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Henry M Hunt.

The crime of the century: or, The assassination of Dr. Patrick Henry Cronin. A complete and authentic history of the greatest of modern conspiracies online

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P




OB,



The Assassination of Dr. Patrick Henry Cronin.



A COMPLETE AND AUTHENTIC HISTORY OF THE
GREATEST OF MODERN CONSPIRACIES.



HENRY M. HUNT,



THE NOTED VQUl.



PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED WITH ORIGINAL ENGRAVINGS.



APART FROM ITS VALUE AS A HISTORY OF A CELEBRATED CASE,

THE STORY ITSELF IS OF THRILLING AND

FASCINATING INTEREST.



COPYRIGHT 1889,

BY
/!,. & D.H.K0CHkR,SPERGER.



PREFACE



This volume is not intended as an addition to
the criminal literature of the country. It has
not been published solely for the pleasure of
those who delight in devouring morbid tales
of crime and criminals. It rather owes
its existence to a general demand from all
parts of the United States, from the Canadas,
from Great Britain, and from many points
on the continent of Europe, for a complete,
concise, and accurate story of one of the
greatest of modern crimes and the events con-
nected therewith. The reports of the public
press, while of the most searching and elaborate
character, have nevertheless been of necessity so
disjointed, fragmentary and confusing, covering a
period of over seven months, each day and
week replete with new discoveries and new
sensations, as to make it well-nigh impossible
for even the most careful reader, with unlim-
ited time at his disposal, to grasp or compre-
hend anything more than the barest outline of this
remarkable case. The object of this volume
therefore, is to present in consecutive form and

M194966 '



PREFACE.

as a complete narrative- all the facts which have
been brought to light from the day of the disappear-
ance of Dr. Cronin, to the close of the trial of
those accused of his murder. Many circumstances
have combined to make the task a difficult and
laborious one, but the results are submitted in
the belief that as the only effort of its kind, it
will prove not only a story of thrilling interest
to the general reader, but also valuable, by its
accuracy and continuity, as an historical work.

THE AUTHOR.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

PAGE.

A Crime That Shocked the Civilized World The Mysterious
Stranger A Sudden Summons The Instincts of Humanity
Triumph over Personal Considerations Last Moments at
Home Parting Words with a Friend Dr. Cronin's Event-
ful Life How He Worked His Way Upward on the Ladder
of Honor and Fame, ........ 15

CHAPTER II.

Dr. Cronin Fails to Return Home Anxiety of His Friends
The Early Morning Ride to the Ice House O' Sullivan's
Surprise and Ignorance The Mysterious Wagon and Its
Occupants A Bloody Trunk is Found The Search Com-
menced "It is His Hair," . . . . . .27

CHAPTER III.

An Accidental Clue Frank Woodruff's Arrest How He Was
Hired to Get a Wagon to Carry the Mysterious Trunk to
Lake View A Corpse is Dumped Out He Thinks It was
That of a Woman His Sensational Confession The
Police on a Wild-Goose Chase, . . . . .46

CHAPTER IV.

"It is a Conspiracy" Dr. Cronin's Friends Claim the Murder
was a Political Assassination The Public Skeptical until
Startling Developments Are Made The Physician in
Danger of His Life for Years Previous Attempts to
Remove Him The Trouble in the Clan-na-Gael Charges
and Counter Charges The Buffalo Convention Why His
"Removal" became a Necessity to Certain People, . 57

vii



Vlll CONTENTS.

CHAPTER V.

PAGE.

Strange Influences at Work Miss Anna Murphy Thinks She
Saw the Doctor on a Street Car His Long and Mysterious
Ride with Conductor Dwyer Reporter Long also Encoun-
ters Him, This Time in Toronto The Police and Public
Satisfied, but His Friends Still Anxious Efforts to Prove
Him a British Spy A Big Reward Offered, . . . 101

CHAPTER VI.

Hoping against Hope The Stench in the Sewer " Murder
Will Out" A Ghastly Discovery Where the Body was
Found The Recognition by Captain Wing Its Horrible
Appearance Evidences of a Foul Crime The Corpse at
the Morgue Pitiable Scenes of Grief The Official Autopsy
The Brutal Way in Which the Physician had been Done
to Death, 126

CHAPTER VII.

The Crime Creates An International Sensation Discovery of
the Lonely Cottage Where the Irish Nationalist Met His
Death Evidences of a Terrible Struggle The Tell-Tale
Blood Stains and Broken Furniture The Mysterious
Tenants and Their Movements The Furniture Bought
and Carted to the Assassins' Den What Milkman Mertes
Saw The Plot as Outlined by the Surroundings Iceman
O'Sullivan Under Surveillance, . . . . . 154

CHAPTER VIII.

