Copyright
Henry W. (Henry William) Blair.

The Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle online

. (page 4 of 5)
Online LibraryHenry W. (Henry William) BlairThe Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle → online text (page 4 of 5)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


blow that labor has struck since the foundation. of the
world. The fight for bread is the first great primal
fight, and it is so absorbing a struggle that until one
conquers it somewhat, he can have no leisure whatever.
So that we may divide the whole struggle of the hu-
man race into two chapters: first, the fight to get leis-
ure ; and then comes the second fight of civilization,
What shall we do with our leisure when we get it ? And
1 take it that Chautauqua has assailed this second prob-
lem. Now leisure is a dreadfully bad thing unless it is
well used. A man with a fortune ready made, and with
leisure on his hands, is likely to get sick of the world,
sick of himself, tired of life, and become a useless,
wasted man. What shall you do with your leisure? I
understand that Chautauqua is trying to answer that
question, and to open out fields of thought, to open out
energies, a largeness of mind, a culture in the better
sense, with the varnish scratched off, as Brother Kirk-
wood says. We are getting over the business of var-
nishing our native woods and painting them. We are
getting down to the real grain, and finding whatever is
best in it and truest in it; and if Chautauqua is helping
to garnish our people with the native stuff that is in
them, rather than the paint and varnish and gew-gawa
of culture, they are doing well."



Literary and Scientific Circle. 67

Joseph Cook writes from Europe concerning the
C. L. S. C. : " I keep Chautauqua in a fireside nook of
niy inmost affections and prayers. God bless the Lit-
erary and Scientific Circle, which is so marvelously suc-
cessful already in spreading- itself as a young vine over
the trellis-work of many lands! What rich clusters
may ultimately hang on its cosmopolitan branches! It
is the glory of America that it believes that all that any
body knows every body should know. 1 '



From J. G. Holland, M.D.

EDITORIAL BOOMS, SORTBNER'S MAGAZINE,
743 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

May 17, 1881.

MY DEAR DOCTOR: I wrote you a discouraging note
yesterday, and here is another. It will be quite imprac-
ticable for me to visit Chautauqua in August, and were
I to do so it would be impossible for me to say a word
in public.

When I received your invitation I was reading "The
Reminiscences of Thomas Carlyle " concerning his fa-
ther ; and I said to myself, " What a god-send the Chau-
tauqua institutions would have been to such a man as
that talented and uneducated father! It would have

gven him fellowship with the genius that had sprung
om his loins, and a view of the realm of thought and
culture in which the brilliant son was walking and win-
ning renown." Could I say more to you? Chautauqua
is opportunity for a great mass of worthy mind, need-
ing it only for the securing of a priceless good. I give
it Godspeed and a thousand good wishes.

With many thanks for your hearty invitation, I am
yours very truly, J. G. HOLLAND.



Edward Everett Hale says concerning the work
of the C.L.S.C.: "What they call here, half in joke,
the Chautauqua Idea, is the notion that grown men and
women have leisure and desire to read thoughtful books
with some system ; that education is not finished when
a boy leaves school. In coming to this place, on Mon-
day, I made a traveler's acquaintance with a gentleman
who had never visited Chautauqua, but he said he was
interested in the Assembly because he was a member



68 The Chautauqua

of the Chaurauqirt Circle. 'I ain a very unworthy
member,' he said laughingly ; l but after all I should
never have read Green's " History of England" if they
had not told me to do so. 1 Such an anecdote gives some
idea of the probable work of such a plan among thirty
thousand people. . . . The fact that the best study for
the best purpose is done after coming to manhood and
womanhood, has been so far left out of sight that sci-
ences and philosophies which belong to mature life have
been crowded in upon the work of children. This folly,
like other follies, gives way before experience. Of our
own times there is no sign more encouraging than the
arrangements of men and women for study. ... Of
such efforts the Assembly at Cbautauqua, now at work
for its eighth summer, with larger and larger attend-
ance every year, is remarkable for its range, its organi-
zation, and the numbers who attend."



