Copyright
Henry Harold Goldberger.

Interlachen 1926 online

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Page Eleven



ENTRANCE TO GIRLS DORMITORY



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'N THE days gone by far-seeing men made plans to build a school
And sought a place where it might grow to benefit mankind.
Thev chose the Ijanks of Hollingsworth. antl there, beside the la I
Tall buildings towered to the sky, and classic corridors
Re-echoed happy shouts of youth, and as the days went by
Stored precious memories within the walls of lives well lived.
And then it was befitting that someone should choose a seal
To typify the ideals of this earnest band of youth.

\nd so the seal was made and dedicated to the school.

Sev'n stars of blue formed in a cross uijon a shield they placed

— The emblem of self-sacrifice upon the sign of faith —

And 'round this rare device three circles lay, symbolical

Of Brotherhood. And then, within these were inscribed three words

To light the path of man and raise him to a higher plane:

Lux, Sapientia and Lex — light, wisdom, and lastly, law.

Light following all knowledge, showing truth to make us free,

\nd wisdom as a background for the vision that we see,

\nd law that we may have our thoughts confirmed in self-control
So to these ideals then our school will .^re stand true,

\m\ stars and shield and circles all are emjjlems which shall help

i'hat we may "see life clearly and niav see it whole."



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LuDD Myrl Spive^. A.B.. A.M.. B.D.
President of Soulheni College



Dr. Spivey came to us from Birmingham-
Southern with many words of praise from
both students and faculty there. Though he
has been the leader of Southern for less
than a year he is loved by everyone of the
student body, the faculty anil the friends of
the College. He is a real friend to all of the
students and there is no problem too small
for him to talk over with them and advise
them accordingly. He is a man of bound-
less enthusiasm aiul tireless energy as shown
in his work during the Million-Dollar Cam-
paign.










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Page Fifteen



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Hazel Belle Mileham. B.S.. A.M. "^^ (

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LOUS ALBERTl. A.B.. A.M., Melro-
pnlilan College of Copenhagen. Pu-
pil ot Joluuiii BatliuUly and Sextiis
Miscow.

Dirrcliir III \ iiuf and Theiiry oj
Music.



ROBERT STKW VKI HI A. B.S.. .Stet-
son University; A.M., Columbia
Llniversity: Ph.D., Nurthwesleiii
University.

Professor oj Chvinnlr).

OLIN BOGGESS. A.B., \ anderliiit I ni-
versity; B-O.. Drew Tlienlngieal
Seminary.

Professor of Greek anil Liibliral
Literature.

W ILLL\M PEW BRANDON, A.B., Em-
ory University; A.M., University of
North Carolina.

Professor of History aud Eco-
nomics.

CAROLINE BROADWELL. Tennessee
Female College; Ward-Belmont Col-
lege; Teacher's Diploma from the
Curry School of Expression.

Director oj School nj Expression

ELOISE HAKKNESS CARV. Binniim.
ham-Scjulliern College.

Secretary to the President






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WALTER COLLIN.S. Ciruiiiiiati Art
Academy: Martz Ueinhokit: Walter
Thor; Hyman School of Illustrating.
Munich ; Adolph von Menzel, Berlin ;
Julian School and Academy Colora?;-
si. Paris.

Director oj School of Art.



RLFLS THOMAS CORNELIUS. A.B..
A.M., \ anderliih Iniversity.

Projessor oj Latin.

JOHN MARSHALL ELLIS. A.B.. Em-
ory University, M.S.

Professor of Biology.

MARY CAROLINE HAIN. B.S.. George
Peahody College for Teachers.

Professor of Household .'science.

THELMA MAY HALL. B.S.. .Southern
College; Graduate \^ ork at Colum-
bia University.

Professor of Household Arts.

JAMES RAYMOND HAYGOOD. A.B.,
\ anderhilt L niversity.

Director of Athletics.




