Herbert Maxwell.

Official guide to the Abbey-church, palace, and environs of Holyroodhouse online

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890

E4H7m
1908




Maxwell
Official Guide to Holyroodhouse




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



GIFT



GomptleO bg SMrectton of tt.Oh, Office of



OFFICIAL QUIPE

To the Abbey = Church, Palace,
and Environs of

flolyroodhouse



WITH A



HISTORICAL SKETCH



BY

THE RIGHT HON.

SIR HERBERT MAXWELL, BART.

F.R.S.. LL.D.
President of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland



WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS

EDINBURGH: MCMVI



SIXPENCE net



Official Guide

to

Holy rood house



Official Guide

To the Abbey-Church, Palace, and
Environs of

Holyroodhouse



WITH A



HISTORICAL SKETCH



BY
THE RIGHT HON.

SIR HERBERT MAXWELL, BART.

F.R.S., LL.D.

PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY OK ANTIQUARIES OF SCOTLAND



Compflc5> b<e Direction of *.rt>. tfice of TKflovfts



WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS
EDINBURGH: MCMVITI



All Rights reserved



CONTENTS.



938194



THE PALACE .... I

THE PICTURE GALLERY ... 6
THE PORTRAITS OF JAMES III. AND HIS QUEEN,

MARGARET OF DENMARK . . . .12

LORD DARNLEY'S ROOMS . xS

THE DUCHESS OF HAMILTON'S DRAWING-ROOM . 19

LORD DARNLEY'S BEDROOM ... 20

LORD DARNLEY'S DRESSING-CLOSET . . .22

QUEEN MARY'S PRIVATE STAIR . . 22
QUEEN MARY'S CHAMBER OF PRESENCE OR AUDIENCE

CHAMBER . ,-

*

QUEEN MARY'S BEDROOM ... 2 6

QUEEN MARY'S DRESSING-CLOSET . . 2 8

QUEEN MARY'S SUPPER-ROOM . 2 g

THE ROYAL APARTMENTS . , x

THE QUEEN'S BREAKFAST- ROOM . 3I

THE VESTIBULE .... 3I

PRINCE ALBERT'S DRESSING-ROOM . . ^
QUEEN VICTORIA'S BEDROOM .



3 2

THE EVENING DRAWING-ROOM



THE QUEEN'S DRAWING-ROOM . -32



VI CONTENTS.

THE PALACE continued.

THE THRONE ROOM . . . 3 2

PRINCE ALBERT'S DRAWING-ROOM . . ."33

THE ABBEY CHURCH, NOW DESIGNATED THE CHAPEL

ROYAL .... -34

THE ENVIRONS OF HOLYROOD . . . . . $8



HISTORICAL SKETCH.

CHAP.

I. ANNALS OF HOLYROOD ABBEY, A.D. 1128-1498 '. 69

II. HOLYROOD AS A ROYAL PALACE . ' .' . 93

III. TROUBLED TIMES AT HOLYROOD ' '. r . 1 09

IV. THE YEARS OF BLOOD . . . ' V 130
V. HOLYROOD ECLIPSED BY ST JAMES'S . .143

VI. FROM CHARLES I. TO EDWARD VII. ''. ' . "". 158



ILLUSTRATIONS.



l-Atiii

1. HOLYROODHOUSE AND ARTHUR'S SEAT FROM THE

NORTH-WEST .... 3

From photograph by A. A. Inglis, Edinburgh.

2. PLAN OF GROUND FLOOR, HOLYROOD PALACE . 4
3- PLAN OF FIRST FLOOR, HOLYROOD PALACE . . 5

4. ARMS OF MARGARET, QUEEN OF SCOTLAND, A.D. 1469 14

5. QUEEN MARY'S BED-CHAMBER . . . .27

From photograph by A. A. Inglis, Edinburgh.

6. WESTERN FRONT OF THE ABBEY CHURCH OF

HOLYROOD ..... 35

From photograph by A. A. Inglis, Edinburgh.

7. HOLYROOD PALACE, SHOWING LORD ROBERT STUART'S

HOUSE ...... 37

From a Drawing by Blore, published 1826.

8. THE PALACE OF HOLYROODHOUSE, SOUTH AND

NORTH GARDENS, THE ABBEY KIRK, AND THE

KIRKYARD . ... facing 58

After Gordon of Rothiemay's Plan.