The New York Herald says: "The fact is that the
Chautauqua Assembly is the visible center of the great-
est university in the world, for the students number
about 25,000, and the course of study is practically end-
less. No one can overestimate the influence of Oxford
or Cambridge, Harvard or Yale, but while many of the
students at these educational centers are there against
their will, and a majority of the remainder are so young
that most lessons stuff their memories rather than feed
their minds, every member of the Chautauqua Circle is
willingly so, besides old enough to perceive his own
ignorance, and busy enough with other affairs to avoid
the fault of reading more than he can think about. . .
Every family in which there is a Chautauqua student
will learn unconsciously that life is worth living, far
more than mere food and clothing. Society, politics,
and religion will improve wherever there is a single
adult who has learned that study need not end when
the doors of the common school close behind him.
Culture, which at present means little more than a gloss
of thin varnish upon very imperfect material, will be
far more genuine and general when thousands of clear-
headed men and women have sought it by beginning
within instead of without ; and if in the mean time
the culture of the present day sneers at the Chau-
tauqua students, it will merely expose its own narrow-



Literary and Scientific Circle. 69

The Poet, John G. Whittier, wrote :

DANVEES, MASS., 4th rno., 29, 1882.
J. H. VINCENT, D.D. :

DEAR FRIEND : I have been watching the progress
of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle inaug-
urated by thyself, and take some blame to myself for
not sooner expressing my satisfaction in regard to its
objects and working thus far. I wish it abundant suc-
cess, and that its circles, like those from the agitated
center of the Lake, may widen out, until our entire
ountry shall feel their beneficent influences. I am very
truly thy friend, JOHN G. WHITTIEK.



jo The Chautauqua

Course of Beading as Pursued Since the
Organization of the 0, L, S, 0,

1878-1879.

HISTORY.

Green's Short History of the English People..

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 4. English His-
tory.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 5. Greek His-
tory.

Old Greek Life. Mahaffy.

LITERATURE.

Primer of English Literature. Stopford
Brooke.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 6. Greek Litera-
ture.



Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 2. Studies of the
Stars.

Eecreations in Astronomy. Bishop Warren.
Human Physiology. J. Dorman Steel.

RELIGION.

Outlines of Bible History. Bishop HursU
Word of God Opened. Dr. B. K. Peirce.



Literary and Scientific Circle, 71

1879-1880.

HISTORY.

Merivale's General History of Kome.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 16. Roman His-
tory.

Ridpath's History of the United States.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 21. American
History.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 24. Canadian
History.

LITERATURE.

Primer of Latin Literature. Eugene Lawrence.

Chautauqua Library of English History and
Literature. Vol. 1.

Primer of American Literature. C. F. Rich-
ardson.



How to Get Strong and How to Stay So. W.
Blakie.

Biology : Botanical and Zoological. Dr. J. H.
Wythe.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 22. Biblical Bi-
ology.

RELIGION.

Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation. Rev. J.
B. Walker.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 18. Christian
Evidences.



72 The Chautauqua

1880-1881.

HISTORY.

General History of the World.
Kawlinson's Origin of Nations.
Lives of Cyrus and Alexander. Abbott.

LITERATURE.

Chautauqua Library of English History and
Literature. Vol. 2.

Hypatia. Charles Kingsley.

Readings from Homer, Demosthenes, Cicero,
and Virgil.

Readings from Addison, Burns, and Tennyson.

Art of Speech. Vol. 1. Dr. L. T. Townsend.



Conversations on Creation.
Studies in Physical Science : The Circle of the
Sciences. C ush* ing.

Introductory Science Primer. Huxley.

RELIGION.

Outlines of Church History. Bishop Hurst.
The Tongue of Fire. W. Arthur. Or, Fish's
Primitive Piety Revived.

Readings in Natural Theology.

