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Henry Arthur Jones.

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has become of of his child? If I should die!
Then it would grow up without a mother, and per-
haps be cruelly treated, and have no one to teach
it to do what is right. (With sudden passion. 2 )

118



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



That would be dreadful! I know I've done wrong
myself, but I want my child to do what is right!
And if I should die wouldn't Lennard wish to
see his child never see his child * never know
how it is brought up

MRS. W. 2

If anything should happen to you, I promise you
I'll look after the child myself.

RACK.
Yes but Lennard won't he care ? 3 Oh !



(MRS. WILMORE makes a gesture of despair. 4 )
MRS. W.

My dear, you must give up Lennard absolutely
from this time, or you will expose and ruin him.

RACK.

(Quickly.) You know I wouldn't do that. I'll do
whatever you wish.

(VIVEASH re-enters, looking harassed and discon-
certed*

MRS. W.
'(Goes to him.) Well?

( VIVEASH shakes his head,, and shrugs his shoul-
ders, looks at RACHEL, and then inquiringly at

MRS. WlLMORE. 6 )

MRS. W.

Miss Neve is quite ready to meet Sir John Plugenet.
She says there isn't the least truth in Mr. Linnell's
slander. She had only the slightest acquaintance
with Lennard in Scotland. 7 Isn't that so, dear?



Yes.



RACH.
119



1 Breaking
down.



Mrs. Wil-
more puts
her hands on .
EacheVs
shoulders.



Makes gesture
of despair,
and collapt.es
in eft air L. c.
bitryin<! her
face on table.

4 And crosses

to top f'f

table, lean-
ing over it
towards Ra-
chel.



6 Remains up
c.



6 Viveash
points to
Kachel.



T Crosses
round to
of Kachel
again.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



VIVE.

In that case, we can very soon settle the whole mat-
ter. 1 You'd better write a little note to Mrs. Wil-
more putting that in so many words. Pens, ink
and paper? Here we are! (Putting paper and ink
in front of her, offering her a pen.)



1 Crosses to
table , takes
chair from
above fire-
place, and
sits L. of
table facing
Rachel.



* Also at Mrs.
Wilmore.



8 Crossing to-
wards her
and putting
her hand on
her shoulder.



What must I say?



RACK.



VIVE.



When you were in Scotland last spring, you became
deeply attached to a gentleman who promised you
marriage ?



Yes.



RACK.



VIVE.



We needn't mention his name call him Mr. X.
That gentleman was not Mr. Lennard Wilmore?
(RACHEL looks at him, 2 but does not speak.)



MRS. W.



It was not my son ? 3



RACK.



No.

VIVE.

Begin your letter by saying that.

RACK.
But won't that be perjury?

VIVE.

My dear young lady, you've just stated to Mrs.
Wilmore and me that Mr. Lennard Wilmore was
not Mr. X. You also made that statement in the
presence of Mrs. Blaney and Mrs. Linnell in Mr.
Linnell's house. It will be perjury if you draw back



now.



120



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



RACK.

I won't draw back. But you won't send me out
of England away from him? I can't go! (Break-
ing down, sobbing a little.)

VIVE.

Come! Come! We mustn't get tearful! Every-
thing will be arranged for your comfort.

RACK.

(Looking from one to the other.) That means you
will send me out of England. You'll let me see
Lennard before I go?

VIVE.

But you say Mr. Lennard Wilmore is the merest
acquaintance.

RACH.

(Wildly.) You know, you know what he is to
me! 1



(MRS. WILMORE makes a gesture of despair to
VIVE ASH.)

MRS. W.

Sir John will be here. 2 Tell her nothing can be
done for her unless Lennard is cleared from this.

RACK.

You needn't fear ! I shall clear him ! 3 But after-
wards, I may see him once, just for a few minutes ?
Oh, do let me! I won't make a scene. Just once!

(VIVEASH and MRS. WILMORE look at each other.
MRS. WILMORE nods.)

VIVE.

I see no harm in your having one short interview
with Mr. Lennard Wilmore.

RACH.
Oh, thank you!

121



1 Burying her
face in her
arms on the
table.



Crosses to
head of table
to Viveash.



Mrs. Wil.
more moves
back to c.
again.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



VIVE.

At my office with certain precautions.
RACK.

Thank you very much. (To MRS. WILMORE.)
Thank you.

VIVE.

Come! Time presses! The letter! (Again push-
ing paper towards her.)

RACK.

