Herbert Menzies Marshall.

Daily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. .. online

. (page 1 of 77)
Online LibraryHerbert Menzies MarshallDaily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. .. → online text (page 1 of 77)
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\A/EEK, MARCH 29 TO APRIL 4, 1909




LIBRARY of CONGRESS
Two Copies Received

MAK 29 ^m

'2-. Copyrljfnt £ntry
CLASS^ /* XXc, Nu,
COPY B.




Cofyright 1 000. B. L. Clarkt



HIPPODROME

SIXTH AVENUE Telephone. 3400 Bryant 43d to 44th Street*

Matinees at 2, Bvenlnsi at 8 TWICE DAILY Matinee. Best Seatt, $1.
SPORTINQ DAYS BIRD BALLET BATTLE IN THE SKIES



VOL. 13



$2.00 A YEAR



5 CENTS A COPY



NO. 157



tvyialit. taoo. bv Dailv Attyactions in A^ew York. Inc.



I



PALMER




SINGER



ALL CARS SOLD BY US ARE LICENSED UNDER SELDEN PATENT
AND GUARANTEED FOR ONE



VEAR ^ ^^^




28-30 H. P., $3,500

Q The Palmer-Singer Town and Country Car, 1909
Model, T3'pe XXX-2. is the most serviceable car on the
market to-day. Its 28-30 H. P. motor provides ample
power to take its full complement of passengers on long,
hard tours over any road at a very good speed. Closed,
it is a beautiful luxurious Town Car, seating four inside,
ideal for the purpose and far superior to. many foreign
makes at double the price. A glance at the specifica-
tions will show the remarkable value it offers.



Palmer & Singer Manufacturing Co.

1620-22-24 Broadway, N. Y. 1321 Michigan Ave., Chicago

New York and Chicago Agents "The Simplex"



m MEW YORK

cA Weekly cMa.ga.zine T>e'voted to c/ld-vance Information.



Vol. XIII



MARCH 29 to APRIL 4, 1909



No. 157



Daily Attractions in
New York, (Inc.)

ThU magaiine is owned and published by Daih
Attractions in New York, a New York
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue j
E.^R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke,
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the
officers IS the office of this Magazine.



B. L. CLARKE, Publisher,

I Madison Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg.

Telephone, i59Gramercy

Daily Attractions circulates through all the

leading hotels in New York City

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION

IT is NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS
Five Cents a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars.

Advertising rates based on bona fide circulation
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors
have credential cards ; ask to see them before
placing order, for your protection and ours.

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon-
day for the following week's issue. Advertise-
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays.

Copyright, 1909, by Daily Attractions in
New York. (Inc. )



CONTENTS Page

Art Notes 3

"Busy Women " (Haryot Holt Dey) 27

Churches 14-1S

Clubs 13

Did You Know in the Year i78g ? 29

Elevated Railroads 30

Ferries 30

Foreign Consuls 28

Hospitals 26

Hotels 20

Li braries 28

Map of Manhattan 16-19

Ocean Going Steamers 25

Public Buildings 28

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 4

Taxacabs 16

Theatres 21-25

This Week in New York 5-12

Where to Shop in New York 8



ART NOTES

National Academy of Design — 215

West 57th St. Spring Exhibition.
Admission, 50 cents. Hours: 10
a. m. to 6 p. m. and 8 to 10 p. m.
(Sundays from 1 to 4 p. m., Free)
(to April 17). Frederick Keppel
& Co.-^ East 39th st. E.xhibi-
tions of Etchings of the seven-
teenth century (to April 6).
Montross Galleries — 372 Fifth
ave. Annual exhibition of the
"Ten American Painters" (to
April 7). American Art Associa-
tion — 6 Madison Square South.
Collection of objects taken from
Siamese and Cambodian temples,
(indef. ). New York School of
Applied Design for Women — 160
Lexington ave. Permanent exhi-
bition of work by advanced stu-
dents, (indef.). R. Ederheimer's
—509 Fifth ave. Exhibition of old
Engravings (indef.). Lenox Li-
brary — Fifth ave. and 71st st. Ex-
hibition of Painter-lithographs,
Portraits of and Prints relating to
Lincoln (indef.).