WHITE SEAL COURSE.

Thalheimer's Manual of Ancient History.

Thalheimer's Manuals of Mediaeval and Mod-
ern History.

Miss Buckley's Short History of Natural Sci-
ence.

Blackburn's Church History.



Literary and Scientific Circle. 73

1881-1882.

HISTORY.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 29. Man's An-
tiquity and language. Dr. Terry.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 35. Outlines of
General History.

Mosaics of History. Selected by Arthur Oilman.

Eeadings from Mackenzie's Nineteenth Cent-
ury. Books 1 and 2.

LITERATURE.

Art of Speech. Vol. 2. Dr. Townsend.

Illustrated History of Ancient Literature Ori-
ental and Classical. Dr. Quackenbos.

Chautauqua Library of English History and
Literature. Vol. 3.

SCIENCE AND ART.

Popular Eeadings concerning Philosophy,
Mathematics, Political Economy, Geology, Chem-
istry, Laws of Health, and Mental and Moral
Philosophy.

A Short History of Art. Miss De Forest.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 32. Outline Les-
sons on Art.

RELIGION.

God in History. Readings.
Eeligion in Art. Eeadings.

WHITE SEAL COURSE.

Ulhorn's Conflict of Christianity with Hea-
thenism.

Hopkins' Outline Study of Man.
Yonge's History of Germany.



74 The Chautauqua

1882-1883.

HISTORT.

Timayenis' History of Greece. Vol.1. Parte
3, 4, and 5.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 5. Greek History.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 4. English History.

Ohautauqua Text-Book, No. 34. China, Corea,
and Japan.

Readings in English, Russian, and Scandina-
vian History.

LITERATURE.

Preparatory Greek Course in English.
Readings in English, Russian, Scandinavian,
Chinese, and Japanese Literature.
Evangeline. H. W. Longfellow.

SCIENCE.

Recreations in Astronomy.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 2. Studies of the
Stars.

First Lessons in Geology.

Hampton Tracts.

Readings in Geology, Astronomy, Physiology,
and Hygiene.

RELIGION.

Readings in Bible History and in Biblical Lit-
erature. Sabbath Readings in Classic Religious
Literature.

WHITE SEAL COURSE.

Timayenis' Greece. Vol. 1 completed.
Abbott's William the Conqueror and Queen
Elizabeth.



Literary and Scientific Circle. 75

Hurst's Outlines of Bible History.
Chautauqua Library. Vol. 1.
Outre-Mer. Longfellow.
Shakespeare's Hamlet and Julius Csesar.

BEQUIRED. FOB THE WHITE (CRYSTAL) SEAL,
FOB THE GRADUATES OF 1882.

THE CHAUTAUQUAN. Required Reading.

History of Greece. Vol. 1. Prof. T. T. Tim-
fiyenis.

William the Conqueror and Queen Elizabeth.
Abbott's Series.

Outre-Mer. Henry W. Longfellow.

Hamlet. Eolfe's Edition.

Julius Csesar. Rolfe's Edition.



1883-1884.

HISTORY.

Timayenis' History of Greece. Vol. 2. Parts
7, 8, 10, and 11. (Or Brief History of Greece.)

Pictures from English History by the Great
Historical Artists. Edited by C. E. Bishop.

Chautauqua Text-Books. No. 4. English His-
tory. No. 5. Greek History. No. 16. Eoman
History. No. 21. American History. No. ,24.
Canadian History.

Readings in Roman, German, French, and
American History in THE CHAUTAUQUAN.

LITERATURE.

Preparatory Latin Course in English. Wil-
kinson.



76 The Chatttauqua

Chautauqua Text- Book, No. 23. English Lit-
erature. Prof. J. H. Gilmore.
Primer of American Literature. Richardson.
Biographical Stories. Hawthorne.

SCIENCE.

How to Get Strong and How to Stay So^
Blaikie.

Easy Lessons in Vegetable Biology. Wythe.