Tell me exactly what to say, and I'll say it.
MRS. W. 1

Mr. Viveash, can't you draft out something?
(Signing to him.)



* Moving up to
above Ra-
chel.



VIVE.

I'd rather leave her quite free to make her own
statement, in her own words.

MRS. W.

I'll put it into her own words, and see that she
copies it. (Signing to him.)

VIVE.

Oh, very well. (Writes hurriedly.) I believe it
has been arranged that a suitable provision shall be
made for Miss Neve's future. Has any amount
been named?

MRS. W.
No.

VIVE.

(Always writing.) To prevent any future mis-
understanding it would be better to fix the exact
amount.

MRS. W.

My dear, what do you think?

122



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



RACK.
(Hopeless.) I don't mind. It doesn't matter.

MRS. W.

But please say. What sum yearly would make you
quite happy and comfortable ?

RACH.

Whatever you please. But I am to see Lennard
just once before I go?

(Enter GOODYER at back, announcing MR. DAU-
BENY. Enter DAUBENY. Exit GOODYER.

DAUB.

Good morning, my very dear friend! (Shaking
hands with MRS. WILMORE.* ) l upe.

MRS. W.
Good morning.

DAUB.

(Bows very slightly to RACHEL, who slightly re-
turns it.) Good morning, Viveash.

VIVE.

(Always writing.) Good morning.

DAUB.

I met Sir John, and he asked me to a but
(glancing at RACHEL) I'm intruding?

MRS. W.

Mr. Viveash, would you rather finish that in the
next room?

VIVE.
(Writing.) I've just finished.

DAUB.

You're sure? Because (Glancing again at
RACHEL, who sits pale and self-absorbed.) Oh,

123



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



by the way, Mrs. Wilmore, my dear wife has just
posted you an invitation for our dinner party.
We've fixed it for the second. Are you free on
that date?

MRS. W.
Yes, I think. 1



Her attention
is divided be-
tween Rachel
and Dau-
beny.

a Daubeny
takes a step
to R. and
back to her
again.



Rises and

hands paper
to Rachel.

Viveash sits
again.



DAUB. 2

Oh, you really must be free, there's a sweet lady!
We're so anxious to get just exactly the right peo-
ple, and to have everything go off well.

VlVE. 3

I think that is precisely the statement you wish to
make? Read it over. 4 (RACHEL reads over what
VIVEASH has written.)

DAUB.

(In a low aside to MRS. WILMORE.) I suppose
that is the young person ?

MRS. W.
Yes.

DAUB.

Poor soul! Sir John insisted on my being present,
but really in these tiresome, unpleasant affairs Oh,
yes now whom would you like to take you in to
dinner? The Bishop?

MRS. W.
I don't care.

DAUB.

Very well, I shall bestow you on the Bishop.
Rather dry, our good Bishop, eh? He's a great
Orientalist. I'll send you his brochure on the new
gospel.

MRS. W.

(Always watching VIVEASH and RACHEL.) New
gospel ? What new gospel ?

124



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



DAUB.

Haven't you heard? Somebody has just discovered
a valuable new gospel, with quite new readings, in
a Syrian monastery. Our good Bishop dabbles a
great deal in apocryphal gospels. Now I take a
more practical view of Christianity.

(VIVEASH has been conferring with RACHEL upon
the paper he has written. MRS. WILMORE has
been keenly watching. )

VIVE.
(Rising.) Is that right?

RACK.
Yes.

VIVE.
Mrs. Wilmore, if you please.

(MRS. WILMORE goes l to VIVEASH, and VIVEASH
just shows her the paper, and whispers instruc-
tions, pointing to the other room. RACHEL sits
pale and distracted.)

(Enter GOODYER at back, announcing, " DOCTOR
and MRS. BLANEY." Enter DR. and MRS.
BLANEY. Exit GOODYER.)

MRS. B.
Good morning, Mrs. Wilmore.

MRS. W.
How d'ye do? (Shaking hands.)

MRS. B.
How d'ye do, 2 Mr. Daubeny?

DAUB.
How d'ye do, my dear friend?

(BLANEY has meantime shaken hands with MRS.
WILMORE, and nodded to VIVEASH, who has nod-
ded in return.)

12$



1 To Viveash
above table.
Daubeny
moves to-
wards R.
table.



Crosses to-
wards R. c.

table.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Blaney cross-
es at back
and down R.



Viveash
opens door.



