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115



THE n-AYS OF
HENRY ARTHUR JONES



THE HYPOCRITES

E HMa? in four Bete






: :






BY

HENRY ARTHUR JONES

AUTHOR OP

THE LIARS," "MICHAEL AND HIS LOST ANGEL," " THE TEMPTER,'

"THE CRUSADERS," "JUDAH," "THE CASE OF REBELLIOUS

SUSAN," "THE DANCING GIRL," "THE MIDDLEMAN,"

"THE ROGUE'S COMEDY," "THE TRIUMPH OF THE

PHILISTINES," "THE MASQUERADERS," "THE

MANOEUVRES OF JANE," "CARNAC SAHIB,"

"THE GOAL," "MRS. DANE'S DEFENCE,"

"THE LACKEY'S CARNIVAL," "THE

PRINCESS'S NOSE," ETC.

"Jjxpedtency is man's wisdom: doing right is God's"
THE PILGRIM'S SCRIP.



COPYRIGHT, 1908, BY HENRY ARTHUR JONKI



PRICE 50 CENTS



Niw YOEK
SAMUEL FRENCH

PUBLISHER

28-30 WEST 38TH STREET



LONDON
SAMUEL FRENCH, LTB.

26 SOUTHAMPTON STREET,
STRAND



THE HYPOCRITES



A PLAY IN FOUR ACTS



HENRY ARTHUR JONES



Expediency is mat's wisdom : doing right is God's."

THB PILGRIM'S SCRIP.



COPYRIGHT., 1908, BY HENRY ARTHUR JONES



CAUTION This play is fully protected tinder the copyright laws
of the United States, is subject to royalty, and any one pre-
senting the play without the consent of the author or his
agents, will be liable to penalty under the law. All applications
for amateur performances must be made to SAMUEL FRENCH,
8-3o West s8th Street. New York City.



NEW YORK
SAMUEL FRENCH

PUBLISHER

28-30 WEST 38TH STREET



LONDON

SAMUEL FRENCH, LTD.

26 SOUTHAMPTON ST.

STRAND



TO

PROFESSOR GEORGE P. BAKER,

HARVARD UNIVERSITY.

DEAR PROFESSOR BAKER,

Will you accept the dedication of this play in
remembrance of your kind companionship on the evening of
its original performance in New York; and in gratitude
for the active sympathy you have always shown with the
modern drama? I believe that the work you have begun
at Harvard, and the interest you have there awakened in
this much neglected art, will, with wise encouragement,
have great and memorable results in time to come, on both
sides the Atlantic.

I am,
Faithfully and gratefully yours,

HENRY ARTHUR JONES.
September, 1906.



PERSONS REPRESENTED.

SIR JOHN PLUGENET.

MR. WILMORE, lord of the Manor of Weybury.

LENNARD WILMORE, his son.

MR. VIVEASH, Lawyer and Estate Agent.

THE REVEREND EVERARD DAUBENY, Vicar of Weybury.

DR. BLANEY.

THE REVEREND EDGAR LINNELL, Curate of Weyburv

GOODYER.

MRS. WILMORE.

HELEN PLUGENET.

MRS. LINNELL.

MRS. BLANEY.

RACHEL NEVE.

PATTY, servant at the Linnells'



SYNOPSIS OF SCENERY.



ACT I.

SCENE. Mrs. Wilmore's boudoir at the Manor House,
Weybury.

Time AN AFTERNOON IN OCTOBER.



ACT II.
SCENE. Living-room at Edgar Linnell's.

Time. Two HOURS LATER ON THE SAME EVENING

ACT III.
SCENE. Library at the Manor House.

Time. MORNING, TEN DAYS LATER.

ACT IV.

SCENE. The same.

Time. AFTERNOON, A FORTNIGHT LATER



The following is the cast of characters at the first performance
at the Hicks Theatre in London under the management
of Charles Frohman.

PERSONS REPRESENTED.

