Copyright
Henry Arthur Jones.

The hypocrites : a play in four acts online

. (page 7 of 8)
Online LibraryHenry Arthur JonesThe hypocrites : a play in four acts → online text (page 7 of 8)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Then why is she here, if not to get at the truth?
Sir John, for the sake of your daughter's happiness,
I demand to ask Miss Neve one question in the pres-
ence of your future son-in-law.

VIVE.
Surely Miss Neve's statement is sufficiently explicit.

LIN.
I demand to put them face to face.

SIR J.

Mrs. Wilmore, I think we might ask Miss Neve
to please step here for a moment.

MRS. W.
If you wish.

(She just glances at VIVEASH, who just signs
assent. )

SlRj.

I do.

MRS. W.
I'll fetch her.

(MRS. WILMORE goes off left, leaving the door
open. 2 )

VIVE.

(To SIR JOHN.) Sir John, you'll take care Miss
Neve is not frightened 3 or brow-beaten ? 4

SlRj.

We will treat her with every consideration. 5

140



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



MRS. W.

(Appears at door, left, looking off.) If you
please *

(RACHEL enters very slowly, limping a little, with
calm, set, determined face, and downcast eyes.
She just raises them to meet LENNARD'S glance
for an instant. 2 )

MRS. W.

This is Sir John Plugenet Miss Neve. (SiR
JOHN and RACHEL bow slightly. 3 )

LIN.

Good morning, Miss Neve. 4 (He holds out his
hand. )

RACH.
Good morning.

(She just looks at him, does not give her hand at
first, but as he holds his out, at length she gives
hers. He takes it, holds it, and leads her towards

LENNARD. 5 )

LIN.
(To LENNARD.) Will you please look at this lady?

VIVE.
What now ?

LIN.

(To RACHEL.) Will you please look at Mr. Wil-
more? I charge you both, as you will answer at
that dreadful day when the secrets of all hearts shall
be disclosed

(LENNARD draws back a little. RACHEL also shows
a very slight sign of faltering, which she in-
stantly controls.)



(Very firmly.)



VIVE.

Sir John, I must protest against
141



Comet to up
c.



a She domes to
L, of table L.



8 Rachel comes
down L. to
below table.



* Crossing
down to be-
low L. table.
Mrs. Wil-
more crosses
to above R.
table. Vive-
ash comes to
above L. c.
chair.



R. Linnell
standing L.
of R. c. chair,
between Ra-
chel and
Lennard.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



this paltry theatrical appeal! Miss Neve has
scarcely recovered from her illness



1 Holding up
his hand to
stop him.



* Advancing a
little.



Linnell
looks at Sir
John. Then
from Len-
nard to Ra-
chel. Then
hopelessly
backs up to
back c. Ra-
chel supports
herself on
chair. Sir
John takes a
step towards
her.



LlN. 1

If you please, Mr. Viveash! Let me put them to
their oath.

VIVE. 2

Doctor Blaney! Sir John!

SlRj.

Mr. Linnell, will you please stand aside? If you
please, sir, I'll question Miss Neve myself. 3 (To
RACHEL, very kindly.) I'm deeply grieved to
trouble you. You know my daughter is to be mar-
ried to this gentleman?

RACK.
Yes.

SlRj.

Please forgive my asking. Has he ever been more
to you than an acquaintance?

RACH.
No.

SlRj.
Has he ever spoken to you any word of love ?

RACH.

No.

SlRj.

Have you the least claim upon him as a lover ?



No.



RACH.



SIR J.



That is your solemn word your solemn oath, in
the presence of Heaven ? You have no claim what-
ever upon Mr. Lennard Wilmore ?

142



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT III



Take* a step
toe.



8 Quickly turn-
ing to Ra-
chel. Lin-
nell crosses
down c,
watching her
anxiously
Mrs. Wil-
more moves
up to back c.
chair.



RACK.

(Quite firmly, and then looking at SIR JOHN.) No,
none whatever!

SlRj.

Thank you for having spoken out so plainly. That
sets the question at rest forever. 1

(RACHEL has answered quite firmly and steadfastly
throughout, but at the end she drops back into
a chair a little exhausted.

SIR J. 2
It has been too much for you?

RACK.
No no please don't trouble.

SIR J.

(Turns to LINNELL.) Mr. Linnell, I daren't trust
myself to speak to you! You, a clergyman,
whose first care it should be to hush all slander
and evil speaking

WIL.
Leave this house, sir ! 3

( LINNELL, bewildered, dazed, looks round, goes up
to door at back, dazed.)

