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of the Anawan on North Main street, the Pocasset on Pleasant
and the Massasoit on Freedom were erected in 1874, the
Quequechan on Prospect street in 1875, and the present
Niagara, on Plymouth avenue, in 1878. The Cascade house
on South Main street replaced, in 1898, a structure put up by
the town of Tiverton in the 50s.

The more recent fire department buildings and apparatus
are : the Bogle Hill station on Pleasant street, erected in
1899, and occupied by Engine No. 9 ; a building corner South
Main and Howe streets, erected in 1899, and occupied by
combined hose and chemical apparatus No. 10 ; the High-
land station, erected in 1909, used by a combination ladder
and chemical truck.

The first Cascade auto equipment was installed Septem-
ber, 1909, and an auto combination hose was added in the
same building in April, 1911.

91



The building at Maplewood was erected in 1910 and Hose
No. 11 installed in it February, 1911.

Before 1829 the firemen were in charge of ten wardens
elected annually. In that year the' number was increased to
20, and in 1832 a fire department was formally established.
After that time, members of companies received a small yearly
compensation. The first permanent man was appointed in
in 1860, as driver of Steamer No. 1, in Court Square. It was
his duty, on an alarm, to take two horses belonging to the
street department, and drive to the fire. Two additional
drivers were appointed in 1865, and took turns at highway
work with their teams. In 1873, the three men and their
horses were placed permanently on duty at the engine houses.
The next year, permanent engineers were appointed, and in
1886 a captain and hoseman for each engine. In 1894 the
captains of all fire companies were made permanent, and since
then the department has rapidly been brought to its present
efficiency. It now has 126 permanent and 29 call men.

The fire alarm telegraph system was installed in 1870,
and the first alarm given from box 16 on Jan. 27. The first
chemical engine was bought in 1872 and the first extension
truck of the aerial type in 1875, and first piece of automobile
fire apparatus was bought in 1909.

The department came under the control of the fire com-
mission when the city charter went into effect in 1903.

The dates of some of the more notable fires are: "The
Great Fire", July 2, 1843; the Empire State, Jan. 13, 1849;
the Micah Ruggles house, Jan. 24, 1857; Globe Print Works,
Dec. 5, 1867; American Print Works, Dec. 15, 1867; Massasoit
Steam Mill, Nov. 2, 1875 ; Granite Mills, Sept. 19, 1874 ;
American Linen, June 29, 1876; Border City No. 1, Nov. 17,
1877; Chace's thread mill, Nov. 29, 1878; Flint Mill, Oct. 28,
1882 ; Sagamore, April 24, 1884 ; Langley's loom harness
factory, (following a boiler explosion which killed four per-
sons) June 14, 1895.



92



POLICE DEPARTMENT

The police department was established in 1844, when a
nig-ht watch of six men was authorized. On the adoption of
a city charter, a chief constable was appointed at $1.50 a day,
with seven day assistants and eight nig-ht men. The title was
changed to city marshal in 1857. By 1872 the force had been
increased to 28 men, 22 of whom were on night duty. More
men were added in 1873 and 1874, increasing the number to
70. On the opening of the northern, southern, and eastern
stations, in 1874, the city was divided into four districts, and
the hours of duty so arranged as not to leave the city un-
guarded for three hours during the day, as had formerly
been the practice. The patrol wagon system went into effect
in 1890, and late in 1910, the horse-drawn wagon was replaced
by an automobile. The department was placed under a com-
mission in 1894, and now numbers 154 men.

The early headquarters were in the Central street town
house, later in the basement of city hall, and since 1857 in the
present building on Court Square, now Purchase street,
though this was shared with the fire and highway depart-
ments till the former was withdrawn in 1875 and the latter
in 1879. The structure was then remodelled with rooms on
the second floor for the district court, which continued to be
used till January, 1911. The police department was then
given the use of the entire building.



93



Bowenville extended from Cedar street to President
avenue, west of North Main street. The Raih-oad Station
formerly standing at the foot of Old Colony Avenue v^as
called Bowenville.

