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Henry Arthur Jones.

The hypocrites : a play in four acts online

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up left. A fireplace with fire burning down left.
A window right, looking into garden. A sofa
facing audience above the fireplace. A table be-
low sofa and a little to the right of it. A table
towards the right. A table up near the right cor-
ner of room. The walls are mainly covered with
bookshelves reaching up high, the books being
mostly in good old leather binding, such as would
remain in an English gentleman's library of the
last century; there are a few modern books. On
the table in the right corner are stacks of books.
On the table below the sofa are pens, ink and
paper. There are the usual library implements
and belongings: a globe; an old Chippendale
clock on the shelf of fireplace; a bust or two; one
or two old family portraits round the room, above
the doors.

M.RS. WILMORE enters, left, very quickly and ap-
prehensively, looking back and beckoning to MR.
VIVEASH, who enters, cautiously closing the door
behind him. MRS. WILMORE'S manner through-
out the Act is restless, and betrays great strain
and anxiety, except when she is in the presence
of others, and is nerving herself to efforts of self-
control.

MRS. W.

(Anxiously. 1 ) Well? Has she come?

97



Turning to
Viveash.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



VIVE.

(Nods.) Just arrived at my office. I've boxed her
up in my private room.

MRS. W.
She accepts our offer ?

VIVE.
I haven't spoken to her yet.

MRS. W.

We must get it all settled before she meets Sir John.
He's pressing to see her, and he wishes Linnell, and
Lennard, and the Blaneys to be present.

VIVE.

That's what I've come about. We're on very tick-
lish ground. We must pick our steps very, very
carefully.

MRS. W.

Yes, but Lennard must be cleared, and this girl got
out of the way.

VIVE.

When did you see her last ?

MRS. W.
Yesterday.

VIVE.

At her lodgings in Gilminster?

MRS. W.
Yes. I've been over nearly every day.

VIVE.
Linnell hasn't seen her?

MRS. W.

i

Not since Dr. Blaney and I took her away from his
house, the morning after the upset there.

98



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



You're sure?



VIVE.



MRS. W.



Quite. He went over, but Dr. Blaney and I left
strict orders he was not to be admitted.

VIVE.

Where is this meeting with Sir John to take place?
MRS. W.

At your office or better have it here. It will look
as if we were not afraid.

VIVE.
Yes, but Miss Plugenet?

MRS. W.

Helen isn't with us now. When her father re-
turned, she went home with him to the Court.

VIVE.

Oh, yes, I'd forgotten. How's Miss Plugenet tak-
ing it?

MRS. W.

She feels it very keenly. She'd arranged to consult
Linnell the next morning. I've had the greatest
difficulty in keeping her away from him. Now she
has left it entirely in her father's hands. Do let us
get it over as soon as possible. 1

VIVE.
(Dubiously.) Ye es. 2 I must see my way clear.

MRS. W.
You frighten me ! 3 Isn't it clear ?

VIVE.

Quite, so far. ( With a cunning look of understand-
standing.) You assure me that Lennard is inno-

99



1 Mrs. W. up c
and turns a
he speaks



Taking a step

torn.



* Advancing t*
him,
alarmed.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



cent, and that Linnell has made a silly mistake. I
take your word, of course. The girl herself also
declares that Lennard is innocent. You're sure
she'll stick to that?

MRS. W.

Yes, I think. I've warned her it's the only chance
of our providing for her and her child. You'd bet-
ter warn her too.



Crosses to R.
c.



*JwR. C. chair.



(Shakes his head.)
statement.

What do you mean?



VIVE.
No, I mustn't go behind her

MRS. W.

VIVE.

If the girl \vill stick to her story, I'm ready to go
on. But before I come on the scene you'd better
see her again, and put the final screw on her.

MRS. W.

Very well. If you think it necessary.
VIVE.

I do. She seems strange and bewildered. You're
going to subject her to a tremendous ordeal. Sup-
pose she were to break down before Sir John!



She mustn't!



MRS. W.
She shan't! 1



VIVE.

(Shakes his head dubiously.) We're hanging on
her single word. If she fails us, she lets us into a
horrible hole.

MRS. W.

(Sits down wearily. 2 ) I don't think I can stand
this strain much longer.

100



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



VIVE.



Courage ! Courage !



MRS. W.