MRS. W.

(As he passes her.) I told you how this would
end.

LIN.

(Suddenly turns at door. 4 ) It's not ended! Sir
John, tell your daughter to look! There's a rat
under the floor of her new home! (Sweeping his
hand round to WILMORE, MRS. WILMORE, and
LENNARD. S ) You know it, all of you! You liars!
You hypocrites! You time-servers! Damned

*43



Svr John
moves to
above Ra-
chel.



Crosses to
him and
catching hold
of him, ex-
citedly.



6 Backing up
to door.



ACT III



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Coming down
L. c. and
pointing to
Wilmore.



* Up back c.
Lennard has
come ronnd
back of R.
table, threat-
eningly to
Linnell. Ra-
chel after
rising has
made for the
door but
staggers
when she, is c.
Lennard,
who is just
behind her,
instinctively
catches her
and holds her
facing him.

8 Mrs. Wil-
more comes
down to be-
hind R. c.
chair. Sir
John comes
down B. c.
Viveash
comes to be-
low sofa.

Viveash
throws him-
self on sofa.
Wilmore
crosses below
table.

6 Lennard
turning to
Sir John.



6 To Linnell,
who has
come down
L. c.

' Buries his
face in his
hands.



Act plays 4
minutes.



<s 44



time-servers ! l You know it ! You know the rat's
festering under the floor! (Coming down to
RACHEL.) You know it too! Ah! You know

(RACHEL starts up frightened and staggers. VIVE-
ASH and SIR JOHN pull LINNELL away. 2 )

RACK.

(Struggling to get free.) No! No! Not you!
Don't don't touch me ! They'll think -Oh, let me
go! 3

LEN.

(Clasping her fiercely, kissing her.) Rachel! Oh,
what a hound! What a cur I've been! Rachel!
Rachel, forgive me ! 4 (She revives, struggles free
from him, and goes off left.)* Sir John, I'm a
scoundrel! I daren't face Miss Plugenet, but ask

her

SIR J.

(Turns away from him with an angry gesture.)
Mrs. Wilmore, you knew this! And you lied to
me and fooled me!

MRS. W.
What have you done, Len?

LEN. 6

Linnell, I beg your pardon. I've behaved like
a 7

LIN.

That's past! Look up! Look up, my friend!
You've cleared yourself! You've owned your
fault ! You're a free man from this hour ! (Shak-
ing hands warmly.)

CURTAIN.



'A fortnight passes between Acts III and IV.
144



ACT IV.

SCENE : The same as Act HI. An afternoon about
a fortnight later. Discover MRS. WILMORE look-
ing eagerly oft at window. She goes to bell 1
and rings it, then returns to window, and again
looks off.)

(Enter GooDYER. 2 )
MRS. W.

Goodyer, wasn't that Mr. Lennard who went into
the lodge just now?

GOOD.
Yes, ma'am.

MRS. W.

With the young lady who

GOOD.
Yes, ma'am.

MRS. W.

Please go across to the lodge and tell him I cannot
see him or the young lady.

GOOD.

Yes, ma'am. (Looking off.) Here is Mr. Len-
nard, ma'am.

(LENNARD enters at back. Exit GOODYER.)

LEN. 3

Mother!

MRS. W. 4

No, Lennard! No! I can never feel you're really

my son again till you've given up this girl

145



* At back.



At back.



* Advances ta
her.



* Above R. c.
chair.



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



LEN.
That will be " never." But you don't mean it !

MRS. W.

I do. To be talked about all over the county, and
" cut " by our old friends ! To be turned out of
our old home, and thrown back into poverty!
That's enough for me to bear, without taking to
my heart the cause of it all.

LEN.
I am the cause of it all.

MRS. W.

No, she is the cause of it all !
LEN.

No, I. I alone. It was my folly and cowardice.
Now I'm trying to repair the mischief I've done.

MRS. W.

By this impossible marriage!
LEN.

I love her! I've never really loved anybody else.
It all came back when she stood there so bravely.
Mother, you wouldn't have me behave like a cad
and a villain to her a second time?

MRS. W.

It's useless to talk. I can never receive Miss Neve
into our family. You must choose between her and

LEN.
Then I choose her.