Farmville extended from President avenue to George
street, west of North Main street, north of this was "Slade's
Ferry". After the construction of the Mechanics Mills
in 1868, the name Farmville by common consent became
Mechanicsville.

Steep Brook included the section from present Baldwin
street northerly to Miller's Cove, from the shore as far castas
the present Highland avenue.

Globe Village (in Tiverton) was the section having its
center near the junction of present South Main street and
Globe street.

Mt. Hope Village was the section near the Mt. Hope
(now Conanicut) Mill.

Harrison ville adjoined Pleasant street near the loca-
tion of Fourteenth street.

New Boston included the section on both sides of what
are now New Boston road, Willow, Ruth, and Meridian streets
as well as that portion of Wilson road east of Highland avenue
as far as the pond.

Oak Grove Village comprises a section on both sides of
Oak Grove Avenue from London street north to Oak Grove
Cemetery, extending east to Freelove street.

Bigberry, the point of land jutting into the Quequechan
river near present Sixteenth street.

"Mosquito Island" the location of the Wamsutta Steam
Mills, now Massasoit Manufacturing Company, south of
Pleasant street.

Rattlesnake Hill, section near the present location of
Watuppa Freight Station.

Newville, section near Sucker Brook and Stafford road,
now included in "Maplewood".

"Happy Hollow" was the ravine extending from Bay
street to Mt. Hope Bay near present Birch street. This was
a favorite resort for Sunday school picnics.

94



Adirondac Grove was on the easterly shore of North
Watuppa pond near the present Fall River- Westport line.
Excursions by steamer from a landing near the present Troy
building were popular until 1872 when the construction of
bridges across Quequechan river made the passage impractic-
able.

''Scotch Hole" a section near the present junction of
Quequechan, Jefferson and Warren streets.

Flint Village included the section from County street
(formerly Old Bedford road) southerly to Quequechan river
and from Quequechan street easterly to Eastern avenue.

Town pump stood at southeast corner of city hall and
was used until introduction of city water.

Indian Town, is the section east of North Watuppa pond
extending from the Westport line northerly about one mile,
deriving its name from an Indian settlement, which was on
the Indian reservation at this location.

The Narrows — " This strait divides the pond into North
Watuppa and South Watuppa. ' ' At one time ' 'this strait was
passed on a foot-bridge of stepping stones." — Fowler's
History. It is now crossed by the roadway to Westport and
New Bedford.



95



FALL RIVER

Founded, 1803.

Incorporated a city, 1854.

Area, including land and water, about 41 square miles.

Length of city, about 11 miles, width 7^ miles.

Assessed polls, April, 1910, 31,815.

Registered voters, 1910, males, 16,414, females, 2,380.

Dwellings, 10,005.

Tax, 1910, inclusive of polls, $1,793,183.73.

Rate of taxation, 1910, per $1,000, $18.70.

Public School Buildings, 52.

Pupils enrolled in Public Schools, 14,267.

Public Library, number of volumes, 83,951.

Post Office, receipts in 1825, $226; in 1910, $147,519.

Miles of Accepted Streets, 1911, 144.84.

Miles of Paved Streets, 1911, 16.47.

Miles of Sewers, 1911, 72.93.

Miles of Water Pipe, 1911, 112.585.

Fire Hydrants, 1911, 1,327.

Electric Arc Lights, 1911, 846.

Gas Lights, 1911, 447.

Kerosene Lights, 1911, 208.



Date


Population


Valuation


Spindles


1810


1,296






1820


1,594






1830


4,159






1840


6,738


$ 2,978,597


32,084


1850


11,170


7,433,050




1860


13,240


11,522,650




1862






192,620


1870


27,191


23,612,214


544,606


1880


47,883


39,171,264


1,390,830


1890


74,918


53,395,908


2,164,664


1900


104,863


73,511,614


3,042,472


1910


119,295


92,488,520


3,943,036



96



COTTON MANUFACTURING





Incorporated


Capital


Spindles


American Linen Co.