9- SEAL OF THE BURGH OF CANONGATE . . 68
10. JAMES V.'S TOWER, FOUNTAIN, AND MAIN ENTRANCE,

HOLYROODHOUSE ..... 70

From photograph by A. A. Inglis, Edinburgh.



viii ILLUSTRATIONS.

11. SEAL OF THE MONASTERY OF HOLYROOD, A.D. 1 141 72

12. HOLYROODHOUSE AND ARTHUR'S SEAT . IIO

Drawn by an English Spy in 1543-44.

13. HOLYROOD PALACE AS IT WAS BEFORE THE FIRE OF

1650 . .121

After Gordon of Rothiemay.

14. SEAL OF THE ABBEY OF HOLYROODHOUSE, FOUR-

TEENTH CENTURY . . . .129



Guide to the

Palace and Abbey Church
of Holyropdhouse.



The Palace.

THE main entrance to the Palace of Holyroodhouse is
in the west front, access to which from the Canongate
lay through a vaulted Gothic gatehouse giving into a fore-
court, now thrown open. This picturesque feature, the
"foir-werk" of James IV., of which traces may be seen in
the shape of the wall-ribs of the vaulted passage remaining
in the wall of the building containing the Abbey Court
and Royal Mews, was removed in 1753. Except the
north-west tower, these arched wall-ribs, together with the
lower part of the round turret at the north-east angle of
the Abbey Court House, and some of the ground-floor
chambers, including the vaulted prison-cell, are all that
now remain of the Palace erected in 1501-3 for the
reception of Margaret Tudor as the bride of James IV.
Not without remonstrance and popular indignation was
the destruction of this "foir-werk" wrought. In some

A



2 PALACE AND ABBEY OF HOLYROODHOUSE.

doggerel verse circulated in the city, entitled "The Echo
of the Royal Porch of the Palace of Holyrood House,
which fell under Military Execution, Anno 1753," "Auld
Reekie" is represented as saying, with too much truth
as was to turn out

" My Cross, likewise, of old renown
Will next to you be tumbled down ;
And by degrees each ancient place
Will perish by this modern race."

The beautiful old cross of Edinburgh, with a shaft 40
feet long in a single piece, was destroyed on i3th March
1756 by order of the magistrates, as being, in the words of
Maitland, one of those erections whereby " the High Street
was greatly pestered and obstructed, and whereby the
beauty of the noble street was greatly eclipsed." So
different are the judgments of men of different generations
in matters of taste !

The present approach to the Palace from the north was
made by direction of Prince Albert in 1857, and was laid
through the north garden, which was Queen Mary's
favourite resort.

The first object to catch a visitor's eye upon entering
what used to be the Fore Court, now called "the Place,"
is a fountain with octagonal base, erected in 1859 after the
style of one in Linlithgow Palace which dates from the
earlier half of the sixteenth century. Built in three stages,
this modern fountain is surmounted by an imperial crown,
supported by the figures of four yeomen of the guard.
Herein James VI. would have found much to please him,
for in this design the crown serves as a cistern to supply
water through lions' mouths to the basins below, thereby
illustrating, accidentally or by design, an ancient principle



4 PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

of monarchy to wit, that the Crown is the sole fountain
of honour.

Passing into the grand entrance, under a sculpture of
the royal arms of Scotland, the visitor has on his left hand




FIG. 2.-PLAN OF GROUND FLOOR, HOLYROOD PALACE.

what is usually called James V.'s tower, but should be
properly called James IV. 's, as there is good evidence to
prove that it was begun by that monarch before 1501.
It is the only part of the present building older than
1672. On his right is the tower erected in that year to
correspond with the other, the whole front measuring



OF HOLYROODHOUSE.



5



215 ft. in length. He is now in the quadrangle designed
by Sir William Bruce, built to the order of Charles II.,
measuring 94 ft. square, and consisting of three storeys,
the court being surrounded by a piazza, of nine arches




FIG. 3. PLAN OF FIRST FLOOR, HOLYROOD PALACE.

on the east, north, and south sides respectively. On
the inside of the arcade is the inscription

FVN : BE : RO : MYLNE : MM : 1671 :

That is, " Founded by Robert Mylne, Master Mason,
1671." The architect's original design for these facades



PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

was more ornate than the somewhat severe style which
they now exhibit; but the Lords of the Treasury were
inexorable, and cut down the expenses upon a Palace
which, as it turned out, Charles II. was never to see.

