Henry Lewis Taylor.

Professional education in the United States online

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2 Advanced V. 8. Mstory

2 First reading course in V. S. Mstory

2 Second reading course in V. S.

history
2 New York history
2 Civics
2 Economics

GROUP S
Other studies

2 Stenography 50 words per minute
1 Stenography lOO words per minute

1 Stenography 125 words per minute

2 Home science
2 Bookkeeping



GROUP 4
History and social science
2 General history
1 Greek history

1 Roman history

2 English history
2 French Mstory
2 U. S. history

Regular examinations are held in January and June in all the

studies, except those in italics, in which examinations are held

in June only. The September examination is for professional

and technical students only.

CALENDAR OF EXAMINATIONS 1900



Form-study and drawing

2 Drawing

2 Advanced drawing



YEAR


January


March


Jnne


September


1000


22-26


28-30


11-16


25-27







DAILY PROGRAM OF REGENTS EXAMINATIONS
The oral examination in reading may be held any time during examination
week at the convenience of the examiner.

SEPTEMBER SUBJECTS



Tuesday
9:15 a. m.— 13:15 p.m.



Wednesday
9:15 a. m.— 13:15 p. m.



Thursday
9:15 a. m.— 12:15 p. m.



Advanced English
German, 2d year
Arithmetic
Rhetoric
Botany



Writing

Elementary English
Plane geometry
Roman history



German, 1st year

Algehra

U. S. history

New York history

American literature

Stenography



1:15— 4:15 p.m.



1:15— 4:15 p.m.



1:15—4:15 p.m.



Physical geography
Geography
Civics
Economics



Spelling

English composition

Physiology and hygiene

English literature

Bookkeeping



Latin, 1st year
Physics, part 1
English history
Drawing



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES



37



JANUARY SUBJECTS



Monday
9:15 a.m.-12 :15 p.m.



German, 3d year
French, 2d year
Adv. arithmetic
Algebra
Adv. drawing
Latin comp.



Tuesday
9:15 a.m.-13:15 p.m.



Rhetoric
English, 2d year
Eng. eelections
Arithmetic
Adv. algebra
Botany
Greek history



Wednesday
9:15 a. m.-13 :15 p.m.



Writing
Elem. English
Plane geometry
Chemistry, part 1
N. Y. history
Greek comp.



Thursday
9:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.



American lit.
German, Ist year
Greek, 1st year
Plane trigonom.
U. S. history
Stenography



Friday
9:15 a. m.-12 :15 p.m.



Latin, 1st year
Xenophon's Anab.
Physics, part 2
General history
Drawing



1:15-4:15 p.m.



1:15-4:15 p.m.



1:15-4:15 p.m.



1:15-4 :15 p.m.



1:15-4:15 p.m.



Adv. English


Virgil's Aeneid


Spelling


Caesar


English reading


English, 1st year


Phy. geography


Eng. comp.


Homer's Iliad


Cicero's Orations


German, 3d year


Geography


Eng. literature


Latin, 2d year


Solid geometry


French, 1st year


Civics


English, 3d year


Astronomy


Physics, part 1


French, 3d year


Economics


Am . selections


Chemistry, part 3


Geology


Roman history




Zoology
Bookkeeping


Eng. history


Phys. and hygiene



MARCH SUBJECTS



Wednesday
9:15 a. m.— 13:15 p. m.


Thursday
'9:15 a. m.— 13:15 p. m.


Friday
9:15 a. m.— 13:15 p. m.


Advanced English
Plane geometry
New York history


German, 1st year

Algebra

U. S. history

Stenography


Rhetoric
Latin, 1st year
Drawing
Arithmetic



1:15— 4:15 p.m.



1:15—4:15 p. m.



1:15— 4:15 p.m.



Spelling

English composition

Civics

Bookkeeping



Writing

Elementary English

Caesar

Physical geography

English history



Physics, part 1

Geography

Physiology and hygiene

Economics



JUNE SUBJECTS (ALL)



Monday


Tuesday


■Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


9:15a.m.-ia:15p.m.


9:15a.m.-12:15p. m.


9:15a.m.-12:15p.m.


9:15a.m.-12:15p.m.


9:15a.m.-12:15p.m.


German, 2d year


Ehetorlc


Writing


American lit.


Latin, 1st year


French, 3d year


English, 2d year


Elementary Eng.