1852


$800,000


94,528


Ancona Company


1903


300,000


40,080


Arkwright Mills


1897


450,000


68,432


Barnaby Mfg. Co.


1882


350,000


25,424


Barnard Mfg. Co.


1874


500,000


80,304


Border City Mfg. Co.


1880


1,000,000


121,228


Bourne Mills


1881


1,000,000


91,258


Chace Mills


1871


1,200,000


116,688


Charlton Mills


1910


800,000


52,000


Conanicut Mills


1880


300,000


29,412


Cornell Mills


1889


400,000


45,040


Davis Mills


1903


1,250,000


127,504


Davol Mills


1867


500,000


44,672


Durfee Mills


1866


500,000


143,952


Estes Mills


1905


300,000


7,000


Fall River Iron Works Co.


1825


2,000,000


488,000


Flint Mills


1872


1,160,000


107,000


Globe Yarn Mills


A




73,408


Granite Mills


1863


1,000,000


122,048


Hargraves Mills


1888


800,000


111,690


Kerr Thread Co.


B




105,732


King Philip Mills


1871


1,500,000


135,232


Laurel Lake Mills


1881


600,000


59,808


Lincoln Mfg. Co.


1906


700,000


62,800


Luther Mfg. Co.


1903


350,000


51,616


Massasoit Mfg. Co.


1882


500,000




Mechanics Mills


1868


750,000


60,512


Merchants Mfg. Co.


1867


1,200,000


134,336


Narragansett Mills


1871


400,000


43,744


Osborn Mills


1871


750,000


70,332


Parker Mills


1895


800,000


111,684


Pilgrim Mills


1910


1,050,000


50,000


Pocasset Mfg. Co.


1822


1,200,000


120,016


Richard Borden Mfg. Co.


1871


1,000,000


101,024


Sagamore Mfg. Co.


1879


1,200,000


141,728


Sanford Spinning Co.


A




57,496



97



Seaconnet Mills


1884


600,000


68,384


Shove Mills


1872


550,000


77,728


Stafford Mills


1871


1,000,000


114,584


Stevens Mfg. Co.


1892


700,000


16,764


Tecumseh Mills


1866


750,000


78,960


Troy Cotton and Woolen








Manufactory


1814


300,000


50,304


Union Cotton Mfg. Co.


1879


1,200,000


110,320


Wampanoag Mills


1871


750,000


84,760


Weetamoe Mills


1871


500,000


45,504






$32,960,000


3,943,036



A Owned by the New England Cotton Yarn Co.

B Owned by the American Thread Co.

C Equivalent to 63,000 print cloth spindles.



Algonquin Printing Co.
American Printing Co.
Ashworth Brothers, Inc.
Fall River Electric Light Co.
Fall River Gas Works Co.
Heywood Narrow Fabric Co.
Kilburn, Lincoln & Co.
Old Colony Breweries Co.
Standard Fabric Co.
Union Belt Co.