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(()i;\ MOUTON HKNDKKSON, MM.
I... W t-stiiKprelaiul (^ollefit*; (Iradii-
ate Work in Georjie Pealnniy (lol-
lejie for Teachers. I nivereity of
Texas.

Instructor in Di-jxirtmfnl of ISiisi-
no.s Administrution.

\l\i;^ Ml FFLY MOREHOL .SE. B.F.
Drake University; A.B.. Universit\
of .Southern California; Graduate
Work. Northwestern Lnivers !t\.

I'rojcssor of Religious Eduraiion.



(;UACE El.EANOK McKEYNOLDS.
A.B.. Maryville College; A. M.. Cor
mil University; Graduate Work.

University of Tennessee and ('olmn-
bia University.

Professor of h's}cholo^\ unit Edu-
cation.



LOUISE AMANDA RENICK, Diplom..
from Cincinnati College of Music:
Graduate \^ ork. Seidel .School of
Music.

Instructor in I'iuno.



WALTER O.MER ROPP. W,st \ ii-ini..
University.

Ilursur and Uirector ol Driiurl-
tncnt ol ///^s//(e^^ tdrninist ration.



(.EORt.K KKWkILN .SCOTT. A.li..
Middle Georgia College: Graduate
Sludenl. \ anderbilt Universit).



Instruitor of History.



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J I 1.1 \ 1). SIMS.

Supi'riiiti-ndi'nt oj Hull tor II I'tii-



HELEN NKEDENBURC SWE.\T. B.M..
Sullins Collejie: (Graduate ^ork,
Nirjiil Solio.il ,.l Music.

Instriirtor ol Hislor\ iti Music



IIENKV Cl.AV NANCE.

Instntrior in jintniiilisin.



(11 AKLE.S AMZl \ AWOV. A.U..
Drake Lniveisity: Ph.D.. I iii\t'isit\
of Iowa.

Frojesstir oj Konutmi' Limgua^e.s.



\1.BEKT GREGORY VREDENBURG,
Diploma from Syracuse Lniversily
of Music; Graduate Work in Piano.
George A. Parker aiul Fredericli
Sliailer Evans; Graduate Work in
\ iolin. William Schultze. Clifford
Schmidt; Graduate Work in Theorv.
Perry Goetschius.

Director oj School of Music.



KOSA LEE WALSTON. A.B.. Woman,-
College of .\labama: .V.M.. Birmin.i-
ham-Southern College; Graduate
Work. Columbia University.

I'rniessnr oj English.




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C)T SO many years ago. in Soiilliciii s wall
The Seniors started tiieir career.
Awed by the grandeur ol her lol [\ halls.
Loving her more with every passing year.

Life's trials eanie to Southern and were shared
By earnest students working for her best;

Toiling that the hardships might be spared
To future generations on their (jiiest.

Life's joys were shared — eternal friendships nunle
To ease the Journey in the World before.

And tender memories that will not fade
When dear lamiliai' (aces are no more.

A few have fallen by the wayside — gone

In form and feature — they have not returni-il.

But in our iiearts their work is carrying on

And from their words and actions we have learned



To those who guided us with careful hantis
We owe more than we ever can repav

We

Tlii'ii' vvortis wi



lake their message into foreign lands;
live again in Future dav!



lomorrow is our
a smile we will go march



ighl.



We have no tears!

And with
To live our lives for others, and to fighl

The fight of life until the Vict'rv's won.



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J I LI A DoKOTHY Funk, A.B.,

"Fllxkie"'

President Class oj '26



"She has that alacrity oj spirit and cheerjul mind that all men admire."

Pres. Girls' Stiiilent Ciniinil. Pres. Life Service Band. Vice-Pres. State Stiuleiit Cuuiicil '20.
Tau Sigma Literary Society. Honorary' Member Salmagundi Club. Southern Staff '25-'26. League
Cabinet ■23-'24. Charter Member Phi Delta Sorority. L'ndergraduate Representative Y. W. C. A.
'26. ^ . W. C. A. Cabinet ■24-'26. Captain Swimming Team "26. Winner Essay Contest '2.1. Tennis
( 'lub llikin;; tniib. Life Service Band. Chorus.