The White Horse and Buggy Detective Coughlin Hires It
for a "Friend" The Trouble in the Stable Dinan Goes
to Schaack The Captain's Peculiar Movements Scanlan
Identifies the Horse The Detective and O'Sullivan are
Jailed The Grand Jury Indicts Them with Woodruff
The Accused Arraigned in Court, ..... 195

CHAPTER IX.

The Lying in State An Impressive Scene The Imposing
Procession At the Cathedral An Eloquent Voice from
the Pulpit Clerical Denunciation of the Crime Laid to
Rest in Calvary Cemetery, ..... 220



CONTENTS. IX

CHAPTER X.

PAGE.

The Coroner's Inquest Opens A Model Jury Visiting the
Scene of the Tragedy Taking the Evidence Captain
Schaack's Compromising Admissions Prominent Clan-na-
Gael Men put on the Stand Alexander Sullivan's Threats
Luke Dillon Tells What He Knows The Documents
Left by the Murdered Man Read by the Coroner A Sensa-
tional Inquiry, . . . ..... 236

CHAPTER XI.

Closing Scenes of the Inquest The Verdict Alexander Sul-
livan's Arrest Ordered Midnight Visit to His Residence
His Cool Demeanor and Cheerful Acquiescence Taken to
the County Jail Incidents of the Arrest. . . . 259

CHAPTER XII.

At the Toronto End of the Conspiracy Investigating Long's
Circumstantial Stories, and His Interviews with Dr. Cronin
A Chicago Fugitive Concerned His Suspicious Move-
ments A Chapter of Startling Coincidences Long on the
Rack Makes Damaging Admissions but will not Retract
The Object to Distract Attention from the Scene of the
Crime Another Confession from Woodruff, . . 275

CHAPTER XIII.

Sullivan's Arrest Creates a Sensation His Friends Stand by
Him The Noted ex-Irish Leader in Court Efforts to Secure
His Release Judge Tuley Gives Him His Liberty Arrest
of Maroney and McDonald in New York Their Extradition
Refused, 292

CHAPTER XIV.

Officer Collin's Suspicions Martin Burke and His Record For-
tunate Discovery of the Photograph of a Clan-na-Gael
Group The Carlsons and Others Identify Burke His
Peculiar Movements and His Flight An Indictment against
Him The Capture in Winnipeg, when En Route to Eng-
land Stubborn Fight to Prevent His Extradition to Ameri-
can Soil The Law Triumphant A Memorable Journey
Home Preliminaries of the Trial A Separate Trial
Granted Woodruff, . . 303



X CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XV.

PAGE.

Theories Regarding the Disappearance of the Murdered Man's
Clothing The Hand of Providence Manifests Itself For-
tunate Discovery of the Last Bloody Evidences of the Crime
Dr. Cronin's Apparel is Found It had been Secreted,
with His Case of Surgical Instruments, in a Catch-basin,
Adjacent to the One in Which the Body was Discovered
Shoes, Jewelry and Purse Missing Complete Identification
by His Friends The Search Continued A Piece of Carpet
Found The Conspirators' Plans Thwarted, . . . 333

CHAPTER XVI.

Special Grand Jury Summoned Personnel of Its Members
Judge Shepard's Vigorous Charge The Testimony Taken
Seventeen DaysMnvestigation Results in the Indictment of
Seven Men Full Text of the Indictment Arrest of Beggs
and Kunze The Alleged Trial of Dr. Cronin in Camp 20, 351

CHAPTER XVII.

Public Abhorrence at the Crime. A Great Out-pouring of the
People Cosmopolitan Assemblage at Central Music Hall
A Judge's Vigorous Speech Congressmen Denounce the
Crime The Rival Demonstrations at Cheltenham Beach
and Ogden's Grove ........ 369

CHAPTER XVIII.

In Court at Last The State's Attorney Points Out the Accused,
Man by Man A Formidable Array of Legal Talent Objec-
tions to Luther Laflin Mills and his Associates Over-ruled
by the Court Weeks consumed in the Wearisome Task of
Securing a Jury Scenes and Incidents .... 384

CHAPTER XIX.