Readings in Physical Science in THE CHAU-
TAUQUAN.

RELIGION.

Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation. Walker.

Sunday Readings in THE CHAUTAUQUAN.

Chautauqua Text-Books. No. 18. Christian
Evidences. No. 39. Sunday-School Normal
Class Work. No. 43. Good Manners.

WHITE SEAL COURSE.

Timayeni' Greece. Vol. 2, completed.
Chautauqua Library. Vol. 2.
Blackburn's Church History,
Bacon's Essays.

WHITE (CRYSTAL) SEAL COURSE FOR GRADUATES OP
1882 AND 1883.

r JjHE CHAUTAUQUAN. Required Reading.

History of Greece. Prof. T. T. Timayenis.
Vol. 2. Completed. $1 15.

Preparatory Latin Course in English. Wil-
kinson. $1.

Credo. Dr. L. T. Townsend. $1.

Bacon's Essays. $1 25.



Literary and Scientific Circle. 77

1884-1885.

HISTORY AND LITERATURE.

Barnes's Brief History of Greece.* 75 cents.
Preparatory Greek Course in English.! Wil-
kinson. $1.

College Greek Course in English. Wilkin-
son. $1.

Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 5. Greek His-
tory.* Vincent. 10 cents.
Cyrus and Alexander. Abbott. 70 cents.
The Art of Speech. Vol. I. Dr. L. T. Town-
send. 50 cents.

Headings in THE CHAUTAUQUAN :
Talks About Good English.
Glimpses of Ancient Greek Life, and
Greek Mythology.



Chemistry. Prof. Appleton.

Scientific Headings in THE CHAUTAUQUAN :

The Circle of the Sciences.

Huxley on Science.

Home Studies in Chemistry. By Prof. J.
T. Edwards.

Easy Lessons in Animal Biology. By Dr.
J. H. Wythe.

The Temperance Teachings of Science, and

Studies in Kitchen Science and Art.

* Need not be read by the classes of 1885, 1886, and
188T.
t Need not be read by the classes of 1885 and 18S6.



78 The Chautauqua L. and S. C.

THE CHAUTAUQUAN is published by T. L.
Flood, Meadville, Pa. Price, $1 50 per annum.
Ten numbers, October to July.



The Character of Jesus. Horace Bushnell.
Cloth, 60 cents ; paper, 40 cents.

How to Help the Poor. Mrs. James T. Fields.
Paper, 20 cents.

History of the Reformation. Bishop J. F.
Hurst. 40 cents.

Sunday Readings in THE CHAUTAUQUAN.
Readings in OUR ALMA MATER :

Lessons in E very-Day Speech. Prof. W.
D. M'Clintock.

Lessons in Household Decoration. Miss
Susan Hayes Ward.

Lessons in Self-Discipline: Thinking,
Memory, Selection of Books, etc.
Official Communications to Members.

WHITE SEAL COURSE.

Life of Michael Faraday. Gladstone.
Excursions in Field and Forest. Thoreau.
Life and her Children. Miss Buckley.

WHITE CRYSTAL SEAL.

THE CHAUTAUQUAN. Required Reading. $1 50.

The College Greek Course in English. $1.

Chemistry. Prof. J. H. Appleton. $1.

Character of Jesus. Horace Bushnell. Cloth,
60 'cents ; paper, 40 cents.

How to Help the Poor. Mrs. James T. Fields.
Paper, 20 cents.

History of the Reformation. Bishop Hurst.
40 cents.



SPARE-MINUTE COURSE, No. 1.

A COURSE of readings in Science, Travel, Biogra-
phy, Education, Manner*, etc., for young people, (and
for older people, too ;) for busy people who have only
an occasional five or ten minute opportunity to pick
up " something to read ;" for field hands, factory or
shop girls and boys, clerks, errand-boys, etc., who
want to live for something besides food and fun ; for
tired housekeepers and for servant-girls, who would
like to furnish their brains and prepare themselves to
talk intelligently to children, and put into their dull
and dreary lives bright thoughts and noble aims.

