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'he New Vor!
'-Jblic Librar.



SERMONS



BT



HENRY MELYILL, B.D.,

MINISTEE OF CAMDEN CHAPEL, CAMBEEWELL, AND CHAPLAIN TO THE TO^TOB OF LONDON ;
FOKMEaLY FELLOW AND TUTOa OF ST. PETEe's COLLEGE, CAMBEIDGE.



COMPRISING



^11 t^e giscottoes fitblisljeir bjj Constnt of i\t %Vii\u.



EDITED BY,

EIGHT EEY. C. PrM'ILVAINE, D. D.,

BISHOP OF THE PEOTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHUECH IN THE DIOCESE OF OHIO.



IK TWO VOLUMES.



VOLUME I,



N I }T T B THOUSAND



STANFORD AND SWORDS, 137, BROADWAY.

1853.



TO THE

CONGREGATION OF CAMDEN CHAPEL.

C A M B E R W E L L ,

In acknowledgment of many kindnesses shown him, through years of heahh, and
months of sickness ; and in the hope that what is now published may help to
strengthen them for duty, and comfort them in trial, this volume is inscribed witb
every sentiment of christian affection, by their faithful friend and pastor,

THE AUTHOR.



PREFACE.

The Author has selected the following sermons for publication, frora having
observed that passages of Sciipture which may more easily be overlooked, as
presenting nothing very prominent, prove especially interesting to an audience
when shown to be " profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for in-
struction in righteousness." He has material in hand for another volume of the
like kind, and may hereafter commit it to the press, if he should have reason to
think that the present has proved acceptable.

Cambxbwcll, Jaauary, 1843.




IRK
^ U3RARY1



15990



CONTENTS OF VOLUME I.



EDITOR'S PREFACE .... .... 5

SERMON I.— THE FIRST PROPHECY 9

SERMON II.— CHRIST THE MINISTER OF THE CHURCH - - - - 20

SERMON III.— THE IMPOSSIBILITY OF CREATURE MERIT - - - - 30

SERMON IV.— THE HUMILIATION OF THE xMAN CHRIST JESUS - - - 40
SERMON v.— THE DOCTRINE OF THE RESURRECTION VIEWED IN CONNEC-
TION WITH THAT OF THE SOUL'S IMMORTALITY - - 51
SERMON VI.— THE POWER OF WICKEDNESS AND RIGHTEOUSNESS TO REPRO-
DUCE THEMSELVES - - - - 61

SERMON VIE— THE POWER OF RELIGION TO STRENGTHEN THE HUMAN IN-
TELLECT- - - - 71

SERMON VIII.— THE PROVISION MADE BY GOD FOR THE POOR - - . 83

SERMON IX.— ST. PAUL A TENT-MAKER 93

SERMON X.— THE ADVANTAGES OF A STATE OF EXPECTATION - - - lo:i

SERMON XI.— TRUTH AS IT IS IN JESUS 114

SERMON XII.— THE DIFFICULTIES OF SCRIPTURE - - - . - 124

SERMONS PREACHED BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, FEBRUARY, 1836.

SERMON I.— THE GREATNESS AND CONDESCENSION OF GOD - - 13K

SERMON II.— THE TERMINATION OF THE MEDI.ATORIAL KINGDOM - - 145
SERMON III— THE ADVANTAGES RESULTING FROM THE POSSESSION OF THE

SCRIPTURES l.=,2

SERMON IV.— NEGLECT OF THE GOSPEL FOLLOWED BY ITS REMOVAL - leO

SPITAL SERMON.— PREACHED BEFORE THE LORD MAYOR &c. IN CHRIST

CHURCH, NEWGATE-STREET, APRIL, 1831 - - - 1G8

SERMONS PREACHED IN GREAT ST. MARY'S CHURCH, CAMBRIDGE,

AT THE EVENING LECTURE IN FEBRUARY, 1836 AND 1837-

SERMON (183G.)— THE GREATNESS OF SALVATION AN ARGUMENT FOR THE

PERIL OF ITS NEGLECT 179

SERMON.— ON THE EFFECTS OF CONSIDERATION 187

SERMON(1837.)— THE TWO SONS - 198

SERMON— THE DISPERSION AND RESTORATION OF THE JEWS - - - 207

SERMONS PREACHED BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, FEBRUARY, 1837.