Startling Interruption to the Trial Villainous Attempt to Frus-
trate the Ends of Justice Bold Efforts to Bribe the Special
Veniresmen in the Interest of the Prisoners A " Hung"
Jury Wanted Fortunate Discovery of the Plot The "Wheels
Within Wheels " of the Conspiracy Prompt Action of the
Prosecuting Authorities Speedy Arrest and Indictment of
the Guilty Parties Crime Added to Crime .... 399



CONTENTS. XI

CHAPTER XX.

PAGE.

A Jury Secured at Last Names and Sketches of the Twelve
Men Selected to Determine the Guilt of the Accused The
Trial Under Way Opening Speeches for the State Scenes
in the Court Room ........ 414

CHAPTER XXI.

Evidence for the State The Story of the Crime Retold A Long
Line of Witnesses Sensational Disclosures and Missing
Links Supplied Mrs. Hcertel's Graphic Story Dr. Cronin's
Knives are Found and Produced in Court A Masterly
Grouping of the Testimony Against the Prisoners . . 430"

CHAPTER XXII.

The Defense Takes its Turn Unsuccessful Efforts to Exclude the
Bulk of the Evidence Given for the State Alibis for the
Prisoners and the White Horse A General Denial of Com-
plicity in the Tragedy Rebuttal Evidence for the Prosecu-
tion 457

CHAPTER XXIII.

Opening for the State The Evidence Reviewed A Masterly
Argument by State's Attorney Longenecker Tracing the
Plot from its Inception to the Murder An Appeal for Jus-
tice Arguments for the Defense Donahoe, Wing, Foster
and Forrest make Their Final Pleas for the Prisoners, and
Ingham, Hynes and Longenecker Close for the State . 470

CHAPTER XXIV.

All the Testimony Before the Jury Judge McConnell's Lucid
Charge The Jury Retires A Period of Anxiety Popular
Excitement at its Height Demeanor f the Prisoners
Suspense at Last Ended The Verdict . . . 563



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PORTRAIT OF DR. PATRICK HENRY CRONIN, THE MURDERED

PHYSICIAN Frontispiece.

PORTRAIT OF PATRICK O'SULLIVAN, THE ICE MAN, ONE OF THE
DEFENDANTS ......... 28

PORTRAIT OF DANIEL COUGHLIN, THE DETECTIVE, ONE OF THE

DEFENDANTS 197

PORTRAIT OF MARTIN BURKE, ONE OF THE DEFENDANTS . . 315
PORTRAIT OF JOHN F. BEGGS, ONE OF THE DEFENDANTS . . 360
PORTRAIT OF JOHN KUNZE, ONE OF THE DEFENDANTS . . 367
O'SULLIVAN AND KUNZE, FROM PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN DURING

TRIAL 392

PORTRAIT OF PATRICK COONEY, "THE Fox" . . 452

PORTRAIT OF SUPT. OF POLICE HUBBARD .... 210

PORTAIT OF OFFICER DANIEL BROWN ..... 354
PORTRAITS OF MR. AND MRS. T. T. CONKLIN . . . .39

PORTRAIT OF ALEXANDER SULLIVAN 263

PORTRAIT OF MERTES, THE MILKMAN 187

PORTRAITS OF FIVE DEFENDANTS ON TRIAL .... 429

PORTRAITS OF THE Six PRISONERS IN COURT .... 332

PORTRAITS OF THE TWELVE JURYMEN .... 416-417

PORTRAIT OF JUDGE MCCONNELL, PRESIDING AT THE MEMORABLE
TRIAL .......... 456

PORTRAIT OF JOEL M. LONGENECKER, THE STATE'S ATTORNEY . 469
PORTRAIT OF LUTHER LAFLIN MILLS (THE NOTED CRIMINAL

LAWYER), FOR THE PROSECUTION 550

PORTRAIT OF GEORGE C. INGHAM, ATTORNEY FOR THE PROSECU-
TION 514

PORTRAIT OF W. J. HYNES, ATTORNEY FOR THE PROSECUTION . 521
PORTRAIT OF W. S. FORREST, LEADING ATTORNEY FOR THE

DEFENSE . . 536

PORTRAIT OF JUDGE WiNG) ATTORNEY FOR THE DEFENSE , 512

xii



ILLUSTRATIONS. Xlll



PAGE.