N. B. — All exhibitions are open to
the public unless stated, when the ad-
mission fee will be given.




Just Try It



THE MOST DELIGHTFUL
AND SPARKLING WATER

A National Favorite at Banquets, Hotels, Cafes,

Clubs and Family Tables. The best Mixer.

Order of Park & Tilford, Charles & Co., Acker,

Ukrrall & Condi t Co., and other Al stores

ARONDACK Spring Co., Saratog:a Springfs, N. Y.



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK



SHORT TALKS



The newest models in spring suits
are both two and three-piece.

In coats there seems to be a lean-
ing toward shorter lengths, some
being only 26 and 27 inches long.
How these shorter coats will take
is problematical, as the longer ones
are much more adapted for the hip-
less style than are the 26-inch coats.

In the dressier coats, there is a
very marked tendency to fasten
over at the left side.

In the three-piece suit the most
noticeable point is the lowering of
the waist line, which has been men-
tioned in this "Talk." The high
Empire waist line is evidently on
the wane; nearly all have the nor-
mal line, some with graduated belt
being somewhat shorter in the back.

At a benefit concert at one of our
large hotels, a gown of old rose
cashmere, worn by a most graceful
woman, is well worthy of mention.

The long skirt hung straight from
a round waist line, belted with silk
of the same shade. It opened at
one side to the belt, with the edges
close together. Near the hem they
fell apart a little, showing a pleated
panel of self-toned embroidery. To
the height of the knees on each
edge was a row of large, silk-cov-
ered buttons. Embroidery was odd-
ly arranged about the armholes,
and, marked in a great motif, the
front of the corsage, low cut over a
guimpe of ecru tulle, laid over old
rose. She wore the oddest possible
hat of white straw, coarsely woven
in great cords, like a basket. It was
trimmed on one side with a great
rosette of black grapes, set inside
of a circle of green leaves. Under
the narrow brim of the pot crown
an old rose ribbon band was used.

Another woman wore a costume
of tabac brown ribbed cloth^ striped
inch-wide with black. The stripes
were cleverly arranged in straight
lines over the hips of the long skirt,
meeting in bias fashion under a nar-
row box-pleat in the back and front.
Buttons covered with black satin



marked the edges of the pleats near
the hem. The half-long coat con-
tinued the box-pleat in the back,
pressed flatly to the hem. On the
body part was much trimming of
wide black silk braid, that shaped a
bolero, lengthening in front far be-
low the waist. Braided tabs crossed
on the bust, closing it.

The tailored suits of voiles and
other like materials which proved
such a delight during the sultry
summer days will happily be the
vogue again.

We describe a tailored costume of
coarse wood-colored tulle. The cir-
cular skirt has three flat bias cloth
bands at the foot, set wide apart;
between each one runs a curling
line of narrow silk braid. Bias
cloth bands stripe the long coat;
each stripe ends in a little loop; the
sleeves, finished in the same man-
ner, falling over the hand like a
fringe. The chemisette is of large,
dotted, wood-colored tulle, with a
cravat of black silk, having long,
narrow, tasselled ends.