SERMON I.— THE.UNNATURALNESS OF DISOBEDIENCE TO THE GOSPEL - 218

SER.MON II.— SONGS IN THE NIGHT 225

SERMON III.— TESTIMONY CONFIRMED BY EXPERIENCE - - - - 232

SERMON IV.— THE GENERAL RESURRECTION AND JUDGMENT - - - 240
SERMON.— THE ANCHOR OF THE SOUL, PREACHED AT TRINITY CHURCH,
CHELSEA, JULY, 1836, IN BEHALF OF THE EPISCOPAL FLOATING

CHAPEL - 247

SERMON —THE DIVINE PATIENCE EXHAUSTED THROUGH THE MAKING

VOID THE LAW - - - - 2.55

SERMON .—THE STRENGTH WHICH FAITH GAINS BY EXPERIENCE - 266



MISCELLANEOUS SERMONS.



SERMON I.— JACOB'S VISION AND VOW



SER.MoN II —THE CONTINUED AGENCY OF THE FATHER AND THE SON - 287

SER.MON HI.— THE RE8URRKCTI0N OF DRY BONES ... - 29G

SER.MON IV.— PROTESTANTISM AND POPERY 307

SER.MON v.— CHRISTIANITY A SWORD - - ... 319

SERMON VI.— THE DEATH OF MOSES - 328

SERMON VII. —THE ASCENSION OF CHRIST - . . . - 338

SERMON VIII.— THE SPIRIT UPON THE WATERS ... 348

SF.R.MON IX.— THE PROPORTION OF GRACE TO TRIAL - - - 359

SERMON X.— PLEADING BEFORE THE MOUNTAINS - - . 370

SERMON XI.— HEAVEN 381

SERMON XII.— GOD'S WAY IN THE SANCTUARY - - 394

SERMON XIII.— EyUITY OF THE FUTURE RETRIBUTION - ^ - - 406



'276



EDITOR S PREFACE



The author of these discourses is well known in England as an eloquent and earnest preacher
of the Gospel, " EnN-y itself," says the British Critic, " must acknowledge his great abilities and
great eloquence." After having occupied the highest standing, while an under-graduate of the
University of Cambridge, he was chosen to a Fellowship in St. Peter's College, and, for some time,
was a tutor to that Society Thence he was called to the pastoral charge of Camden Chapel, (a pro-

?rietary chapel,) in the overgrown parish of Camberwell, one of the populous suburbs of London,
he first twelve discourses in this volume were preached in that pulpit, and the rest, while he was
connected therewith. It has not unfrequently been the privilege of the Editor to worship and
iialen, in company with the highly interesting and intelligent congregation that crowds the pews
and aisles, and every corner of a standing-place in that edifice; fully participating in that entire
and delightful captivity of mind in which their beloved pastor is wont to lead the whole mass (/
Ilia immerous auditory.

Melvill is not yet what is usually called a middle-aged man. His constitution and physic^
powers are feeble. His lungs and chest needing constant care and protection, often seem deter
mined to submit no longer to the efforts they are required to make in keeping pace with his high-
wrought and intense animation. The hearer sometimes Hstens with pain lest an instrument so
fi^il, and struck by a spirit so nerved with the excitement of the most inspiring themes, should
suddenly break some silver cord, and put to silence a harper whose notes of thunder, and strains
of warning, invitiition. and tenderness, the church is not prepared to lose. Generally, however,
one thinks but little of the speaker while hearing Melvill. The manifest defects of a very peculiar
delivery, both as regards its action and intonation : (if that may be called action which is the mere
quivering and jerking of a body too intensely excited to be quiet a moment) — the evident feebleness
and exhaustion of a frame charged to the brim with an earnestness which seems laboring to find a tongue
in every limb, while it keeps in strain and rapid action every muscle and fibre, are forgotten, after a
little progress of tlie discourse, in the rapid and swelling current of thought in which the hearer is
carried along, wholly engrossed with the new aspects, the rich and glowing scenery, the bold promi
nences and beautiful landscapes of truth, remarkable both for variety and unity, with which every
turn of the stream delights him. But then one must make haste, if he would see all. Melvill de-
livers his discourses as a war-horse rushes to the charge. He literally runs, till for want of breath
he can do so no longer. His involuntary pauses are as convenient to his audience as essential to
himself Then it is, that an equally breathless audience, betraying the most convincing signs of
having forgotten to breathe, commence their preparation for the next outset with a degree of unan-
imity and of business-like effort of adjustment, which can hardly fail of disturbing, a little, a strang-
er's gravity,

There is a peculiarity in the composition of Melvill's congregation which contributes ranch to
give peculiarity to his discourses. His chapel is a centre to which hearers flock, drawn by the re-
putation of the preacher, not only from all the neighborhood, but from divers parts of the great me-
tropolis, bringin'' und



Online LibraryHenry MelvillSermons (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 76)