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Henry Arthur Jones.

The hypocrites : a play in four acts online

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Enter GOODYER at back with a paper on tray.

GOOD.
Cook asked me to give you this receipt, ma'am.

MRS. W.
Oh, yes. (Takes receipt.)

Enter MRS. BLANEY, right.
MRS. W.

Goodyer, show this young lady out, and put hef
into the way to the station.

GOOD.
Yes, ma'am. 3

MRS. W.

(To RACHEL.) You'll find "The Bear" a very
comfortable hotel. Till to-morrow, then. Good-
night. (Shaking hands.)

RACK.
Good-night. (Going off.)

LIN.

(As RACHEL passes him.) I hope you'll be success-
ful. (Offers hand.) Good-night.

50



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



RACK.

Good-night.

(Shakes hands with him, and hurries off 1 without
looking up. GOODYER closes the door, and exit
after her? 1

VIVE.
So you're going to take up Missy?

MRS. W. 3

Oh, no. I'm shopping in Gilminster to-morrow,
and I've promised to give her a few introductions
that's all!

MRS. B. 4

Dear Mrs. Wilmore, be very careful. She struck
me as

MRS. W.
How?

MRS. B.

Well, she seemed to avoid meeting my glance. I
think it's such a good plan to fix your eye steadily
upon persons, such as servants and governesses
like this 5 give them one piercing look, and if
they flinch, have nothing to do with them!

DAUBENY enters? followed by WILMORE.

DAUB.

(To MRS. WILMORE.) Ah! Ah! I'm sure you've
forgotten it again!

MRS. W.

No, here it is. (Giving him the receipt.)
DAUB.

Thanks. My best respects to your cook. Quails
Estelle!

(Sits, 7 takes out his spectacles, and affectionately
ponders his receipt.)



At back.



1 Linnell cross-
es down to
Viveash.



8 Coming down
L. of table.
Mrs, Blaney,
who has
watched Ra-
chel off,
comes down
R. of table.

* Speaking
across table.



6 Suits action
to the word.



6 Right. Cross-
es above
table.



1 1n armchair
above fire-
place.



ACT I



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Crosses c. to
Linnell. Mrs.
Wilmore
crosses up to
Lennard by
sofa. Mrs.
Blaney has
crossed up to
above table.



WIL.

(To LINNELL and VIVEASH.) 1 Did you give Wil-
liam Sheldrake my message ?

VIVE.

Oh, yes. We put the matter to William in a nut-
shell, didn't we, Linnell? And the result is, up go
William and Sarah's banns next Sunday.

WIL.
That is so far satisfactory.

DAUB.
Most satisfactory!

(Folds up his receipt carefully, and puts it in his
pocket.)

WIL.

On consideration, Linnell, you might take up this
subject in your discourse next Sunday.

LIN.
What?

WIL.
Eh, Daubeny?

DAUB.

An excellent idea!

WIL.
Unless you prefer to deal with it yourself, eh?

DAUB.
No, I'll leave it in Mr. Linnell's hands.

MRS. B.

It's high time that somebody instilled some sort of
morality into our young people.

WIL.

(To LINNELL.) Next Sunday evening then. 2
You'll please let William Sheldrake and Sarah Piper

52



* Crosses and
sits at head
of table.
Viveash has
crossed up to
up R. back c.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT I



and the members of their family know that I wish
them all to be present.

LIN.

What? You wish me to start this wretched pair
on their newly married life by crying- out their
fault from the housetops, and shaming them before
all their neighbours !

WIL.

(Very angry.) Yes, sir, I do! Wretched pair in-
deed! Don't they deserve to be wretched? Shame
them? Don't they deserve to be ashamed? I beg
you will hold them up severely as a warning to
others. And I beg you will represent my attitude
in this matter as dictated by the fatherly interest I
take in all my tenants! (Tapping the table vigor-
ously with his forefingers to emphasize his senti-
ments.) And I beg you will let it be understood
that I have only one rule in these cases, that I will
tolerate no tampering with the plain dictates of
morality on my estate! (Ceases tapping the table,
and rises with a self -satisfied air.) 1 And I don't
doubt we shall all be very much edified next Sunday
evening! (Goes towards the group of DAUBENY,
VIVEASH and MRS. BLANEY, turns round to LIN-
NELL. ) Did you hear what I said ?

