Hermann Hoernes.

Automotive industries online

. (page 108 of 156)
Online LibraryHermann HoernesAutomotive industries → online text (page 108 of 156)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


ful fuel could be used, leaving the Standard Oil Company to
raise its prices as much as it pleased and not affect automobilists.
The Valvoline Oil Company, which supplies some of the New
York garages with gasoline, has not advanced its prices recently,
and garages getting gasoline from that concern are adhering to
the old price of 20 cents a gallon.



*- AUTOMOBILE OFHCIAL A. A. A. BLUE BOOK."

For the man who tours "The Automobile Official A. A. A.
Blue Book," just from the press of the Class Journal Com-
pany, will be found invaluable. It contains 599 routes, cover-
ing 31467 miles, distributed over sixteen states, and including
Canada. The complete book sells for $3, but is also issued
in three sections, selling at $1 each. Particularly valuable
will be found the special maps of entrances and exits of the
larger cities. There are 207 route maps, of which fifteen are
full page and seven double, and 144 city maps,, with a total
of 351 maps of the several kinds. Orders can be placed direct
with the Class Journal Company, Flatiron Building, New
York City.

A. H. C H. A. OFFICES IN NEW YORK CITY.

The American Motor Car Manufacturers' Association has
decided to remove its offices and the headquarters of the
organization from Chicago to New York City. A general
manager to succeed R. B. McMullen has not yet been selected,
but definite announcement regarding the plans of the associa-
tion will be made in the near future.



Digitized by



Google



TH



REGISTRATIONS WAY DOWN EAST

^D, Me., May 14. — No better idea of the pop
mobile in Maine and the constantly increasing
Hne Tree State can be gained than that obtains
ition of the records of license registration in
Secretary of State in Augusta. All machines and
Maine must now have a license as the result
by the Legislature of 1905. These licenses are
i at the Secretary of State's office. Through the
i Hon. Byron Boyd, the incumbent of that office,
dve of The Automobile was enabled this week to j
ible data on the growth of the sport in Maine.
^ soon as the law went into effect in 1905, the
, to the office of the Secretary of State on the p
iiers and chauffeurs to secure licenses. During the
jlaw was in force 736 automobiles were registered,
ied all the cars owned in the State at that time. 1
^ent date there have been 138 registrations in 1906, which,
jfled to the 736 of the year previous, makes the total of 874. It
- confidently predicted that before the summer is passed the
ffiistration will pass 1,000.

During the first year of the license the larger per cent.- of cars
^ere of the runabout type, but this year the touring car has
|ained in popularity. Of the 138 new automobiles registered 73
ire of the runabout type and 65 are touring cars. The number
Df licenses issued last year to persons operating automobiles was
P85 and the number issued to date is 1,143, or an increase of 158
this year. The owners and operators of the automobiles have
taken kindly to the law and there has never been an objection
raised to paying the license.

The amount of money received by the State for registration and
licenses, after deducting all the expenses, was $2,828.27 in 1905.
The amount received so far this year is about $500. The num-
ber of motorcycles registered in 1905 was 104, and there have
been only six new ones added so far this season. The number
Df dealers' registrations issued in 1905 was 25, and this year there
bave been 11 added. In the issuing of certificates of registration
to dealers the letter B is placed before the number as a dis-
ringuishing mark from the ordinary registration as an individual
md the letter A before the numbers issued to motorcycle owners.



HOW NEW JERSEY REGISTRATION PROGRESSES.

Trenton, N. J., May 12. — List of cars registered in the Secre-
tary of State's office since the new law took effect :

Cadillac, 20; Maxwell, 19; Olds, 14; Pope-Hartford, 14; Loco-
mobile, 12; Autocar, 12; Winton, 10.

Reo, 8; Fiat, 8; Thomas, 8; Panhard, 7; White, 7; Ford, 6;
Rambler, 5 ; Pierce, 5 ; Franklin, 5 ; Mercedes, 5.

Royal, 4; Packard, 4; Leon Bollee, 4; Clement, 4; Peerless, 4.