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Rae Buterbaugh. A.B.. "Bobbie"'

"Love mafifs those yoiins uhoni age doth
chill.
Ami u'hiini ht' tinils \oui\g. keeps young
still."

Pre?. Phi l).lt;i. Intfilaihen Staff. Ep-
silon l.ajiili<la Si^ma. .Salmagundi Clul).
Pan-Hellenic Coiineil. Scribblers" Club.
Y. W. C. A. '22. Canoe Team. Polly-
anna Club ■22-"23. .\ss't English De-
[lartmenl "2.S. The Gleemen.



William Edward Bl hr.man, "Ed""

"II ise. stalely, tall, ilignifieil. is that ally"

Pres. Pi Kappa. Phi Sigma. Pres.
Sophomore Class. Capt. Swimming
Team. Winner Canoe Singles '24-'25.
Male Quartette. Miscosimpar. Chorus.






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Janette Clarke Crosby. A.B.
■"Janette"

"She is gentle, she is shy.

But there is mischief in her eye."

Y. "W . C. A. -22-23. Scribblers' Club.
.Salmaf;uiifli Club. Phi Delta Sorority.
Lakeland High Club.



EuR.4 Lee Dlrrance, A.B.

■"^'ESTPOCKET"

"A chilli she seems in form and face.
But in her class she holds her place."

Sigma Delta Literarj- Society. Y. W.
C. A. Canoe Team. Tennis Club "22
•24.



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tATiiEniNE Mary Hall. A.B.
"Catty"

"Shf i> full of joke and jests
trul ifi-ll her wonts become her."

(la.-? \ iff -President. Soplunnnrf. ^.
\\". (;. A. Cahinet. SdUtliern Staff. Si;;-
nia Delta Reader. Junior Class Presi-
dent. Y. W. C. A. Vice-President.
President Sigma Delta Literary Sociel\.
League Cabinet. Student Council Secr-'-
tarv. Inlerlaclien .Staff. Kappa Gamma
Tau.



\i MO Loi,-. Kf:Ksfn. A.H..
"Kersey"

"Sliulidii.s. iiiiiling and sensible are the
adjectives best describing."

Pres. V. W. C. \. Pres. Tau .Sigma
Literary .Society. Girls' .Student (Coun-
cil. Literary Editor Soulliern. '2.S-26.
\ ice-Pres. Kappa (iamma Tau. \ icc-
Pres. Senior (Hass. Honorar\' nieinber
.Salmagundi Cluh. Pres. Epsilon Land)-
da .Sigma, (^apt. ^Sllite (^anoe Team.
"25. .Southern Staff. ■2L Srrilihlers"
Club. '24-'25. Hiking Club. Swimming
Club.



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\^ ILLIAM R. NeBLETT

"Bill"

re is pUd.sure in poetic pains,
h only poets Knou."



l'liili>iiiatlu-an Oialor. "25-'26. Presi-
dent l)el)ating (^luli. Spring '25. Soutli-
em Staff. ■22-'2:i Editor-in-Cliief nl
Southern, '25-"26. Boosters" Club. Salm-
agundi Club. Southern Male (Juartelte.
(irrhestra. Beta \In.



Mary Caroline Nelson. A.B.
"Mary"

"She works ivhen she uorks.
tnd plays when she plays."

Lambda Sigma Literary Society,
(.iris" (iovernment Council. "2.S. Y. \^ .
( !. \. (ihairman \^ orld Fellowship Com-
mittee. Kappa Gamma Tau Sororitv.
.Salmagunfli (!hib. '2-S. \^ iiite (]anop
Team. '24.