German, Ist year


Xenophon's Anab.


Virgil's Eclogues


Eng selections


Eng. poetry


Greek, 1st year


Greek, 2d year


Adv. arithmetic


Arithmetic


Plane geometry


Plane trigonom.


Physics, part 2


Algebra


Adv. algebra


Chemistry, part 1


U. S. history


General history


Adv. drawing


Botany


N. Y. history


Stenography


Home science


V. S. hlat. reading


Greek history


French history




Drawing


course 1




Greek comp.






Latin comp.











1:15— 4:15 p.m.



1:15— 4:15 p.m. 1:15— 4:15 p. m.



1:15— 4:15 p.m.



1:15— 4:15 p.m.



Advanced Eng.


English prose


Spelling


Caesar


English reading


English, 1st year


Virgil's Aeneid


Eng. composition


Greek, 3d year


Cicero's Orations


German, 3d year


Latin, 3d year


Eng. literature


Homer's Iliad


Solid geometry


French, 1st year


Spheric trlgon.


English, 3d year


Latin, 2d year


Physios, part 1


French, Sd year


Phys. geography


Am. selections


Astronomy


Geology -


Sallust'B Catiline


Geography


Ovid's metamor.


Chemistry, part 2


Phys and hygiene


Roman history


Civics


Zoology


Eng. history


Adv. U.S. hist.


TJ. S. hist, reading


Economics


Bookkeeping






course 2











38 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

Studies, calendar and daily program revised for the five years
1900-1905 go into effect with the September examinations of
1900.

Sample papers. Calls for sample examination papers grew so
burdensome that free distribution became impracticable. All
the papers of the year are mailed in paper covers for 25 cents, or
bound for 50 cents. Unbound sample papers not including more
than 10 subjects may be had for 10 cents.

On full equivalents. Candidates for the medical student cer-
tificate having credentials that can be accepted in place of exam-
inations, should forward them or authenticated copies, and the
accuracy of the translations of credentials in a foreign language
should be certified by the respective consul general. Credentials
should be issued in due form by the president, dean or principal
of the institution ; and should be signed under seal or acknowl-
edged before a notary, unless the institution is in the University
of the State of New York.

On partial equivalents. Candidates for the medical student
certificate having credentials that can receive partial recognition
should forward them in accord with the instructions to can-
didates for full equivalence. In case of uncertainty apply for a
partial equivalent blank or have an ofiQcial of the institution
certify in detail the work successfully completed giving special
attention to item 1 of the Directions. See that the certificate
is issued under the offlcial seal of the institution or acknowledged
before a notary public by the principal. If work has been done
in other high schools secure a credential from each. Diplomas
from registered institutions may be sent in lieu of this certificate
when they give the information called for under item 1 of the
Directions. If the school is not registered submit the informa-
tion called for in item 2 of the Directions.

Directions. 1 Give the full name of the applicant, the exact
name of the institution and of the department attended, an accur-
ate description of the course pursued, using the same terms that
are given in the ofiQcial announcement, circular or catalogue of
the institution.



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES 39

2 Send an of&cial announcement, circular or catalogue of the
institution, showing

a) requirements for admission, i. e. subjects and years given
to their completion;

6) requirements for graduation in each course, including sub-
jects pursued and time devoted to each.

3 Application for medical student certificate:

This certifies that admission to the (classical, etc.) course at
(school, post-oflSce, state) requires years of preacademio

work and that (name in full) successfully completed 189

the first ° year of the course as follows:



Subjects



Weeks
per year



Periods .
per week



Minutes
per period



Standing



State university of North Dakota, Grand Forks, Pres. Web-
ster Merrifield, M. A.

1897-98. 21 schools classified by the high school board.

Registration

Eight years preacademic met by eight years elementary gram-
mar school

Two years academic met by requirements of the third class

Three years academic met by requirements of the second class
and by admission to Latin and English courses

Four years academic met by requirements of the first class
and by the successful completion of the freshman year
classical, Latin-scientific, scientific courses

B. A. registered for course certificate.

Ohio state university, Columbus, Pres. James H. Canfleld,"
LL.D.

" We have no published list of accredited schools in this state
— our accrediting is not yet systematic or quite satisfactory."
May 14, 1898

1896-97.

a Use the same form for the 2d, 3d and 4th years of the course.
liDr Canfield was called to Columbia in 1899.



