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Transcriber's Note

Illustration captions in braces {like this} are from the Table of
Contents, and have been added to the main text by the Transcriber
for the convenience of the reader.




ZIGZAG JOURNEYS
IN
EUROPE.

_VACATION RAMBLES IN HISTORIC LANDS._

BY
HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH.


BOSTON:
ESTES AND LAURIAT.
1882.




_Copyright_,
BY ESTES & LAURIAT,
1879.

[Decoration]




[Illustration: "THE BOY-KING."]




PREFACE.


The aim of the publishers and writer, in preparing this volume for
young people, is to give a view of the principal places in England and
France where the most interesting events have occurred; and, by a free
use of pictures and illustrative stories, to present historic views of
the two countries in an entertaining and attractive manner.

An American teacher takes a class of boys on a vacation tour to
England and France, and interests them in those places that illustrate
the different periods of English and French history. It is his purpose
to give them in this manner a picturesque view of present scenes and
past events, and to leave on their minds an outline of history for
careful reading to fill.

A few of the stories are legendary, as the "Jolly Harper Man" and the
"Wise Men of Gotham;" but these illustrate the quaint manners and
customs of the Middle Ages. Nearly all of the stories that relate to
history are strictly true.

The illustrations of history, both by pencil and pen, are given in the
disconnected way that a traveller would find them in his journeys;
but they may be easily combined by memory in their chronological
order, and made to form a harmonious series of pictures.

The writer has sought to amuse as well as to instruct, and for this
purpose the personal experiences of the young travellers are in part
given. Two of the boys, who have small means, make the trip in the
cheapest possible manner. Tommy Toby meets the mishaps a thoughtless
boy might experience. The other travellers have an eye for the
literary and poetic scenes and incidents of the tour.

* * * * *

That the volume may amuse and entertain the young reader, and awaken
in him a greater love of books of history, biography, and travel, is
the hope of the publishers and the author.

28 Worcester St., Boston, Mass.




CONTENTS.


CHAPTER PAGE
I. THE JOURNEY PROPOSED 3

II. TOM TOBY'S SECRET SOCIETY 12

III. FIRST MEETING OF THE CLUB 22

IV. ON THE ATLANTIC 51

V. THE LAND OF SCOTT AND BURNS 71

VI. STORY TELLING IN EDINBURGH 84

VII. A RAINY EVENING STORY AT CARLISLE 104

VIII. A CLOUDLESS DAY 119

IX. A SERIES OF MEMORABLE VISITS 135

X. A VISIT TO OXFORD AND WOODSTOCK 153

XI. LETTERS AND EXCURSIONS 160

XII. LONDON 173

XIII. BELGIUM 205

XIV. UPPER NORMANDY 226

XV. PARIS 249

XVI. BRITTANY 283

XVII. HOMEWARD 304




THE ZIGZAG SERIES.

BY
HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH,

OF THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE "YOUTH'S COMPANION," AND
CONTRIBUTOR TO "ST. NICHOLAS" MAGAZINE.


NOW PUBLISHED.
_ZIGZAG JOURNEYS IN EUROPE._
_ZIGZAG JOURNEYS IN CLASSIC LANDS._
_ZIGZAG JOURNEYS IN THE ORIENT._

TO BE FOLLOWED BY
_ZIGZAG JOURNEYS IN THE OCCIDENT._




ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
"The Boy-king" _Frontispiece._