SIR JOHN PLUGENET, BART., of Pluge-

net Court Mr. C. V. France.

MR. WILMORE, lord of the Manor of

Weybury Mr. Mr. J. H. Barnes.

LENNARD WILMORE, his son Mr. Vernon Steele.

MR. VIVEASH, Lawyer and Estate

Agent Mr. Arthur Lewis.

THE REVEREND EVERARD DAUBENY,

Vicar of Weybury Mr. Alfred Bishop.

DR. BLANEY Mr. Cecil Brooking.

THE REVEREND EDGAR LINNELL,

Curate of Weybury Mr. Leslie Faber.

GOODYER Mr. Fred Grove.

MRS. WILMORE Miss Marion Terry.

HELEN PLUGENET Miss Viva Birkett.

MRS. LINNELL Mrs. Leslie Faber.

MRS. BLANEY Miss Henrietta Watson.

RACHEL NEVE Miss Doris Keane.

PATTY, servant at the Lhmells'. . Miss Irene Clarke.



The following is a copy of the first performance of the play
at the Hudson Theatre, New York, on August joth, 2906.

HUDSON THEATRE

HENRY B. HARRIS Manager.

Evenings, 8.15. Matinees Wednesdays and Saturdays, 2.15.

FOURTH MONTH.
CHARLES FROHMAN

Presents the New Play, in Four Acts,

THE HYPOCRITES

BY HENRY ARTHUR JONES
" Expediency is man's wisdom : doing right is God's." The Pilgrim's Scrip.

PERSONS REPRESENTED.

SIR JOHN PLUGENET, BART., of Pluge-

net Court John Glendinning.

MR. WILMORE, Lord of the Manor of

Weybury J. H. Barnes.

LENNARD WILMORE, his son. . . . Richard Bennett.,
MR. VIVEASH, Lawyer and Estate

Agent Arthur Lewis.

THE REVEREND EVERARD DAUBENY,

Vicar of Weybury W. H. Denny.

DR. BLANEY Cecil Kingston.

THE REVEREND EDGAR LINNELL,

Curate of Weybury Leslie Faber.

GOODYER Jay Wilson.

MRS. WILMORE Jessie Millward.

HELEN PLUGENET . Viva Birkett.

MRS. LINNELL Grace Hadsell.

MRS. BLANEY Helen Tracy.

RACHEL NEVE Doris Keane.

PATTY, servant at the Linnells' . . Louise Reed.




9o.



1



K



Df






O



01




ACT I.

SCENE. MRS. WILMORE'S boudoir, the Manor
House, Weybury, a bright pretty room in an old
English country house. A door at back, centre.
A large sofa left of the door at back. A large
bow window opening out upon garden up left.
A cottage piano down left, below window. A
door up right. A fireplace down right, with a
fire burning. A comfortable armchair above the
fireplace. A table with chairs right centre.

TIME. About four on an autumn afternoon.

Discover MRS. WILMORE seated at table talking to
MRS. LINNELL, who is standing near. MRS.
WILMORE is a charming English lady of forty-
five, well-bred, well-dressed, still attractive in face
and figure, with easy, pleasant, winning manners.
MRS. LINNELL is a bright, pretty, ordinary little
lady, very tidily, but very cheaply dressed.

MRS. W.

Mr. Wilmore is much annoyed by Mr. Linnell's

conduct

MRS. L.
I'm very sorry

MRS. W.

My dear, your husband has been curate of Wey-
bury for just a year. During that time we've had
nothing but constant little upsets in the parish.

MRS. L.

There were so many things to be reformed.

IT



ACT/I : .



THE HYPOCRITES



MRS. W.

Of course there were! And we quite appreciate
Mr. Linnell's zeal and courage in reforming them.
But he makes us all thoroughly uncomfortable!

MRS. L.
How?

MRS. W.

We never know whose turn to be reformed may
come next. And we all know we need it !

MRS. L.

Edgar has only done what he thought right.
MRS. W.