Electro, 3 ; Stevens-Duryea, 3 ; Vehicle Equipment Co., 3.

Haynes, 2; Mitchell, 2; Waltham, 2; Darracq, 2; Columbia, 2;
Buick, 2 ; Wagner, 2 ; American Daimler, 2 ; National, 2 ; Rochet-
Schneider, 2.

Hotchkiss, Martini, Rothschild, Stearns, Apperson, Grout,
Premier, Lane, Berg, Foster, Jackson, Acme, Walters. El-
more, Searchmont, Mobile, Mors, Renault, Brasier, Baker, F. N.
Co. of Belgium, Marion, De Dion, Bradford, Stahl, English Daim-
ler, Lozier, Eldridge, each i ; total, 238.



VERMONT^ THOUSAND IHARK PREDICTED.

MoNTPEUER, Vt., May 14. — Automobile licenses to the number
of 590 and 724 certificates to operators have been issued by Sec-
retary of State F. G. Fleetwood, of Vermont. From present
appearances the number of automobiles owned in the state before
the close of the year will be close upon 1,000.

An enthusiastic automobilist in Vermont who has a leaning
toward statistics calls attention to the fact that horses caused
the deaths of fifteen people in the state last year, while only two
fatalities occurred that were in any way related to automobiles.




C. A. COEY, OF CHICAGO, EIITERTAIIIIITG WILLIE HOPPE AND LOUIS
CURE, THE BILLDIRD EXPERTS. IN HIS THOMAS •* FLYER.*'



THE LOZIER WAS NOT A DEAD ONE.

The Lozier Motor Company corrects a caption on page
757 of the May 10 issue of The Automobile, wherein a cross-
the-page picture had as a part cf its information: "Lozier
dead on left." The Lozier company states that when the pic-
ture was taken the Lozier was not "dead," but still on its
way to the top of Greenwich Hill, "wliere it finished in tenth
place, among the first eighteen cars. The Lozier was the
only touring car of 35 horsepower or over, and carried a
greater total weight than any other of the first twenty-five
cars to finish."






THE CURIOUS BOY AND THE AUTO.

Trenton, N. J., May 14. — Dr. Howard K. Stokes, brother o^ ,



the Governor of New Jersey, recently experienced an unusual ac-,^
cident to his machine in this city. Mr. Stokes went into a caf^;^ .'
leaving his White steamer in the care of a boy about ten y^^^^^^^^^^r
of age. While in the cafe the curious youngster began examiniw:^^ •
the different levers, and in a twinkling the machine started : .

full speed through Hanover street, finally dashing against tr_:^> ^^^^
wall of the Alhambra Hotel, on North Warren street. The b ^. m ^ j.
was thrown into the air and the machine badly damaged.



0/

ic-



BALTinORE'S COURSE CHANGES HANDS.

Baltimore, May 14. — August Fenneman, president of the co
pany ^ * ' * ' . r-. • r> . .

the pr

interei




OLDSMOBILE MODEL S, aoo-HOUR NON-STOP AT DETROIT— B
AND WRIOHT, FRONT ; SCHNEIDER AND SCHOFISLD. REAR.



Digitized by



Google



/pod.



THE AUTOMOBILE.



813



THE ART OF TIRE REPAIRING.

V art has developed in the United States within the
years. It is the repairing of automobile tires. How
IS been the growth of this trade can be realized only
t to one of the large tire repair stations in the large cities,
iteresting things in connection with the art are to be
such a visit. In the repair department of the Conti-
Taoutchouc Company, 43 Warren street, New York,
airge preparations have been made and a huge stock
>arts and accessories laid in in anticipation of an un-
ited demand on the facilities of the shop this season,
I even now coming in at the rate of nearly fifty a day
lir, and during the summer from fifteen to twenty
vorkmen will be employed. Yet this particular repair
lent was established only last summer. Moreover, it
ire of the repairing of Continental tires for only a
territory, as there is a larger Continental repair depot
ilo, and others in Philadelphia, Boston, and Chicago,
rossman, manager of the American branch of the
house, left New York last week for the Pacific coast.



