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Henry Arthur Jones.

The hypocrites : a play in four acts online

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LIN.



Since our object is to avoid disputes; and supply
the working men with pure recreation, and pure
beer!

WIL.

Pure beer! And pray, sir, do you constitute your-
self the sole judge of pure beer?



No, I rarely taste it.



LIN.



WIL.



Then what is your objection to Felly's entire?

LIN.
I have none.

WIL.

Then why do you set yourself against a man who
must surely be a far better judge of pure beer than
you?

28



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



DAUB.

I must say, Linnell, your action strikes me as most
injudicious. Mr. Felly is a large subscriber to our
schools

WlL.

And thereby provides sound food for the children's
minds, while he provides sound beer for the parents'
bodies.

DAUB.

In your position, your conduct involves the Church
herself. You are placing her in antagonism to the
world around her.

LIN.

She always has been in antagonism to the world
around her! She always will be!

DAUB.

Yes, yes in a sense. But these are troublous times
for the Church. What the Church needs to-day is
"safe men/' pre-eminently " safe men"! (Tap-
ping his sentiments into his stomach with his fat
fingers.) Safe Christian men!

LIN.

Have I done anything a Christian ought not to do ?
WIL.

It's very difficult to say what a Christian ought or
ought not to do in these days, but at any rate he
oughtn't to upset the parish.

MRS. B.

It must set a bad example to the whole neighbour-
hood when they see their own clergyman wilfully
flying in the face of all morality.

MRS. W.

You surely don't wish to get out of touch with
your people?

29



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Extending his
arms in in-
terrogation.



* Wilmor*
makes same
movement.



Rises and
crosses to
Linnell, o.



LIN.



No, I don't wish.



DAUB.

Then, my dear Linnell, why do it? Why stir up
strife in a peaceable parish like ours ? x Why ?
Why? Why?

WIL.

Yes, indeed, why? Why? Why? 2 (LINNELL
doesn't reply.) You see you have no answer!
Daubeny, perhaps you'll leave this in my hands.

DAUB.
Certainly.

WIL.

I'm a very easy-going man as a rule, but there
comes a time when my good-nature kicks, and says, 3
" I've had just enough of this." (To LINNELL.)
If you wish to remain in Weybury, you will please
write to Mr. Pelly that you've advised your friends
to withdraw from your " Blue Lion " fad, as it is
unworkable. Do you understand?

LIN.

(After a longish pause.) Yes.
WIL.

Pelly is very much upset at your attitude. You
might send him some little word of apology.

LIN.
Apology ? !

WIL.
Yes, sir, apology! Did you catch the



(Angrily.)
word?



Yes. Apology.



LIN.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



WlL.

You will also please go this evening 1 to William
Sheldrake, and say that I insist he makes an honest
woman of Sarah Piper.



By what process?



LIN.



WIL.



(Enraged.) By what process ? By the good, plain,
old-fashioned process of holy-matrimony. He will
have the banns put up next Sunday.



If he refuses?



LIN.



WIL.



Then I give him notice to leave his farm next
Michaelmas.

LIN.

Mr. Viveash is your estate agent. Wouldn't such
a message come more fittingly from him ? *

WIL.

No, sir, I choose you to deliver it, because I wish
you to represent the moral aspect of the case.

VIVE.

(Who has been listening and watching most atten-
tively all through.) Perhaps I'd better go with
Linnell and represent the legal aspect.

WIL.

That's as you please, so long as Sheldrake under-
stands he has got to marry the girl.

Enter GOODYER, door right.
GOOD.

Tea is served in the drawing-room, ma'am. 2 *
''(Exit, leaving door open.)

31



1 Viveash rises
and replaces
chair.



* Mrs. Wilmore
rises. Vive-
ash turns her
chair to-
wards piano,
and moves
up back c.

* Cue for
Floats, 1st
Border and
Arcs

(Prompt.) to
change. For
particulars
see Lighting
Plot.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



* Mrs. Blaney
rises, crosses
tip c. and
Exits.

* Wilmore
Exits. Daub-
eny meets
Mrs. Wil-
more up c.



DAUB.

(Rising with alacrity.) Ah!

WlL.