I dare say. But you have two little children, and
your income is

MRS. L.

A hundred and twenty a year.
MRS. W.



* Mrs. Wilmore
rises. They
move a little
toe.



A man can't afford extravagant notions of right
and wrong on a hundred and twenty a year. * Go
home and persuade your husband to drop all this
unnecessary reforming. It's altogether too expen-
sive a luxury for a man in his position.

MRS. L.
I'll tell him what you say.

MRS. W.

And one little hint. Now that Mr. Daubeny is
appointed Dean of Gilminster, Mr. Wilmore, as
lord of the Manor, has the presentation to the liv-
ing here

MRS. L.
Oh, Mrs. Wilmore !

12



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



1 Enter GOODYER, the butler.

GOOD.
(Announcing.) Mr. Viveash. 2

Enter MR. VIVEASH, a shrewd, genial man of fifty,
clever, alert, plausible, cynical, but with an air of
bonhomie. In manners, dress, and culture, he
is much above the ordinary country lawyer.

VIVE.

(Coming cordially to MRS. WILMORE.) How d'ye
do?

MRS. W.

How d'ye do? (Shaking hands.) The door,
Goodyer.

VIVE.

(To MRS. LINNELL.) How d'ye do? (Shaking
hands. )

MRS. L.
How d'ye do?

VIVE.
How's Linnell? What fresh mischief is he up to?

MRS. L.
Mischief?

VIVE.

If he raises the pitch just half a note higher, he'll
make the old place simply uninhabitable for a com-
fortable hardened old sinner like me. 3

MRS. W.
(To MRS. LINNELL.) Do you hear that?

MRS. L.
Yes.

MRS. W.

Good-bye, dear. (Shaking hands.)

13



At back.
Stands R. of
door.



* Mrs. Linnell
moves L. c. a*
Viveash
comes down
c.



8 Mrs. Linnell
crosses in
front of Vive-
ash to Mrs.
Wilmore.
Viveash
moves a little
to R.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



> At back.



Viveash ad-
vances to R.
of Mrs. Wil-
more.



(Exit MRS. LINNELL 1 GOODYER, who has waited,
closes it behind her. VIVEASH goes up very cor-
dially to MRS. WILMORE. His manner to her
throughout is more that of an old friend than of
a lawyer.)

VIVE.
Any news from Sir John?

MRS. W.

Yes, a cable from Suez. He'll be home next week,
and as he must return to India before Christmas,
Lennard and Helen are to be married almost at
once.

VIVE.

Good. 2 I don't like long engagements. What
about the name?

MRS. W.

Sir John insists that Lennard shall take the name of
Plugenet on his marriage.

VIVE.

Well, considering how handsomely he has behaved
over the settlements, that's not much!

MRS. W.

No, but my boy is my boy, my only one, and to give
up his father's name however, as there's plenty
of money, we may manage to get the old peerage
revived.

VIVE.

I'm sure you will. I'm sure you can manage any-
thing, after watching the superb way you've man-
aged this marriage!

MRS. W.

It didn't need any managing. When Sir John had
to go to India, he was obliged to leave Helen in

somebody's care. I was a very old friend, and

14



THE HYPOCRITES



ACTl



I'm sure you had.



MRS. W.
15



Viveash
crosses above
table, to R. of
it* placing
hands on
table, leans
over towards
tier.



VIVE.

He couldn't have left her in better hands.
MRS. W.

Lennard was away in the Highlands making that
railway. When he came back, what more natural
than that Helen and he should fall in love with each
other?

VIVE.

Very natural, very right, very satisfactory. All the
same, I take off my hat to you I 1

MRS. W.
You think I'm a scheming, match-making mother

VIVE.

Every good mother must be scheming and match-
making.

MRS. W.

At any rate I've not acted meanly or selfishly. I've
done it all for Len.

VIVE.

I'm sure you have. And I do take off my hat to
you. 2

MRS. W.