UOR TIRE SHOP EQUIPPED WITH MODERII MACHDIERY.

>lish sub-agencies in Denver and to re-establish the
mcisco business following the earthquake and fire,
e New York house, which supplies all sub-agencies
;w goods and with parts and supplies for repairs, a
alued at $85,000 has just been laid in, preparatory to
:inning of the rush season. This stock consists of
>f European and American sizes, inner tubes, neatly

in cylindrical pasteboard boxes, new valves, repair
taching tools, waterproof tire cases, tire sleeves, and
bandages. The casing bandages are a comparatively
rm of emergency repair, lately imported. They are
xiblc and slightly elastic bands of rubber-treated can-
ee inches wide by six feet long, and provided with
:klcs at one end and corresponding perforated strap
I the other extremity. In event of a blow-out, gash,
blister, this band is bound around the tire and rim in a
manner while the tire is partially deflated, and is

in place. When the tire is inflated the bandage holds
ing firmly in form and permits of driving fully 200
itil permanent repairs can be made,
ugh some used tires are returned to the Hanover fac-

be "scrapped," few tires get to this hopeless stage,



one of the most common causes for sending them to the scrap
pile being the hardening of the beads so that it becomes
practically impossible to attach and detach the shoes.

Retreading is one of the most common repairs. When tires
require this treatment most of the old rubber tread is cut and
peeled off by hand. Most of what remains is ground off by
means of a small wheel thickly studded with short, sharp
pins, which is revolved rapidly by steam power. This leaves
a rough finish all over the tire, on which the rubber cement
that is now applied adheres thoroflghly. Ready-made treads
in the form of flat bands of rubber of proper length and width
to exactly cover the shoes of all sizes are kept in stock, some
with smooth round treads, and others with flat corrugated
treads for racing cars. These are coated inside with cement,
and after the cement has partly set, the treads are applied to
the shoes, which are mounted on expanding iron mandrels.
When a dozen tires are thus prepared they arc placed on a
small iron truck, with the mandrels still inside to insure the
tires retaining their shape, and the truck is wheeled into a
large boiler, where the tires are vulcanized in steam for an
hour, at pressures of 75 and 150 pounds to the square inch.
They are then cooled and dusted with chalk, when they are
again like new and ready for shipment.

Usually the tires returned for repair have the canvas dam-
aged, by a cut, blowout, or rim chafing. In such case all the
rubber and fabric is carefully cut away from the damaged
place or places and new pieces of canvas cemented in place.
These are then sewed down to the old canvas, the stitching
sometimes being run all around the shoe, at quarter to half-
inch intervals. When the patches are comparatively small,
solid chunks of rubber are carefully cut to the right shape
and with scarfed edges to set into the places where the old
rubber has been removed and new canvas applied. Cement-
ing is done and the tire steamed.

Many a tire that to a layman looks beyond redemption
comes out of the shop looking, and for service wearing, prac-
tically as well as new.



PAPER TIRES FOR AUTOMOBILES.

Milwaukee, Wis., May 5. — J. W. Carhart, well known in Wis-
consin as the builder of the first steam automobile, has invented
a paper tire for automobiles. The tire, he claims, is a great im-
provement over those manufactured out of rubber, inasmuch as
it is cheaper, more durable, cannot be punctured, requires no
pumping, and never goes flat. Furthermore, he maintains that
his paper tires are as soft and resilient as pneumatic tires, and
that they may be utilized wherever rubber tires are made use of.
The tires are composed of heavy binder's board, sawed into sec-
tions corresponding to the circle of the wheel. Four or more
of these make the circuit of the wheel, being built upon the rim
by adding one layer or segment to another with white lead or
other paint between. A thick sheet of rubber is wrapped around
the rim before the tire is built upon it, thus forming a cushion
or foundation. After sufficient lamin«e have been applied to con-
stitute the desired thickness, metal plates are applied to both
sides of the tire, which are bolted through, and hold it securely.
In order to avoid rigidity the plates are so arranged as not
to meet. The tread of the tire is flat, the paper forming a
cushion, while the metal plates are not flush with the tread.