* Mrs. Blaney
crosses to L.
looking off at
door. Tiien
crosses back
to c. Vive-
ash follows
to her L.



1 Viveash
crosses at
back to above
table R.



DR. B.

(To RACHEL, very coldly.)
self so far recovered?



I trust you find your-



RACH.
Yes, thank you. 1

MRS. B.

(Looking at RACHEL.) Mr. Viveash asked us to
meet Sir John. Perhaps we're too early? We
might wait in another room.

MRS. W.

Oh, no. Please sit down. (Going to door, left.)
Miss Neve, will you please come this way ? 2

(RACHEL limps quickly across the room, ashamed,
with eyes cast down, and goes off, left, MRS.
BLANEY watching her fiercely all the time.)

MRS. W.
I'll be back in a few minutes. (Exit, left?)

MRS. B.

I was quite right about that girl. Have you ever
noticed, Mr. Daubeny, how that class of person
always avoids meeting the glance of a truly good
woman ? 4

DAUB.
Do they now? I've not observed

MRS. B.

Yes. The doctor's profession bringing him con-
stantly into contact with undesirable persons, I have
felt it my duty to share his labours

DAUB.

Very charming of you ! Quite charming ! I'm sure

our dear friend appreciates

126



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



DR. B.

(Stiffly.) Mrs. Blaney is an admirable helpmeet in
many respects.

MRS. B.

And having no home ties of my own

DR. B.

(Annoyed.) Yes, yes, my dear

MRS. B.

I have been able to devote myself entirely to the
interests of public morality, whereas if Providence
had smiled on our union

DR. B.
We needn't pursue the subject.

MRS. B.
No, but if Providence had seen fit

DR. B.

My dear Matilda, nothing is to be gained by repin-
ing.

MRS. B.

I'm not repining, but while persons like this draw-
ing-mistress are allowed to flaunt their delin-
quencies

DAUB.

Very true ! Ah, yes ! Very true ! By the way, my
dear friend, 1 (to VIVEASH) now we're all alone,
and all good neighbours, I hope our young friend
Lennard hasn't got himself into a very bad
mess

VIVE.
Oh no!

DAUB.

Because we don't want any washing of dirty linen,
do we? It's so bad for society, gives such a handle

127



1 Crosses to
above R.
table. Vive-
ash comes
down on his
R. Mrs. Bla-
ney advances
nearer to
table. Bla-
ney is on a.
of table.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



to the lower classes, and in these democratic days
now, do tell me, there isn't going to be a scandal ?
(Anxiously.)

VIVE.
Oh no ! Oh no !

DAUB.

Because I've just sent out the invitations for my
first dinner-party in Gilminster, and I've asked the
Wilmores and Sir John Plugenet. And if there is
to be an exposure really I don't know what I
should do.

VIVE.



We shall bring Lennard



You needn't be alarmed,
off with flying colours.

DAUB.

I'm delighted! Sir John seems bent on fishing
things out. You'll be able to satisfy him, eh?

VIVE.

Well, the girl herself declares that Linnell is abso-
lutely mistaken.



She does ?



DAUB.



VIVE.



Of course, if it comes to a question of hard swear-
ing, and Linnell says one thing and we say another,
then I hope Mrs. Wilmore may rely that her old
friends will rally round her, and see that her version
is believed.

DAUB.

Of course we shall ! Linnell came to me with a long
rigmarole about a letter that the girl had written to

Lennard .

MRS. B.

Yes, quite between ourselves, while I was waiting

128



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



for the Doctor that night, this young person's things
were on the table, and a letter had fallen out of her

bag

DR. B.

(Warningly.) My dear!

VIVE.

(Quickly) Did you see the contents?
MRS. B.

Of course not ! But, as it was lying open I couldn't
help catching sight of the word " shame," and

DR. B.
My dear, I think you must be mistaken.

VIVE.
Do you intend to say anything about this letter?

(DR. BLANEY makes her an authoritative gesture to
say "No")

MRS. B.
Oh no ! I shouldn't dream of mentioning it ! *

(Re-enter MRS. WILMORE with a letter in her
hand?)

MRS. W.

(To VIVEASH.) Will you please see what Miss
Neve has written? (Giving him letter.) It's past
twelve. 3 Sir John ought to be here.



VIVE.

(Nodding.) Couldn't be better! I'll take care of
it, shall I? 4

(Enter WILMORE at back.)
WIL.

How d'ye do, Daubeny? (Shaking hands.)