These little books or tk tractlets " twenty-three in
all are short, entertaining, instructive, and cheap.
One dollar will pay for the whole of them if ordered at
once, and if the dollar is not at hand, they can be
bought at the rate of five cents each.

This " Spare-Minute Course, No. i," will give
young people a start in a right path, and who can tell
to what heights of attainment and power they may
come -after a while ?

Let proprietors and foremen of factories, pastors of
churches, superintendents, public-school teachers, and
others who have charge of young folks, hefp us to in-
troduce this new course of reading.

On the receipt of testimony that one has read this
course, a certificate to that effect will be forwarded,
the applicant inclosing four cents in postage-stamps to
the Office of the C. L. S. C., Plainfield, N, J.

This is not the C. L. S. C. Course of reading, but
it is one step up and toward that noble society.

All of these little " tractlets " (except the two
* 4 Chautauqua Text-Books") belong to the "Home
College Series."

They are as follows :

i. READINGS IN SCIENCE. Home College Series
Tracts : No. 47. The Ocean, 50. ; No. 16. The Rain $



5C. ; No. 84. Our Earth, 50. ; No. 7. The Sun, 5 c. ;
No. 15. The Moon, 50. ; No. 25. The Stars, 50. To-
tal, 300.

2. READINGS IN TRAVEL AND ART. Home College
Series Tracts : No. 48. Two Weeks in the Yosemite
and Vicinity, $c. ; No. 50. Ten Days in Switzerland,
SC. ; No. 3. Egypt, 5C. ; No. 10. Art in Egypt, sc. ;
No. 45. The Euphrates Valley, 50. ; No. 51. Art in
the Far East, 50. Total, 3oc.

3. READINGS IN BIOGRAPHY. Home College Series
Tracts: No. 23. William Shakespeare, 50.; No. 26.
John Milton, 50. ; No. 8. Washington Irving, 50. ;
No. 75. Daniel Webster, 5C. Total, 2oc.

4. READINGS ON GENERAL SUBJECTS. Home Col-
lege Series Tracts : No. 69. Reading and Readers, 50. ;
No. 49. Keep Good Company, 50. ; No. 54. Words, 50.;
No. 27. Penmanship, sc. ; No. 36. Readings from
Wordsworth, sc. ; Chautauqua Text-Book, No. 43.
Good Manners, loc. ; Chautauqua Text-Book, No. i.
Biblical Exploration ; or, How to Study the Bible,
ice. Total, 45C.

Order a part or the whole of this series at once.
The full set will be sent, postage paid, on receipt
of $t, with the following order: tk Inclosed find one
dollar, for which send me the full Chautauqua Spare-
Minute Course, No. i." Then sign your name and
post-office address, and send the order and dollar to
Phillips & Hunt, New York, or Walden & Stowe, Cin-
cinnati, O.

Having received the books, go to work and read.
Read when you have time. Make time whether it
comes or not. Read whether the books are interesting
or not. Read because you ought to read. Read each
tractlet over at least twice the oftener the better.
Try to recall what you read. Talk about the subject
of your reading to some friend or companion. Tell
what you can remember. Ask questions. Write out
your ideas on the several subjects. Begin and con-
tinue. " Never be discouraged."

Every page you read with a firm will and a desire
to know gives you strength and breadth and worth.
It increases your own self-respect. It makes you more
worthy of the respect of others.



PUBLICATIONS OF PHILLIPS & HUNT,

8O5 Broadivay ' 9 Neiv York.



HOME COLLEGE SERIES.

Price, each, 5 cts. Per 100, for cash, $3 50.



The " HOME COLLEGE SERIES" contain short papers
on a wide range of subjects biographical, historical,
scientific, literary, domestic, political, and religious.
Indeed, the religious tone will characterize all of them.
They are written for every body for all whose leisure
is limited, but who desire to use the minutes for the en-
richment of life.