Those who have lived through
and battled with the peculiar
climatic changes of a New York
winter realize in a dull way they
lack vigor, elasticity; to embody the
feeling in one word, they are
"tired.'" They need building up —
look in vain for a tonic that is not
medicine. To those we tell of the
Pleasant Valley Wine, the pure
juice of the grape. If you have
never travelled through the beauti-
ful ]\Iohawk Valley, you must cer-
tainly give yourself the pleasure of
visiting the home of "The Pleasant
Valley Wine." Look over the beau-
tiful vinej^ard with the vines bend-
ing with the bunches of grapes.
With the sun shining upon them,
bringing out the exquisite red and
purple, an artist need not leave his
country for inspiration. For a table
wine for family or hotel, it is un-
equalled, whilst the "tired" christen
it "The wine of the convaleseenit..''''
Madame Roberta.



tOTTS




This Week in New York

Monday, March 29th

MISCELLANEOUS

'"Ceylon, 'The Pearl of India': Anuradliapura and Its Remarkable
i'.uddhist Ruins; Penang and Singapore; Hong Kong and Canton, in
China," lecture by :\Ir. Walter Scott Perry. St. Peter's Hall, 20th St.,
lietween Eighth and Xinth a\'es. 8.15 p. in. Free.

The Story Tellers' Club of the West Side Y. AI. C. A., 318 West
57th St., meets every Monday evening in Room 511 at 9.15. You are
cordially invited to attend.

Demonstration by the Parks and Playgrounds Association on the
roof of the Waldorf-Astoria to test the feasability of using the roofs of
great buildings for playground purposes. A song recital will take place
in the sun parlor on the roof. Isador Luckstone's "Doll's Calander,"
dedicated to ]\Irs. Leonard \\'. Ely, will be given, Mrs. Ely singing to
Mr. Luckstone's accompaniment. The visiting children will dance folk
dances, in addition to playing games. Waldorf-.Astoria. Afternoon. Pro-
ceeds of the recital will be contributed to the Playground Association's
work.



LADIES! We clean Kid Gloves, all lengths, at 5 cents per pair

CLEANERS OF FINE GOWNS



592 FIFTH AVENUE, bet. 47th and 48th Streets -

1 EAST 38th STREET, corner Fifth Avenue

2145 BROADWAY, bet. 7Sth=76th Sts. (Astor Apartment)

2269 BROADWAY, bet. 81st and 82d Streets -

218 AMSTERDAM AVE., bet. 69th=70th Sts. (Sherman Sq.

704 EIGHTH AVENUE, bet. 44th and 4Sth Streets

905 SEVENTH AVENUE, bet. 57th and 58th Streets -

641 MADISON AVENUE, bet. 59th and 60th Streets

125th STREET and MORNINGSIDE AVENUE

61 EAST 125th STREET, bet. Madison and Fourth Avenue

NEWPORT STORE, 158 Bellevue Avenue, Newport, R. I.

WORKS: 6=8-10-12 MANHATTAN STREET



Phone, 2243 Bryant

Phone, 5376 38th St.

Phone, 2119 Columlius

Phone, 1682 Riverside

) Phone, 1437 Columbus

Phone, 4136 Bryant

Phone, 1546 Columbus

Phone, 4329 Plaza

Phone, 3210 Morningside

S Phone, 973 Harlem

Phone, 776 Newport

Phone. 3210 Morningside



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

THIS WEEK— Continued

Burton Holmes, Travelogues: "Vienna," at the Lyceum Theatre, 45th
St., east of Broadway. 3 p. m. Tickets at box office.

"Mosquitoes" (illustrated), lecture by Ira S. Wile, M.D. New York
Public Library, 112 East 96th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

Horse Show — American Horse Exchange (to March 30).

"Italian Painting: 'The Baroque Period,'" lecture by Edward R.
Smith, reference librarian of the Avery Library, in Room 309, Havemeyer
Hall, Columbia University. 4.10 p. m. Open to the public.

Eighty-fourth annual exhibition of the National Academy of Design,
215 West 57th st. Admission, 50 cents. (Hours: 10 a. m. to 6 p. m.
and 8 to 10 p. m.)

"Joan of Arc" (illustrated), lecture by Prof. Georges Castegnier.
Public School 159, 241 East 119th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

Minerva, meeting. Waldorf-Astoria. 12 noon.