LIN.
Yes, I heard you.



(WILMORE goes to the group, and is seen to be jus-
tifying his outburst to them in a vigorous, self-
satisfied way. MRS. WILMORE and LENNARD
have remained near window at back, listening
with great apprehension. LINNELL stands calm,
self-controlled.

CURTAIN.

Two hours pass between Acts I and II. 2



53



Crosses to
Linnell.



* Act plays 36
minutes.



ACT II.

SCENE. Sitting-room at MR. LINNELL'S. A

plainly, sparely furnished room in an old ram-
bling house. On the left is a bow window looking
out on the street. On the right is a fireplace with
fire burning. In the back wall to the right is a
door leading to the staircase, with one step show-
ing below it. In the back wall a little to the left
is a door leading into a passage, and beyond the
passage another door leading into EDGAR LIN-
NELL'S study. When these doors are open, a view
is obtained of the study beyond them. In the
back wall to the left is a small window with little
red curtains, drawn apart, so that the passage can
again be seen, lighted by an oil lamp, and leading
up to the front door of the house. An easy chair
above the -fireplace with a table above it against
the left wall. Another table is down stage left
with chairs to the right and above it. Cheap
prints on the walls. Cheap, but not ugly, furni-
ture. The place gives an impression of gentee*
poverty, but contains nothing in bad taste.

THE TIME is about eight on the evening of the sam<,
day, and the room is lighted with oil-lamps. On
the table to the left are a rug, and the umbrella
and hand-bag which RACHEL has carried in Act
I.

Discover PATTY showing in MRS. BLANEY. PATTY
is the LINNELLS' servant, a neat, sharp, little
country girl in a cotton frock. 1

MRS. B.

Dr. Blaney is still here?

55



1 Mrs. Blaney
enters to L. C.
Patty follows
to R. of her,
leaving room-
door open,
through
which ?.s FP en-
door Of JX-C'W
opro?:-;tr. (i}?o>
a little open.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



PATTY.

Yes, ma'am. In the study with Mr. and Mrs. Lin-
nell binding up the poor young lady's foot.

MRS. B.

(At door, listening across the passage.} How did
the accident happen?

PATTY.

The lady slipped down the steps at the station, and
sprained her foot so bad as she couldn't walk.

MRS. B.
What made them bring her here?

PATTY.

Mrs. Linnell was going by train to Gilminster to do
her shopping, and saw the young lady fall. And,
as our house was close by, she had her brought
here in Mr. Perry's new red van.

MRS. B.

(Listening.) I can hear Mr. Linnell's voice, and
the Doctor's, but I can't distinguish a word.

PATTY.

Oh, isn't it annoying, ma'am, when you just can't
catch



1 Crosses to top
of table.



* Patty comes
to R. of table.

9 Takes it up
and exam-
ines it.

* Pitts it down
again and
takes up um-
brella.



(MRS. BLANEY frowns at her, 1 and comes away
from door to the table, examines the rug f um-
brella, and hand-bag.

MRS. B.
Do these belong to the young person?

PATTY.
Yes, ma'am. 2

MRS. B. 3

A very peculiar rug ! Much more like a man's rug 1
than a lady's ! 4

56



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



PATTY.

It has got a man's look about it!
MRS. B.

And quite a common umbrella. (Examining the
texture. ) 1

PATTY.

Yes, ma'am. Not a penny more than seven and
sixpence.

MRS. B.



(Taking up the hand-bag, looking at the initials.)
R. N. I suppose it's the drawing-mistress person
who called on Mrs. Wilmore. (She has managed
to open the hand-bag and peep in. 2 Suddenly.)
Patty, please tell Dr. Blaney his dinner is getting
cold, and that I'm waiting.



PATTY.



Yes, ma'am. 3



(PATTY goes across passage, and is seen to enter
the study door opposite. The moment her back
is turned, MRS. BLANEY takes a folded letter out
of the hand-bag, hesitates, puts it back, looks long-
ingly at bag, gives way to her curiosity* takes
out the letter, reads: "Wednesday morning"
that's this morning. Glancing round at study
door, reads : " I am in Weybury, 5 and must see
you at once." The study door, which has been
open a little way, is opened wide by DR. BLANEY,
who appears at it, speaking off into study. He is
a stout, middle-aged man, with a bland, sleek,
formal, deferential, bedside manner.