Since the Easter holi4ays,with their glorious weather and
natural exodus from the cities, several English papers have com-
menced a wordy war against the "national nuisance," the dust,
which would be most laudable were not motoring indirectly at-
tacked. In order to cut away as much ground as possible from
under the antagonists* feet, the Nottingham A. C. has decided to
hold no more club runs, and to cancel all such fixtures for this
season. This prompt action will find ready imitators elsewhere, is
the opinion of our English correspondent.



Digitized by



Google



■J



Sf4



THE AUTOMOBILE.



May 17, 1906,



ARTISTIC EXAMPLE OF REMODELING.

Comfort and appearance in a touring car are attributes
that are gaining in importance every year with the user.
There are, undoubtedly, many cars of excellent workman-
ship, but of old-style design, which, at an expenditure of a



JESSE B. CORIVWALL'S REMODELED TYPE D LOCOMOBILE.

moderate sum, can be transformed in appearance and made
to ride more comfortably. An interesting case is that of
Jesse B. Cornwall, who has been running a 1904 type D Lo-
comobile in the hilly country about Redding Ridge, Conn.
Early this spring Mr. Cornwall took his car to a carriage
builder, who remodeled the body, lengthened the chassis
frame, repainted the outfit entirely and added a luggage
carrier, the cost of the various items approximating $270—
a figure which, it is stated, is rather low for one job of the
kind, and the firm doing the work would not estimate again
so low in a similar case. The wheelboise of the car shown
was increased from 36 inches to approximately 106 inches and
the rear-entrance tonneau was closed up at the back and
made into a side-entrance tonneau of exceptionally roomy
dimensions. The car is remodeled, is thoroughly up to date
in external appearance and comfort, and the machinery is
substantially as good as when it was built.



NEW FACTORY STARTED AT NEW HAVEN.

New Haven, Conn., May 15. — Papers of incorporation have
been filed in Hartford by the Ultra Motor Company, of this city.
The incorporators are Joseph Schaeffers and John H. Connell,
of New Haven, and John K. Brachvogel and Otto S. Jung, of
New York City. The company is capitalized at $25,000. The
new concern proposes to manufacture, build and construct en-
gines, motors, automobiles and motor boats and all their appif-
tenances. They will build a large factory in this city.



nRE CHIEF CROKER OF IfEW YORK Uf HIS AMERICAN MERCEDES,



THE AUTOMOBILE CALENDAR.
AMERICAN.

Shows.

May 14-19 — New Orleann (La.) Automobile and Motor Show.
May 24-26— Open Air Show. Empire City Track, New York Trade

Association.

Tours.
May 30...— Endurance Run. ScUt Lake City to Ogden. Utah. Bert

Fuller, Manager. Salt Lake City.
June 6... — Orphans' Day, Second Annual Celebration by the New

York Motor Club.
June 16-18 — Three-Day Tour, Bay State Automobile Association,

Boston to Rye Beach. N. H.
June 18-23 — Second Annual Economy Test, New York Motor Gub.
June 21 -26 — Second Annual Tour, Albany Automobile Club. Albanf

to Boston and Return.
July 12 — Annual A. A. A. Tour, Chicago to Bretton Woods.

N. H. Rules for the Glidden Trophy operative from

Buffalo.
Sept — Endurance Run, Denver to Colorado Springs, Centen-
nial Celebration Discovery of Pike's Peak.

Race Meets and Hill Climbs.

May 19....— Cincinnati (O.) Paddock Hill Climb Automobile Club
of Cincinnati.

May —Richmond, Ind.. 10-mile Obstacle Road Race. Wayne

County Automobile Club.

May W. . .-^len Valley Hill Climb, at Indianapolis, Ind.

May 24...— Dead Horse Hill Climb. Leicester, Mass.. Worcester
Automobile Club (Chester I. Campbell, Manager. S
Park Sq., Boston).

May 26-. . .—Princeton, N. J., Hill Climb of the University of Prince-
ton Automobile Club.

May 80... — Boston Annual Meet of the Bay State Automobile Aa*
sociation, Readville Track.