Calvary Church, Fourth ave. and 21st st., noon-day service, 12.25 to
12.50. Address by the Rev. J. Lewis Parks, S.T.D., rector (to April 3).
A cordial welcome for all.

"Five Months in Algiers," lecture by Miss M. Elizabeth Crouse, at
the League for Political Education, 23 West 44th st. 8.30 p. in. Single
admission, 50 cents.

Daughters of Indiana, ]\Iiss Mary Garrett Hay, meeting. Hotel
Astor. 3 p. m.

Concert for the benefit of the Diet Kitchen, one of the most worthy
charities, which suppl)' nourishing food to poor invalids. Among the
artists will be Miss Germaine Schnitzer, Mr. Albert Spalding, M. Charles
Gilibert, and Mr. Marcel Charlier, the accompanist. Waldorf-Astoria.
3 p. m. Tickets may be obtained from Mrs. Henry Villard, 145 West
58th St., and at the Waldorf-Astoria.

Economic Club of New York, dinner. Hotel Astor. 7 p. m.

Present Events: "The New City Budget," lecture by Mr. Michael M.
Davis, Jr., at the League for Political Education, 23 West 44th st. 11 a. m.
Single admission, 50 cents.



Tuesday, March 30th



MISCELLANEOUS

Professional Woman's League, subscription bridge and euchre, at the
Hotel Remington, 129 West 46th st. Afternoon. Tickets may be obtained
from members.

The County Meath Home Industrial Association, which was formed
by the Countess of Aberdeen and other prominent ladies to furnish work



DAILY LENTKN NOON-DAY !

A Brief Address by DR. PARKS, on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday



MADISON AVE. AND FORTY-FOURTH STREET

A Cordial Welcome for .\ll

DAILY LENTKN NOON-DAY .'SERVICES, 12. OG TO 12.30



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

THIS WEEK— Continued

to the Irish peasant women in tlieir own homes, has made a great success
with the lace made under its auspices. It has opened an exhibition of
robes, scarfs, fichus, coHars, etc., at the Scuola Gallery, 59 West 39th st.
Some of the specimens are of singular beauty.

"The Reform of tiie Tariff," lecture by Eugene E. Agger, Ph.D.
New York Public Library, 103 West 135th st. 8.15 p. m. Eree.

The Dannreuthcr String Quartet, at the Horace Mann School, Broad-
way and 120th st. 4.10 p. m. Open to the public.

"Henry V." (illustrated by selections), lecture by Mrs. Olivia Sanger
Hall. St. Cornelius' Church, 423 West 46th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

Daily Attr.\ctions in New York is published every Saturday for the
succeeding week's daily attractions. You cannot buy it on the news-
stands, but you can subscribe to it for three months for fifty cents.
Subscribe now and plan your pleasures ahead.

"Paris" (illustrated), lecture by Prof. A. D. F. Hamlin. American
Museum of Natural History, 77th st. and Central Park West. 8.15 p. m.
Free.

Sent free for 2-cent stamp to pay postage, one set of Mennen's
Bridge Whist Tallies, enough for six tables, by mentioning Daily Attrac-
tions in your letter to Gerhard Mennen Co., Newark, N. J.

Traffic Club of New York, meeting. Hotel Astor. 8 p. m.

Ethical Social League, meeting. Hotel Astor. 3 p. m.



Wednesday, March 31st

MISCELLANEOUS

Mothers of Great Men: "The Mothers of Goethe and Shakespeare,"
talk by Miss Jessie Allen Fowler, 18 East 22d st. 11 a. m. Free.

New Yorkers, Mrs. Horace A. Rounds, president, subscription bridge
and euchre. Hotel Astor. 2 p. m. Tickets, $1, may be obtained from
Mrs. Charles K. Mills, chairman, 770 St. Nicholas ave.

Mahler, with the New York Philharmonic. Carnegie Hall, 57th st.
and Seventh ave. 8.15 p. m. Tickets at box office.