Now, Mrs. Blaney, 1 I feel I can go into tea with
a clear conscience ! 2

(Looking sternly at LINNELL as he goes off.
Exeunt MRS. BLANEY and WILMORE, door right.)

DAUB.

(To MRS. WILMORE.) I hope your cook has pro-
vided some of those delicious hot tea-cakes.

MRS. W.
Yes, I think.

DAUB. 3

There's a very excellent, dear creature! (Exit
right.)

MRS. W.

Aren't you coming to tea, Mr. Linnell?

LIN.

Would you mind if I stay here? I have to write
my letter of " apology " to Mr. Pelly.

MRS. W.
You'll find pens and paper. Come, Mr. Viveash.



Patting Mrs.
Wilmore's
hand.



Closes door.



(Exit right. VIVEASH is following her, but stops
at door and looks at LINNELL, who has stood
calm and bitter without moving. 4 Comes up to
him and puts his hand on LINNELL'S shoulder.)

VIVE.
Linnell, you won't mind my speaking plainly?

LIN,
Speak on.

32



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



VIVE.

For a man with a wife and two children, aren't
you behaving like well, like a silly jackass?

LIN.

How?

VIVE.

Here is a good fat living waiting for you. Can't
you let this sleepy old place go on its sleepy old
way? Can't you shut your eyes, hold your tongue,
and just flick a bit of butter into our friend Wil-
more's ears every now and then, eh? Isn't it worth
doing ?

LIN.
Perhaps, but I can't do it.

VIVE.

Why not?

LIN.

Before I entered the 'priesthood
months in questioning my motives,
dark time, but I could see one thing clearly, and
I shaped my whole life to it. I resolved I would
always fearlessly say what I thought to be true, al-
ways fearlessly do what I thought to be right, and
never think of consequences. That's what I'm
striving to do now.

VIVE.

Where do you expect it will land you?

LIN.

(Looks at him with a grave smile.) Well, if not
in Paradise, at least in self-respect.

VIVE.

I should say it would land you in the workhouse.
My dear Linnell, you aren't a baby; you're an edu-
cated man. Open your eyes! Look at the world

33



I spent many
I had a long,



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



* Moves a little
B.C.



around you, the world we've got to live in, the
world we've got to make our bread and cheese in!
Look at society. What is it? An organized hy-
pocrisy everywhere! We all live by taking in each
other's dirty linen, and pretending to wash it; by
cashing each other's dirty little lies and shams, and
passing them on! Civilization means rottenness,
when you get to the core of it! It's rotten every-
where ! And I fancy it's rather more rotten in this
rotten little hole than anywhere else. 1 (LINNELL
makes a protest.) Oh, yes it is! I've been forty
years in a lawyer's office here. I know the history
of every family in the place! If I were to take the
roof off every house, and show you what's under-
neath ! What's the use? It's a lovely, pictur-
esque little township, nestling at the foot of the un-
dulating downs. Let it nestle! Take the guide-
book view of the place! Let sleeping dogs lie!
Think it over. Do as I say, and you'll be Vicar
of Weybury in three months, and, who knows,
Dean of Gilminster before you die!



* Crosses up to
door R.

* Crosses up to
c. after him.

* Viveash stops
at door.

* Crosses back
to him, claps
him on shoul-
ders, makes
gesture of
despair at
LinneWs ob-
stinacy and
Exit R.

8 Linnell goes
to head of
table, puts
hat on lower
end of it.



LlN.

Thank you. I'm afraid I must go on my way to
the workhouse.

VIVE.
(Shrugs his shoulders.) By Jove, you will! 2

LIN.

(Quickly.) 3 Forgive me! 4 I'm sure your advice
has been most friendly. I wish I could take it.
But I can't. I'm not built that way.

( VIVEASH looks at him, 5 goes off*)
LIN.

(Speaking to himself in a calm, bitter tone.) Dear
Mr. Pelly, you are a rich brewer; I am a poor cu-
rate ; therefore I apologize to you. You want " The

34



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



. Blue Lion " for your own profit ; I want it for the
profit of my working men; therefore I apologize to
you.

(He laughs a little, bitter laugh, and sits down at
table to write.)



Enter GOODYEAR * showing in RACHEL NEVE. 2 She
is a beautiful girl, about twenty, plainly dressed.
She has a quiet, shrinking, modest manner, and
delicate, refined features, with a settled, frightened
expression on them. She carries a little hand-bag
and an umbrella.