40 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

Registration
Preacademic not given
Three years academic met by admission to classical and Latin

course in philosophy
Four years academic met by the successful completion of the

sophomore year, modern language, English (Ph. B.) and

science (B. S.) courses; freshman year B. A. and Ph. B.

courses
B. A. and Ph. B. registered for course certificate.

University of Oregon, Eugene,Pres.CharlesH.Chapman,Ph.D.
1898-99. 38 accredited schools.
Registration
Eight years preacademic met by the successful completion of

eighth grammar grade
Two years academic met by 30 credits of preparation
Four years academic met by 62 credits of preparation; by the

successful completion of the freshman year B. A., B. S. and

B. L. courses
B. A., B. S., B. L. registered for course certificate.

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Provost Charles C.
Harrison, LL.D.

1897-98. No list of schools whose diplomas are accepted in
whole or in part, the diploma of each candidate decided on its
own merits.

Registration
Two years academic met by admission to course 4
Three years academic met by admission to courses 2 and 3
Four years academic met by admission to course 1, by the suc-
cessful completion of the freshman year courses 2 and 3
(B. S.); by the successful completion of the sophomore year
courses 4 (B. S.)
B. A. and B. S. of courses 1, 2 and 3 registered for course certifi-
cate, B. S. of courses 4 not registered for course certificate.

University of South Dakota, Vermillion, Act. Pres. James E.
Todd, M. A.
1897-98. 22 accredited schools.



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES 41

Registration

Eight years preacademic met by the successful completion of

the common school course
Three years academic met by the successful completion of the

sub-freshman department
Four years academic met by the successful completion of the

freshman year classical (B. A.), science (B. S.), letters (B. L.)

courses
B. A., B. S. and B. L. registered for course certificate.

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Pres. Charles W. Dabney,
LL.D.

1897-98. 39 schools of the state accredited for 1898.
Registration

Eight years preacademic met by five years primary and three

years secondary
One year academic met by admission requirements
Four years academic met by graduation from the literary,

scientific B. L. or B. S. as languages are elected, engineering,

civil, mechanical, chemistry courses
Not registered for course certificate.

University of Texas, Austin, Pres. George T. Winston, LL.D.
1897-98. 72 affiliated schools.

Registration
Preacademic not given

One year academic met by admission to B. S. course
Two years academic met by admission to B. L. course
Three years academic met by admission to B. A. course
Four years academic met by the successful completion of the
junior year B. S. course, sophomore year B. L. course, fresh-
man year B. A. course
B. A. registered for course certificate.

West Virginia university, Morgantown, Pres. Jerome H. Ray-
mond, Ph.D.
1897-98. 13 accredited schools.



42 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK

Registration
Preparatory schools at Morgantown and Montgomery
Eight years preacademic met by the successful completion first

preparatory year
Two years academic met by the successful completion third

preparatory year
Four years academic met by the successful completion of the

sophomore year of modern literature (B. L.), philosophical

(Ph. B.), scientific (B. S.), classical (B, A.) courses
Not registered for course certificate.

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Pres. Charles K. Adams,
LL.D.

1897-98. 137 accredited schools.

Registration

Eight years preacademic met by the successful completion of
eighth grammar grade

Three years academic met by admission to English, general-
science, engineering, civic historical

Four years academic met by admission to modern or ancient
classical; by the successful completion of freshman year
B. A., B. L., B. S. courses

B. A., B. L., B. S. registered for course certificate.

University of Wyoming, Laramie, Pres. Frank P. Graves,
LL.D.

1897-98. 12 accredited high schools.
Registration

Eight years preacademic met by admission to preparatory

school
Three years academic met by unconditional admission to the

liberal arts college; by the successful completion of the

freshman year classical, literary, scientific with Latin (B. A.)

without Latin (B. S.)
B. A., B. S. registered for course certificate.



PROFESSIONAL EDDCATION IN THE UNITED STATES 43

Associations

The following associations of a national or local character are
exerting such influence in formulating uniformity in the courses
of secondary schools and requirements for admission to colleges
and universities that they are given a place of permanent record.
The only subject uniformly required for admission to colleges
throughout the United States, viz, college-entrance requirements
in English, is the result of the active effort of these associations.
It is probable that in the near future more definite courses of
instruction and more uniform requirements for admission to
college will be secured through their influence.

