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Helen Campbell.

The American girl's home book of work and play online

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what the neighbors to the right and left have written. The
top of each paper is then folded down so as to hide what
has been written, and each one passes his paper to his
neighbor on the right, so that every player has now a new
paper before him. On this he writes a gentleman's name ;
if that of one of the gentlemen in the company, so much
the better. Again the papers are passed to the right after
being folded over ; the beauty of the game being that no
one may write two consecutive sentences on the same paper.
The quality of a lady is now written (fold, and pass the
paper), the ladys name, then where they met, what he said
to her, what she said to him, the consequence, and what
the world said. The papers are now unfolded in succes-
sion, and the contents read, and the queerest cross ques-
tions and crooked answers are almost sure to result. For
instance, the following will be a specimen : " The conceited
Mr. Jones (one of the company) and the accomplished Miss
Smith met on the top of an omnibus. He said to her, 'Will
you love me then as now ? ' She said to him, ' How very
kind you are ! ' The consequence was, * they separated for
ever;' and the world said, 'Serve them right." Another
strip, on being unfolded, may produce some such legend as
this : " The amiable Artemus Ward and the objectionable
Mrs. Grundy met on the mall at the Central Park. He said
to her, 'How do I look?' She said to him, 'Do it/ The
consequence was ' a secret marriage ; ' and the world said,
' We knew how it would be. ' "



YOU ARE NOTHING BUT A GOOSE. 6?



HOW TO GUESS ANY NUMBER THOUGHT OF.

Desire one of the company to think of any number she
chooses, provided it be even. Tell her to triple it, halve
the product, triple this half, and then tell you how many
times nine will go into it. Multiply this by two, and it will
be the number thought of. Thus, suppose 4 to be the num-
ber ; you triple it, making 12 ; halve this product, leaving 6 ;
again triple this, making 18, in which 9 will go twice : this
" twice " multiplied by 2 gives you 4, the number thought
of. Or, to give another example, suppose 6 to be the
number; triple it, 18; halve it, 9; triple it again, 27. You
ask how many times 9 will go in it, and, being told 3 times,
multiply it by 2, and the answer is 6.

HERE I BAKE, AND HERE I BREW.

A circle of little girls hold each other firmly by the hand.
One in the centre touches one pair of hands, saying, " Here
I bake ; " another, saying, " Here I brew ; " another, saying,
" Here I make my wedding-cake ; " another, saying, " Here
I mean to break through." As she says the last phrase, she
pushes hard to separate their hands. If she succeed, the
one whose hand gave way takes her place : if not, she keeps
going the rounds till she can break through. Sometimes
they exact a forfeit from any one who tries three times with-
out success, but it is usually played without forfeits.

YOU ARE NOTHING BUT A GOOSE.

This play consists in telling a story, and at the same
time making marks to illustrate what you are telling. For
instance, " An old man and his wife lived in a little round
cabin. I will sketch it for you with my pencil, so that you
may know it. Here it is : o This cabin had a window in



68 SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.

the middle, which I shall make thus : On one side was a
projecting door, which I shall make opposite the window,
thus : = From the side opposite the door branched out a
road, bordered on one side by a hedge. Here is a print of



it : - This road terminated in a large pond. Here it

is : ^"^JP Herbs grew round it, which I mark thus :



One night some robbers came to the farther end of

this pond. I will mark them thus : S The old woman
heard them, and persuaded her husband to get up and see
what was the matter. The old people travelled along, down
to about the middle of the pond, and there they stopped. I
shall represent them thus : || || Each one held out a hand
to keep silence, which movement I shall mark thus :

" But they did not hear any thing ; for the robbers had
taken fright, and run away. After standing out in the cold
some time for nothing, the old man said to his wife, ' Go
back to the house : you are nothing but a goose? ' As you
say these words, hold up the sheet of
paper on which you have been drawing,
and the company will see the print of a
goose rudely sketched, thus :

While making your marks, you must
be careful that those who are watching you see the print
sideways or upside down : otherwise they will be apt to sus-
pect your design before you finish it.