129



1 Crosses to
Blaney.
They have a
few words in
dumb show,
Mrs. Blaney
angrily
crosses and
sits L. of B.
table.

1 Crosses to c.
Viveash
meets her
there.

8 Crosses down,
and sits L. c.



* Crosses to top
of table.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



Half rising
and bowing.



DAUB.
Good morning, my dear friend.

WIL.
Mrs. Blaney, how are you?

MRS. B. 1
How d'ye do?

WIL.

Ah, Blaney! We meet under very strange circum-
stances! That a son of mine should be accused
of ! And this upstart surate! I hope, Daubeny,
that when he leaves Weybury you'll take care he
doesn't annoy us any further?

DAUB.

Yes. It's a little difficult to know what to do with
him. What do you propose?

WIL.

I hope he will have the grace to disappear entirely !
That is my invariable attitude towards any scoun-
drel who crosses my path "Disappear! Clear out
of my way! Don't force me to take any further
notice of you ! " 2

DAUB.
An admirable rule !

(Enter GOODYER at back, showing in SIR JOHN
PLUGENET. Exit GOODYER.)

SIR J.
I'm a little late. 3 How do, Blaney?

DR. B.
How are you, Sir John?

SIR J.

How are you? (To MRS. BLANEY. )"

130



* Crosses to be-
low sofa L.



Comes c.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



MRS. B. 1
Good morning, Sir John.

SIR J.
(Looking round.) Mr. Linnell is not here?

WIL.

Yes, I had him shown into another room until such
time as we required him. (Rings bell.)

SlRj.

We must have Lennard too.

WIL.

Lennard is only too anxious to face his traducer. 2
( GOODYER appears at door at back. )

WIL.

Ask Mr. Lennard and Mr. Linnell to come here.
{Exit GOODYER.)

SIR J.
And Miss Neve herself?

VIVE.
In the next room.

MRS. W.

She's ready to come in at any moment, but I'm
sure you'd wish to spare her as far as possible.

SIR J.

Certainly.

VIVE. 3

Meantime, there is Miss Neve's own statement in
her own words. Just cast your eye over that.
(Giving him the letter MRS. WILMORE has brought
in.)

(Enter LENNARD at back. Throughout the scene
he assumes a careless, confident manner, but at
moments he betrays intense anxiety and ex-
changes furtive looks with his mother.)



1 Rises and
bows and
sits again.



Crosses down

L.



Crosses to Si>
John.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



LEN.
How are you? (To DAUBENY.)

DAUB.

Good morning, my dear young friend. (Shaking
hands. )

LEN.
How d'ye do, Mrs. Blaney ?

MRS. B.
How d'ye do?

LEN.
Good morning, Blaney.

SIR J.

(Having read the letter.) But this is positively
conclusive.

VIVE.
I thought you'd say so.

SIR J.
What can Mr. Linnell say to this ? 1

(Enter GOODYER at back, announcing " Mr. Lin-
nell." Enter LINNELL. Exit GOODYER. LIN-
NELL bows as he comes in. SIR JOHN, poisoned
against him by the WILMORES and VIVEASH, re-
gards him with evident distrust and coldness.)

MRS. W.
(Introducing.) Mr. Linnell Sir John Plugenet.

LlN. 2

Good morning, Sir John.

SIR J.
( Very coldly. ) Good morning, sir.

VIVE.

We may as well come to business at once. Will
you be seated ? 3

132



> Putting state-
ment in
pocket. Vive-
ash crosses
back to head
of table, and
places chair
from up L.
back at top
of table for
Sir John.

* Coming to c.
on Sir John's
R.

1 Wilmore sits
down L. Vive-
ash L. Of L.
table as be-
fore, Sir
John at head
of table. Mrs.
Wilmore is
already seat-
ed R. of same,
Linnell re-
mains stand-
ing up c.,
Daubeny sits
in arm-chair
up R. back c.
Lennard
crosses and
stands on his
R. Mrs. Bla-
ney is al-
ready seated
L. of R. table.
Blaney tits
down R.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



(DAUBENY, MRS. WILMORE, MRS. BLANEY, DR.
BLANEY sit. VIVEASH seats himself, and makes
notes all the while.)

VIVE.

Mr. Linnell, I must ask you formally to withdraw
certain damaging statements you have made regard-
ing Mr. Lennard Wilmore and Miss Neve.

WIL.
And apologize! (A pause.)