It has turned out fortunately. When I remember
that six months ago we were paupers, with all our
land heavily mortgaged, and Lennard was a strug-
gling engineer, with a few hundreds a year, and no
prospects and now!

VIVE.

Yes, it's a brilliant change of scene for all of us.
I had terrible trouble to renew the mortgages.



Viveash
standing at
fireplace.
Mrs. Wil-
more sitsi*.
of table.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



VIVE.
I had to come into it with my bit of property

MRS. W.
It was good of you.

VIVE. 1

By the way, Markdale is agent for the Plugenet es-
tate. He's very old. When he drops off you might
put in a good word for me to Sir John.



1 Coming to-
wards table
again.



* Rises and
shakes hands
with Viveash,
who has come
down table.

From R. door
they cross
back towards
window L.
Helen first,
Lennard
following.



Viveash
crosses up
and shakes
hands with
Helen up c.
Lennard has
crossed be-
hind Helen
and is now
on her L.
Mrs. Wil-
more has re-
sumed her
seat.



* Lennard
shakes hands
with Vive-
ash.



MRS. W.
My dear old friend, I'm sure I can manage that. 2

Enter right HELEN PLUGENET and LENNARD WIL-
MORE. 3 She is a tall, delicate, refined girl of
about twenty, dreamy, spirituelle, unusual. LEN-
NARD is an ordinary, handsome young English-
man about twenty-five. They are in outdoor
clothes.

VIVE.
I'm sure you can. (They shake hands cordially.)

VIVE.
How d'ye do? 4 (Shaking hands.)

HEL.
How d'ye do?

VIVE.
How are you, Lennard? (Nodding to LENNARD.)

LEN.

How are you? 5

VIVE.
Now, when you two can spare me half an hour

HEL.

About the settlements?

16



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT t



Ye<



VIVE.



HEL.



Everything is to be just as Lennard wishes. Only
please put in a clause that the little garden in the
corner of my soul is to be my own always my
very own freehold.

VIVE.
I must leave the corners of your soul to Daubeny.

HEL.
Oh, please don't!

VIVE.
Well then, to Linnell.

HEL.
At least, Mr. Linnell is sincere.

VIVE.

Yes, confound him! That's what makes him such
a terrible nuisance.

HEL.

Now I know why Mr. Linnell is so much disliked.
MRS. W.

Helen, 1 I hope you've reconsidered the question of
the marriage

HEL.

No, dear. The quietest, simplest wedding at our
own little church, and only Mr. Linnell to marry us.



Why Mr. Linnell?



MRS. W.



HEL.



Because he's just a plain, ordinary curate, and I
like him.

17



1 Helen crosses
down to Mrs.
Wilmore.
Viveash and
Lennard sit
on sofa at
back, talking



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



Viveash and
Lennard rise
and come
down stage.
Viveash L. c.
Lennard L.



Lennard
crosses to
Helen c.Vive-
ash sits on
piano stool,
polishes spec-
tacles with
handker-
chief.



As she crosses
up to it.



Stops up L. c.
looKing after
her.



Crossing up
to him.



MRS. W.

You haven't spoken to him?
HEL.

Yes, last night. He has promised to marry us.
(MRS. WILMORE shows great disappointment.)
Dear, you mustn't be angry with me. (Kissing
her.) My marriage is the greatest event in all his-
tory, and you must let me have my own wilful
way. 1

MRS. W.

Of course, dear, but I hoped

HEL.

For a big, fashionable wedding in London. Then
all my lilies would have withered!



What lilies?



MRS. W.



HEL.



The lilies I've been trying to grow in my own little
garden. 2

LEN.

I must take a look round that garden.
HEL.

No, Len, not at present. You'd only tread on the
flower-beds. (Looking out of window.)* We
must make haste if we are to get to the wish-tower
for the sunset. Are you coming? (Exit.)

LEN.

(Going after her.) 4 I wish I was a better fellow,
for her sake !