DR. B.

(At the study door.) Rest the foot entirely. 6
Don't leave that sofa. Above all, no excitement.
Perfect quiet. Good evening.

57



1 and putting
it down on
table. Patty
takes it up at
once Mrs.
Blaney picks
up hand-bag.



As she holds
hand-bag it
falls open,
disclosing a
letter insidf.
Replaces bag
on table.



*Puts umbrella
on table.



* Looks round
quickly to see
no one is
watching.



6 Dr. Blaney
appears
from back
room.



Mrs. Blaney
quickly re-
places letter
and crosses
to window.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



(He speaks that at the study door, and crosses
passage into room. 1 MRS. LINNELL and LIN-
NELL follow him in from the study. MRS. LIN-
NELL is in outdoor clothes.



ToR.c. Mrs.
Linnell fol-
lows toe.
Linnell
round back
and down R.,
having closed
door as he
entered.



* Crossing to
Mrs. Linnell.



DR. B.

A sprain. Quite a simple sprain. No cause for
serious alarm. There is also a temperature which
may, or may not, develop into some more or less
pronounced form of fever. She says she has been
living with some cousin in London. I should ad-
vise getting her back there at once.

LIN.

There's no train for London to-night, and if she
has a temperature, mightn't it be dangerous?

DR. B.

Well, from that point of view, it is inadvisable to
move her.

MRS. B.

Who is she, and what is she doing in Weybury?

MRS. L.
She seems to be a lady.

MRS. B.

There are so many sorts of ladies nowadays. 2 And
before you allow her to have an infectious fever
here, with your two children so liable to catch any-
thing and everything -

MRS. L.

Her box was labelled for Gilminster. I'm going
there. Shall I order a carriage, and take her over?

LIN.

What would you do with her?

53



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



MRS. B.

Send her to the best hotel. She'll be far more com-
fortable there than staying here and running up a
heavy doctor's bill, without any means of paying.

DR. B.

Under the circumstances, that might be the wiser
plan.

LIN.
I don't think we'll turn her out to-night.

DR. B.

In that case we must do our best for her. I'll send
in a soothing draught, and a lotion for the foot.
As regards diet a little arrowroot or gruel; noth-
ing heavy; no meat; no solids; no stimulants. A
little soda and milk to drink. Above all, no ex-
citement. Perfect quiet. Of course, if the temper-
ature should rise still higher but we trust it won't.
(To LINNELL.) x Good evening. (To MRS. LIN-
NELL.) Good evening, Mrs. Linnell. Now,
Matilda !



1 Linnell cross*
es up to door.



(He goes off into passage, followed by LINNELL.
They are seen through the window talking at
lamp. )

MRS. B.

Where's her other luggage?

MRS. L.
At the station.

What's it like?

One large trunk.

MRS. B.

I should unpack it for her, and look very carefully
through everything.

59



MRS. B.
MRS. L.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Door slam.



Toe.



MRS. L.

I couldn't do that.

DR. B.
(Voice from passage.) Now, Matilda!

MRS. B.

Coming, dear! I'll run in again after dinner, and
see if you've found out anything about her.

(Exit at back. She is seen to pass the window with
LINNELL and DR. BLANEY. 1 MRS. LINNELL
takes up the hand-bag and looks at the initials.
A moment later LINNELL re-enters the room. 2

LIN.

Rather unfortunate, eh, Mary? Stopped your
shopping ?

MRS. L.

No, they keep open late on market night, and sell
off cheap. One must save every penny when one
has an extravagant husband like you.

LIN.
Extravagant? I? In what?

MRS. L.

In your ideas of right and wrong. They're far
too expensive for our position. You can't afford
them on a hundred and twenty a year.

LIN.

I can't afford to do what's right on a hundred and
twenty a year?

MRS. L.

No, not when it offends everybody, and brings your
children to beggary.

LIN.

(Very gently strokes her hair.) "Thou speakest
as one of the foolish women."

60



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



MRS. L.