SIR J.
(Sternly to LINNELL.) What have you to say, sir?

LIN.
(Glancing round him.) Nothing.

SIR J.

What?! You make this dreadful accusation, and
then you run away from it?

LIN.
I'm not running away. I'm here.

SlRj.

But you've repeated this slander?

LIN.
Not to a single person since that night.

WIL.
But it's all over the town !

LIN.

Not through any word of mine. I've no wish to re-
peat this story even now unless you force me.

SIR J.

Perhaps, sir, but before you leave this room you
must either repeat it, or withdraw it absolutely.

133



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



* Turning to
Lennard.



* Coming down
c.



LIN.

If you please. Through an accident I became aware
of Mr. Lennard Wilmore's fault. I urged him to
own the truth to you. 1 I urge him still, I entreat
him, with all

VIVE.

(Dry, hard.) Mr. Linnell, please reserve your
sentimental appeals for the pulpit. Sir John wants
to get at the facts.

LIN.
I'll give them to him.

SIR J.
(Cold, distrustful.) I shall be obliged.

LlN. 2

While Miss Neve was in my house, a letter she had
written tumbled on the floor. Thinking it was ad-
dressed to myself, I began to read it. It spoke of
the writer's shame and distress

WIL,

But what reason had you for connecting the writer's
shame and distress with Mr. Lennard Wilmore?

LIN.

It said " I shall call on your mother this afternoon,

and "

VIVE.

But, you may have observed, other people besides
Mr. Lennard Wilmore have mothers.

LIN.

Yes, it is customary. (Advancing a little towards
MRS. WILMORE.) Mothers who bring their sons

up to love the truth and hate lies

134



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



SIR J. 1

What? Mr. Linnell! You accuse a lady in Mrs.
Wilmore's position ! 2 Viveash, I shall lose my
patience.

VIVE. 3

Keep calm, Sir John! We shall soon explode this
bag of moonshine. 6 (To LINNELL.) You're sure
this letter didn't read, " I'll call on your grand-
mother?"

LIN.
No the girl didn't mock at her agony. Do you?

VIVE.
What became of this letter?

LIN.
Miss Neve burnt it.

VIVE.

That's a pity. Mrs. Wilmore, will you please ask
Miss Neve whether the letter Mr. Linnell picked up
that night was written to your son, and whether it
contained any reference whatever to you, or to
him? (MRS. WiLMORE. 5 )

LIN.
Why ask her? ...You know she'll say " No."

MRS. W.

Surely Miss Neve must know to whom she wrote
that letter. (Exit MRS. WILMORE, left. 6 )

VIVE. 7

Have you any other evidence against Mr. Len-
nard Wilmore?



Yes, his own word. 8



LIN.



135



1 Sir John
rises.



a Crosses up to
R. end of

sofa.



Rises and
puts his and
Sir John's
chair under
table.

Leaning over
back of
chair.



6 Rises.



6 Lennard has
crossed,
opened door
for her, and
stands look-
ing after her.

1 Crosses to
above L. c.
chair.



Sir John
crosses to L.
of Daubeny.
Lennard
comes down
L. to below
table.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Moving a step
or two to-
wards L.



1 Rises, crosses
and stands
with back to
fireplace.



Mrs. Wil-
more enters
from L. and
comes to be-
low sofa.



My word?



LEN.



LIN.



You owned to me * you had betrayed this girl under
a promise of marriage; and you begged me to hide
it!

LEN.

What? I asked you what bee you'd got in your
bonnet !

WIL.

A bee in his bonnet! Now that to me exactly de-
scribes the situation.

DAUB.

A very happy phrase ! A bee in his bonnet ! ( Tap-
ping his stomach.)

VIVE.

I suppose what really happened, Lennard, was this
Mr. Linnell told you this poor girl's story; you
pitied her, and then he muddled up

LIN.

(Sternly.) Please don't put his lie into his mouth!
He has it pat enough!

WlL. 2

Lie! We're using very pretty language now!

MRS. B.
And in the presence of ladies ! 3

DR. B.

Violent language is generally associated with a bad



case.



LIN.



Yes, and sometimes with a good case, too !

136



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



SIR J. 1

Lennard, my boy, 2 you are to take my name, and
be my son. Tell me Is there any truth in what

Mr. Linnell says?

LEN.

(Catches sight of his mother's anxious face, and,
after the faintest faltering, says firmly.) No, not the
least.

SIR J.
You did not confess you had betrayed this girl?