Turning to the left upon entering the west front of the
Palace, the visitor passes along the colonnade to the north
side of the quadrangle, enters the first door he comes to,
and ascends a staircase which is remarkable only for its
wrought-iron railing, dating from the seventeenth century,
and exhibiting a bold design of crowned thistles. Opening
off the landing is what was designed as a Council Chamber
in the Palace, built by Sir William Bruce for Charles II.,
but it is now known as

The Picture Gallery,

from the spurious portraits of one hundred Scottish kings
which line the walls. These effigies were executed in
fulfilment of a contract, dated 26th February 1684, be-
tween Hugh Wallace, his Majesty's Cashkeeper, on the
one part, and " James de Witte, Painter, Indwellar in the
Cannogate," on the other ; whereby the said James " binds
and obleidges him to compleatly draw, finish and perfyte
The Pictures of the haill Kings who have Reigned over
this Kingdome of Scotland, from King Fergus the first
King, to King Charles the Second, our Gracious Soveraigne
who now Reignes Inclusive, being all in number One
hundred and ten, . . . and to make them like unto the
Originalls which are to be given to him." It was stipulated
that the portraits were to be finished "in large Royall
postures " within two years, the artist's fees being at the
rate of ,120 per annum. Originally in hanging frames,
the canvasses were badly slashed by the sabres of Hawley's



OF HOLYROODHOUSE. 7

dragoons, who, having been routed by Prince Charlie's
Highlanders at Falkirk on lyth January 1746, vented
their ill-humour upon these works of art. The pictures
were subsequently removed from the frames, repaired, and
fixed in the panels of the wainscoting. Part of de Witt's
duty was to inscribe each portrait with the name of the
subject, "the names of the Kings most famous in large
characters, and the remanent in lesser characters." All
the likenesses and many of the very names of the earlier
monarchs are fictitious ; others represent but the kings of
the various divisions Pictish, Scottish, Cumbrian, &c.
which cannot be considered as consolidated into a single
realm until Malcolm Ceanmor defeated and slew Macbeath
in 1057. No doubt, in depicting some of the later kings
de Witt had authentic originals to work from.

The catalogue, taken for what it is worth, is as follows,
the figures within parentheses being those inscribed by
de Witt, who is not responsible for the grotesque chrono-
logical jumble of the present arrangement :

1 (97) Robert L, "the Bruce," 1306-29; restored

Scottish independence.

2 (47) Congallus II., 558. Probably Conall the

son of Comgall, King of Dalriada. Died
in 574-

3 (57) Eugenius VI., 688.

4 (56) Eugenius V., 684.

5 (100) Robert II., 1371-90.

6 (61) Etfinus, 730.

7 (60) Mordacus, 715.

8 (64) Solvathius, 767.

9 (9 6 ) John Baliol, 1292-96; dethroned by Ed-

ward I.
10 (101) Robert III., 1390-1406.



R PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

11 (36) Romachus, 348.

12 (102) James I., 1424-37 ; murdered at Perth.

13 (91) Donaldus I., 199. Erroneously inscribed

David I. [See No. 66.]

14 (59) Eugenius VII., 699.

15 (63) Fergus III., 764.

16 (62) Eugenius VIII., 761.

r 7 ( I0 3) James II., 1437-1460; killed at the siege
of Roxburgh Castle.

1 8 (68) Alpinus, 831 ; slain in battle at Pitelpin,

834.

19 (67) Dungallus sive Dugallus, 824.

20 (66) Convallus III., 819.

21 (104) James III., 1460-1488; murdered at Mil-

town of Bannockburn.

22 (73) Gregory, 876; properly Ciric or Grig; ex-

pelled in 889 ; died at Dundurn, 896.

23 (71) Constantinus II., 859.

24 (70) Donald V., 854.

2 5 ( I0 5) James IV., 1489-1513; killed at Flodden.

26 (79) Culenas, 966 ; properly Culen Finn or

White Colin ; killed by the Britons,
971.

27 (72) Ethus, cognomento Alipes (that is, Wing-

footed), 874.

28 (75) Constantine III., 904.

29 (106) James V., 1513-1542; father of Mary

Queen of Scots.

30 (89) Edgar, 1097-1107.

31 (80) Kenneth III., 970; slain in civil war on

the Earn in 1005.

32 (76) Malcolm I., 943 ; slain near Fetteresso in

954-



OF HOLYROODHOUSE. 9

33 (107) Mary Stuart, 1542; abdicated, 1567; exe-

cuted at Fotheringhay, 1587.