GOOD.

Mrs. Wilmore is taking tea just now.
RACK.

I sent her a note this morning, telling her I would
take the liberty of calling. 3

GOOD.
(Placing a chair for her.) What name?

RACK.
Miss Neve. 4

GOOD.
I'll tell Mrs. Wilmore. 5

(Exit GooDYER. 6 While he has been speaking to
RACHEL he has turned up the electric lights* It
has been growing gradually dark, and the sunset
at window fades aivay into night. LINNELL has
just risen, and bowed very slightly to RACHEL.
During following scene he writes at table, and
tears it up. RACHEL has seated herself. He goes
on writing. She takes a folded letter out of her
hand-bag, glances through it, and puts it back.)



I beg pardoj



RACK.

35



1 At back
standing t,.
of door, this
time only.

* Who crosses
to c. Good-
yer moves
down on her



8 Ooodyer gets
chair from
above piano
and places it
L. c. on, a lint
ivith Linnell:
Linnell rises,
bows to
Rachel and
sits again.



4 Sits.



8 Goodyer
crosses up
back, closes
door, switch
es on lights
and Exits.

Right.

* For part icit-
lars of
change *
Lighting
Plot,



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



LIN.

Can I be of any service to you ?
RACK.

Perhaps you could tell me. I'm a teacher of draw-
ing, and I've asked Mrs. Wilmore to see me, be-
cause I was told she is the leading lady in the
neighbourhood.



Right.



At bade.



Yes?



LIN.



RACK.



I hoped she might recommend me. I believe there
is no drawing-master in Weybury?

LIN.

No, but there are several in Gilminster. Have you
any friends in Weybury?

RACK.

No. I had a friend who lived near here

Enter GooDYER. 1

GOOD.
Mrs. Wilmore will see you in a few minutes.

RACK.
Thank you. (Exit GOODYER. ) 2

LIN.
And this friend ?

RACH.

That was a long time ago. Do you know of any
rooms in Weybury, not expensive? I'm troubling 1
you?

LIN.

Not at all. I'll write out one or two addresses for
you.

36



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT



Thank you.



RACK.



LIN.



(Writing.) Where are your own friends your
father and mother?

RACK.

My mother died ten years ago. My father is an
artist. Times were rather hard, so last spring he
took an offer from a railway company in Canada
to make sketches for their advertisements. He's
there now.

LIN.

And he left you alone? Without resources?
RACK.

No, I was to have joined him, But I stayed in
England.

LlN.;

And your other friends ?

RACH.
I have no other friends.



None?



LIN.
RACH.



No near friends. My father has always gone from
place to place painting landscapes, so we had no
regular home.

LIN.

(Rises and goes to her with a sheet of paper.)
I've written several addresses there. (Giving her

the paper.

RACH.
Thank you.

37



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



Hiding her
face with
hand.



LIN.

(Looking at her sympathetically.) I'm afraid
you've not come on a very hopeful errand. And
your health has suffered

RACK. 1

(Quickly.) It's nothing. I'm quite well.
LIN.

My name's Linnell. I'm the curate here. If my
wife or I can be of any use to you, we live in the
station road, close to the station.

RACK.
Thank you.

(He goes back to table and seats himself to write.)
RACK.

(Again taking out the letter from hand-bag and
looking round as if waiting for some one.) Has
Mrs. Wilmore any daughters whom I could teach?

LIN.
No. She has an only son.

RACK.
And I suppose this son he's too old?

LIN.

For a drawing-mistress? Yes, I'm afraid. He's
going to be married next month.

(He has spoken casually, with his head over the
table. A spasm of horror and fright passes over
RACHEL'S face. She sits overwhelmed for some
seconds. He continues writing. At length she
puts back the letter in hand-bag, rises and stag-
gers towards door at back. 2 )



* Has to sup~
port herself
by the chair.

And crossing
to her
quickly.



LlN.

(Rising.) 3 Is anything the matter?

38



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



RACK.

(Who has recovered herself.) No, I thought per-
haps Mrs. Wilmore might be too busy

(MRS. WILMORE enters.*)

LIN.
Here is Mrs. Wilmore. 2

(VIVEASH follows MRS. WILMORE on?)