NO.

1. Thomas Carlyle. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

2. William Wordsworth. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

3. Egypt. By J. I. Boswell.

4. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. By Daniel

Wise, D.D.

5. Rome. By J. I. Boswell.

6. England. By J I. Boswell.

7. The Sun. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

8. Washington Irving. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

9. Political Economy. By G. M. Steele, D.D.
10. Art in Egypt. By Edward A. Band.

n. Greece. By J. I. Boswell.

12. Christ as a Teacher. By Bishop E. Thomson.

13. George Herbert. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

14. Daniel the Uncompromising Young Man.

By C. H. Payne. D.D.

15. The Moon. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

16. The Rain. By Miss Carrie E. Dennen.



17. Joseph Addison. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

18. Edmund Spenser. By Daniel Wise, D.D.
iq. China and Japan. By'j. I. Boswell.

20. The Planets. By C. M. Westlake. M.S.

21. William Hickling Prescott. By Daniel Wise,

D.D.

22. "Wise Sayings of the Common Folk.

23. William Shakespeare. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

24. Geometry.

25. The Stars. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

26. John Milton. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

27. Penmanship.

28. Housekeeper's Guide.

29. Themistocles and Pericles. (From Plutarch.)

30. Alexander. (From Plutarch.)

31. Coriolanus and Maximus. (From Plutarch.)

32. Demosthenes and Alcibiades. (From Plu-

tarch.)

33. The Gracchi. (From Plutarch.)

34. Caesar and Cicero. (From Plutarch.)

35. Palestine. By J. I. Boswell.

36. Readings from "William Wordsworth.

37. The Watch and the Clock. By Alfred Taylor.

38. A Set of Tools. By Alfred Taylor.

39. Diamonds and other Precious Stones. By

Alfred Taylor.

40. Memory Practice.

41. Gold and Silver. By Alfred Taylor.

42. Meteors. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

43. Aerolites. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

44. France. By J. I. Boswell.

45. Euphrates'Valley. By J. I. BoswelL

46. United States. By J. I. Boswell.

47. The Ocean. By Miss Carrie E. Dennett.

48. Two Weeks in the Yosemite and Vicinity.

By J. M. Buckley, D.D.

49. Keep Good Company. By Samuel Smiles.

50. Ten Days in Switzerland. By H. B. Ridga-

way, D.D.

51. Art in the Far East. By Edward A. Kand.

52. Readings from Cowper.

53. Plant Life, By Mrs. V. C. Phoabus.

54. Words. By Mrs. V. C. Phrebus.
Readings from Oliver Goldsmith.



56. Art
57- Art
58. Art
5Q. Art



61. Art



n Greece. Part I. By Edward A. Eand.
in Italy. Part I. By Edward A. Eand.
n Germany. By Edward A. R;md.
n France. By Edward A. Eand.
n England. By Edward A. Kand.
n America. By Edward A. Eand.



62. Readings from Tennyson.

63. Readings from Milton. Part I.

64. Thomas Chalmers. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

65. Rufus Choate. By Dr. O. Adams.

66. The Temperance Movement versus The Liq-

uor System.

67. Germany. By J. I. Boswell.

68. Readings from Milton. Part II.

69. Reading and Readers. By H. C. Farrar, A.B.

70. The Gary Sisters. By Miss Jennie M. Bingham.

71. A Few Facts about Chemistry. By Mrs. V. C.

Phoebus.

72. A Few Facts about Geology. By Mrs. V. C.

Phoebus.

73. A Few Facts about Zoology. By Mrs. V. C.

Phoebus.