THE PUZZLE WALL.

Suppose there were a pond, round which four poor men
built their houses, thus :




THE PUZZLE WALL.

O



Suppose four wicked rich men afterwards built houses around
the poor people, thus :



o o



O O



and wished to have all the water of the pond to themselves.
How could they build a high wall so as to shut out the poor
people from the pond ? You might try on your slate a great
while, and not do it. I will show you.




RONDOS AND MUSIC.

French children are especially fond of these graceful
games, and several are given here. The songs, of course,
require memorizing, and some one who plays the piano will
add much to the enjoyment, though this is not essential.



/O SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.



GIROFLE, GIROFLA !



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The players range themselves in a line, holding each
other's hands, the tallest taking her station in the middle,
and leading the song. One of the number, who, instead of



GIROFLE, GIROFLA! Jl

joining her companions, has been left standing apart, then
dances up to them, singing the first verse, "Here's a band
of pretty maids," etc., returning to her place when she has
finished it. The other players then advance and retire in
the same manner, singing their answering verse. This in
repeated until they come to the question

" What if, after all, you should

Girofle', girofla !

Meet the old witch in the wood ?
Girofl^, girofla ! "

To which the person addressed must reply by crooking her
fingers to represent claws, and assuming as terrible a voice
and appearance as possible, as she sings, " I would frighten
her this way," etc.; her companions meanwhile joining
hands, and dancing round her ; after which the game finishes.

FIRST VERSE. SOLO.

Here's a band of pretty maids,

Girofle', girofla !
Some in curls, and some in braids,

Girofle', girofla !

CHORUS.
They are fair as well as good,

Girofle, girofla !
And behave as maidens should,

Girofle', girofla ! "

SOLO.
Give me one of them, I pray :

Girofle', girofla !
Do not take them all away,

Girofle', girofla !

CHORUS.

No, indeed ! I could not spare

Girofle, girofla !
Even one bright curl of hair,

Girofle', girofla !



72 SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.

SOLO.

I must seek the wood alone,

Girofle', girofla !
Since you will not give me one,

Girofld, girofla !

CHORUS.

In the dark and lonely wood,

Girofle', girofla !
You can have no purpose good,

Girofl^, girofla!

SOLO.

Violets, both white and blue,

Girofle', girofla !
There I find, and cowslips too,

Girofle', girofla !

CHORUS.
What if you should meet the king

Girofle, girofla !
Whilst your flowers gathering ?

Girofle', girofla !

SOLO.
I would make him courtesies three,

Girofle, girofla !
Say, " Long live your Majesty ! "

Girofld, girofla !

CHORUS.
What if you should meet the queen ?

Girofld, girofla !
That would startle you, I ween,

Girofle', girofla !

SOLO.
I would offer her my flowers,

Girofld, girofla !
To perfume her royal bowers,

Girofld, girofla !



GOOD-DAY, CECILIA I
CHORUS.

What if, after all, you should

Gii-ofte, girofla !
Meet the old witch in the wood ?

Girofte, girofla !

SOLO.

I would frighten her this way,

Girofle', girofla !
Till she dared no longer stay,

Girofl^, girofla!



GOOD-DAY, CECILIA !




My fa - ther had no child but








SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.



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One of the players is blindfolded, and a long wand or stick
given her. Her companions then join hands, and dance
round her, singing the first verse of the rondo. When this
is finished, they pause, and the blindfolded person, extend-
ing her wand, touches one of them, saying, " Good-day,
Cecilia ! " to which she must immediately respond by taking
hold of the end of the wand, and repeating the same words.
The other one then resumes, "Ah, ah, Cecilia!" which
having been duly echoed by her companion, if she does not
then succeed in discovering her identity, she lowers her
wand, and the other players resume their dance and song,
again pausing at the end of the second verse. The person
touched is, of course, allowed to disguise her voice to the
best of her ability.