34 (95) Alexander III., 1249; killed by a fall from

his horse near Kinghorn, 1285.

35 (94) Alexander II., 1214-1249.

36 (90) Alexander I., "the Fierce," 1107-1124.

37 (108) James VI., 1567-1625; succeeded to the

throne of England, 1 603.

38 (83) Malcolm II., 1005-1034.

39 (82) Grimus, 996.

40 (74) Donald VI., 904.

41 (109) Charles I., 1625-1649 ; executed in London.

42 (86) Malcolm III., "Ceanmor" or Great-head,

1057-93; practically the first King of all
Scotland ; slain in Northumberland.

43 (85) Macbeath, 1041 ; slain at Lumphannan in



44 (52) Duncan I., 1034. The real date of his

accession as King of the Cumbrian Britons
was c. 1018; slain by Macbeath in 1040.

45 (no) Charles II., crowned at Scone in 1651,

and at Westminster in 1661 ; died in

1685.

Ferchardus I., 621.

James VII. and II., 1685 ; dethroned, 1688.
William "the Lion," 1165-1214.
Donald II., 264.
Kinnatellus, 569 ; probably intended for

Conad Cerr Kenneth the Left-handed

who ruled the Scots of Dalriada for three

months about 607.
51 (88) Duncan II., 1094; murdered by direction

of his uncle, Donald Bane.




10 PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

52 (92) Malcolm IV., "the Maiden," 1153-65.

53 (35) Fincormacus, 301.

54 (77) Mainus, 291 B.C.

55 (98) David II., 1329-71.

56 (99) Edward Baliol, 1332 ; surrendered the

kingdom to Edward III. of England in
1356.

(2) Feretharus, 305 B.C.
Fergus I., 330 B.C.

(5) Nothatus, 233 B.C.
(4) Dornadilla, 262 B.C.

(3) Indulfus, 969, son of Constantin. His

actual reign was 954-963.

62 (18) Caratacus, 63.

6 3 (9) Josina, 169 B.C.
64

65 (6) Rutherus, 231 B.C.

66 (27) David L, 1124-1153; founder of the Abbey.

This painting is wrongly inscribed Donaldus
I., but the scene with the stag in the
background clearly indicates whom it was
intended to represent. 1

67 (25) Ethodius L, 165.

68 (19) Corbredus L, 55.

69 (14) Evenus II., 77 B.C.

70 (40) Fergusius II., 404.

71 (15) Ederus, 60 B.C.

72 (65) Achaius, 787.

73 (n) Durstius, 10 B.C.

74 (12) Evenus L, 98 B.C.

75 (13) Gillus, 79 B.C.

76 (16) Evenus III., 12 B.C.

1 See Historical Sketch, p. 71.



OF HOLYROODHOUSE. II

(20) Dardanus.
(24) Conarus, 149.
(23) Mogaldus, 113.
(22) Lugtacus, no.

(21) Corbredus (Galdus), 76.
(31) Findocus, 253.

(29) Athirco, 231.

(37) Angusianus, 321.

(33) Donald III., 265.

(34) Crathilinthus, 277.

(41) Eugenius II., 420.

(38) Fetheimachus, 354.

(39) Eugenius I., 357.

(42) Dongardus, 451.

(44) Congallus I., 479.

(45) Goranus, 501.

(46) Eugenius III., 535.

(49) Aidanus, 570; inaugurated by St Columba;
died in 606.

95 (50) Kenneth I., 605.

96 (58) Amberkeletus, 697. His true name was

Ainbhceallach ; slain in 719 by his brother
Selvach.

97 (54) Ferchardus II., 646. Ferchar fada, Far-

quhar the Tall, father of Ainbhceallach
and Selvach ; King of Dalriadic Scots ;
died in 697.

98 (55) Malduinus, 664.

99 (69) Kennethus II., 834, conqueror of the Picts.

Kenneth Macalpin ; died in 860.
100 (51) Eugenius IV., 606. Probably Ewen or

Eugene, King of Strathclyde.
James VII. and II.



12 PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

The visitor probably will give but fleeting attention to
this collection, and will pass forward to examine a work of
rare merit, which is displayed upon two oaken stands in
the middle of the floor, namely

The Portraits of James III. and his Queen,
Margaret of Denmark.