ncorporated


Capital


1891


$500,000


1880


750,000


1910


400,000


1883


800,000


1880


690,000


1900


40,000


1854


80,000


1896


1,500,000


1910


150,000


1871


72,000



98



INDEX



Abbott, JohnH 42

Abolition of Grade Crossings 43, 44

Academy of Music 34

Advent Christian Church 87

Albatross, steamer 66

Aldermen, first Boai'd of 26

Algonquin Printing Co 40, 61

American Linen Co 23, 60

American Ptg. Co. . .19,61,62,64,71-76

Anawan street 19

Anawan School 22, 23, 78

Annawan 6

Annawan Mill 18, 59, 63

Anthony, David 57

Area of City 1

Arkwright Mills 40

Armory 42

Articles of Confederation approved 14

Athenaeum 21, 27

Banks 5, 74 to 77

Baptist Church at Narrows 17

Baptist Temple 19, 82

Barnaby Mfg. Co 38

Barnard Mfg. Co 32, 40

Battery M 42

Battle of Fall River 14, 15

Bay State Print Works 55, 61, 62

Bay State Steamboat Co 24, 34, 63

Bay State, steamer 24, 35

Belting introduced 59

Blaisdell, J. C 26

Blessed Sacrament Church 86

Block Printing 19

Block Shop 21

Board of Health 37

Bogle Street Church 86

Borden Block 34

Borden, Capt. Thomas 24

Borden, Holder 59, 61

Borden, M. C. D 61, 63, 87

Borden, N. B 26

Border City Mills .32, 38

Boys' Club 87



Brayton M. E. Church 86

Broadway Chapel 82

Brownell Street Chapel 82

Boundary line 11, 29

Bourne Mills 38

Bradford Durfee, steamer 24

Braley, H. K 39

Bridge Mill 22, 58

Brightman Street Bridge 51

Bristol, steamer 35

British Attack 14, 15

Brown, S. M 31

Brownell Street School 39

Bucket Engine 19, 88

Buffinton, L & Son 59

BufRnton, James 26

Cabot, Sebastian 6

Canonicus 6

Canonicus, steamer 24, 66

Caroline, schooner 67

Catholic Churches 83 to 86

Central Congregat'l Church. . .34, 84

Chace Mills 32, 40

Chace, Oliver 18, 54, 57

Chace's Thread Mill 18

Charlton Mills 40

Cherry street .... 19

Children's Home 87

Cholera outbreak 26

Church, Benj. and Caleb 12

Church of the Ascension. . .19, 34, 84

Churches and Charities 81, 88

Church of the New Jerusalem. . . .87

Citizens' Savings Bank 23, 48, 76

City Charter 25, 26, 27, 44, 45

City Dispensary 41

City Election, first 26

City Engineer 39

City Hall 33, 39

City Stables 37, 39

Civil War 28, 29

Cleft Rock 11, 20

Cloth produced 3



99



Clyde Line 36

Columbia Street School 23, 80

Company stores 61

Conanicut Mill 18

Congregationalists 13

Corbitant 6

Cote Piano Mfg. Co 67

Cotton used 3

Coughlin, John T 49, 50

Coughlin, John W - .40

Coughlin School 42

Covel Street School 39

Crab pond 70,71

Creek, the 20

Crescent Mills 32

Cummings, John W 39

Custom House 17, 36

Dart, schooner 67

Davenport, James F 33

Davenport School 32

Davis Mills 40

Davis, Robert T 32

Davis School 32

Davol Mills 28

Davol School 41

Davol, William C 56

Day Nurseries 88

Diocese of Fall River 48

District Court House 51

Division of Town 15

Durfee, Col. Joseph 14. 15, 17, 52 to 55,62

Durfee Mills 28, 38

Dyer Transportation Co 36, 67

Earliest Settlers 10

Eight Rod way ..11

Electric cars 41

Electric drive ... 73, 74

Electric lights 37, 39

Empire State, steamer 24, 25 35

Engines, steam 72 to 74

English machinery 55, 56

Estes Mills 62,63

Eudora, steamer 24

Evening School 23

Exchange Hotel 51

Exchange street 20

nixplorers 6



Factory School 80

Fairbanks, George 31

Faith, steamer 34

F. R. & P. Steamboat Co. . . 36,63,65,66

Fall River Bank 18, 38, 75

Fall River, Battle of . . ' 14

Fall River Bleachery 32, 62

Fall River Co-operative Bank. 38, 77

Fall River, Diocese of 48

Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank

31,48, 75, 76, 77

Fall River Gas Works Co 63

Fall River Iron \ 18, 23, 38, 40, 59, 61,
Works Co. I 63 to 66, 70, 71

Fall River Line 24, 34, 35, 63, 66

Fall River Machine Co 63, 68

Fall River Railroad 25

Fall River, R. I. , annexed 30

Fall River Manufactory

18,56, 57, 58, 63

Fall River Savings Bank 18, 75

Fall River Union Bank 18, 75

Feehan, Bishop 48

Fire alarm 90, 92