PORTRAITS OF THREE OF THE CARLSON FAMILY . . .168
PORTRAITS OF PRINCIPAL WITNESSES BEFORE THE CORONER'S

INQUEST . . 254

PORTRAIT OF DE?-ECTIVE MICHAEL WHALEN . . . 206

PORTRAIT OF DETECTIVE BARNEY FLYNN .... 464

PORTRAIT OF LAWRENCE R. BUCKLEY 242

PORTRAIT OF T. P. O'CONNOR 244

PORTRAIT OF P. M'GEHAN 247

THE COURT ROOM, SHOWING THE GREAT TRIAL IN PROGRESS . 413
THE CARD OF SULLIVAN ICE Co., THAT LURED DR. CRONIN

FROM HIS HOME ON THE NlGHT OF THE Muk"DER~ . . 2O

THE MYSTERIOUS WAGON 31

DETECTIVES INSPECTING THE SPOT WHERE THE TRUNK WAS

FOUND 42

THE BLOODY TRUNK AND ITS CONTENTS . . . .35
PICTURE OF DR. CRONIN TAKEN AFTER HE WAS FOUND IN

THE CATCH-BASIN WITH THE " AGNUS DEI " ON BREAT: . 135
SCENE AT THE MORGUE, SHOWING THE BODY LYING ON SLAB

AND BEING IDENTIFED BY SCANLAN AND CONKLIN . 140
THE SPOT WHERE THE TRUNK WAS FOUND . . .33
THE SKULL OF DR. CRONIN, SHOWING THE WOUNDS . . 143
THE BROKEN ROCKER ON WHICH DR. CRONIN PROBABLY SAT

WHEN KILLED 161

BLOOD-STAINED PIECE OF BRASS 161

THE SOLITARY LAMP ........ 161

THE CATCH-BASIN SOUTH VIEW 127

THE CATCH-BASIN, SHOWING FIRE-PLUG AND DITCH . . 129
THE DISCOVERY OF THE BODY IN THE CATCH-BASIN . . 131
ALEXANDER SULLIVAN'S RESIDENCE ..... 264

THE ASSASSINS' DEN, SHOWING THE CARLSON COTTAGE IN

REAR 157

DIAGRAM OF THE LOCALITY OF THE MURDER . . .156

FOOTPRINT FOUND IN HOUSE 160

THE CORONER'S JURY .... ... 239

JURORS EXAMINING FINGER MARKS IN PAINT ON WINDOW

BLIND .... . . 245

JURORS EXAMINING BLOOD STAINS IN PARLOR OF COTTAGE . 238
THE WHITE HORSE AND BUGGY THAT TOOK DR. CRONIN

AWAY FROM His HOME , , , , , , , 199



XIV ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE.

LIVERYMAN DINAN'S STABLE 198

THE FUNERAL PROCESSION 223

DR. CRONIN'S APARTMENTS IN WINDSOR THEATRE BUILDING . 18
DR. CRONIN'S RECEPTION ROOM IN CHICAGO OPERA HOUSE

BUILDING . 184

DR. CRONIN'S OFFICE IN CHICAGO OPERA HOUSE BUILDING . 181
DR. CRONIN'S MAIN OFFICE IN CHICAGO OPERA HOUSE BUILD-
ING ........... 183

STATE'S ATTORNEY LONGENECKER ADDRESSING THE COURT . 296

DR. CRONIN'S Box AND ITS CONTENTS 337

THE LOAD ON THE STRETCHER . . . . . .338

SOME OF DR. CRONIN'S CLOTHES 340

Two VIEWS OF DR. CRONIN'S HAT . . . . 341

DR. CRONIN'S POCKET INSTRUMENT CASE . . . 342

DR. CRONIN'S SLEEVE BUTTON, COMB, R. A. BUTTON, CASE,

ETC. ... -343
DR. CRONIN'S POCKET CASE . -345
REMAINS OF THE MURDERER'S VALISE- . . 346
THE SILVER HYPODERMIC SYRINGE CASE . . 347
DR. CRONIN'S SURGICAL INSTRUMENT CASE . . 348
THE ENGLISH PRESCRIPTION BOOK . . . 349
THE JUDGE HEARS OF THE JURY-BRIBING PLOT . 401
THE KNIVES 466



CHAPTER I.

A CRIME THAT SHOCKED THE CIVILIZED WORLV

THE MYSTERIOUS STRANGER A SUDDEN

SUMMONS THE INSTINCTS OF HUMANITY

TRIUMPH OVER PERSONAL CONSIDERATIONS

LAST MOMENTS AT HOME PARTING

WORDS V/TTH A FRIEND DR. CRONIN^S

EVENTFUL LIFE HOW HE WORKED HIS WAY

UPWARD ON THE LADDER OF HONOR AND
FAME.