You won't desert us?



VIVE.



I'll go as far as I dare, professionally. Perhaps a
little further. 2 I'm in the same boat with you. If
your mortgagees close, I shall find myself in a very
tight place. 3

(Enter at back WILMORE, a little excited. 4 )

WIL.

Sir John has just driven over with Helen. Are
you quite ready to see him?

MRS. W.
(Rising, bracing herself.) Yes. 5

(Enter GOODYER at back, announcing SIR JOHN
PLUGENET. Enter SIR JOHN PLUGENET'; 6 a
handsome, well-built, English gentleman of -fifty,
healthy, frank, genial, pleasant, strong, resolute.
Exit GOODYER.

SIR J.
How d'ye do, Mrs. Wilmore? 7 (Shaking hands. 8 )

MRS. W.
My dear Sir John !

SiRj.
How are you, Viveash ? 9

VIVE.
Capital, thanks.

MRS. W.

I hope Helen isn't still fretting about this stupid
mistake of Mr. Linnell's?

101



1 Advances to-
wards her.



Moves to c.
again.



' Crosses below
L. table.

4 Remains up
c.



B Wilmore
moves to
near sofa.
Mrs. Wil-
more rises.

6 Viveash
crosses to
fireplace.



7 Crossing to
her.

8 Mrs. Wil-
more sits
again.



9 Crosses to-
wards L. C .
chair. Wil-
more crosses
to above R.
table.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



* Crosses to
back of L. c.
table.



SlRj.

She is worrying a little.

MRS. W.
Oh, we shall easily put it right.

SlRj.

(Firmly) We must put it right. How's the girl?

MRS. W.
Recovering slowly.

SlRj.

Still at Gilminster, I suppose?
MRS. W.
No ; she came over to Weybury this morning.

SIR J.
She's in Weybury now?

MRS. W.

Yes. As Lennard's name has been dragged in, I
thought Mr. Viveash ought to see her, so she's now
at his office.

SIR J.

What do you make of this business, Viveash ? *
VIVE.

Our friend Linnell has been moonraking in dirty
waters, and has fished up this bag of moonshine.

SIR J.

Rather dirty, foggy moonshine, eh ? Well, we must
dispel it. I'll come to your office, and see the girl
myself.

(MR. and MRS. WILMORE show alarm, which SIR
JOHN, who has turned to VIVEASH, does not
see.)

102



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



VIVE.

Yes hadn't I better get all the threads together for
you?

SIR J.

Threads? What do you mean?

VIVE.
We may as well thrash this out thoroughly

SIR J.
(Firmly.) That's what I mean to do.

VIVE.

I'll see Linnell, and the Blaneys, and the girl herself,
and arrange a meeting, and let you know.

SIR J.
Why not this morning, now I'm in Weybury?

VIVE.
By all means, if you wish it.

SIR J.

I do. The sooner we bring this parson to book, the
better, eh, Mrs. Wilmore?

MRS. W.

Oh, pray let us get this tiresome business over, and
go on with the wedding.

WIL.

Certainly. 1 Not that anyone who knows me
Would believe that a son of mine still, I owe it to
my position to silence this slander at the earliest
moment.

VIVE.

We'll silence it this morning. What time will suit
you, Sir John?

103



Wilmore
crosses down
R. to below
table.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Crosses back
to c. to Mrs.
Wilmore,



SIR J.

(Looking at his watch.) I'm driving Helen across
to the Oakleys. I can drop her, and be back here
at twelve.

VIVE.

Twelve. I'll have everything and everybody here
ready for you.

SIR J.

Do. There's a good fellow ! * Extraordinary af-
fair ! You say Lennard did know this girl in Scot-
land?

MRS. W.
Oh, yes.

SIR J.
What sort of terms were they on?

MRS. W. 2

Sir John, if I tell you something in absolute con-
fidence

SIR J.
You know you can trust me.

MRS. W. 3

There were two or three young fellows down there
making this railway. One of them went to South
Africa. When it became necessary for Miss Neve
to know his present address, she naturally came to
his old chum to find out.



Turning to-
wards him
confidently.



* Rises and
moves to Sir
John.



I see.



SIR J.
MRS. W.



I had to drag this out of Lennard. He's a dear,
loyal fellow. He'd rather lie under an unjust sus-
picion himself than betray his chum. You under-
stand ?