MRS. W.
Miss Rachel Neve?

RACK.
(Yes.

MRS. W.

You wrote me this morning. You wish to ask my
advice about giving drawing lessons in Weybury ? 4
You seem to be ill



RACK.

No I 5

MRS. W.

You've only just arrived in Weybury. Did you
get any lunch?

RACK.
No. I've had nothing. I suppose it's that.

MRS. W.
They shall get you something. (Rings bell.)

RACK.

Oh, please don't trouble. I shall be better in a mo-
ment.

MRS. W.

My dear child, you're fainting from want of food.
(GOODYER appears.) 6 Goodyer, show this young
lady into the library, and give her some cold meat
and tea.

39



Right.



* Linnell
moves up
c. as Mrs.
Wilmore
comes to c.

8 And remains
above table.
Linnell
moves round
back to down
R.



4 Rachel again
staggers.
Mrs. Wil-
more advan-
ces quickly to
her assist-
ance.

6 Quickly re-
covering.



At back. Mrs.
Wilmore up
R. C.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



* Goodyer
stands out-
tide room at
back. Rachel
move* up to
door.



* No answer.
From Rachel,
who show*
anxiety.



At back. Mrs.
Wilmore
crosses up
and closes
door.



* Viveash
crosses down
L.



Coming down
c< a little.



Crossing to-
wards door
R.

1 Moving to c.



And makes
significant
gesture that
Linn ell is in
the clouds.



Right.



GOOD.
This way, miss. 1

MRS. W.

Why did you come to Weybury of all places to look
for pupils?

RACK.

I was told that you

VIVE.

Have you brought any letters of recommendation?
MRS. W.

Who mentioned my name to you? 2 There! We
won't bother you now. Go and eat something and
come back here, and we'll see what can be done.

RACK.
Thank you.

(She goes off.)*

MRS. W.
Extraordinary application !

VIVE.

Looks a little queer. 4 I should get to know some-
thing about Missy before you help her.

MRS. W.

Oh, I can do nothing for her, 5 poor creature, except
give her a sovereign, and pass her on. Are you
coming back to tea ? 6

VIVE. 7

No. I've had my single cup.

(LINNELL is standing absorbed. MRS. WILMORE
looks significantly at VIVEASH with regard tJ
LINNELL. VIVEASH shrugs his shoulders. 8
She smiles and exit?

40



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



Viveash
crosses up to
door. Lin-
nell follow-
ing.

3 At window
Helen crosses
to c. and
meets Lin-
nell. Len-
nardputs
his hat on
top end of
piano and
comes to I*.
of Helen.



VIVE.

(Goes to LINNELL.) l Now, Linnell, we'll go and
administer our respective doses of law and gospel
to William Sheldrake!

LIN.

I can only advise him as I've already done.
VIVE.

Then you'd better keep your mouth shut, and let
me administer law and gospel too ! 2

(As they are going off, HELEN and LENNARD en-
ter. 3

HEL.
How d'ye do, Mr. Linnell?

LIN.
How d'ye do? (Shaking hands.)

HEL.

I've heard from my father. I wrote him that I
-wished you to marry us.

LIN.
I shall be very pleased, if it's Mr. Wilmore's wish.

LEN.
Oh, yes, delighted. Very kind of you, Linnell.

VIVE.
Now, Linnell.

* (Exeunt LINNELL and ViVEASH.) 4

LEN.

I'm afraid old Daubeny won't like our shunting
him for the marriage.

41



* Arcs
(Prompt)
change. For
particulars
see Lighting
Plot.

* At back,

Lennard
crosses and
leans on top
end of piano.
Helen cross-
es, places her
hat on lower
end and sits
at piano.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



* Bringing
hands down
violently on
keyboard,
making a
discord.



HEL.

I couldn't be married by Mr. Daubeny! (Going to
piano, which is cpen, playing disjointed chords dur-
ing the following scene.) * To be blessed by those
fat hands! (A little shudder.} There would be
something almost profane about it. Don't you feel
that?

LEN.

No. Old Daub is a very good sort of parson, as
parsons go.

HEL.

(Playing a chord.) Len, I've been talking to your
mother about marriage.



Yes?



LEN.



HEL.