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Nellie Ver.4 Rosencr.ance. A.B.
"Sweet Nellie"

"For she iias just tlie quiet kind
^ hose nature never varies."

Y. W. C. A. Lambda Sigma Literan
Society. Life Service Band. Student
Volunteer Band. West \'irginia Club.
Boosters' Club.



l.ovE Albert Smith, A.B.
"Love"

"Fur uitliuut an honest heart
No man is worth regarding."

Pres. Phi Sigma Literary Society,
\ ice-Pres. Ministerial Association. Life
Service Band. Miscosimpar.



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Gertrude Smith. A.B.
"Gertie"

"l^argc iftis hrr bounl) and hrr soul
sincere."

Pollyaniia Club. "22. A. P. I'. Sucietx.
'25. Lamhda Sigma. "22. ^ . \\ . C. A..
"22. Scribblers" Club. "22.



W iLBLR D. Staats. A.B.
"Lightning"

A big si.t-juoter ui cheerful disposition."

Miscusimpar. '25-"26. Letterinan's
CJub. Pi ICapiia. Fuutball. Basketball.
SaJmagundi Club. Phi Sigma.



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Genevieve Starcher. A.B.
"Genevieve"

"Hfr heart's as sunny as her hair."

Sigma Delta Literary Society. Phi
Delia. Vi inner Literary Dramatic (.on-
test. "2.S. Marshall Colle<:e. "24.



Lawrence \. Swanson. B.S.
■Gloria"

"7 dare do ail that may became a man.
If hu dares do more is none."

Orchestra. ■23-"24-'25. Southern Staff.
24. Philomathean Literary Society.
Scrihljlers" (iluh. .Salmagnmli Cliih.
Business ALtnager Interlachen. (llioru.T>.




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Senior Class History

^**«»l siPRKMEl.v lia|i])v grou]) of venlanl rxjilorers once enterecl upon a great but
^ "^ hazardous adventure in the hope that somewhere the\ might discover that
wonderful fountain of kiKJwIedge that ■'hould ipieiieh an insatiable thirst.
With an anK>r undimined bv an\ fear of failure, and with dreams of manv worthx
deeds and noble aeeoniplishments, these vouths se! out u|)on a long four-vear journew
In keeping with the spirit of these ideals the courageous adventurers chose a path but
barelv trodden, and one which held in its possession a pearl of great price — the corner-
stone oi a niightv future institution.

Thus it happened that the Class of '26 marked its beginnings with the foundation
of a greater Southern. Rich and varied were the experiences of that first vear as the
searchers earnestly began their noble quest. Each dav brou'^ht a progress that filled
the eves of onlookers with wonder and admiration. Final I v, two massive structures,
surrounded bv a wealth of orange trees, gracing the shores of beautiful Lake Hollings-
worth. stood in niightv grandeur "neath a glorious Florida skv.

This was indeed a memorable occasion for the Freshmen of "22. and following in
rapid succession were many other events which shall long be kept in memory by this
class. There was the brilliant o|)ening rece|)tion. when thousands of visitors were first
welcomed to the halls of a new Southern; the annual celebrations such as Halloween
parties, Thanksgiving dinners, and George Washington banquets. Could we forget the
beautiful May Day Festival, when the appearance of Arthur and Guinevere led u-
back to the days of knighthood and chivalry? Are we not proud of the fact that dur-
ing this year the Department of Journalism was instituted in the College curriculum
and was composed largely of our own Freshmen members'? In fact, every phase of
college life found Freshmen trying to fit themselves to the new environment and be-
come a vital force in the great adventure.

In the second stage of the j(>urne\ we have become a sophisticated group of Sopho-
mores, jolly, happy, carefree — quite conscious of the fact that we can no longer be
dubbed as "ignorant little Freshies." Beinc modest about our achievements, however,
we will not boast of a long line of illustrious events. Let it suffice to say that besides
many scholarly attainments Sophomores won recognition in every phase of athletic*.
Lnwilling to be outdone in loyalty to upperclassmen. we entertained the dignified
Seniors with a lovely picnic on the entrancing shores of Scott Lake. This was our la.-t
big event as Sophs — for summer days were fast approaching — three months more and
we should find ourseKes in a place of high esteem.