104



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



SlRj.

Ah, yes.

MRS. W.
I may rely you'll never make use of this?

SlRj.

Of course not. Well, 1 that partly explains but 2
why should this parson stick to his stupid blunder?

MRS. W.
The man's a fanatic !

WIL.

A harebrained, cantankerous fanatic! Wants to
dump down model public-houses all over the coun-
try, and ruin the brewers.

VIVE. 3

Poor Linnell is a moral maniac, who will some day
discover that the world is square, because he pro-
fesses rectilinear principles.

MRS. W.
Hush!

(As HELEN and LENNARD enter at back. 4 )

HEL.

(Goes affectionately to MRS. WILMORE.) Good
morning, dear. (Kissing her.)

MRS. W.
How are you, dear?

HEL.
How d'ye do, Mr. Viveash?

VIVE.
Good morning.

HEL.

You're talking about Mr. Linnell. I want you to
give me back my promise, and let me see him.

105



1 Moving to-
wards L.

8 Stopping and
turning to
Mrs, Wil-



Viveash has
come again
below L.
table.



Sir John
moves to-
wards sofa.
Lennard
comes to c.
by him, and
shakes hands
with him.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



Upc.



Crosses up to
R. of Helen,
in front of
table. Mrs.
Wilmore
crosses
round and
up to win-
dow.



MRS. W.

My dear, you've left this entirely in your father's
hands. If you see Mr. Linnell now, it will be going
over to the enemy.

HEL.
I can't think of Mr. Linnell as an enemy.

SmJ.

Lennard, you see Nell is fretting. I needn't ask
you

HEL.

(Goes very quickly to LENNARD. 1 ) No, you
needn't ask him! Len, I love you, and I will trust
you. I do trust you, entirely !

(LENNARD takes her hand, kisses it warmly.)

WIL.

There's a noble girl for you ! 2 My dear Helen, I'm
proud of you ! I feel my dear boy's happiness will
be safe in your keeping.

HEL,

Don't let us speak another word of this hateful
thing. But when my father has cleared it up, I
want you all to be very kind to Mr. Linnell. He's
not to be punished.

WIL.

I must say I hope his conscience won't spare him!
HEL.

Whatever mistake he has made, I'm sure he is act-
ing honestly.

VIVE.
That's a bad excuse for setting houses on fire!

SiRj.

Now, Nell, I'll just drop you at the Oakleys. We
must hurry on. (Looking at his watch.)

1 06



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



HEL.
Good-bye, Mrs. Wilmore. 1 (Kissing her.^

her, Lennard

MRS. W.
Good-bye, dear.

HEL.
Good-bye, Mr. Wilmore.

WlL.

Good-bye, my daughter that is to be !

(Shaking hands, is about to kiss her, but she makes
as if she did not see it.)

HEL.
Come and put me in the dogcart, Len.

(Exit at back, followed by LENNARD.)

WIL.
What a noble girl, Plugenet! What a noble girl!

SIR J.
At twelve o'clock here, Viveash.

VIVE.
At twelve o'clock.

SIR J.

Au revoir.

(Exit SIR JOHN a? back. WILMORE closes the door
after him. 2 WILMORE, MRS. WILMORE, and
VIVEASH stand looking at each other. At length
VIVEASH takes out his watch. )

VIVE.

There's no time to waste. 3 I'll call and tell the
Blaneys to be here. They're safe?

MRS. W.

Oh, yes, they're on our side. 4

107



* A nd stands at
it, tapping
floor with his
foot.



Viveash
crosses up to
door. Wil-
more moves
over to up u

* Moves R. c.
towards
Viveash.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Moving to-
ward* Mrs.
Wilmore.



WlL.

They ought to be. I got Blaney appointed public
vaccinator.

VIVE.

(To MRS. WiLMORE. 1 ) You'd better have one
more dig at Linnell, and persuade him he's mis-
taken, eh!

WIL.

He's an obstinate beast ! In fact, as you very justly
observed, Linnell's really a maniac.

VIVE.

He's certainly guilty of the criminal lunacy of not
knowing on which side his bread is buttered.

WIL.
If he won't listen to reason, what then?

MRS. W.

Crush him! Either my Lennard has to go down,
or this man. If he won't retract, crush him ! Crush
him! Crush him!