MRS. W. 6

Len, that's unworthy of you! You won't do any-
thing now to break off the marriage?

18



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



1 Carefully
folds up
handker-
chief, and
puts it in hit
pocket.

* Comes douin
c. a little.



LEN.

No, of course not. I love her too much, but she
is too good for me.

MRS. W.

(Kissing him.) There isn't any girl in England
who's good enough for my boy.

(Kissing him fondly. Exit LENNARD.)

MRS. W.

(Standing at window, looking after him.) What
mother wouldn't be proud of him!

VlVE. 1

Well, we shall have no further trouble with him
when he's once married.

MRS. W. 2
Lennard never has given us any real trouble.

VIVE.

Hum

MRS. W.

Not more than any handsome, high-spirited boy
naturally gives to his parents, eh?

VIVE.
No no, about the average.

MRS. W.
Well, it's all over now.

VlVE. 3

Yes, all over. And we've only to shake hands, and
Congratulate ourselves that our little comedy will
have such a happy ending wedding bells interior
of the village church shouts dancing on the vil-
lage green curtain!

19



Viveash rises
and crosses
toe.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



MRS. W.

Yes, when Lennard and Helen stand at the altar
next month, I shall feel I've reaped the harvest of
my life. I shall have nothing to do but to rest and
be happy.

VIVE.

Not you! You'll be working night and day to get-
that peerage for Lennard.



1 Crosses to B.
c.

J At back.

* Viveash
moves to-
wards L. as
Daubeny
comes down
c. Mrs. Wil-
more advan-
ces to meet
him.



* Mrs. Wilmore
sits u of
table.



* Viveash
crosses round
at back of
table and sits
in chair be-
low fireplace.



MRS. W.
You shrivel me up with your cynicism'! *

Enter GOODYEAR/ showing in the REVEREND EVE-
RARD DAUBENY, 3 a fat, rosy vicar of sixty, pur-
ring, placid, time-serving, self-indulgent. GOOD-
YER announces " Mr. Daubeny." DAUBENY en-
ters, and GOODYER exit.

DAUB.

(To MRS. WILMORE.) How d'ye do, my dear
friend ?

MRS. W.

How are you? (Shaking hands.)
DAUB.



Ah, Viveash!
How are you ?



VIVE.

(Shaking hands.)

MRS. W.
Mr. Viveash is scoffing, as usual. Scold him well. 4

DAUB.

Fie ! Fie ! Ah, you may scoff, Viveash, but whether
we believe our religion, or whether we don't;
whether it's true or whether it isn't, you can't deny
that it's the linch-pin of society; and once take
away the linch-pin 5 by the way, Mrs. Wilmore,

20



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT i



your cook never sent me the receipt for those
heavenly devilled quails what did you call them?



Quails Estelle



MRS. W.



DAUB.



Quails Estelle! My dear wife was so enchanted
with them. We thought they would make such an
excellent entree for our first dinner party at the
deanery.

MRS. W.

When do you leave Weybury?
DAUB.

In about a fortnight. Talking of my leaving, has
Wilmore settled the presentation of the living here ?

MRS. W.

We half promised it to Mr. Linnell.
DAUB.

Surely a half promise isn't binding. I tremble to
think of my poor parish in the hands of that head-
strong, misguided young man ! 1

Enter 21 MR. WILMORE, in shooting costume. He
is a stout, violent, shallow, hot-tempered, illogi-
cal, English country gentleman, stuffed with all
the prejudices of his class. He appears hastily
and angrily at door at back, where he is seen giv-
ing his gun to GOODYER.

WIL.

And, Goodyer, send over to Mr. Linnell, and tell
him I wish him to see me here at once. 3 Ah, how
do, Viveash? Daubeny, how are you? Upon my
word, things have come to a pretty pass ! 4

21



1 Daubeny
moves above
table.

At back Vive-
ash rises
and sits
again after
Wilmore has
sat.



8 Enters and
closes door
after him.

4 Crosses and
sits on chair
at piano.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



DAUB.