MRS. W.
crosses i. c. $ o fo j t i j ve to t h an k vour friend Mr. Linnell

8 Grosses to for this 2

fireplace. 1 r imS '

146



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



LEN. 1

Yes, Linnell is our friend. He has seen Sir John
Plugenet, and brought him round

MRS. W.

I don't wish him brought round. He has behaved
infamously in spreading this scandal through the
county. We are utterly disgraced and ruined!

(Enter VIVEASH and WiLMORE. 2 WILMORE is
pompously self-pitying. LENNARD bows to him,
but he barely nods to LENNARD in return.)

VIVE.

Well, how are you? (Shaking hands with MRS.
WILMORE.)

MRS. W.
As you see. 3

VIVE. 4

Glad to see you back home, Lennard.

WlL. 5

Lennard is not at home ; except in the sense of being
present here for the moment. He is still enjoying
the hospitality of his bosom friend Linnell.

VIVE.

Surely, Wilmore, you won't turn your only son
out of doors?

WIL.

I shall certainly not welcome him here until he has
given up his idea of marrying this a young per-
son.

LEN.

I'm sorry, father. Mr. Linnell is to marry Miss
Neve and me to-morrow morning in London.

WIL.

What?

147



1 Coming down
c. Mrs.
Wilmore
crossing to
above table.



3 At back Wil-
more closes
door after
him. Len-
nard moves
to above B. c.
table.



Sitting at L.
c. table.

Crosses be-
hind table
and down L.



6 Standing at
door.



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Crosses to her.
Wilmore
crosses to
above R. c.
table.



MRS. W.
(Heartbroken.) Lennard! Lennard!

WIL.
And pray what happens after that?

LEN.

Sir John Plugenet has been kind enough to get me
a railway appointment in India.



Indeed!



WIL.



LEN.



Through Linnell's influence. Rachel and I leave
for India next week. And I'm going to pull my-
self together, and make a thundering hard try to
be a better sort of chap for the future. 1 Mother,
you'll help us?

MRS. W.
No, Lennard, no!

LEN.

I've brought her over from Gilminster. If you
won't come to our wedding at least you'll see her,
and wish us happiness ?

MRS. W.
I can't! I can't!

WIL.
Where is this young person?

LEN.
Across at the lodge.

WIL.
In my lodge! On my premises!

LEN.

Yes, father. I think my future wife is quite good

148



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



enough company for your gardener! Mother,
you'll see her?

MRS. W.

No no

VIVE.



I think you'd better. 1

(Enter GOODYER at back, announcing 2 MR. DAU-
BENY. Exit GOODYER.)

DAUB.

Ah, my dear friends! How are you, Mrs. Wil-
more? (Shaking hands with her.) Enjoying this
marvellous autumn weather, I trust?



MRS. W.



Yes.



DAUB.

That's right ! You're looking more charming than
ever! (Nodding to VIVE ASH.) Ah, Viveash!
Lennard !

VIVE.
How are you?

LEN.
How d'ye do?

( VIVEASH has whispered to LENNARD. LENNARD
goes off, left.)

DAUB. 3

Wilmore, my dear old friend, I do trust you aren't
allowing this tiresome little affair of Lennard's to
depress your spirits ?

WIL.

No. I am bearing up wonderfully well on the
whole. 4

DAUB.

That' s right.

149



1 Lennard
crosses be-
hind table to
Viveash.

* Wilmore
makes ges-
ture of an-
noyance and
crosses down
R.



8 Crossing to-
wards Wil-



Sits R. of R.
table. FttH.
ash sits L. be-
low fireplace*



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



Crossing to-
wards Mrs,
Wilmore.



WlL.

I can safely say that throughout this undeserved
affliction I have borne myself like a Christian, and
a gentleman

DAUB.

I'm sure you have ! And that must be a great con-
solation to you!

WIL.

We all have to suffer for the wrongdoings of
others

DAUB.

We do ! We do ! Very true ! Ah, yes ! Ah, yes ! *
Well, we shall be safely ensconced in the Deanery
to-night. I ran over to say " Good-bye." My dear
wife would have come, but she has one of her hack-
ing coughs. However, she sent her love and
sympathy. By the way, Mrs. Wilmore, you didn't
answer her note?

MRS. W.
About your dinner party?

DAUB.

Yes. As Sir John Plugenet is to be there we
thought it only kind to you to give you a chance of
avoiding him.

MRS. W.

Have you given Sir John Plugenet the same chance
of avoiding us?