VIVE.

I'll send him on to you. (Going up to back.)

WlL. 2

(Very anxiously.) Viveash, we shall pull through
this?

VIVE.

(Looks dubious, shrugs his shoulders.) It all de-
pends on the girl. If you can't get her as tight as
wax

WIL.
Well?

VIVE.

Then, for heaven's sake, draw back, and pull your-
selves out of it as best you can!

1 08



* Crotsina up
to Viveash.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



MRS. W.

We can't draw back now! *
WIL.

It would be worse than telling the truth at first. 2
VIVE.



I'll bring her along to you. Get her as tight as
wax, or - - (Makes a significant gesture, and exit
at back.)

WIL.

This is a nice position for a man with my honour-
able record ! 3 Throughout my whole life, I've
never had to do so much violence to my conscience.

MRS. W. 4

Oh, strangle that conscience!
WIL.

Strangle my conscience ? ! Upon my word ! I don't
believe women have any moral principles at all !

MRS. W.

We haven't 5 when it comes to saving those we
love. There's where we tower above you little
creatures ! Now will you help me save Lennard ?

WIL.

I'm doing all I can. You must own all through
these painful circumstances I've preserved a high
moral tone to everybody -

MRS. W.

You overdo it. 6 If you don't take care your moral
principles will ruin us.

WIL.

Really, Charlotte! Upon my word! (He is going
off at back, and turns. 7 ) That case of Sheldrake

109



* Moving L.
again.



* Crossing to
Mrs. Wil.
more R. c.



Crossing to
L. c.



* Crossing up
to him.



9 Moving about
impatiently.



1 To Mrs. Wil-
more, who is
up L. c.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



and Sarah Piper has come up again. I'd better let
him off, eh ?

MRS. W.

No, you'd better preserve your high moral tone
with him at least till this is over !

WIL.

Very well. It will prove that I do act up to my
principles as a general rule.

MRS. W. 1

Yes ! We all act up to our principles when it costs
us nothing!

WIL.

Upon my word, Charlotte ! I will not endure these
constant insinuations that I am



' Crossing to
below R.
table.



Turning to
him.



L.C.



* Wilmore
crosses to
him.



Mrs. Wil-
more cross-
ing to Wil-
more c.



MRS. W.
What? 2

WIL.

That I am a no better than I should be !

(LENNARD enters, sulky, dejected, self-contemptu-
ous, throws himself into a chair? WILMORE
watches him with growing anger, and when LEN-
NARD is seated f 4 bursts out furiously.)

WIL.

This is all your doing, sir! I bring you up in the
strictest path ! I set before you an example that any
son might be proud to copy, and instead of walking
in my footsteps, you bring this hussy here

MRS. W. 5

Will you cease? Will you cease? And remember
that I know you! (WILMORE fires up and is about
to speak.) I tell you, I know you!

(WILMORE goes out at back, silenced and abashed.)

no



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



* Putting his
arm round
her.



Looking up
at him.



* Rises and
moves to c v



MRS. W.

(Goes to LENNARD. 1 ) Oh Len! Len! (She bursts
into tears.)

T T? AT her hands.

My poor darling! 2 Don't cry! Mother, it's a
thundering shame you've got to do this for me!
What a cad I've been !

MRS. W.

Hush ! 3 Oh, Len, if I can only save you ! And I
will!

LEN.

I'm not worth saving! I'm only worth kicking!
What a howling skunk I felt just now when Helen
stuck by me!

MRS. W.

Don't talk like that ! 4 You've done no worse than
others, only it has come to light ! Sir John is com-
ing! You'll be questioned. You'll say just what
I've told you?

LEN.
Yes, I've got it all ready. 5

MRS. W. 6
Remember, it's all your future! You won't fail?

LEN.

No, I won't fail, dear. I can see what a plucky
fight you're making, an dit's all for me ! Well, I'm
going to back you up. You make dead sure of that,
you best mother that ever lived! Whatever comes
of it, I'm going to back you up through thick and
thin. (Giving her his hand.)

MRS. W.

You're my own son! (Kissing him passionately.)
Now I'm brave again! We shall win, Len! We
shall win!

in



6 Rising and
following.

6 Putting her
hands on his
shoulders.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



* Lennard
moves below
L. c. chair.
Mrs. Wil-
more moves
toward L. c.
as Linnell
comes R. c.