Association of colleges and preparatory schools of the mid-
dle states and Maryland. Organized in 1887 as the College
association of Pennsylvania; in 1888 it became the College asso-
ciation of the middle states and Maryland; in 1892-93 admitting
preparatory schools it assumed its present title; next meeting
Dec. 1-2, 1899, Trenton, N. J., Sec. M. Whitcomb, Philadelphia, Pa.

The object of the association is to consider the qualifications
of candidates for admission to college and the methods of ad-
mission; the character of the preparatory schools; the courses
of study to be pursued in the colleges and schools, including their
order, number, etc.; the relative number of required and elec-
tive studies in the various classes; the kind and character of
degrees conferred; methods of organization, government, etc.;
the relations of the colleges to the state and to the general
educational systems of the state and country; and any and all
other questions affecting the welfare of the colleges and schools,
or calculated to secure their proper advancement.

The regular annual meeting is decided by the executive commit-
tee unless determined by the association. Expenses are met by
a $5 assessment on each institution. Membership is open to any
college, normal or high school or other school preparing students
for college in the middle states and Maryland on approval of the
executive committee. In March 1898, the association had 156
institutions on its roll of membership, of which one third were
colleges and universities and two thirds secondary schools.



44 UNIVERSITY OF THE) STATE OF NEW YORK

Uniform entrance requirements in English. The most important
steps toward the unification of college-entrance requirements in
English were taken by this association at Columbia college De-
cember 1893. On resolution introduced by Pres. Low a joint com-
mittee of 10, five representing the colleges and five the prepara-
tory schools was appointed to consider the present usage in the
matter of entrance examinations in English with power to print
and circulate their report. At the first meeting of the committee,
February 1894, at New York university, circulars of inquiry were
ordered sent to the colleges of New England, the middle states
and Maryland, also to the preparatory schools and correspond-
ence was opened with the commission of colleges in New England
and with the New England association of colleges and prepara-
tory schools. On May 17, 1894, at Philadelphia the three dele-
gations organized themselves into a conference and the con-
clusions reached embraced five general recommendations, two
lines of entrance requirements and a scheme for an advanced ex-
amination.

The second meeting of the conference was held May 9, 1895 in
Boston with delegates present from the three associations and
from the conference of teachers of English of the north central
states. After discussion five propositions were voted, books for
reading were recommended for 1899 and 1900 and a continuation
of the joint conference was recommended.

The third meeting held May 31, 1897 in New York included dele-
gates from the association of colleges and preparatory schools of
the southern states, recommended books for 1901 and 1902 sub-
ject to the ratification of bodies represented and adjourned to
meet Dec. 29, 1897 in Philadelphia. At the adjourned meeting
seven specific recommendations were made concerning the teach-
ing of English. The fifth meeting held May 29, 1899 in New
York recommended books for 1903, 1904 and 1905.

Reading. Subjects for the academic year beginning

1 Ag 99 Dryden's Palamon and Arcite; Pope's Iliad, books 1, 6,
22, 24; Addison's Sir Roger de Coverley papers; Goldsmith's Vicar
of Wakefield; Scott's Iva/nhoe; De Quincey'e Flight of a Tartar



PROFESSIONAL EDTJCATION IN THD UNITED STATES 45

tribe; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Tennjaon'e Princess; Low-
ell's Tision of Sir Launfal.

1 Ag 1900-01 Shakspere's Merchant of Yemoe; Pope's lUad,
books 1, 6, 22, 24; Addison's Sir Roger de Goverley papers; Gold-
smith's Yicar of WaTcefield; Coleridge's Ancient mariner; Scott's
Ivanhoe; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Tennyson's Princess;
Lowell's Yision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner.

1 Ag 1902-4 Shakespere's Merchant of Venice and JuUus
Caesar; Addison's Sir Roger de Cov&rley papers; Goldsmith's
Yicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Ancient mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe;
Carlyle's Essay on Bums; Tennyson's Princess; Lowell's Yision
of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner.

Study and practice for the academic year beginning

1 Ag 99 Shakspere's Macbeth; Milton's Paradise lost, books 1
and 2; Burke's Speech on conciliation with America; Macaulay's
Essays, on Milton and Addison.

1 Ag 1900 and 1901 Shakespere's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas,
Gomus, L' Allegro and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on conciliation
vMh Anverioa; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison.