May 30...— Baltimore (Md.) Race Meet. Maryland Motor Exhibition
Association.

Sept. 8 —100-Mile Road Race, on 25-Mile Circuit in Monroe

Couniy, N. Y. Rochester Automobile Club and New
York State Automobile Association.

Sept. 22. . .—American Elimination Trials for Vanderbllt Cup Race
(Long Island Course probable).

Sept —Colorado Springs. Two-Day Meet. Centennial Cele-
bration Discovery of Pike's Peak.

Oct. 6 — Vanderbllt Cup Race, American Automobile Associa-

Uon.

Motorcycle Tours and Contests.

May 30.— Fort (Seorge Hill Climb, New York Motorcycle Club.
■July 8-7..— Annual Endurance Run and Meet, Federation American
Motorcyclists, Rochester. N. Y.

FOREIGN-

Shows.

Oct. 6-14— Leipsiz (Germany) Exhibition, Krystall Palast.

Nov. l...-:-New Zealand International Exhibition opena at Chriat-

church.
Nov. 1-16 — Berlin (Germany) Automobile E^xhibition.
Nov. 15-24 — London, Olympla Motor Show.
Nov. 23 -Dec. 1 — London, Stanley Show, Agricultural Hall.

Tours.

June B-IS — Herkomer Cup Touring and Speed Trials. Munich, Ba-
varia.

June 11-16— Land's End to John O'Groafs. Auto Cycle Club of
Great Britain.

June 13-16— Scottish Reliability Trials.

July 29- Aug. 15— Circuit Europ4en, 3.000 miles. Paris, Milan.
Vienna, Berlin. Cologne. Paris.

Races, Etc.

..—Motor Cycle Club of France. Championships.

-27 — Le Grand Prix. Sarthe Circuit. France.

. . — International Cup Race for Motorcycles. Cesky (Hub

Motocycllstu of Austria.
..— Suze-Mont Cenis Hill Climb (Italy). Automobile Gub

of Turin.
■16 — Circuit des Ardennes (Belgium).
■16 — ^Ventoux (France) Automobile Meeting.
-19— Ostend (Belgium) Meet.
... — Semmering Hill Climb.
■Sept. 2 — Brescia (Italy) Automobile Meeting.
. . .—Tourist Trophy Race, Isle of Man, Auto Club of Great

Brttain.
. .—Chateau Thierry (France) Hill Climb.
..— Galllon (France) Hill Climb.



May 27.


June


26


July


8.


July


15.


Aug.


1-


Aug.


15-


Aug.


14


Aug.


23


Aug.


27-


Sept.


27


Oct.


7.


• Oct.


28.



Digitized by



Google



May 17, 1906.



THE AUTOMOBILE.



815



NEW nVE-GALLON GASOLINE PUMP.

A new model of the Bowser system of oil storage and control,
long distance equipment, has been put on the market by S. F.
Bowser & Company, Inc., of Fort Wayne, Ind. Their standard
garage equipment, as is well known, is furnished with a gallon
pump which, at the option of the operator, measures gallons
and their fractions at a stroke. The new pump is designed to
meet the demand of users of gasoline in large quantities. It is
of five gallons capacity, each full stroke pumping and measuring
five gallons instead of one. This pump is also capable of such
adjustment as to accurately measure two and one-half gallons,
gallons, or quarts, as desired, so that it will answer every re-
quirement.

In a great many garages, and especially in the larger cities,
gasoline is used in very large quantities. A great many cars
are cared for and some of the cars hold as much as thirty gal-
lons of gasoline. With this five-gallon pump such a car can be
supplied in from one to two minutes, where ordinarily fifteen to
twenty minutes would be required. In addition to the style illus-
trated in this column, which is operated by hand, this equipment
is furnished with a power pump arranged for either belt or



FRONT VIEW BAKER ELECTRIC FIRE DEPARTMENT CAR.

ELECTRICS FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT USE.