* Lennard
crosses up L.
c. Linnell
puts his hand
on his shoul-
der and stops
him as he is
passing him.
Mrs. Wil-
more has
moved below
i* c. chair.



Enter GOODYER, announcing MR. LiNNELL. 1 Enter
LINNELL, looking ill and more haggard than be-
fore, but with a look of desperate determination
on his face.

MRS. W.

Good morning.

LIN.

Good morning.

LEN.

Good morning, Linnell.

LIN.

Good morning. (To MRS. WILMORE.) Mr. Vive-
ash says you wish to see me?

MRS. W.
Yes. Lennard, you needn't wait. 2

LIN.

(Stopping him.) Yes, please one moment. You
know I've no wish to discover your fault. I'd
willingly bury it. But I can't bury the conse-
quences. You can't bury the consequences. Come
then, face them like a man.

(LINNELL has put his hand on LENNARD'S shoulder.
LENNARD tries to shuffle uneasily away from
him.)

LEN.

Upon my soul, Linnell, I don't understand a word
of what you're talking about!

(About to go off left, but LINNELL, who has one
hand on one shoulder, claps the other hand on
the other shoulder, and turns LENNARD round
face to face with him.)

LIN.

'(Very sternly.) You don't understand? You

112



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT in



shall ! You've behaved like a scoundrel to one poor
girl! You've wrecked her life, and you're leaving
her to bear her shame and despair alone! You
mean to behave like a scoundrel to another, who
has given you all her love and faith, and all her
estate! And your mother is helping you!

MRS. W.
(Indignant.) Mr. Linnell!

LIN.

'(Repeats, looking fixedly at MRS. WILMORE.)
Your mother is helping you! The mother loves
her son, and she helps him build his house on this
filthy bog of deceit ! You can't do it ! Your house
will tumble on your heads ! When 1 meet Sir John
Plugenet, I must tell him the truth! I must show
you a seducer! Don't force me to show you a
coward and a liar into the bargain ! Do you under-
stand me now? Have I spoken plainly?

(LENNARD has shown some uneasiness, but he
nerves himself, gets away from LIN NELL'S grasp,
and laughs at him contemptuously.)

LEN.

My good Linnell, have you still got that bee in your
bonnet ?

(Exit left, with a contemptuous laugh at LINNELL.)

LIN.

Then you take your stand upon your lie? So be it!
I'll be here at twelve to meet Sir John Plugenet.

(Going off at back. MRS. WILMORE has shown
impatience and rage at LINNELL'S words to
LENNARD, but with a great effort she controls
herself, and speaks with outward calm, which,
however, betrays suppressed anger and determi-
nation.)

"3



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Moving up L.
c. towards
him.

* To her. c.



MRS. W.

Mr. Linnell * one moment. (LINNELL comes
down. 2 ) As you seem determined to rake out this
mare's nest

LIN.
Mare's nest?!

MRS. W.

Perhaps we'd better leave metaphors, and look at
the plain facts.

LIN.

Will you ? Dare you ?

MRS. W.

There's no evidence to connect Lennard with this
girl. You haven't one single particle of proof.

LIN.
Well?

MRS. W.

Sir John and Miss Plugenet fully accept our ex-
planation. You'll merely waste your time in trying
to convince them. You'll only prove yourself a
more obstinate and misguided fanatic than people
already think you.

LIN.

People think me an obstinate and misguided
fanatic ?

MRS. W.
Didn't you know it?

LIN.

No! How strange! And I thought myself just a
plain, ordinary, honest man!

MRS. W.

After this inquiry is ended, you will leave Weybury
with the reputation of having started a malicious

114



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



slander against one of your parishioners. Mr.
Daubeny cannot possibly recommend you to another
curacy. Your career will be ended. You will go

down

LIN.

Let me go down! If the truth is to go down, let
me go down with it ! I couldn't wish a better end !

MRS. W.

r Ah ! You're seeking martyrdom ! I'm afraid you'll
find it! What will become of your children?

LIN.
They will be catered for like the sparrows.

MRS. W. 1

Very much like the sparrows, I should say; with
crumbs of charity, and what they can pick up on the
roadside. Why won't you be sensible? 2 I offer
you one last chance. If you refuse, think what your
children's future must be!