DAUB.
I don't quite follow.

MRS. W.

Mrs. Daubeny suggests we should decline to come
to your dinner party.

150



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



1 Wilmore rises
with impa-
tience.



' Rises. Vive-
ash also.



DAUB.

No, indeed! Don't put it like that! Such old
friends! But being our first dinner party, we're
anxious to avoid any little discord. 1

MRS. W.

I see! Please tell Mrs. Daubeny we withdraw our
acceptance of your kind invitation.

DAUB.

We must have a little cosy family dinner just our
four selves. Now name your own day.

MRS. W.
Thank you. 2 I cannot fix one at present.

DAUB.

Well, don't be long about it, there's a dear, amiable
lady! Viveash, my dear friend, when you're over
at Gilminster, you'll drop in and lunch with us?

VIVE.
Delighted.

DAUB.

Do, now. (Going off, suddenly bethinking him-
self.) Wilmore, 3 I hear you're leaving Weybury,
which I do hope is not true. But if you are, and if
you should be disposing of your cellar, you might
put an old friend in the way of buying what re-
mains of that port you know that delicious, soft,
silky, sixty-eight ? 4 Now there's a hint for you,
my dear friend ! Do take it ! Good-bye !

WIL.

Good-bye.

DAUB.

(To MRS. WILMORE.) Don't worry about this
affair of Lennard's. It will soon blow over soon
blow over. Good-bye, Viveash, my dear friend.



9 Crossing over
to him.



* Mrs. Wil-
more has
gone abor?
table to fire-
place and
rang bell,
and returned
to above L. c.
chair.



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



*At back
standing out'
side.



* At back

Wilmore
crosses up B.
c. Viveash
moves round
L. and back
to c.

* Crosses down
below I,, table
and to fire"
place.



VIVE.
Good-bye.

(GOODYER appears at door. 1 )
DAUB.

Good-bye, dear friends. Good-bye. (Exit* fol-
lowed by GOODYER.)

MRS. W.
You see ! We are to be cut by everybody ! 3

WIL.

Yes, I met the new Wesleyan minister yesterday,
and instead of bowing respectfully to me, as he
ought, he stared up at the front of his new chapel.
I'm sure he was chuckling up his sleeve !

VIVE.

Let's hope he was meditating a lapse into Gothic
for his next meeting house.

WIL.

You can chaff, Viveash! you're not losing the
honourable record of a lifetime, laboriously spent
in advancing the highest morality and soundest
Churchmanship amongst your neighbours



* Coming down
c.



VlVE. 4

No, but I'm losing the few shekels I'd laboriously
scraped together in fostering litigation amongst
such of my neighbours as were fools enough to go
to law. What's the use of harking back? We're in
a very awkward position, and only one man can
pull us out Linnell.



* Coming to be
low table.



Linnell! 5



MRS. W.
VIVE.



Linnell. Of course this business has put Linnell in
high favour with Sir John. Now, I'm persuading

152



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



Linnell that Sir John was very unchristianlike in
making a fuss and blackguarding you all over the
county. Linnell is persuading Sir John that he was
very unchristianlike, and Sir John is beginning to
feel that he was very unchristianlike; so I fancy
he'll help us out of our hole with the mortgages;
especially as your property would be a very good
investment for him, and round off the Plugenet
estate. 1 But we must get Linnell to pull the strings
with Sir John for us.



MRS. W.

I will owe nothing to Mr. Linnell, except my own,
and my son's disgrace and ruin.

(Enter GOODYER at back.)
GOOD.

Miss Plugenet and Mr. Linnell are in the drawing-
room, ma'am. 2 They wish to see you alone for a
few minutes.

MRS. W.

I will see Miss Plugenet. I cannot receive Mr.
Linnell.

VIVE.

Oh, I think you will. (To GOODYER.) All right,
Goodyer. We'll come into the drawing-room.
(Exit GOODYER. 3 )

VIVE.

(To MRS. WILMORE.) Come, old friend! 4
You've lost a great deal, but don't lose your nerves,
don't lose your temper, don't lose your hold of the
situation. I shall send Linnell to you. (Exit,)*

WlL. 6

Charlotte, I think you might come and help us pull

the strings

153



1 Crossing to-
wards Mrs.
Wilmore.



* Wilmore, be-
hind L. c.
table, slams
book.



3 Leaving door
open.



* Taking hand.



6 At back.



* Crossing up
R. c.



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



> Crossing up
to Wilmore.