Little introduction to this volume is needed.
It is the story told in plain unvarnished words,
so that everyone who reads may understand
of a crime that has shocked the people of the
United States, and astounded the civilized
world. Back of that crime was a conspiracy so
wide in its ramifications, so cunningly contrived,
so successfully executed, as to rival the diaboli-
cal plots and outgrowing tragedies that have
been placed at the doors of the secret societies
of France, Italy and Spain, by the historians of
the Dark Ages. In the United States, as an
event of national importance, the crime may be
said to rank with the assassinations of Presi-



15



l6 THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY.

dents Lincoln and Garfield. In the case of the
former, as of the latter, the perpetrator of the
crime was a half crazed enthusiast, who imag-
ined that he had a mission to perform in tak-
ing the life of the Chief Magistrate of the Re-
public. An effort was made, it is true, to de-
monstrate the fact that the assassin of Abraham
Lincoln was but the tool of a band of conspir-
ators, but, despite the fact that fivo of his al-
leged accomplices suffered an ignominious death
upon the scaffold upon conviction for complicity
in the appalling crime, the question as to the
actual existence of a conspiracy has remained
to this day a mooted one. In the case of
President Garfield there was not even a sugges-
tion that the assassin acted upon other than his
own insane impulse. So far as concerns the
Haymarket horror in Chicago, the point as to
whether the throwing of the bomb that echoed
ground the world was the outcome of a con-
spiracy, or the act of an individual who had
inbibed anarchistic principles and doctrines un-
til reason had been dethroned, and a desire for
vengeance upon the supposed enemies of the
proletaire had generated into an uncontrollable
determination, is still unsettled in the minds of
many people eminently well versed in the law;
as well as in those of a goodly proportion of the
masses. So far, however, as the tragic fate of



THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY. 17

^r. Cronin is concerned, no such doubt may be
3did to exist. That he fell a victim to a plot,
remarkable in its conception and execution;
conceived in shrewdness and forthought, and
executed by the aid of far-reaching and elabor-
ate machinery; and with remorseless precision, is
beyond peradventure. But it serves no pur-
pose to anticipate. The following chapters
tell their own story of the manner and methods
by which the murder of a law-abiding American
citizen, prominent in his profession and of na-
tional reputation, was decreed and carried out.
It was the first crime of its character in the
history of the United States. It will probably
be the last.

THE DISAPPEARANCE.

The locality was Chicago. The date Satur-
day, May 4th, in the year of our Lord one
thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine. The
time eight o'clock of the evening. Philip Pat-
rick Henry Cronin for this was the full name
of the physician was closeted with a patient
in the most spacious of the front suite of rooms
attached to a handsomely furnished flat directly
over the Windsor Theatre on North Clark
Street. The tenants of the flat, T. T. Conklin,
a well-known saloon keeper, and his wife, were
among his most intimate and confidental friends,



i8




DR. CRONIN'S APARTMENTS IN WINDSOR THEATRE BUILDING.



THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY. 19

and with them the physician, who was a con-
rmed bachelor, had resided so long that he was
regarded, to all intents and purposes, as one of
the family. They nursed him in sickness?
studied his every requirement when in health,
and in a great measure, shared with him his
personal and political knowledge. It was a
happy, congenial family in every sense of
the term. Dr. Cronin was on the point of dis-
missing the patient, for an important meeting of
the Celto-American Society, which published a
paper of which he was the political editor, ne-
cessitated his hurrying away to the other side
of the city, when the door-bell rang violently.
Mrs. Conklin responded. A man pale and
breathless, stood on the landing.

"Is Dr. Cronin in?" he demanded, in a hur-
ried, nervous manner.

"Yes," was the reply, "but he is busy with
a patient."

"Well," responded the stranger with increasing
nervousness. "I want to see him. It is a
matter of life or death."

Some fragments of the conversation had pene-
trated to the office where the physician was
giving a final injunction to his patient. He
threw open the door and came out into the
vestibule.

"What is the matter?" he asked.



2O



THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY.



"Doctor" said the strange visitor as he pre-
sented a card, "one of the workmen at P. O 'Sulli-
van's ice house at Lake View, has met with an
accident and been terribly injured about here "
(indicating the abdomen by a wave of his hand).
"Unless a doctor sees him at once," he went on
in his hurried, nervous, manner, "he will die.
O'Sullivan is out of town, but he has spoken
so often of you and said that you should be
called in case of an accident that I thought
I'd better come to you,"

Dr. Cronin glanced at the card. .It was a
fac-simile of tms.