The quickness and ease with which an electric vehicle can be
gotten under way, and the simplicity of its operation, make it an
ideal machine for many purposes. One of the new models man-
ufactured by the Baker Motor Vehicle Company, of Cleveland,
O., has proved to be so speedy and to have such a large mileage
capacity that two of the machines have been placed in the ser-
vice of the New York Fire Department and are in use by deputy
chiefs. These cars are known as speed wagons; they are two-
passenger runabouts of comparatively light weight, about 1,700
pounds, equipped with twenty-five cells, and the maximum speed
is given as thirty-two miles an hour. The average mileage on
one charge of the battery is given as from forty to fifty miles.
This distance was greatly exceeded in a test run made in Cleve-
land, when a speed wagon covered 84 3-4 miles before the battery
were exhausted.

C. B. Rice, the New York representative of the Baker company,
states that two more speed wagons are to be supplied to the New
York Fire Department shortly.

One of the important advantages of electric machines for the
exacting work of the deputy fire chiefs is that they can be started
instantly. This, together with speed and the ability to travel a



FIVE-OALLON BOWSER PUMP WITH ao-BARREL TANK.



direct connection. Such an outfit can be set to pump five gal-
lons or five hundred gallons, and when the required amount is
drawn, the pumping ceases.

The claims advanced for the new outfit are that the maximum
amount of gasoline can be pumped and accurately measured in
the least amount of time, with the minimum labor and without
loss, inconvenience or danger.



REINCORPORATES TO HAKE NEW AXLE.

Columbus, O., May 14. — The Direct Drive Axle Company,
with $150,000 capital stock, is the successor of the Columbus
Auto Axle Company, of this city. The company will manufac-
ture a new design of automobile axle, invented by Irvin Plcuk-
harp, a young college graduate, which is claimed to be a distinct
improvement over the axles now in use. It is persistently ru-
mored that Pleukharp has been offered $100,000 for his invention,
which is the result of experiments covering several years.

The main feature of the new axle is that there are no trans-
mission gears, and the change from a high to low speed can be
made in an instant, not by the accustomed gears, but by means
of positive clutches located on the back axle. The inventor says
there is a gain of from 15 to 20 per cent, in power on the low
speed, which will facilitate hill climbing and starting.



VIEW OF SAME CAR FROM THE REAR.

reasonable distance, forms a combination that should give excel-
lent results and at the same time prove economical.



Digitized by



Google



THE AUTOMOBILE.



iw RAHBLER DELIVERY WAGON.

/model has been added to the product of Thomas B.

/ Co., of Kenosha, Wis., manufacturers of the Rambler

^c new machine is a delivery wagon, with closed body,

fopelled by a double opposed-cylinder motor of 20 horsc-

^ced under the body and driving through a two-speed

y transmission and side chains to the rear wheels, the

ment of power and transmission mechanism being practi-



Mn ^i "Tliii I 1 1



fact,

- ..-o— » r — .7. -n the

lines of the Rambler surrey, type Two, including the distmctive
round topped bonnet; the component parts are heavier, however,
to enable them to withstand the severe work imposed by commer-
cial service.

The frame is made of a single piece of pressed channel steel
with cross pieces of the same material; in the cross pieces the
ends are extended and formed into reinforcements for the joints,
so that separate comer plates are not required. Front and rear
axles are of heavy steel tubing, 2 inches in diameter; the wheels
run on ball bearings and are 32 inches in diameter and fitted with
4-inch pneumatic tires. The wheelbase is 102 inches and the
tread 56 1-2 inches.

The engine is water-cooled by the thermo-syphon system, so
that no pump is necessary; no fan is used. The cylinders have
a bore of 5 inches and the stroke is 6 inches ; the pistons are fitted
with no less than six rings each, placed in pairs in three grooves,
with joints on opposite sides. Ignition is by jump spark, two
vibrator coils being mounted on the dash ; the timing of the spark
is done automatically by a governor. The carbureter is of the
float-feed type, automatically supplying a correct mixture at all
engine speeds. Steering is by wheel with tilting pillar, and the
throttle is actuated by a small wheel mounted on the pillar under
and parallel with the steering wheel. A minor point that has re-



Online LibraryHermann HoernesAutomotive industries → online text (page 108 of 156)