I fear our friend Linnell has been injudicious
again !

WIL.

Injudicious ! If you please, " The Blue Lion " is
to be pulled down and turned into a model public-
house and working-man's social recreation club!
And our precious Mr. Linnell is the ringleader of
the scheme!

MRS. W.

" The Blue Lion " has always been a dreadful,
drunken, disreputable place! Why not turn it into
a model public house?

WIL.

Because Pelly wants it for one of his brewery
houses. Naturally a big brewer like Pelly doesn't
wish to have model public-houses dumped down
everywhere in his own district. It would ruin his
brewery. He has given me plainly to understand
that if I don't put the stopper on Linnell, he'll take
care Lennard shan't put up for the Gilminster divis-
ion. What do you think of that, Viveash?

VIVE.

It's hopeless for Lennard to stand for Gilminster
without Felly's support.

WIL.

There you are! Pretty position for a man of my
standing! My son can't serve his country in Par-
liament because my curate well, not precisely my
curate, but, say, our curate chooses to run amuck
against an influential brewer, and sound churchman,
like Pelly!

* At back. Enter GOODYER,* showing in MRS. BLANEY, a

country doctor's wife, about forty-five; a moral,

22



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



ambiguous woman, soured by childlessness;
formal ill-natured, with an air of melancholy res-
ignation; dressed in a marked provincial style;
quite provincial and middle-class in tone, manner
and thought. GOODYER announces^ " Mrs.
Blaney." * (Exit GOODYER.)



How d'ye do?



MRS. W.



MRS. B.



How are you? (Shaking hands.) How d'ye do,
Mr. Wilmore? (Shaking hands.) 2 Mr. Viveash! 3
Oh, Mr. Daubeny, I went over to the vicarage, and
they told me you were here.

DAUB.
I hope nothing serious has happened ?

MRS. B.
Yes. 4 At least, it happened three weeks ago.

DAUB.
What?

MRS. B.
Sarah Piper.

DAUB.
Ah, yes ! Ah, yes ! Most unhappy girl !

VIVE.
I'm told it's a remarkably fine child.

MRS. B.

Yes, unfortunately. And why children should be
allotted to a hussy like that, while those whose con-
duct and respectability might surely entitle them to
some consideration from Providence

DAUB.

Ah, yes! It's most inscrutable!

23



1 All rise as
Mrs. Blaney
enters. Mrs.
Wilmore
crosses up c.,
shakes hands
with Mrs.
Blaney.

* With Mr.

Wilmore,
who has ad'
vanced to c.
Viveash
crosses up R.,
and bows to
Mrs. Blaney.

8 Crosses to
Daubeny,
who has
moved to be-
low table.
Mrs. Wil-
more has
joined Wil-
more up L. C.
Gets work
bag from
table up L.
then drops
dorvn L. and
sits at piano,
working.
Wilmore
standing R.
of her. Vive~
ash has come
down c.

Mrs. Blaney
sits L. of
table.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



VIVE.

But three weeks Sarah Piper hasn't already made
a fresh contribution to

MRS. B.
Yes. She has confessed who is a responsible.

WIL.
Who is the scoundrel?

MRS. B.
I'm sorry to say he is a tenant of yours.

WIL.

No! After the example I made of Peter Rawlins
last year, surely no tenant of mine would dare to
No!

MRS. W.

Who is it, Mrs. Blaney?

MRS. B.
William Sheldrake.

MRS. W.
I'm very sorry.

MRS. B.

Yes. Such a quiet, respectable young man. Al-
ways took off his hat with such a pleasant, modest
smile. Oh, Mr. Daubeny, how is it that so many
respectable people ?

DAUB.

Very true! Ah, yes! Very true! There does
seem to be a far greater proportion than one would
have supposed it is truly appalling!

(His hands on his fat stomach, tapping it with his
fat fingers.)

24



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



MRS. B.