* Moves away



MRS. W.

I've pulled all my strings ! They've all broken ! *
Please tell Mr. Linnell I will not receive him and
leave me alone. 2 (Throwing herself in a chair in
despair. )

WIL.

(Looking at her.) Yes, it's a pretty state of affairs.
However, I can honestly say I've acted throughout
according to the dictates of my conscience

MRS. W.

(Enraged.) Conscience! Conscience! Conscience!
Oh, stamp on it! Stamp on it! What's the use of
a conscience like yours, that always works

wrong 3

WIL.



Crosses and
sits R. c.



Goes up to
tier, offering
his Aland,
which she
ignores and
crosses to-
wards L. c.
chair.

At back,
closes door.



Upon my word! Really, Charlotte! My own wife
too!

(HELEN appears at the door at back, which has"
been left open.)

HEL.
(Coldly bows.) I beg pardon

WIL.
Please come in, Miss Plugenet

(HELEN enters.)

HEL.

(Entering.) May I have a few words with Mrs.
Wilmore ?

WIL.
Certainly. 4 I a j I a

(HELEN takes no notice of him. He pompously
pulls himself together and exit.}*
154



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



HEL. 1

(Pale, subdued.) I couldn't leave Weybury with-
out saying " Good-bye " to you.

MRS. W.
Thank you. It's kind of you.

HEL.
Your son is not at home to-day

MRS. W.
Yes, Lennard is at the lodge.

HEL.
Then I mustn't stay. 2 Good-bye.

MRS. W. 3

Good-bye, dear. Oh, Helen, I'm so sorry! (The
two zvomen cry together. 4 ) And your heart is
broken too!

HEL.
No, not quite. Mr. Linnell has been so kind.

MRS. W.
Mr. Linnell! 5

HEL.

He has taught me to bear it, and to grow strong
and better by it. I shall have a higher life, if not
a happier life. A high life can't be a happy life,
can it? I'm going to work with Mr. Linnell in
London.

MRS. W.
In London?

HEL.

I've managed to get him appointed to the vicarage
of St. James's, Shadwell. It's a poor living, but it's
just what he wished, and what I wish. We are
leaving to-night. He wants to see you. He's wait-
ing in the next room.

155



1 Comes c.



* Holds out her

arms to-
wards Mrs.
Wilmore.

3 Rises and em-
braces her.

* Taking
Helen's face
in her hands.



6 Backing a
step.



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



MRS. W.

I can't see him. The man who has brought me to
the dust! I can't I 1



1 Crosses L. c.



* Helen turns
and again
holds out her
arms to Mrs.
Wilmore.

8 Embracing
her.



* Helen backs
to above R. c.
chair. Mrs.
Wilmore
moves to L. C.
chair.



6 At L. of open
door.



6 Who also em-
braces her.

i At back. Len-
nard closes
door, and
comes to R. of
Rachel, and
brings her
down a step.



8 Lennard
brings her
down to c.
He moves to



HEL.
Good-bye then. 2

MRS. W.

Good-bye. 3 Oh, Helen, it's all over! All my
wishes! All my life! I'm dead! No, worse than
that ! I'm living, with nothing to live for ! ( Wip-
ing away her tears.) Good-bye!



HEL.



Good-bye !



(They are embracing when the door at back opens,
and RACHEL enters, shown in and followed by
LENNARD. RACHEL comes down a few steps*
MRS. WILMORE and HELEN then disengage
themselves* and RACHEL and HELEN recognize
each other.)

LEN.

(Showing great shame.) I beg pardon. I didn't
know (He is going off.)

HEL.

No, please stay. I'm going. (He stands deeply
ashamed? HELEN goes towards door, then stops,
looks at RACHEL a moment, goes to her.) I hope
you will be very happy! (Kisses RACHEL. 6 Exit?)

LEN.

Mother, we're leaving England in a few days.
Haven't you a word to say to her?

MRS. W.

(To RACHEL.) Yes. Please come to me. 8 I don't
wish to speak unkindly, but, through you, Lennard's
career has been destroyed for the time



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



1 Coming up to
Rachel and
taking her
hand.



RACK.
Oh, don't say that !

MRS. W.

I must. My son was in a great position. He might
have hoped for any honours the highest he had
a splendid future. To-day he's a disgraced pauper
through you !

LEN.

Mother ! x Mother ! Rachel, come away with me.
MRS. W.