GOOD-DAY, CECILIA! 75

My father had no child but me,
He banished me across the sea :

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

He banished me across the sea :
The boatman gay then said to me,

" Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia ! "

The boatman gay then said to me,
" What will you give me for my fee ? "

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

" What will I give you for your fee ?
I've but these golden guineas three."

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

" You've but these golden guineas three ?
Then sing instead a song to me."

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

" I'll sing instead a song to thee,
The same the bird sings on the tree."

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

" The same the bird sings on the tree ;
And this is what the song shall be :

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

" And this is what the song shall be :
When you guess right, we'll set you free."

Good-day, my pretty Cecilia ;

Ah, ah, Cecilia !

When the blindfolded person makes a correct guess, she
changes places with the one whose identity she has dis-
covered.



76 SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.



THE NEW FRENCH FASHION.



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Do you know how now they dance, Do







you know how now they dance, Do you know how now




they dance, In the new French fash - ion?




The leader of the game is called the captain, and his
movements must be imitated by all the other players.



THE NEW FRENCH FASHION. 77

Captain and men dance round, joining hands, and sing-
ing,

Do you know how now they dance \bis. -

In the new French fashion ?

until the air has been once gone through. They then pause ;
and the captain says, " Attention to the word of command !
Right hand ! Left hand ! " at the same time stretching out
one hand after another; his companions doing the same.
They dance round again, singing,

This is the way now we dance
In the new French fashion !

SECOND.

Let us go on with this dance \bis.

In the new French fashion !

CAPTAIN. Attention to the word of command! Right
hand ! Left hand ! Right foot ! Left foot ! and

This is the way now we dance
In the new French fashion !

THIRD.

Let us try again this dance [Ms.

In the new French fashion !

CAPTAIN. Attention to the word of command ! Right
hand ! Left hand ! Right foot ! Left foot ! Right side !
(embracing the next player) and

This is the way now we dance
In the new French fashion !

FOURTH.

Let us now conclude this dance
In the new French fashion !



78 SOME GAMES THE Y MIGHT HA VE PL A YED.

CAPTAIN. Attention to the word of command ! Right
hand ! Left hand ! Right foot ! Left foot ! Right side !
Left side ! (embracing the players on both sides of him) and

This is the way now we dance
In the new French fashion !

The captain's movements must be imitated by all the
other players, and he himself must be careful to execute
ach movement as he names it.



SOWING OATS.



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SOWING OATS.



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oats as through his fields he goes; And when the grain spring






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Soft rain, fall, and bright sun, shine, And make my oat - crop fine ! "





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The players then range themselves in a circle, and dance
round without singing, whilst the air is played once. The
song then commences thus :



80 SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.

I.

This is the way my father sows [bis.

His oats, as through his fields he goes ; [bis.

(Here the players imitate the action of sowing)

And, when the grain springs from the ground,
He folds his arms, and, gazing round,

(Here they all fold their arms, pirouette round, and return to their
places)

Says, " Soft rain fall, and bright sun shine,
And make my oat-crop fine ! "

ii.

This is the way my father reaps [bis.

His oats ; and when they lie in heaps, [bis.

(Here they imitate the action of reaping)

In yellow heaps, upon the ground,

He folds his arms, and, gazing round,
(Same movements as in preceding verse)

Says, " Rain keep off, and bright sun shine,

And make my oat-crop fine ! "

in.

This is the way my father binds [bis.

His oats in sheaves ; and, when he finds [bis.

(Each player here passes her right arm round her companion's waist)

No more remaining on the ground,

He folds his arms, and, gazing round,
(Same movements as before)

Says, " Thanks to rain and bright sunshine,

My oat-crop has been fine."

IV.

This is the way my father's oats [bis.

Are made to lose their husky coats ; [bis.

(Here each player imitates on her companions shoulder the action of
threshing)



GALOO, 8l

And when the flail rings on the ground,
He folds his arms, and, gazing round,
(Same movements as before)

Says, " Come what will, come rain or shine,
My crop is housed in time."

THE BLACK ART.