1 Lennard
crosses to L. c.



1 Turns in
chair, facing
him.



It seems I've had altogether wrong ideas about
it.

LEN.
How? 2

HEL,

(Playing occasional bars.) Perhaps my father was
wrong to bring me up so strictly. He ought to
have made me go more into society. But I never
liked it. I always kept back from the world. 3 It
seems to me that if you and I could live here al-
ways, looking after our own people, and restoring
the dear old church

LEN.

Well, why shouldn't we?
HEL.

That would be an ideal life for me. Would it con-
tent you?

42



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



LEN.
You want me to go to Parliament, don't you?

HEL.

But that means living in London. And London
means society. And society means doing as people
in society do. Since I had that talk with your
mother, I begin to hate life.

LEN.

What did my mother tell you?

HEL.
I questioned her about you.

LEN.

I hope she didn't tell you anything very alarm-
ing?

HEL.

It wasn't what she told me. It was what she
wouldn't tell me.

LEN.

Like a good mother, she wanted to make the best
of me.

HEL.

Yes, I saw that. But that made me think the
worst. 1 Lennard, you aren't very different from
my ideal of you?



I hope not.



LEN.



HEL.



Marriage is very sacred to me. It's a sacrament.
(Vehemently.) Yes, it's a sacrament! And it
mustn't be less to you than it is to me! Tell me

it isn't !

43



1 Advancing
and taking
his hands.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



< Advances to
her.



Half turning
away from
him.



Turning to
him again.



Helen

crosses up c.
and turns to
him.

* Crosses to
door right,
and turns to
him. Len-
nard has
crossed to c.



No no



LEN.



HEL.



Oh, Len, I love you so much. You know father
has told Mr. Viveash to settle everything upon
you.

LEN.

You're too good too generous!
HEL.

No that's nothing. I've settled more than that!
I've settled all my love for always! I've given
you all everything that doesn't belong to God.
And I can't bear



What?



LEN.



HEL.



To think you haven't settled everything upon me ! 2
(Bursting into tears.)

LEN.

I have. You're a little hysterical.
HEL.

No. I'm quite calm and sensible. 3 Len, there is
no one (Passionately.) No woman can ever come
between us, and say that you

LEN.
Dearest, you're distressing yourself about nothing.

(He tries to kiss her, but she escapes from his em-
brace. )

HEL.

You won't tell me. 4 If you hide anything from me,
I shall be the most miserable girl that ever lived. 5
Are you coming in to tea?

44



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



LEN.

In a few minutes. I must give Jenkins orders about
the beaters to-morrow.

(Exit HELEN. 1 He stands distressed and per-
plexed, makes a gesture as if dismissing the sub-
ject, and is going off at back when he comes face
to face with RACHEL, who enters.



LEN.

RACK.

LEN.



Rachel !
Lennard !

My God !

RACH.

Forgive my coming. I was obliged

LEN.

Shush! (Closes door.) You've not gone out to
your father?

RACH.
I daren't!

LEN.
Daren't?

RACH.
Can't you guess?

LEN.
Rachel !

RACH.

I've just heard you are to be married. 2 It isn't
true?

LEN.

Yes. (She makes a gesture of despair.) I told
you it was impossible our friendship could con-
tinue.

RACH.
Friendship ? ! 3

45



Right.



J He moves
away from
her to L. c. by
chair. Ra-
chel follow-
ing on his R.



Rachel turns
to chair L. of
table.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



* He advances
to her.



* Turning to
him.



* He moves
away a step
toward L.



' He advances
to her
quickly.



LEN. 1

And we parted and said good-bye.
RACK.

You promised we should meet again, when I came
back to England.

LEN.

Why didn't you go to your father as we arranged?
RACK.

There was no boat for a fortnight. Then I began
to be afraid. So I stayed on in England till I was
sure 2 Lennard, it's the worst.

LEN.

Good Heaven! But when I left you three months
a g> y u had no thought

RACK.

Not then. Oh, this suspense has been terrible!
Lennard, you will marry me, you promised?

LEN.
I was free then. I'm not free now.

RACK.
And you never told me you were engaged!

LEN.
I wasn't actually engaged when I last saw you.

RACK.

But you were going to be. And it was to get rid
of me ! 3 Do you remember all you said to me ?
And you never meant it!