"Land of the Panung and Yellow Robe" (illustrated), lecture by Mr.
Charles S. Braddock. Young Men's Institute, 222 Bowery. 8.15 p. m.
Free.




HERBO-NERVO TONIC

CONFECTION AND SODA DRINK

ABSOLUTE PURITY GUARANTEED. SERIAL No. 12,B«e

Hegeman's, Riker^s, Caswell & Massey, Bamadell ^ Co., R. H.
Macy and all drag counterB aud Boda (oantaiDS. Confaction at
Park Si Tilford'a and all first class dealer!. Indoraed by tha late
Dr. J. Clark* Thomaa, New York City. Manufactured by

HERBO-NERVO CO.

42 and 44 West 39th Street New York City



WHERE TO SHOP IN NEW YORK



The following establishments have been carefully selected as furnishing the best assortment
of the special article mentioned, at prices that are right.



BOOTS AND SHOES
CRAWFORD SHOES

23d St. and 4th Ave. 93 Nassau, cor. Fulton St.
1363 B'way, nr. 36th St. 141 West 125th St.

103 West 42d St., near 6th Ave.
Many other stores.



CHIROPODIST & MANICURE
Dr. J. T. WHELAN & Miss M. S. WILSON

McCutcheon Bldg., 347 Fifth Ave., near 34th St.
Electro Vibratory Facial Massage.
All instruments sterilized.
'Phone; Madison 6igz.



GLOVES

LORD & TAYLOR, Broadway & 20th St.

"REYNIER" : perfection in quality, fit and style.
New importations for street and evening wear.
All the fashionable shades and lengths.



JEWELERS
BLACK, STARR & FROST

5th Ave. & 39th St.
Pearl Necklaces, Diamonds, Emeralds,
Sapphires. Exclusive designs in diamond
jewelry and watches.



MEN'S CLOTHING a^ndloml'ure

BROOKS BROTHERS, svay & 22d St.

Ranging in price from the medium to the more

expensive.

Also boys' clothing.



SILKS AND VELVETS
LORD & TAYLOR, frl^/J & mh'ltV

100 shades Satin Dora - at 58c. per yard

75 shades Salome Silk - at *i.35 per yard

75 shades Indro Silk - at $1.00 per yard

Black Satin Florence, 36 inch, at Si-So per yard



SHIRTWAISTS

A complete assortment of Lingerie Waists for
Spring and Summer wear, at moderate prices

JAMES McCREERY & CO.
23d Street 34th Street



STATIONERY Fine Art

BLACK, STARR & FROST

5th Ave. & 39th St.
Heraldic Dies, Wedding Invitations
Visiting and Reception Cards
Imported and Domestic Writing Paper



Mail orders will receive careful and prompt attention. You will confer a favor by mentioning
DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK when purchasing.



THIS WEEK— Continued

The Wednesday Harmony Club, concert for the bcnelit of the Free
Industrial School for Crippled Children. VVhldorf-Astoria. Evening.

Phi Beta Kappe, meeting. Hotel Astor. 8 p. m.

National Arts Club, an "Evening of Story and Song," arranged by
Miss Elizabeth Jordan.

Torry Botanical Club, at the New York Botanical Garden. Dr.
John K. Small and Mr. Norman Taylor will deliver address. 3.30 p. m.
Visitors welcome.

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st St., the Rev.
Charles A. Eaton, D.D., minister; Wednesday evening meeting. 8 p. m.
A cordial welcome for every one.

Wednesday evening meeting, Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal
Church, Madison ave. and 60th st., the Rev. Wallace MacMullen, D.D.,
minister. 8 p. m. A cordial welcome for all.

"The New York Nautical Schoolship" (illustrated), lecture by Keran
O'Brien, M.D., Sunshine Chapel, 550 West 40th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

Organ recital by Samuel A. Baldwin, at the College of the City of
New York. Amsterdam ave. and 138th st. 3 p. m. Free.