Fire department

18, 27, 28, 32, 50, 88-92

Fire of 1843 21, 22

Fires, dates of 92

First Baptist Church 31, 82

First Christian Church .... 19, 22, 83
First Congregat'l Church.. 19, 82, 83

First M. E. Church 84

First National Bank 38, 76

First Railroad 25

First settlers 10

First town house 17

Fiske, "Jim" 35

Flint Mills 32, 40

Flint Village 32

Flour Mills. 28

Forcing pump companies 89

Foster Hooper School 23, 50, 80

Four Corners 20

Fowler Congregational Church .... 85

Free delivery of mail 31

Freemen's purchase 9

Free text books 32, 81



100



French Canadians 30

French Congregational Church. . . .85
Friends, denomination of.. 13, 19, 83

Fulling Mill 12, 17, 58

Gas introduced 24

Goose-nesting Rock 3

Globe Cotton Mill 52 to 55

Globe, Daily 5, 40

Globe Presbyterian Church 86

Globe Print Works 23, 61, 62

Globe Village 32

Globe Yarn Mills 38, 40, 62, 63

Grade crossings 43, 44

Granite Block 22,58

Granite Mills 28, 40

Granite Mills fire 37

Granolithic sidewalks 48

Great fire 21, 22

Great lots 11

"Great Vacation" 36

Greene, William S 39, 41

Green schoolhouse 23

Grime, George 44, 45

Grist Mills 12, 17, 20, 58

Gunn House 51

Hancock, steamer 24

Hargraves Mills 38, 40

Harrison Street Chapel 82

Hat Factory 38, 67

Hawes, Marvel & Davol 68

Hearse House 18

Herald, Daily 5

Higgins, Thomas F 50

Highest elevations 1

Highland road 31

High School 23, 38, 50, 80

High Street School 23, 80

Home for Aged People 88

Home Guard in Revolution 14

Horseboat 34

Hours of labor, early 59

Hospitals 24, 34, 40,41,50,88

Hugo A. Dubuque School 50

Immaculate Conception Church ... .85

Incorporation of city 25

Incorporation of town 15, 16

Indian Reservation 13



Indians 6 to 10

Irene & Betsey, the 66

Irregularities of 1878-79 36,37

Jackson, Amos M 42

Jail, new 43

Jennie Lind, steamer 66

June Street School 23, 50, 80

Kerr Thread Mills 38, 62

Kilburn, Lincoln & Co 63

King Philip 6

King Philip Mills 28, 32, 40

King Philip, steamer 24, 65

Lafayette Co-operative Bank 77

Laurel Lake Mills 38, 40, 55, 58

Lexington alarm, response to 14

Lincoln Mfg. Co 40

Lincoln School 23, 50

L'Independant 5

Lindsey, Crawford E 37

Line Meeting House 17

Maple Street School 80

Marshall, James & Bros 67

Marvel & Davol 68

Massachusetts, steamer 24

Massasoit 6

Massasoit Bank 23, 38, 48, 75

Massasoit Mfg. Co 59, 62, 63

Massasoit Mill 18, 59

Massasoit-Pocasset Bank ..48, 75, 76

Massasoit Steam Mill 23, 59, 72

Mechanics Mills 28

Merchants Mfg. Co 28

Metacomet 6

Metacomet Bank 23, 38. 48, 76

Metacomet Mill 23, 60, 63, 64

Metacomet, steamer 24

Methodist Churches 19, 22, 84, 86

Metropolis, steamer 25, 35

Mill right 11, 12

Monitor, newspaper 18

Montaup 7

Montaup Mills 32

Morgan Street School 31, 80

Motto of city 25

Mount Hope Avenue School 39

Mount Hope, steamer 36

Nankeen Mill 18, 58



101



Narragansett Mills 32, 40

Narragansett Steamship Co. 35

National Union Bank 48, 75

Naval Brigade 42, 43

N. B. Borden School 31

Newport, railroad to 30

Newport, steamer 35

News, Daily 5

Newspapers 5

New York steamers 24, 34, 35

Nimrod, schooner 67

North Burial Ground 18

North Christian Church 86

North Main street widened 32

North Park 39,45

North Watuppa pond 1

Notre Dame Church 85

Oak Grove Cemetery 26

Old Colony Steamboat Co 35

Old Colony, steamer ... . . ." 24, 35

Osborn Mills 32

Osborn School 41

Panic of 1857 27

Park Commission 45

Parks 4, 31, 33, 39, 45

Parker Mills 40

Parochial Schools 81

People's Co-operative Bank ... .38, 77

Piano Manufacturing 67

Picking Machinery 57

Pilgrim Congregational Church ... 85

Pilgrim Mills 40

Playgrounds 50

Pleasant street 19, 30, 32

Plymouth Colony 6

Pocasset Bank 23, 48, 76

Pocasset Indians 6

Pocasset Mfg. Co ... . 18,23,58 to 61,78

Pocasset purchase 11

Pocasset street 19

Police 24,32,37,42,93

Police Commission 43

Poor sold by auction 16

Population 3, 13, 15, 16, 18, 19,25,31,37
39, 43.