(Edging away from his caress.) No, I speak like
a good wife and mother. 1 There's scarcely a labor-
er's home in Weybury that hasn't more comforts
and luxuries than ours. Edgar, 2 won't you do as
Mr. Wilmore wishes ?



How?



LIN.



MRS. L.



Study him. Make friends with him. Then he'd
give you the living. (Glancing out of window.)
There's the signal down. I shall only just catch
the train. (Kissing him.) You're to do as I tell
you. For our children's sake!

LIN.
I can't bow the knee to Baal.

MRS. L.



Yes, you can/
Weybury. 4



It's the only way to be vicar of



(LINNELL stands perplexed, sighs deeply, goes to
staircase door, opens it, takes off the coat he is
wearing, takes from peg a very old, threadbare
coat, which is hanging there, hangs up the coat
he has taken off.) 5

(Enter PATTY from study.) 6

PATTY.

The young lady has asked for her rug and things.
LIN.

(Putting on the old coat.) You took my letter to
Mr. Wilmore?

61



1 Crosses to R.
c. impati-
ently.



* Advancing to
him.



* Crosses up t<*
door c.

Mrs. Linnell
exit at back,
passes win-
dow in pas-
sage, and off
at front
door, which
is heard to
shut behind
her.

6 Crosses to
fireplace
putting on
coat.

9 Crosses to be-
low table for
rug, etc.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Facing Lin-
nell.



PATTY.

Yes, sir. 1 He was in the hall, and he took it and
read it.

LIN.
Well?

PATTY.

He got as red as a turkey cock. "Oh, indeed,"
he says. " Tell Mr. Linnell I'll come and talk to
him myself after dinner," he says, and then he
marched off as if all the world belonged to him.

LIN.
That will do, Patty.

(Turns from her towards the fire. PATTY takes
up the rug, umbrella and bag, and goes off with
them. She carries the hand-bag upside down,
and the letter slips out of the pocket on to the
floor near the door. LINNELL stands in per-
plexity? sees the letter f goes up to it, picks it
up?)

LIN.

(Reading.) "Wednesday morning. I am in
Weybury and must see you." Who's this? "You
must keep your promise, or the shame will drive me
mad. I am coming to call on your mother in the
hope of seeing you, and giving you this. You

will marry me " (He shows surprise, and his

hand drops with the letter at his side. ) Shame ! !

(The door at back opens, and RACHEL stands there %
pale and distracted, leaning on a walking-stick,
and against the doorway. 4 )

LIN.
You shouldn't have moved. Your foot?



8 Crosses up to
close door,
which Patty
has left open.

8 But does not
close door.
Crosses to
above table,
reading.



Of the room.



Looking
about anx-
iously.



( Indicating stick. )
lost a letter



RACK.
I found this in there. 5

62



I've



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



LIN.
(Offering the letter.) Is it this?

RACH.

(Takes it eagerly, just glances at it.) You've read
it?

LIN.

Only the opening sentences. At first, I thought it
was addressed to me.

RACH.

(Darting at him a look of eager inquiry.) You
know ?

(He does not reply. She limps hurriedly to the fire,
puts the letter on it, and drops exhausted into the
easy chair. He x comes up to her with a sympa-
thetic gesture.)



RACH.
You wish me to leave here ?

LIN.
Not till you have found another home.

RACH.

Home? I shall never have a home, unless Oh,
what shall I do ?

LIN.

That letter was written to somebody in Weybury,
and never delivered. (She does not reply.) To
Mr. Lennard Wilmore?



RACH.
LIN.



( Quickly. ) No.

No?

RACH.

No. I mustn't say whom it was written to. That



1 Closes door
and comes to
her i*.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



doesn't matter. (Suddenly attempting to rise.) I
must go to Gilminster.



*Begoestohet
assistance.



(She rises* but her foot gives way, and she sinks-
into chair.)

LIN.
There's no train till eleven. You can't go to-night.

RACK.
I am sorry to be so much trouble.

LIN.

Don't think of that. Think only how we can help
you to meet this.

RACK.

Thank you. (A pause. She suddenly looks at
him.) 1 want to ask you one question.

LIN.
Ask me.

RACK.

Because I've done wrong, my child won't do wrong
won't grow up to be wicked?

LIN.