First annual dinner of the Optimists' Club. Waldorf-Astoria. Eve-
ning. Among the speakers will be Joseph H. Choate, Mayor McClellan,
Hamilton Wright Mabie and others.



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

THIS WEEK — Continued

Wednesday evening meeting, the Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth
ave. and 29th St., the Rev. David James Burrell, D.D., LL.D., minister.
8 p. m. A welcome for every one.

"A World's Race for a Continent" (illustrated), lecture by Edward
Hagaman Hall, L.H.D. New York Public Library, 66 Leroy st. 8.15 p. m.
Free.

Wednesday evening meeting, Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Cen-
tral Park West, at 68th st. 8 p. m. Strangers are cordially welcomed.

Baseball — St. Francis' College vs. New York University, at New York.



Thursday, April ist



MISCELLANEOUS

■'The Panama Canal" (illustrated), lecture by Edwin E. Slosson,
I'h.D. Institute Hall, 218 East 106th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., Lenten recital,
\rthur Hyde, organist and choirmaster, organ recital; Mr. Daniel Beddoe,
rnor, soloist. 8.15 p. m. No tickets required.

Closing exercises of the woman's law class, address by the Rev.
Cliarlcs F. Aked. Mendelssohn Hall, 119 West 40th st.

Washington Heights Chaper, D. A. R., luncheon. Hotel Astor. 1 p. m.

Colorado Cliff Dwellings' Association, New York State Chapter, en-
tertainment, the proceeds of which will be used to restore one of the most
j beautiful of the ancient cliff dwellings of the Mesa Verde. Waldorf-
Astoria.

Euterpe Club, bridge and euchre. Waldorf-Astoria. Evening. For
tickets apply to Mrs. B. F. Brown, Crescent Court, 127th st. and Clare-
uKint ave.

"Through the Kaiser's Domain" (illustrated), lecture by James W.
Rogan, D.D. New York Public Library, 112 East 96th st. 8.15 p. m.
Free.

'"New Passion" oratorio by the Philadelphia composer, Dr. W. W.
Gilchrist, by the Festival Choir of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.
Mr. William Henry Hall, conductor, in Synod Hall, Amsterdam ave. and
111th St. 8.15 p. m.

Final lecture by ^liss Ethel Arnold upon the life of her grandfather,
the famous schoolmaster, Dr. Arnold, of "Tom Brown's School Days."



N E >V Y O 1^ IV 1^: 11 S '''^" "p'^resfde^nt^"^"'^'

BRIDGE AND EUCHRE

Wednesday, Marcli 31st, at 2 p.m.. Hotel Astor, Broadway S 44th St.

TICKETS, 0>K UOLI^VR

Tickets maj' be obtained upon application to Mrs. Charles K. Mills, Chairman,
770 St. Nicholas .\venne. or from members.



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

THIS WEEK — Continued

Bishop Greer will preside and introduce the lecturer. Waldorf-Astoria.
4 p. m.

"Much Ado About Nothing" (illustrated), lecture by Mrs. Frances
Carter. Public School 135, First ave. and 51st st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

Church of the Divine Paternity, Central Park West, at 76th st. Short
address by the Rev. Frank Oliver Hall, D.D., pastor, 3.30 o'clock, followed
by an organ recital by Mr. J. Warren Andrews, assisted by Mr. Daniel,
bass, soloist. 4 p. m. Open to the public.

"The Passing of Our Great Wild Animals, and Means Taken to
Restore Them," lecture by William T. Hornaday, director of the New
York Zoological Park, at the American Museum of Natural History, 77th
St. and Central Park West. 8.15 p. m.