This is a very simple trick, which may cause much mysti-
fication. There must be two initiated ones. The magician
sends his partner out of the room, and announces that any
one of the company may choose an object in the room, which
his partner will recognize as soon as asked. Suppose a book
on the table is chosen. The partner is called in. Magician
points with his wand to a variety of objects, and finally to
his shoe, a black ribbon, or any other black thing, immedi-
ately before indicating the chosen book. The magician may
make his list of questions long or short, as he thinks best.
If the tests are repeated many times, it varies the game to
substitute the white or red art, wherein the object mentioned
last before the right one is white or red, instead of black.

GALOO.

Of much the same order of trick is "galoo," which seems
quite as mysterious as the " black art." One leaves the room,
the partner remaining in it, and selecting a person to be
guessed. She then points to one and another, at each per-
son saying, "Galoo?" and the child in the hall answering
" No," till the right one is reached. The secret lies in the
fact that the one who spoke last before the room was left is
the one chosen. If no one speaks, the partner is the one.



82 SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.



TO PUT THREE CHILDREN THROUGH THE KEYHOLE.

This is done by choosing three children, with a great deal
of ceremony, and arranging them by the door, with orders
to stand perfectly still till their turn comes. Then write
their names, each on a separate slip of paper, and roll them
up, so that they easily pass through the keyhole.

HOW TWO CHILDREN MAY STAND ON A HANDKERCHIEF WITH-
OUT TOUCHING ONE ANOTHER.

Lay a handkerchief across the sill of a door, close the
door carefully, and have a child stand on each side of it, on
the bit of handkerchief which will extend beyond it.

FRENCH BLIND MAN'S BUFF.

Children form in circle. One is in the centre, olindfolded,
and furnished with a stick. The children dance round in
the circle to music, if possible, until the blindfolded person
knocks the stick on the floor. They then stop instantly.
The blindfolded lifts the stick to some one in the circle, and
asks a question. The one addressed answers in a disguised
voice, holding his end of the stick close to his mouth to help
in disguising the voice. As soon as the blindfolded guesses
any one by means of the voice, he changes places with that
person.

BACHELOR'S KITCHEN.

All the children sit in a row or a circle. Any number can
play. One is named "the old bachelor." He goes to each
child, in turn, and says, " Have you any thing for a poor old
bachelor like me ? "

Each player makes some answer, offering the " bachelor "
any thing, from a crying doll to an elephant. The bachelor
then questions the giver about the article. The giver is onlv



EASTER EGGS. 83

allowed to respond to the questions by repeating the name
of his article. If he speaks an unnecessary word, or laughs,
he must pay a forfeit. If a player has failed, or cannot by
any device be made to fail, the bachelor passes on to the
next player.

EASTER EGGS.

If a party is given on Easter Monday, or in Easter week,
these may be made a very pretty and attractive feature.

Decorated Easter eggs can, of course, be bought at con-
fectioners', from simple painted eggs to gorgeous egg-shaped
boxes filled with confectionery ; but pretty home-made ones
can be easily prepared.

First the eggs must be blown, or boiled hard. If boiled,
they are less fragile, but, of course, cannot be kept very
long. If blown, the hole can be covered with a little picture,
or bit of ribbon, no matter what ornamentation is used for
the rest of the egg-shell.

For coloring the shell, Paas Dyes are effective, and easily
used. They can be bought at any fancy-store. Directions
for use are given with every package.

An old-fashioned way of coloring the boiled eggs is
to wrap a piece of bright silk, or cheap calico, around the
eggs before putting them into water. The water must be
cold when put on the stove, and must be allowed to boil at
least twenty minutes. This method may make the shells
very pretty, but it is not always sure of success.