The fall of 1924 greeted a more serious-minded, deep-thinking group of explorers.
Vie were then Juniors, real u|)perclassmen. with a feeling of pride that we should have
a share in bigger responsibilities. Among our Juniors we discovered great genii, some
of whom carried off prizes in the annual lilerar\ societv contests; others found them-
selves of great value in all campus activities.









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Senior Class History — Continued

There are so many interesting things to remember as Juniors, but probably the
most exciting of all was the clay we ilonned tiie Senior caps and gowns and marched
into chapel with a dignity that no Senior could ever parallel. Then, of course, came
the climax of the whole year, the long-awaited Junior-Senior Banquet, which was put
over in royal style at the Cleveland Heights Club House. Our Junior missions had
now been completed, and joyously we awaited the passing of the last final exam, con-
fident that soon we should bear a long-coveted title.

Happy explorers that we are! A dream of the long ago has at last come true for
now we are Seniors, striding in all our dignity o"er the old familiar haunts, pausing
here and there to reflect on the glories of the past, the hopes of the future. 'Tis a
busy, busy life now with so many important affairs taking place. A most noteworthy
occasion in our Senior year was the day we assumed the formal dress of dignity, anil
as our rights demanded, taking our places next to the Faculty, we marched with stately
tread in the great procession that led us to the scene of our new college President's
inauguration. A grand and glorious dav it was. a memory neer to be forgotten in
the annals of our class history.

Springtime again rolls round and with it great anticipation lur the Seniors.
Various kinds of entertainments and banquets are to be given in our honor; we are
looking forward to the arri\al of rings and invitations, the publishing of the Intek-
l^iVCHEN, the night of the Senior play and last but not least Conmiencement itself.
What a thrill the mere thought of graduation brings! And yet the feeling of joy comes
not alone, but 'tis intermingled with a touch ot sorrow, for we realize that we have set
out upon the last mile of the journey.

The ardent explorers have finally readied the end ol tlie marvelous aiUenture.
But^Q thrfw-it is not a signal that the great journey is by any means complete. 'Tis
^.-iwH-^a"~'auii:lHi2 torch that shall light the way to richer fields, wherein a deeper wisdom



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bas^ these happS' youths from a great and growing Alma Matei



rd,|)a3^ these happS' youths from a great and growing Alma Mater, the
^ed irrrtl •«FQAVj^=ii>to strength and beaut^ here, shall be emanated in their

-Kersey, '26.









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Juniors — That's Enoigu

E HATK to say we're perfect

We're so modest, don't you know.
But we really, truly think that we're "'the stuff ;^nL



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But. anyway, we're Juniors — that's enouglis

We really feel quite sorry «^''^''^ '"^ f^TA

For these other classes here. ' A J^

W e think they're rather young and play tc^e^j^'ttgh; "^ J/^

Because they just aren't dignified

And serious like us
And — well, they just aren't Juniors — that'rf'tjt^nigh. \J \ ^M|^ A^\\\>'.

But, seriously now, IM i^^Ms )t{\>

We've been here three long years; ' lm> '' ^ ''

We're for Southern when the sailing's smooth or rough. -^^ ^4^.-;- '^3|a> I'>^v*,v\

When you're wondering who loves her. ^'''^x i'' %^' ' v,W>' 'o

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And who's Southern bom and bred.



Just look us Juniors over — that's enough.'^.-^J ■- ^^^^.jg . ^'r?'^-*-"K^f%^ Vil '^*


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Online LibraryHenry Harold GoldbergerInterlachen 1926 → online text (page 1 of 5)