Your child's future is in your hands to shape. Be-
gin to change from this moment. There lies the
best hope for your child.

RACK.

You think I'm a bad girl ?

LIN.

No; but if you are, then you're my especial charge.
RACK.

I'm not a bad girl. I've made one mistake, and
now I can't get back.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



LIN.

Are you sure of that?

RACK.

(Eagerly.) Can I? Show me the way!
LIN.

There's only the one old way. You've done wrong 1 .
You repent.

RACH.

Oh, yes, I repent. But repentance doesn't get you
back. I want to get back to where I was.

LIN.

That's impossible. Things can never be as they
were. But put the past behind you. Look to the 1
future. Resolve to bear the burden of your wrong-
doing bravely.

RACK.

I can't! I can't face it ! All my life long! All my
life long !

LIN.

Life's a running stream. However foul and muddy
it may be, it clears and purifies itself as it goes
along. So it will be with yours.

RACH.

No! No! How can I meet people? Everybody
will avoid me!

LIN.
I won't. I'll help you. I'll be your friend;

RACH.
(Looks up gratefully.) How kind you are!

LIN.

Tell me what I can do. Shall I write to your

father?

65



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



RACK.

No, not yet. He's so happy out there with his
work. And when he comes home to me!



Bending over
her.



Looking up
at him.



' They crow up
c. She sud-



denly stops,
turns to hii



im.



LIN.



But he'll forgive you ?



RACK.

Oh, yes, he's kindness itself. That's why I don't
wish to break his heart.

LlN. 1

Let me speak to the man who brought you to this.

RACK.

The man who ?

LIN.
Lennard Wilmore.

RACK. 2

But it wasn't you're quite wrong in thinking that
letter was from him. (He looks sternly at her, her
eyes drop, she shows confusion.) I mean it
would be useless you're mistaken.

LIN.

(Very cold and stern.) I can do nothing for you
unless you're quite truthful with me. Your foot is
paining you. Let me help you back to the sofa.

(Helping her to rise, giving her his arm. 3 )

RACK.
(Suddenly.) Oh, don't you turn against me!

LIN.

I won't. Let me try to set things straight for you,
will you ?

66



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT n



Patty is seen
to cross from
room at back
to front door.



8 Showing anx-
iety.



' And stands a
little below
her, on her B,

Who comes c.
Patty stand*
by door.



RACK.

iYes at least Oh, I don't know what to do! (Sud-
'denly, with great agitation.) I mustn't stay

here

(A knock off at the front door. 1 )

LIN.

Calm yourself. Make up your mind to stay to-
night, and in the morning we'll decide what to do.

RACK.
Thank you! 2 That's not Mrs. Wilmore?

LIN.
Rest there a moment. I'll see who it is.

[(He is putting her into the chair near the door*
when PATTY, who has opened the front door,

Centers from passage, showing ; M HELEN. 4 )

PATTY.
Here's Miss Plugenet, sir.

HEL.
(Entering.) Oh, I'm so sorry. You're engaged?

LIN.

No. Come in. A lady who has met with an acci-
dent. We're taking care of her for the night.

(HELEN and RACHEL bow slightly to each other.)

HEL.
[You're suffering

RACH.
My foot is sprained.

HEL.
Can I do anything for you?

RACK.
No, thank you.

67



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



Helen moves
towards
table. Patty
goes to Ra-
chel, and
supporting
her, helps her
to rise and
cross to door.



* In doorway.



LlN.

Patty, help the lady back to the sofa. 1
PATTY.

Lean on me, Miss. Shove me about as much as
you like. I'm as strong as a cart-horse.

RACK.

(Looking round a little wildly.) 2 You mustn't
think what you thought is not true

LIN.

(Soothingly.) Let Patty take care of you. I'll
come to you in a few minutes.

(Helping PATTY and RACHEL off at door at back.
He closes door after them.)

HEL.
I didn't know you had a visitor. You're busy?

LIN.
No. Sit down. 3 What is it?

HEL.

Mr. Linnell, we're almost strangers, but I feel I
may trust you absolutely. Isn't that so?

LIN.
Yes.

HEL.

I'm in great perplexity.

LIN.
Tell me.

HEL.

(Suddenly. 4 ) Ought I to marry Lennard?

LIN.

What makes you ask me that?