LEN.

Yes. 4 I did mean it. I did love you, Rachel. And
even now if there were any way out of it ! That's

46



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



1 L. of table.



impossible now ! But of course I'll see you through
as far as I can. (She shows despair, sits down help-
lessly.) 1 Why did you come here? Why didn't
you write to me?

RACH.

i

I thought you might be away on some engineering
work, and then the letter would be opened. I did

write this morning (Half taking the letter out

of the hand-bag.

LEN.
Where are you living?

RACH.

I stayed at my cousin's till yesterday. I came here,
thinking perhaps I could give drawing lessons, and
then if your mother should only take to me, all
might be well. Oh, what shall I do?



LEN.

There's no absolute danger yet, for some months,
is there?

RACH.
Not till the spring.

LEN.
That gives you time to turn round.

RACH.
But it must come ! And then ! I can't face it ! 2

LEN. 3

Rachel! Don't give way like this! Rachel!

He is bending over her, consoling her, when MRS.
WILMORE enters, right*

MRS. W. 5

Lennard ! 6 You know this lady ?

47



Buries her
face in her
arms on
table.

Quickly bend-
ing over her.



Sees Lennard
bending over
her and
closes door.

8 He crosses
L. c.

8 Mrs. Wilmore
comes to c.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Advancing to
her.



LEN.

Yes I

MRS. W.

And you allow her to come here?

LEN. 1

Mother, I've behaved like a scoundrel to her.
MRS. W.

We won't talk of that now. (To RACHEL.) Will
you please leave at once?

LEN.

Mother, she's the best and truest girl! Her only
fault is that she trusted to my word, and I broke
it! We must help her.

MRS. W.

Certainly. We'll do whatever is right. (To
RACHEL.) Please go now. (Going towards door
at back.

LEN.

Mother, it isn't only herself. (MRS. WILMORE
looks inquiringly.) There will be another.



Another ?



MRS. W.
LEN.



My child!

MRS. W.

(To RACHEL.) Is this true?
RACH.

Oh, I think I shall kill myself!
MRS. W.

Hush! Of course we'll help you, but you mustn't
be seen in Weybury. (Takes out watch.) Let me
think. You'll just have time to catch the 6.15 to

48



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



Gilminster. Go there, to "The Bear Hotel."
Stay there to-night. I'll come to you to-morrow
morning, and arrange something. You'll go?

RACK. 1 * Rachel ri,e,.

Yes. But Lennard

MRS. W.

(Quickly.) My son's name mustn't be mentioned.
Promise me you won't bring him into this.

RACH.
Of course I won't! I promise.

MRS. W.

Remember that. It's the only condition on which
I can help you. You understand?

RACK.
Yes. I love him too much to

MRS. W.
Hush! You've no time to spare. 2

RACK.

(Going towards LENNARD.) Good-bye. Oh! I
can't (Nearly breaks down.)

MRS. W.

(Intercepting.) 3 Please no scenes here. You
must go. (She goes towards door.)

LEN.

Rachel, 4 you forgive me? (She nods.) 5 Mother,
I can't let her go like this !

MRS. W. 6

(Intercepting, very imperious.) Lennard, you for-
get what is due to me, and to others. Let me save
you from the consequences of your folly, if I can. 7
(Rings bell. LENNARD goes up to sofa.)

49



1 Crosset ttp to
door.



Coming down
quickly
again and
opens it.
Rachel cross-
ing up R. c.

* Rachel stops.

6 Lennard ad-
vances.

6 Closing door
quickly.

1 Laughter
heard out-
side, also
talking. Ra-
chel backs to
above table.
Mrs. Wil-
more to R. of
door as Vive-
ash and Lin-
nell enter.



ACT .



THE HYPOCRITES



> Viveash
comes to Mrs.
Wilmore.
Linnell re-
mains in L.
of doorway.



* Viveash cross-
es down L.



Waits in
passage.



VIVEASH and LINNELL enter at back. 1

VIVE.
Oh, you're still busy.

MRS. W.
No. Is it anything important?

VIVE.

No. A marriage has been arranged between Wil-
liam Sheldrake and Sarah Piper. 2

MRS. W.
Oh, I'm glad. That's settled then.


2 4 5 6 7 8

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