Portuguese papers .5

Postoffice 17, 31, 36



Power, development of 71 to 74

Power Looms 57

Primitive Methcdist Churches 83

Print Cloths, first 58, 61

Printing machines 19, 61

Providence Line '.20, 24, 35, 36

Providence, steamer 35

Public Library 4, 27, 41

Purchase street 50

Quarry Street M. E. Church 86

Quequechan 7

Quequechan River, improvement

of 46, 47

Quequechan Mill 61

Quequeteant 7

Railroads 25, 30, 34, 41, 43, 63

Railroad stations 25, 43

Reed, Milton 39

Reorganized Church, L. D. S 86

Reservoir Commission 42, 46, 47

Revolution, history in 14

Rhode Island, steamer 24

Richard Borden Mfg. Co 32, 38

Richard Borden, steamer 35

Robeson Mills 28

Robeson's Print Works .... 18, 59, 61

Rock street 19

Rolling Rock 3

Roman Catholic ( nq oi ^o qo <.r^ «7
Church r^' ^1' ^^' ^^ ^^^^

Ruggles Park 45

Sagamore 7

Sagamore Mills 32, 38, 40

Sacred Heart Church 85

Sagkonate 7

Ste. Anne's Church 85

Ste. Anne's Hospital 88

St. James' Church 86

St. John's Church 86

St. John's R. C. Chapel 19, 84

St. Joseph's Church 85

St. Joseph's Orphanage 87

St. Louis' Church 85

St. Luke's Church 86

St. Mary's Church 31, 83, 84

St. Mathieu's Church 86

St. Patrick's Church 85



102



St. Paul's M . E. Church 31, 86

SS. Peter's and Paul Church 85

St. Stephen's Church 86

St. Vincent's Orphanage 87

St. William's Church 88

Salvation Army 88

Samuel Watson School 50

Sanford Spinning Mill 40, 62

Satinet Mill 18, ,58

Schools 13, 77 to 81

Seaconnet Mills 38, 40

Second Baptist Church 82

Second National Bank 31, 48, 76

Sewers 33

Shipbuilding ." 65, 66

Shove Mills 32, 38, 40

Six Score Acre Lots 11

Skeleton in Armor 21

Slade's Ferry 34

Slade's Ferry Bridge 34

Slade Mills 32

Slade School 32

Slater, Samuel 56, 57

Sliding Scale 47, 49

South Main street widened 32, 39

South Park 31,33

Spanish War 42

Spindles 3, 31, 37, 38, 39, 43

Spring street 19

Sprinkling of streets 24, 41

Stafford Mills 32, 38, 40

Stage Lines 17

Standard Fabric Co 40, 68

Stang, Bishop 48

State of Maine, steamer 25

Stevens Mfg. Co 40

Stocks, Town 13

Store pay 61

Streetcars 37, 41

Strike of 1904 47

Summerfield M. E. Church 86

Superior Court 36

Superior Court House 42

Tanks, Water Department 50

Tanneries 12

Teaser, steamer 66

Tecumseh 7



Tecumseh Mills 28, 38, 40

Tehticut 6

Telephone system 37

Temperance societies 87

Textile School 48

Third Baptist Church 85

Thorfinn 6

Tiverton Print Works 55

Toll Roads 30

Tory sentiment 14

Town Clock 19

Town Hearse 18

Town House 21,22

Town Meeting, first 16

Town stocks 13

Training School 81

Trinity Baptist Church 85

Troy Co-operative Bank 38,77

Troy C. & W. Manufactory 18, 55 to
58,. 63, 69, 71