A third manner of decoration is to paste little decalco-
manie pictures over the white shell. The pictures can be
bought in sheets very cheaply. If the weather is warm at
Easter time, the eggs can be hidden out of doors, under
bushes, or in low trees. Ingenuity can be exercised in mak-
ing pretty little nests of dried moss or twigs, decorated with
ribbons, which serve as resting-places for the eggs. The



84 SOME GAMES THEY MIGHT HAVE PLAYED.

children are told to hunt for them, and of course are allowed
to keep all that they find. Prizes can be offered to the most
successful hunter and to those who find none. If the weather
is not suitable, the eggs can be hidden in the house.

Another pretty device for giving the Easter eggs is to
have a candy or cotton-wool hen sitting upon an egg-filled
nest on the tea-table. If she is made of candy, she can be
broken up, after the distribution of the eggs, and form part
of the feast.

Or the eggs can be served in a dish called "the ostrich-
nest," or "a dessert pie." This is a large tin pan filled
with sand, in which the eggs are placed. It can be brought
to the children at the close of their tea, and introduced with
a little story of how Chinese eat birds' nests, and that the
host has determined to let the children try whether they like
it or not. Each child is given a saucer full of pie, and finds
an egg. If there are only a few children, they could dig in
the sand for the eggs which the ostrich has put there.

For a party at a season of the year when Easter eggs are
not suitable, it is pretty to give the children some little
present. This may be done in a variety of ways.

BONBONS.

Paper caps and other articles of paper attire are done up
in snapping bonbons, which may be bought at any confec-
tioner's.

BALLOONS.

Get as many red balloons as there are children. Let them
float in a room, with strings attached. Open the doors, and
let the children rush in, and try to catch the strings. In
New York white balloons with children's names in red
letters can be made to order.



SCISSOR PRESENTS. 85



GRAB-BAG.



Put a number of little presents in a bag, and let the chil-
dren grab for them.



PAPER BAGS.



Fill a large paper bag with candy, suspend it to chandelier,
blindfold the children, and let each, in turn, try to break the
bag with a stick. When it breaks, all scramble for the candy.
A clean sheet should be spread under the bag.



SCISSOR PRESENTS.



Tie the present to the chandelier with a string ; lead
child in turn to end of room ; blindfold him, turn him round,
and let him march to chandelier, and cut down the present
with scissors.



86 HINTS fiOR PARLOR PLAYS.



CHAPTER V.

HINTS FOR PARLOR PLAYS.

IN all entertainments at home, whether tableaux, living
statuary, charades, or short plays, it is well to have ready
certain " properties," as they are called, that add greatly to
the effect, yet need not be expensive. There are various
books giving full directions for building a stage, and arran-
ging every thing connected with it, often at great cost and
trouble. With such work this book does not meddle, pre-
ferring to give only what is possible anywhere, and need
cost but a very small sum. But there are certain directions
which apply to the simplest as well as to the most elaborate
entertainment, and will help in "the arrangement of stage
scenery, furniture, curtains, background, costumes, and
light."

A stage raised from the floor is of course most desirable ;
but, where this cannot be, a parlor with folding-doors is next
best. Where tableaux or living statuary are to be attempted,
one person should be chosen as stage-manager, who has a
good eye for color and grouping. A frame is the first essen-
tial, and must be made to fit the front of the stage, whether
this is a raised platform or merely a back-parlor.

" Four l pieces of wood an inch thick, and about one foot in

1 The directions which follow are taken from a very carefully prepared little book
entitled Parlor Exhibitions, edited by Mr George W. Bartlett, a name familiar to all the
readers of St. Nicholas and Wide Awake, and published by Dick & Fitzgerald, New
Yerk.



HINTS FOR PARLOR PLAYS. 8/

width, are neatly joined at the corners ; and over the entire
open space is fastened a coarse black lace, through which
all the pictures are to be seen. The wooden frame must
now be covered with glazed cambric, bright yellow in color,
which is drawn tightly over the wood, and fastened securely,
being neatly drawn over the edges. At regular intervals
fasten large full rosettes of the cambric. It is a great im-
provement, though not necessary, to mix black with the
rosettes, and carry a narrow strip of black all round the



Online LibraryHelen CampbellThe American girl's home book of work and play → online text (page 5 of 28)