LEN.

(Quite firmly.) No, Sir John. (MRS. WILMORE
shows immense relief.)

SIR J.

(Relieved. Shakes his hand cordially.) I believe
you. And now, tell this man to his face that he is

mistaken. He'll know what that means.

(MRS. WILMORE shows anxiety.)

LEN.

(Steps firmly to LINNELL and says fiercely.) Mr.
Linnell, you are mistaken !

(MRS. WILMORE shows great relief. LINNELL
flames with resentment, is about to reply, but
stops and stares round, growing bewildered, and
beginning to realise the hopelessness of his posi-
tion; at length drops into chair, 3 and buries his
face in hands on table.)

MRS. W.

(Comes forward.) Miss Neve says most positively
that the letter Mr. Linnell picked up was not written
to Lennard, and had no reference to him or to me.



(To LINNELL.)
denies



SIR J.
You hear that Miss Neve

137



1 Crosses down

B. C.

* Lennard
crosses to
him. Mrs.
Wilmore
crosses to L.
of Daubeny.



* R. of L. table,
Sir John
moves up a
step or two.
Lennard
turns to Mrs.
Wilmore,
who has come
a little down
c.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



' Dr. Blaney
rises and
moves up R.
a little.



LlN.

Oh, yes, she denies. They all deny! And Mr. and
Mrs. Wilmore! Let them deny too! If you please,
both of you, deny, deny, deny!

WIL.

So we're to be dragged into it! So we knew

LIN.

(To WILMORE.) Aye, you knew ! For you offered
me the living to hold my tongue ! (To MRS. WIL-
MORE.) And you you begged me with tears to
save your boy. Well, I've done my best to save
him ! You must go your way and ruin him ! Go
on and ruin him ! *

SIR J.

(Struck by the sincerity of LINNELL'S utterance.)
Wilmore Mrs. Wilmore, surely you didn't beg
Mr. Linnell to

MRS. W. 2

My dear Sir John, when we got there, we found
Mr. Linnell in an excited state -with this bee in
his bonnet his own wife implored him to with-
draw his silly statement. Mrs. Blaney, you remem-
ber?

MRS. B.

Oh, yes. Poor Mrs. Linnell said she was sure he
didn't mean it, and told him to beg Mr. Wilmore's
pordon. 3

(LINNELL is overwhelmed. SIR JOHN looks at
VIVEASH, who shrugs his shoulders contemptu*-
ously. )

VIVE.

Have you any further evidence to offer us?
(LINNELL, growing more and more bewildered,
shakes his head.)
138



Coming a
little nearer
him. Len-
nard moving
a little up c.



Rises and
crosses round
to Blaney.
They move
up R. and
Daubeny
joins them.



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT in



VIVE.

Sir John, will you please show him Miss Neve's
letter to Mrs. Wilmore.

SIR J.

Ah, yes ! * (Bringing out the letter which VIVEASH
has given him.) Please read that.



To what end?



LIN.



SIR J.



Please read it. (LINNELL takes the letter, and looks
at it mechanically, not trying to understand it.)
You see, the girl herself declares Mr. Lennard Wil-
more is nothing to her.

LIN.
She knows ! She knows !

VIVE.
I'm glad you admit she knows. 2

SIR J.
Well, what have you to say?

LIN.

Nothing. (Giving back the letter.}

SIR J.
Nothing, sir? Nothing?

LlN. 3

(Suddenly.) Yes! Please bring Miss Neve
here

MRS. W.

(Alarmed.) Sir John, you shall see Miss Neve and
question her yourself, but Dr. Blaney will say if she

is in a fit state

139



1 Crosses to
Linnell. Mrs.
Wilmore
crosses douon
to his R.
Lennard
crosses to
above R. C.
chair.



* Leaning
over Lin-
nell's chair.



* A pause
then sud-
denly rising.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Coming down
R. again.



* Lennard
crosses down
to below R.
table. Bla-
ney has
moved up R.
to Mrs. Bla-
ney and
Daubeny
again. Sir
John crosses
R. c. Vive-
vsh crosses to
Wilmore at

fire, speaks
to him for a
moment, then
crosses at
back of table
to Sir John c.

Then, looking
at Linnell.

Linnell cross-
es up and
stands at
back by door.

6 Viveash
moves up
back.



DR. B. 1

I must certainly forbid any violent or distressing
scenes. It would be highly dangerous to my
patient.

LIN*


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