This painting is on both sides of two panels of fir,
covered with gypsum, each measuring inside the frames
about 6 ft. 10 in. by 3 ft. 8 in. The subject, the identity
of the persons represented, the artist, and the original ar-
rangement of the pieces, have been matter of animated
discussion among experts in history and art. It is need-
less to mention all the divergent views which have been
propounded from time to time ; those, probably, will come
nearest the truth who accept the opinion expressed by Mr
James Caw, Curator of the Scottish National Portrait
Gallery, in his monumental work on Scottish portraits. 1

First, as to the personages represented. On the front
of the right panel (left as you look at it) is James III.
kneeling, a figure of St Andrew standing behind him sup-
porting the crown upon the King's head, which has caused
these paintings to be known popularly as a coronation
piece ; but James III. was only nine years old when he
was crowned at Kelso in 1460 nine years before his
marriage with Margaret of Denmark, whose portrait appears
in the corresponding panel. It has been surmised that in
St Andrew was represented Schevey, Archbishop of St
Andrews ; but, as observed by the late Mr David Laing,
the painting bears no resemblance to the fine medallion

1 Scottish Portraits. Edinburgh, 1902.



OF HOLYROODHOUSE. 13

portrait of that prelate by an Italian artist. A youth
kneeling behind the King is probably his son, afterwards
James IV., who was more than twenty years younger than
his father a considerably greater difference in age than
that indicated in the picture. But, as Mr Caw has pointed
out, " as this altar-piece was probably painted in Flanders
from material supplied by the donor, Sir Edward Bonkil,
the apparent ages of king and prince are not of first-class
importance. Moreover, the anomaly of representing even
a very young prince as of older years is not unknown in
fifteenth and sixteenth century art"

On the front of the second panel Queen Margaret is
shown kneeling. Behind her stands a saint in plate
armour, holding a standard in his left hand charged with
a red cross and the inscription Ave Maria. His right
hand is extended, as if indicating delivery of the Princess
to her adopted realm. The kingdoms of Norway, Sweden,
and Denmark at the time of this marriage, 1469, were
united under one crown ; it is doubtful, therefore, whether
this figure may represent Cnut, patron saint of Denmark,
or Olaf, patron of Norway. The identity of the Princess, is
put beyond all doubt by the lozenge on the cover of her
prie-dieu, displaying the royal arms of Scotland impaled
with those of the triple kingdom of Scandinavia.

Turning to the reverse of the King's panel, we find a
powerful representation of the Trinity the Father seated
on a golden throne, with a crystal sphere rolling at his
feet, supporting the crucified Son, above whose head
hovers the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove.

The back of the Queen's panel displays an ecclesiastic
on his knees, with an angel seated at the organ behind
him, and another angel standing at the back of the organ.
An escutcheon displayed on the organ-seat bears the arms



14 PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

of Sir Edward Bonkil, 1 the subject of the portrait, first Pro-
vost of Trinity College, and confessor to its founder, Mary
of Gueldres, widow of James II. This panel is accounted
the finest piece of painting in the whole composition.

So much for the personages represented in this beautiful
painting. As to the occasion for which it was painted, we




FIG. 4. ARMS OF MARGARET, QUEEN OF SCOTLAND, A.D. 1469.

may dismiss the idea that it was the coronation of Queen
Margaret. It appears to be a votive piece, executed to
the order of Provost Bonkil, and dedicated by him as an
altar-piece in the Church of the Holy Trinity, built by
Mary of Gueldres to commemorate her husband, James
II., who was killed at the siege of Roxburgh Castle in

1 The prefix "Sir" does not here indicate secular knighthood, but
the honorary title commonly accorded to priests as " the Pope's
knights."



OF HOLYROODHOUSE. 1$

1460. Queen Mary died in 1463, when no more than
the choir and transept of the church were built. Mr David
Laing suggested that the angel wearing a diadem, seated
at the organ in the portrait of Bonkil, represented the
deceased Queen, but that cannot be considered as more
than ingenious conjecture. The whole composition may
be understood to depict the King and Queen of Scots and
the Heir- Apparent, supported by the patron saints of their
respective countries, worshipping the Holy Trinity, to
whom the church was dedicated, and whose simulacrum,
whether carved or painted, probably formed the subject of
the centre-piece. This centre-piece has disappeared per-
haps destroyed as idolatrous in the fervour of the Reform-
ation. When these folding panels were closed in front of
the centre-piece, Provost Bonkil, on the reverse of the
Queen's panel, would appear adoring the Holy Trinity de-
picted on the reverse of the King's panel.