74. Hugh Miller. By Mrs. V. C. Phoebus.

75. Daniel Webster.* By Dr. C. Adams.

76. The World of Science. By C. VV. Gushing, D.D.

77. Comets. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

78. Art in Greece. Part II. By Edward A. Rand.

79. Art in Italy. Part II. By Edward A. Rand.

80. Art in the Land of the Saracens. By Edward

A. Rand.

81. Art in Northern Europe. Part I. By Edward

A. tian-1.

82. Art in Northern Europe. Part II. By Edward

A. Rand.

83. Art in Western Asia. By Edward A. Rand.

84. Our Earth. Bv Mr*. V. C. Phoebus.

85. John Wiclif. By Daniel Wise. D.D.

86. Martin Luther. By Daniel Wise. D.D.

87. Charles Lamb. Miss Jennie M. Bingham.

88. Injurious Garden Insects. By Dr. B. D. Halsted.

89. The Regicides. By Dr. C. Adams.

90. Amos Lawrence. By Dr. C. Adams.

91. John Knox. By Daniel Wise, D.D.

92. Margaret Fuller. By Miss Jennie M. Bingham.

93. The Life Current. By C. M. Westlake, M.S.

94. Charlotte Bronte. By Miss Jennie M . Bingham.

95. Ulrich Zwingle. By Daniel Wise, D.D.



96. Philip Melanchthon. By Danii-1 Wise, D.D.

97. John Ruskin. By Mrs. V. C. Phoebus.

98. The Coral Builders. By Mrs. V. C. Phoebus.

99. Italy. By J. I. Boswell.

100. Macaulay. By J. I. Boswell.



THE CHAUTAUQUA- TEXT-BOOKS.

No. i. BIBLICAL BIOLOGY. A Condensed
Manual on How to Study the Bible. By J. H.
Vincent, D.D. Full and rich 10

No. 2. STUDIES OF THE STARS. A
Pocket Guide to the Science of Astronomy
By H. W. Warren, D.D 10

No. 3. BIBLE STUDIES FOR LITTLE
PEOPLE. By B. T. Vincent 10

No. 4. ENGLISH HISTORY. By J. H. Vin-
cent, D.D 10

No. 5. GREEK HISTORY. By J. H. Vin-
cent, D.D 10

No. 6. GREEK LITERATURE. By A. D.
Vail, I) D 20

No. 7. MEMORIAL DAYS OF THE
CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY AND
SCIENTIFIC CIRCLE 10

No. 8. WHAT NOTED MEN THINK OF
THE BIBLE. By L. T. Townsend. D.D. . . 10

No. g. WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT 10

No. 10. WHAT IS EDUCATION ? By Prof.
William F. Phelps, A.M . . . . 10

No. ii. SOCRATES. By Prof. William F.
Phelps, A.M 10

No. 12. PESTALOZZI. By Prof. William F.
Phelps, A.M 10

No. 13. ANGLO-SAXON. By Prof. Albert S.
Cook 20

No. 14. HORACE MANN. By Prof. William
F. Phelps, A.M 10

No. 15. FRCEBEL. By Prof. William F.
Phelps. A.M 10

No. 16. ROMAN HISTORY. By J. H. Vin-
cent, D.D 10

No. 17. ROGER ASCHAM AND JOHN
STURM. Glimpses of Education in the Six-
teenth Century. By Prof. Wm. F. Phelps, A.M. 10

No. 18. CHRISTIAN EVIDENCES. By
J. H. Vincent, D.D 10

No. 19. THE BOOK OF BOOKS. By J. M.

Freeman, D.D 10

No. 20. THE CHAUTAUQUA HAND-
BOOK. By J. H. Vincent, D.D 10

No. 21. AMERICAN HISTORY. By J. L.
Hurlbut, A.M 10

No. 22. BIBLICAL BIOLOGY. By J. H.
Wythe, A.M., M.D 10



Cts.

No. 23. ENGLISH LITERATURE. By Prof.

J. II. Gihnore 10

No. 24. CANADIAN HISTORY. By James


1 2 4

Online LibraryHenry W. (Henry William) BlairThe Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle → online text (page 4 of 5)