis, 332 ; tea-rose, 329 ; tools, 319 ;
wax, 318 ; wax fruit, 334 ; white
camellia, 320 ; white jasmine, 324 ;
white pink, 324.

Wood-carving and light carpentering,
339 ; light, 359 ; manuals, 339 ; pol-
ishing, 360 ; sharpening tools, 352 ;
spray of ivy-leaves, 355 ; tools, 345 ;
woods, 347.

Work in general, 420.



Tales of the Heroic Ages.

toy ZEI\A!DE A. RAGOZIM, author of " Chaldea," " Vedic India," etc.
No I. Siegfried the Hero of the North, and Beowulf, the Hero

of the Aiu;l<>-Saxoiis. Illustrated. 12 ... $1.25
No. II. Frith jof, the Viking of Norway, and Roland, the Paladin

of France. Illustrated. 12 $1.25

No. III. Salammbo, the Maid of Carthage. Illustrated. 12 . $1.25

4i The author is one who knows her subject as a scholar, and has the skill and
imagination to construct her stories admirably. Her style is terse and vivid, well
adapted to interest the young in these dignified and thrilling tales." Dial.

Plutarch for Boys and Girls.

Selected and Edited by JOHN S. WHITE. Illustrated. 8. $1.75
Library Edition. 2 vols. 16 $2.50

" It is a pleasure to see in so beautiful and elegant a form one of the great books
of the world. The best Plutarch for young readers." Literary World.

" Shows admirable scholarship and judgment." Critic.

Pliny for Boys and Girls.

The Natural History of Pliny the Elder. Edited by JOHN S. WHITE
With 52 illustrations. 4 ...... $2.00

u Mr. White's selections are admirably made. He has gleaned in all directions
for his notes, and the result is one which reflects on him great credit, and adds
another to the number of juvenile books which may be commended without reser-
vation.' ' Independent.

" For the libraries of the young and every boy and girl in the land should
collect a library of their own these superb books have a special adaptation ; they


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Online LibraryHelen CampbellThe American girl's home book of work and play → online text (page 27 of 28)