Assuming that the youth kneeling behind the King
represents Prince James, who was bom in 1473, an( * that
the painter followed precedent by giving him an indefinite
age, the composition appears to date not later than 1476,
when the King's second son was born, also named James, 1
else he, too, would have been included in the group.

This fine painting has been attributed to a variety of
masters. The first mention of it as part of the royal
collection occurs among the Public Records, apparently
of date about 1623 or 1624, in a document entitled "A
Note of all such Pictures as your Highness [James VI. and
I.] hath at this present, done by severall Famous Masters
owne hands, by the Life : Inprimis, King James the Third

1 Afterwards Duke of Ross, Archbishop of St Andrews at the nge of
twenty-one, and Chancellor of Scotland at the age of twenty-six. Died
aged twenty-seven.



16 PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

of Scotland, with his Queene, doune by Joan Vanek [Jan
Van Eyck]." After that period the identity both of por-
traits and painter became confused, and gave rise to con-
siderable controversy. In a catalogue of pictures at
Hampton Court, compiled during the brief reign of James
VII. and II. [1685-88], the altar-piece appears as
follows :

No. 955 One of the Kings of Scotland at devotion, crowned by

St Andrew ; James the Fourth.
No. 960 One of the Queens of Scotland at devotion ; a Saint

in armour by her.

When William III. bought Nottingham House in 1691
and transformed it into Kensington Palace, it was furnished
with pictures from St James's, Windsor, and Hampton
Court. Accordingly, in Faulkner's History of Kensington
[1820, pp. 516, 517] these panels are mentioned as hang-
ing in the Queen's dining-room, are described as portraits
of James IV. of Scotland and his brother Alexander [he had
no brother of that name] and of Margaret his Queen, and
are assigned to a painter of the fifteenth century, although
the marriage of James IV. did not take place till 1503.
In 1836 they were taken back to Hampton Court, where
they remained till 1857, when, in compliance with the
prayer of a memorial prepared by the late David Laing
and the late W. B. Johnstone, R.S.A., Queen Victoria
was graciously pleased to restore this historic work of art
to Holyrood.

Now the attribution of the work to Van Eyck is ob-
viously wrong, for that master died shortly after 1440.
After examining all the evidence in favour of other painters,
Mr C.aw concludes that " Hugo van der Goes seems the
most likely to have executed these panels. His work is



OF HOLYROODHOUSE. 17

exceedingly rare. . . . The famous Portinari altar-piece,
now in the picture gallery of the Hospital S. Maria
Nuova, Florence, which is mentioned by Vasari, and is
dated by M. Wauters 1470-75, seems the only one upon
the authenticity of which experts agree." He proceeds
to point out many features in which the Portinari and the
Holyrood compositions resemble each other. Van der
Goes was dean of the Guild of Painters in Ghent, 1473-75 >
in 1476 he retired to the monastery of Rouge- Cloitre, and
died in 1482.

It is indeed wonderful that this work of art escaped the
destruction to which the zeal of Reformers doomed so
much excellent work in Scotland. In 1567 Trinity
College was conveyed by gift of the Crown to the Provost
and Magistrates of Edinburgh; in 1574 the collegiate
authorities condemned their own ancient seal as idolatrous,
because "it contenis the ymage of the Trinitie efter the
auld maner," and directed that a new one should be made.
Now one of the compartments in this altar-piece represents
the Trinity, wherefore it is well that it had been removed
at the time of the transfer, probably to the Chapel Royal
of Holyrood. 1

This Picture Gallery was the scene of the grand ball
given by Prince Charles Edward in 1745, so graphically
described in the pages of Waverley. Since ihe Union
it has been the place of assembly for the election of
Scottish representative peers, and here also the Lord High
Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of

1 Not to be confounded with the Abbey Church, afterwards con-
stituted the Chapel Royal. The "chapel royal of Halyrudhous,"
where mass was sung for Mary Queen of Scots, is believed to have
stood on the south side of the old Palace, and was removed when Sir
William Bruce erected I he present one.



U



1 8 PALACE AND ABBEY CHURCH

Scotland holds his annual levees. The Gallery measures
150 ft. in length, 24 ft. in breadth, and is about 20 ft.
high.

On returning from the Picture Gallery to the staircase,


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