1 Ag 1902-4 Shakespere's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Gomus,
L'Allegro and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on conciliation with
America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and AdMson.

Recognition, advanced English 2, English composition 2, rhet-
oric 2, literature 2, total 8.

Association of colleges and preparatory schools of the south-
ern states. Organized 1895^ next meeting 1-3 N. 99, Athens, Ga.,
Sec. J. H. Kirkland, Nashville, Tenn.

The object of the association is to consider the qualifications
for admission to colleges, the methods of admission, the char-
acter of the preparatory schools, the courses of study in college
and school including their order and number, the promotion of
interests common to both. Regular annual meetings are held
in November. Expenses are met by a |5 assessment on each
Institution. Membership is open to any college, high school or
other school preparing students for college in the southern states
on recommendation of the executive committee and assent of the



46 UNIVERSITY OF THH STATE OF NEW YOEK

association at a regular meeting. No college is eligible that
furnishes preparatory instruction in any subject as part of its
college organization, that does not hold written entrance exam-
inations for admission, publish them annually and deposit copies
with the secretary; that admits students under 15 years of age.
Minimum requirements for admission to college binding on
each institution:

English, a part of the requirements of the Association of the

middle states and Maryland ;
History and geography: United States history, general geog-
raphy;
Mathematics: arithmetic and algebra through quadratics, or

algebra to quadratics and three books of plane geometry;
Latin: four books of Caesar and four orations of Cicero (or
their equivalent), with accompanying work in grammar and
prose composition ;
Greek: three books of the Anabasis (or equivalent) with accom-
panying work in grammar and simple prose composition
(operative in 1900).
Examinations in history, geography and English required of
all students except that those pursuing technical studies in not
more than two subjects may be excused; in Latin, Greek and
mathematics of all students expecting to continue these subjects.
No preparatory school that confers degrees is eligible. Roll
of members shows colleges eight, high schools three, others 20,
total 31.

Eecognition, arithmetic, geography and English (grammar),
eight year preacademic; English (composition and literature) 4,
history 2, algebra 4, Latin 10, Greek 6, total 26 counts or two
years academic.

Commission of colleges in New England on admission exam-
inations. Organized 1886, next meeting April 1900. Sec. W. 0.
Poland, Brown univ.. Providence, E. I.

In the spring of 1886, 13 colleges of New England had signi-
fied their willingness to enter the commission as an experiment,
reserving the right of full liberty of action; in April delegates



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES 47

framed rules for the organization, which were referred to the
colleges for sanction, in September the rules had been ratified
by all the colleges and the commission was definitely estab-
lished.

The commission is constituted by the appointment of one dele-
gate from each college to serve for three years.

The functions of the commission are to consider and to recom-
mend to the several faculties such measures as they may deem
expedient to maintain and promote uniformity in the require-
ments for admission to college.

Full liberty of action is reserved to each faculty on all pro-
posals.

Annual meeting in the month of April. Delegates from other
New England colleges admitted on their acceptance of the rules.

The influence of the commission has been widespread and deep
as is shown by the uniformity of requirements for admission to
the various colleges of the commission whose annual catalogues
show what suggestions of the commission have been ratified.

The 15 colleges in the commission for the year 1898 :

Amherst, Boston univ., Bowdoin, Brown univ., Colby univ.,
Dartmouth, Harvard univ., Middlebury univ.. Smith univ., Trin-
ity, Tufts, Wellesley, Wesleyan univ., Williams, Yale univ.

National association of state universities. Organized July
1896, meeting July 1899, Los Angeles, Cal., Sec. Joseph Swain,
Bloomington, Ind.

The purpose of the association is to consider questions relating
to the promotion of higher education in all its forms in the
universities of the several states of the Union, and the discussion
and prosecution of such questions and plans as may tend to make
more efficient in their work the institutions included in the mem-
bership of the association.

At least one meeting is held in each calendar year.

Membership may include all colleges or universities in the
states or territories of the United States which are founded
wholly or in part on those grants of land made by congress to
the states on their admission into the Union, which grants are



48 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

cominonly known as seminary or university grants and any col-
lege or university in any state vphich may be designated and
recognized by the state as the state university.

The following institutions were represented at its organiza-
tion: Universities of California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho,
Indiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, North
Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia,
Washington.

New England association of colleges and preparatory schools.
Organized 1886, next meeting October 1899, Boston, Mass., Sec.



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