Troy, name, 1804-34 16

Trust Company 75,76

Turnpikes 30

Union Cotton Factory 54, 55, 58

Union Hospital 88

Union Mill Co 28, 40, 72

Union Savings Bank 31, 48, 75, 77

Union street 19

Unitarian Church 19, 78, 83

United Presbyterian Church. . .31, 85

United States, steamer 66

Valuation 5, 17, 25, 31, 39, 43

Verazzano 6

Wages in early mills 57,60

Wampanoag Indians 6

Wampanoag Mills 32

Wamsutta 6

Wamsutta Bank 31, 76

Wamsutta Woolen Mill 72

War of 1812 17

Warren, railroad to 30

Washington street 19

Wash wheels 21 •

Water Lily, steamer 66

Water Power 12, 71

Water Works 33, 50

Watuppa 7



103



Watuppa Mill 18,59

Watuppa Reservoir Co 68 to 71

Weetamoe 6

Weetamoe Mills 32, 40

Weetamoe, steamer 34

Westall School 50

Whaling 25, 68

White Mill 18, 58

William J. Wiley School 50



William Connell School 42

William Marvel, steamer .67

William S. Greene School 50

Women's Union 87

Wood slide 20

Wyoming Mills. 23

Yellow Mill 58

Young American, steamer 66

Y. M. C. A 87



104



1811



1911



MERCHANTS— MANUFACTTTRERS

COTTON CENTENNIAL CARNIVAL

ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION OF THE
BUILDING OF THE FIRST COTTON MILL IN FALL RIVER

\V ]<]EK OF JUNE 19-24, 1911



MONDAY.



MANUFACTURERS DAY.



2.30 P.M. Crowning of the Queen of the Carnival at

City Hall by Mayor T. F. Higgins.
4.00 Opening:

Manufacturers Exposition, State Armory.

Art Exhibit, Public Library.

Cotton Manufacturing, Bradford Durfee

Textile School.
Historical Exhibit, Music Hall.

TUESDA Y. A UTOMOBILE DA Y.

3.00 Automobile Parade.

8.00 Fireworks Display at South Park,

WEDNESDAY. FALL RIVER DAY.
3.00 Trades Parade.

TH URSDA Y. MERCHANTS DA Y.
1.00 Horse Show, North Park.

8.00 Grand Carnival Parade.

FRIDA Y. PRESIDENT'S DA Y.

1.00 President Taft will visit the city.

Evening. Grand Confetti Carnival.

SA TURD A Y. A VIA TION DA Y.
Water Carnival on Mount Hope Bay.
Hydro-aeroplane Exhibition by Glenn H. Curtiss.

105



As a part of the observance of the centennial, a notable
exhibit of the products of the various industries of the city
has been arranged in the State Armory. The great drill hall
has been most attractively decorated in blue, completely
hiding the roof, and the same color has been used in the
various booths, which are adorned with branches and oak
leaves. In addition to the products themselves the processes
of manufacture are illustrated in many cases by machinery in
operation, showing the methods used in the making of hats,
pianos, card clothing, the printing of calico, the fringing of


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Online LibraryHenry Milne FennerHistory of Fall River, Massachusetts → online text (page 9 of 10)