The Building Trades Exhibition, to be held at the Builders' Exchange,
on 32d St., between Broadway and Fifth ave., open to the public an exhibit
of hollow tile suburban residences by the Builders & Craftsmen's Com-
pany. Models of unique houses in craftsman style and handicraft interiors
will be shown, some being all of fireproof construction and others of only
fireproof exteriors. These models will be the exact counterpart of this
new type of building actually erected by this company, who manufacture
most of their own materials and erect this type of building all under
one contract anywhere within fifty miles of the city.



Friday, April 2d



MISCELLANEOUS

"The Evolution of the Locomotive" (illustrated), lecture by Mr.
George L. Fowler. West Side Neighborhood House, 501 West 50th st.
8.15 p. m. Free.

Sewing Class for the benefit of the Nursery and Child's Hospital, at
the residence of Mrs. Joseph S. Auerbach, 11 West 10th st.

Under the auspices of Sorosis, illustrated lecture by the Hon. James
S. Whipple, Commissioner of Forest, Fish and Game for New York
State, in the Astor Gallery of the Waldorf-Astoria. 2.30 p. m. Mrs.
Warren Higley, chairman.

"How the Other Half Live in England" (illustrated), lecture by Miss
Anna Seaton Schmidt. Public School 160, Suffolk and Rivington sts.
8.15 p. m. Free.

Equal Suffrage League of New York, meeting. Hotel Astor. 3 p. m.



Telephone, 1434 Madison

M RS. D. E. TUTHILL

39 East Thirty- First Street

begs to announce that she has opened a Table d'Hote Dining Room in her
private hotel. ^ Special arrangements for full board or for two meals daily.

ALL HOME COOKING
Single or Double Rooms Furnished or Unfurnished Private Baths

10



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

THIS WEEK— Continued

Lecture on musical art by Mmc. Emma Eames before the students
of the Societe Francaisc of Barnard College.

For the information of our readers, it gives us pleasure to state
that the large Motor Buses of the New York Transportation Co. can be
hired for the small sum of $5 per hour. They have a seating capacity of
34 people, and can be used for Theatre, Card Parties, or Luncheons when
it is desired to go together. For those coming from suburban cities these
Motor Buses will meet them at the Depot, taking them to their destina-
tion and calling for them. Think of it: 34 persons can ride for live
dollars for one hour and have the protection and courtesy of a private
carriage. Try one!

"Algiers and Algeria" (illustrated), lecture by Miss Jennie Pomerene.
Public School 40, 320 East 20th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.



Saturday, April 3d



MISCELLANEOUS

Musicale for the benefit of the Little Mother's Aid Association, Mrs.
Benjamin Lillard, chairman, at the Plaza Hotel. Afternoon. Applica-
tion for tickets may be made to Mrs. Emilie Van Biel, 34 Gramercy Park.

"Capital Employed in the Packing Business," lecture by Prof. James
Walter Crook, 503 West 145th st. 8.15 p. m. Free.

Chicago Woman's Club of New York, discussion of a "Circle of
Cities: New York," 19 East 26th st.

There is only one "Hippodrome," and we have it right here in New
York. Do not think of leaving the city without seeing the "Big Play-
house," Sixth ave. and 43d st. Twice daily — every evening at 8, every
afternoon at 2. Prices to suit you — from 25 cents to $1.50.

"The Industrial Uses of Wood" (illustrated), lecture by Mr. Edwin
W. Foster. St. Bartholomew's Lyceum Hall, 205 East 42d st. 8.15 p. m.
Free.

Annual athletic-gymnastic meet of the Harlem Branch of the Young
Men's Christian Association, at the 22d Regiment Armory. 8.15 p. m.

Dinner, given by the Alumni of Columbia College and the Schools
of Applied Sciences. Waldorf-Astoria. The "Early Eighties," an organ-
ization of graduates from 1880 to 1884, are in charge, and the dinner
will be in honor of Dean John Howard Van Amringe, who on that day
will celebrate both his birthday anniversary and the fiftieth anniversary



Online LibraryHerbert Menzies MarshallDaily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. .. → online text (page 1 of 77)