63



Helen sits R.
of L. c. table.
He comes
downc.



Rises and
goes to him.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



HEL.

Because Mrs. Wilmore puts me off. And I've
come to you, because you won't put me off. You
won't tell me these things don't matter; that all
young men sow their wild oats; and that I'm fool-
ish to ask from Lennard what I bring to him my
whole heart, my whole nature, my whole life. I've
explained myself badly. But you understand ?

LIN.
I think I do.

HEL.

Then ought I to marry him?

LIN.
You love him?

HEL.

(Warmly.) With all my heart. Should I have
accepted him else? I came fresh from school.
That was four months ago, and for the first month
all was like a happy dream. Then I got this ter-
rible doubt, and I can't rest. I'm not foolish ! I'm
not hysterical ! I can't marry him if I feel he is still
bound to to some one who came before me. What
can I do ?

LIN.

Shouldn't you go to your father?

HEL.

No. He wouldn't understand. That's why I came
to you.

LIN.

'(After a long pause.) I cannot advise you.

HEL.

You can't ? Isn't it your duty to advise me ? Isn't
that why you are a clergyman?

(LINNELL takes a step or two in great perplexity. 1 )

6g



1 Towards a.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



Takes a step
towards him.



LIN.
Have you heard anything or seen or guessed?

HEL.

I've questioned Mrs. Wilmore. Just now, after
dinner, I begged her to be quite frank with me, but
I feel she's hiding something. That drove me to
you. 1 Do you know anything?

LIN.

That is a question I did not hear.
HEL.

Then you do know. (He turns away from her
very coldly.) I beg your pardon. I'm wrong to
speak like that. But I trust you. I throw myself
upon you. Advise me as you would your own
sister !

LIN.

Let me think this over. Come to me to-morrow
morning, will you?

HEL.

Yes. You don't blame me for this? I'm not a
traitor to Lennard ?

LIN.
Not if you are true to your best instinct.

HEL.
It is my best instinct, and I must obey it.

LIN.

(Warmly shaking her hand.) You're right! (A
knock off at the front door. PATTY goes to it from
study. )

HEL.

I'll come to you to-morrow morning, then? (He
nods.) Thank you so much.

70



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT II



Linnell
moves to n. c.
Helen to L. c.



LIN.

For what?

HEL.

You quiet me, and comfort me. I feel you're quite
honest.

LIN.

(Smiling.) Are honest men so scarce?

Enter LENNARD, in evening dress.' 1
LEN.

[Ah! I guessed I should find you here. (Looking
anxiously from one to the other.) More spiritual
advice and ghostly comfort, eh, Linnell ? I begin to
be jealous.

HEL.

You shouldn't speak like that. You make sacred
things so cheap.

LEN.

(Betraying a little nervousness and alarm.) I beg
your pardon. I interrupted you. (Looking from
one to the other. ) Has anything happened ?

HEL.

No. Oh, yes that young lady can we do any-
thing- for her?

LEN. 2

Ah, Linnell, my mother heard of the accident at
the station. She's coming here presently.

LIN.

Indeed!

LEN.

She has taken a great interest in this young girl.
Now, Helen. Good night, Linnell. 3

LIN.

(Puts his hand on LENNARD'S shoulder.) Will you
come back by-and-by?



* Crosses to
Linnell.



About to
cross to door.



ACT II



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Drops cap at
back, looks
out and then
comes down
c. then cross-
es to chair
and sits.
Directly he is
seated the
front door is
heard to
slam. He
rises nerv-
ously.

Comes down
c.



Why?

I want to speak to you.

Certainly, but

Why not stay now ?
I must see you home.



LEN.

LIN.

LEN.
HEL.

LEN.
HEL.



No. It's only across two fields, and it's moonlight.
I'll leave him with you, Mr. Linnell.

LEN.
Well, if you wish

HEL.
I do. (Going off at back.) Oh, don't trouble.

(To LINNELL, who accompanies her to the front
door and opens it for her. Meantime LENNARD
shows great apprehension, goes up to door, looks
after them,' 1 tries to compose himself, awaits
LINNELL'S return with great anxiety. LINNELL
reenters, closes the door after him?

LIN.

Will you sit down? (LENNARD sits apprehen-


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