I often look round and ask myself, " Who is to be
trusted ? "

DAUB.
Who indeed? Who indeed?

MRS. B.
And I answer, " Nobody."

DAUB.
Oh, come! come! Isn't that just a little too severe?

MRS. B.

One cannot be too severe. As I was saying to
Mr. Linnell about William Sheldrake

WIL.

Linnell ! l Does Linnell know ?
MRS. B.

Yes, Sheldrake has confessed to him, and he thinks
Sheldrake ought not to be made to marry the girl!

WIL.
What?

MRS. B. i
I

That's Mr. Linnell's opinion!

WIL.

Mr. Linnell's opinion ! 2 Daubeny, do you hear your
curate's opinion of the Ten Commandments? Mr.
Linnell's opinion ! Upon my word ! Mr. Linnell's
opinion! Mr. Lin

Enter GOODYER 3 announcing, " Mr. Linnell." ED-
GAR LINNELL enters at back, a pale, earnest, re-
fined ascetic, about thirty, giving the impression
of being overzvorked and underfed. He has
bright, deep, sunken eyes, a beautiful smile, and
25



1 Wilmore
crosses to
Mrs. Blaney.
Viveash mov*
ing behind
him to Mrs.
Wilmore,
gets chair
from above
piano and
sits on her
right.



9 Crosses to ton
of table.



At back.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Standing L. c.
Wilmore
crosses to
Linnell c.
Mrs. Blaney
crosses to
head of table.



a serene expression. Ordinarily his voice is soft f
and his manner subdued, gentle and self-con-
trolled. GOODYER waits at door for him to enter,
and then exit.

LIN.
(Goes to MRS. WILMORE.) How d'ye do?

MRS. W.
(Shakes hands a little coldly.) How d'ye do?

( LINNELL after just bowing to DAUBENY and MRS.
BLANEY, advances to MR. WILMORE. WIL-
MORE stands indignant^ repellent.

LlN. 1

Is anything the matter?

WIL.

I understand William Sheldrake has confessed to
you that he and you're actually encouraging him
to desert his wretched victim?

LIN.

No. The whole case is most difficult. I'd rather
not discuss it here.

WIL. i

I daresay. But I insist on discussing it here.
MRS. B.

We mustn't shirk our duty merely because it is
shocking and disagreeable. 2

LIN.
Sheldrake has thoroughly repented.

WIL.
Repented ? Rubbish ! Blatant rubbish !

LIN.

The girl has a bad character, and I believe it was
she who tempted him.

26



1 Mrs. Blaney
crosses and
sits down R.,
Daubeny
having cross-
ed up to fire-
place.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



DAUB.

Oh! Oh! Come! Come! Come!

LIN.

He never promised to marry her. She is every way
below him, in class, in manners, in conduct, in feel-
ing for what is right !

WIL.

Feeling for what is right! Rubbish, sir! Blatant
claptrap ! 1

LIN.

Sheldrake's sisters are living with him. For their
sake, I believe it will be a wrong thing to bring a
girl of that stamp into the family.

MRS. B.

But what can be done with her? We must up-
hold the sacredness of marriage.

LIN,
That's exactly what I am doing.

WIL.

What! Upon my word! I never heard of any-
thing so monstrous so subversive of all the princi-
ples and convictions that have guided my entire life.

LIN.
Have you anything more to say to me ?

WIL.

Yes. I hear you're supporting this scheme for turn-
ing " The Blue Lion " into a working-man's club.

LIN.

Yes. An anonymous donor has come forward with

the money

27



Sits L. of
table.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



WIL.

Some election dodge of the dissenters, eh, Daubeny ?
DAUB.

Well, without being uncharitable towards our dis-
senting friends

WIL.

Just so. I wish to do them every justice, but,
throughout my life, I have never met with more
than six dissenters whom I could trust. I hope I
have misjudged them.

LIN.

It is expressly stipulated that politics and religion
are to be excluded.



Religion excluded!



MRS. B.


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