SULLIVAN ICE COMPANY,

Private Families and Others supplied with the best Table




H3E HOUSES AT SILVER LAKE, WIS.



THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY. 21

For a moment he twirled it between his
finger and thumb. Then he looked at his
watch. It was near the hour for the meeting,
in the proceedings of which he was liable to
take a prominent part. But the humane in-
stincts of the profession quickly overcame all
other considerations.

"One moment" he ejaculated, "and I will
be with you."

"I have a buggy and fast horse downstairs"
called out the stranger.

Dr. Cronin darted into his office. Hastily
gathering up his surgical instruments, he packed
them into their case. A package of lint and
absorbent cotton was pushed down into his
pocket. Then he reappeared and with the
remark "I am ready," made for the stairs.
The unknown went down in advance and the
doctor followed. At the curb, with a white
horse in the shafts, was the buggy that was to
take the physician on his supposed errand of
mercy. As he reached the street, he came
vis-a-vis with Frank T. Scanlan, Jr., a prominent
young Irish-American, who had previously ar-
ranged to call for and accompany him to the
meeting.

"Are you ready" the latter asked.

"No," was Dr. Cronin's reply. "I'm called
away on an accident case."



22 THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY.

The stranger was already in the buggy.
"There's no time to lose," he called out, and
the ejaculation caused Scanlan to turn his head
in that direction. He was startled for a mo-
ment by the look of fiendish rage with which
the fellow was regarding him. Before he could
say a word, however, Dr. Cronin had taken his
seat in the vehicle. A whip cut through the
air and descended on the animal's back, and as
it started off the physician called out to his
friend, who still stood on the sidewalk:

"I may get down town in an hour, but don't
wait for me. I really don't know how long
this case may occupy me."

Man proposes, but God disposes. It was the
physican's last farewell to his home and his
friends. The white horse sped into the dark-
ness and each revolution of the wheels of the
vehicle carried one of it$ occupants nearer his
doom.

THE STORY OF HIS LIFE.

It is necessary to digress a moment at this
point in order that something may be said re-
garding the previous history of the man whose
name was soon to be ,on millions of tongues.
Born on August 7th, 1846, on Erin's soil, near
the town of Mallow, in the famed county of
Cork, he was brought to the United States



THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY. 23

when yet a babe in his mother's arms. For five
years thereafter he was numbered among the popu-
lation of New York City. Thence the family
moved to Baltimore, and thence again to the
province of Ontario. When ten years of age he
was placed in the care of the Christian Brothers
at the Academy of St. Catherines. He graduated
with honors in 1863, and, a boy of seventeen,
started out to battle with the world. His first
wages were earned at Petroleum City, Pa., where
he taught school. From here he went to Titus-
ville and thence to Clearfield, in the same state,
where in 1866 he held a good position in a store.
But he was restless and ambitious.

There was no charm from his point of view
in the plodding life of a country school teacher or
store keeper. He wanted to make his way in the
world and he realized that in order to accomplish
this it would be necessary to take the historic ad-
vice of Horace Greeley and 4t go west." Accord-
ingly, late in the fall of 1867 he bade farewell to
the many friends and acquaintances he had made
in the oil regions and departed for Missouri. He
first located in a country town, but after a short
stay removed again to St. Louis. Here he secured
a position in the store 0f Michael Dougherty, a
grocer. Those who came in contact with him at
that time remembered him in after years as a
young man of pleasing presence, fine attainments



24 THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY.

and a remarkably good musician. He was es-
pecially a fine tenor singer, and soon after his ar-
rival he became a member of the choir of the
Catholic Church of St. John's. The numerous ser-
vices and consequent rehearsals, however, con-
flicted materially with his work at the store, and
as a result he secured another position as super-
intendent of omnibuses for a local transfer con-
cern. Meanwhile he had been industriously en-
gaged in the study of pharmacy, and so well did
he combine this craving after knowledge with com-
mendable prudence and economy, that after awhile
he was enabled to become a full fledged druggist
with a store of his own on Garrison street, ad-
jacent to Easton avenue. Even then, however,
he was not satisfied. He aimed still higher,
and immediately begun the study of medicine
at the Missouri College. From this institution
he graduated in 1878, and, relinquishing the drug
business, entered upon the practice of his newly
chosen profession. Meanwhile he had identified
himself with the local militia, and held the rank
of captain at the time of the strike in 1877.
Shortly after his graduation he was appointed a
commissioner to the Paris exposition. The next
twelvemonths were passed abroad, a goodly por-
tion of that period being spent in Dublin and



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