No, Lennard, please let her hear me! (To
RACHEL.) I'm not reproaching you. It's done.
But now you're going to do him a further in-
jury

RACK.
No! No!

MRS. W.

Yes ! If you leave him, and go out of his life, this
disgrace will pass away and be forgotten. In a few
years he will redeem his mistake, and make a good
marriage. Won't you give him a chance? Haven't
you done him harm enough?

RACK.
Oh, what am I to do?

LEN.

Come away with me! Mother, I'll never give her
up now.

MRS. W.

Then I hope she'll have the good sense and the good
feeling to give you up.

LEN.

Rachel!

157



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



MRS. W.

Keep silence, Lennard, if you please, and let me save
you from this last dishonour. What do you say ?

RACK.

I love him so much! I can't give him up now!
You won't ask me! I've promised Mr. Linnell!
(LINNELL appears at door.) Ah, tell me! 1 Must
I give Lennard up ? Is it for his good ? Tell me I
ought, and I'll try to do it, 2 even now !

MRS. W. 3

Mr. Linnell, please keep away from us now! I
won't have you interfere in this. (To RACHEL.)
You've heard what I said! Don't listen to him.



1 Crossing up
R. c. Len-
nard follows
on her K.



* Turning to
Lennard who
takes her in
his arms.

* Crossing up
L. c.



* Coming down
a little.



9 Crosses up to
door.



Mrs. Wtt-
more slants
door and
crosses down
IH c. again.



LlN. 4

She will listen to me. And you will listen to me.

MRS. W.

I won't! Go, please! (Pointing?) The door!
The door!

LIN.

(To LENNARD.) Miss Neve, Lennard, please leave
me a few minutes with Mrs. Wilmore. (Motioning
them to door, left.)

MRS. W.
No! No!

LIN.

If you please, Lennard!

LEN.
Rachel (Taking her off, left.)

MRS. W. 6

Is it always to be so? Will you always come in
my way?

LIN.

Always! till you're in the right way.

158



THE HYPOCRITES



ACT IV



I won't hear you!



Ah, but you will !



MRS. W.



LIN.



MRS. W.

No! No! You've broken up my home, you've de-
feated all my hopes, you've ruined my son, you're
parting me from him now when I love and need him
most, you're sending him away to India to die, per-
haps, out there I may never see him again. You've
done all this! Well, you've done it! So be satis-
fied with your work, and let me be ! l

LIN.

My work isn't finished

MRS. W.
Not finished?! Pray, what more have you to do?

LIN.

To open your eyes! To make you see what you
would have done ! 2 Think of it ! And you asked
me, God's minister, to wink at your foul trick and
help you help you prepare a long life of treachery
and distrust for your son and his bride ! Look at it !
Where is your conscience? Where is your eye-
sight? Ah, but you wouldn't have done it! Very
shame would have stopped you

MRS. W.
You have stopped me ! So be content.

LIN.
No, not till you own your son is doing right.

MRS. W.
To marry that girl ? 3

159



1 Crosses down
to below
table.



* Crosses down
to her.



9 Turning up
to him.



ACT IV



THE HYPOCRITES



1 Falls in chair
R. of i.. table,
burying her
face in her
hands.



LIN.

Yes! They love each other. Their future will be
all the more secure from their bitter remembrance
of the past. They'll work out their repentance in
a great love. He'll build his house on the true love
of man and wife. It will stand. His hopes, his
honour, his safety, his duty, his happiness, all lie
with her. Can't you see that?

MRS. W.

I can see nothing, except that I am to lose Lennard.
You've robbed me of him! You've robbed me of
him! 1

LIN.

No! No! Or if I have, it's only to give him back
to you! I took him from you a coward, a de-
ceiver, a seducer, ready to act a base lie and live
an idle, selfish life upon the money of a woman
he didn't really love I give him back to you an
honourable, upright man, ready to work and to face
life bravely with the woman he does love. Ah!
Take him from me take the new Lennard to your
heart, and thank God for giving you a son you can
be proud of!

MRS. W.

I can't ! I can't ! I can't bear to think 2 I can't
owe anything to you !

LIN.

Don't think of me as your creditor. Think of me
as your servant ! God's servant, and therefore your
servant, sent to hold a light to your path, and
smooth it where it's rough and thorny! Won't


1 2 3 4 5 7

Online LibraryHenry Arthur JonesThe hypocrites : a play in four acts → online text (page 7 of 8)