LIN.

Beggary! Beggary! I know it! But faith and
truthfulness with it! That's a good legacy after
all! You can't match it! Just think what your
child's future must be! Lies! Lies! And nothing
but lies ! You won't do it ! You'll draw back. I
offer you one last chance. Come out of this refuge

of lies

MRS. W.

(Impatient and indignant.) My good man, it's
simply useless to talk further. (She goes away a
step or two and then comes back to him.) You're
determined to ruin Lennard?

LIN.

I think you're determined to ruin me. Isn't that
so?



1 Moving a
little to-
wards L. a



* Moving up to
him again.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



* Crosses to top
of table.
Linnell
moves below
R. c. table as
Viveash
enters to c.



Crossing to
Linnell R.



* Mrs. Wilmore
moves round
to below table
L., and then
to mantel-
piece, lean-
ing on same,
burying her
head in her
hands.



Linnell cross-
es up to door.



MRS. W.

Yes! If you drive me to it. And I shall be merci-
less. Do you understand?

LIN.
I understand.

MRS. W.
There is no more to be said. 1

(VIVEASH enters. 2 )

VIVE.
You've finished with Mr. Linnell?

MRS. W.
Quite. He persists in this story, and- (Shrugs



her shoulders.)

VIVE.

Nonsense. 3 Come, Linnell, you're not so mad as

to stick to

LIN.

I'm so mad as to stick to the truth. Take me on
that level, please.

( VIVEASH stands nonplussed for a moment, and
exchanges a look with MRS. WILMORE.)

VIVE.

Very well. 4 Sir John Plugenet has instructed me
to collect all the particulars of this affair. Would
you mind making your statement to me ?

LIN.
Certainly. In writing?

VIVE.

Oh, no. This little inquiry is quite informal. Sup-
pose we have five minutes together in the garden, 5
and see if we can throw some light on this plaguey
business ?

116



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



LlN. 1

(Looking from one to the other.) You're acting
for Mrs. Wilmore in this?



Yes.



VIVE.



LIN.



Is it light she wants? (To MRS. WILMORE.) Is
it light you want? Or dust and darkness? Ask
her!

(Exit at back. 2 MRS. WILMORE and VIVEASH
look at each other with some alarm. 3 )

VIVE.

Confounded 4 righteous, stiff-necked beggar!
(Pointing off left.) The girl's in there. You must
nail her! (Exit after LiNNELL. 5 )

MRS. W.

(Goes to door left, opens it, and speaks off.) Will
you come here, please?

(Enter RACHEL in out-of-door clothes. She is still
looking pale and ill, her manner is frightened and
subdued, and she limps a little.)

MRS. W.
(Shakes hands.) Good morning, dear.

RACK.

Good morning. 6

MRS. W.

Now, my dear, Sir John Plugenet will be here soon.
He'll question you severely. You won't break
down?

RACK.
(Calmly.) No, I shan't break down.

MRS. W.

(Looking at her searchingly.) You're quite sure
you won't betray yourself?

117



1 At door.



Closes door.

Mrs. Wit-
more sits in
chair L. c.



* Viveash com-
ing c. to Mrs.
Wilmore.

Mrs. Wil-
more stands
c. deciding
her line of
action, then
crosses to
door I*



6 Crosses down
and stands

R. O/L. C.

chair. Mrs.
Wilmore
closes door
and crosses
down to Ra-
chel's R.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Rachel tits
1*0.



RACK.
(Firmly) Quite sure. 1

MRS. W.

Thank you, dear ! I can't tell how deeply I feel foe
you in all this. But it will soon be over now.

RACK.

(Seated at table, left.) If I do this, I may see Len-
nard sometimes?



Rises and
crosses to
Mrs. Wil-
more.



MRS. W.

I'm afraid that's impossible. Mr. Viveash and I
think it advisable you should not live in England.

RACH.

Then I shall never see Lennard again! Won't he
wish ever to see me ?

MRS. W.
It wouldn't be right. It wouldn't be wise.

RACH.

But won't he want to know what has become of
me ? And I love him so ! I love him now more
than ever ! Didn't he send me any message ?

MRS. W.
He begs you to do this for his sake.

RACH.
He begs me?

MRS. W.
Yes. You will?

RACH.

Yes, of course. But won't he wish to know what


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