Statue of William the Conqueror at Falaise _Half-title._

It is Vacation 3

Tommy and the Bear 9

Tommy's Adventure 10

Norman Fisher-Girl 13

King Charles's Hiding-place 14

White Horse Hill 15

Street Scene in Normandy 16

Colonnade of the Louvre 17

Harold's Oath 23

Finding the Body of Harold 26

The Death of the Red King 27

St. Stephen's Church at Caen 30

Robert Throwing Himself on his Knees before his
Prostrate Father 31

William the Conqueror Reviewing his Army 35

Mont St. Michel 37

Amazement of Christopher Sly 46

Norman Peasant Girls 49

Pilot-Boat 53

Two of our Fellow-Travellers 55

A Steerage Passenger 56

Joan of Arc 59

Joan of Arc Recognizing the King 63

Joan of Arc Wounded 67

Signals 70

The Boys Consult the Barometer 72

Birthplace of Robert Burns 73

Edinburgh Castle 77

Holyrood Palace 79

Mary Stuart 80

Murder of Rizzio 81

Francis II. of France 86

Francis II. and Mary Stuart Love-making 89

The Death-bed of Francis II. 93

Mary Stuart Swearing she had never sought the
Life of Elizabeth 97

The Black Douglas Surprising an Enemy 100

Cæsar's Legions Landing in Britain 104

Romans Invading Britain 105

Massacre of the Druids 106

Druid Sacrifice 107

The Hermit 111

Shamble Oak 121

Greendale Oak 122

Parliament Oak 123

Mortimer's Hole 124

Murder of Thomas À Becket 125

Richard's Farewell to the Holy Land 129

Limestone Dwellings 133

Peveril of the Peak 137

The Boy at the Wheel 138

Boscobel 139

The Tomb of Richard Penderell 139

King Charles's Hiding-place 140

Shakspeare 141

Anne Hathaway's Cottage 144

Ruins of Kenilworth Castle 145

Portrait of Elizabeth 149

Alfred and his Mother 153

Canute and his Courtiers 154

Flight of Empress Maud 155

Death of Latimer and Ridley 156

Rosamond's Bower 157

A Studious Monk 157

An Old Time Student 158

House of a Migrating Citizen 162

Fac-simile of the Bayeux Tapestry 163

St. Augustine's Appeal to Ethelbert 169

The Saxon Priest Striking the Images 171

Westminster Abbey 174

Trial of Charles I. 177

Burial of Richard 180

The Tower of London 181

Wolsey Served by Nobles 185

Whitehall 187

Wolsey's Palace 188

Death of Cardinal Wolsey 189

Children of Charles I. 190

Oliver Cromwell 191

Queen Henrietta Maria 193

Street Amusements 195

Street Amusements 196

"'Ave you got a Penny?" 197

Victoria at the Age of Eight 200

Anger of King John 203

A Dutch Windmill 206

Dog-Carts 207

Street Scenes in Brussels 208

Hotel de Ville, Brussels 209

Charlemagne in Council 210

Charlemagne at the Head of his Army 211

Hotel de Ville, Ghent 212

Van Artevelde at his Door 213

Charles the Rash Discovered 217

Capture of King John and his Son 227

Tower of Joan of Arc, Rouen 229

The Maid of Orleans 230

"It is Rather Hard Bread" 233

Death of St. Louis 235

Interior of St. Ouen 236

Palais de Justice, Rouen 237

Northmen on an Expedition 238

The Barques of the Northmen before Paris 239

Catharine de Medici 241

Coligny 243

Charles IX. and Catharine de Medici 247

The Goddess of Reason carried through the
Streets of Paris 251

Garden of the Tuileries 255

Fountain in the Champs Elysées 257

Place de la Concorde 258

Entrance to the Louvre 259

Fountain, Place de la Concorde 261

Man of the Iron Mask 263

Versailles 267

Little Trianon 268

The Dauphin with the Royal Family in the Assembly 269

Forest of Fontainebleau 273

In the Wood at Fontainebleau 274

"Je ne comprends pas" 277

At Prayers 278

Clock Tower at Vire 283

Revoking the Edict of Nantes 291

Fénelon and the Duke of Burgundy 295

The Cathedral at Nantes 298

Louis XV. 299

Molière 306

The Reading of "Paul and Virginia" 307

Racine 309

Racine Reading to Louis XIV. 310




ZIGZAG JOURNEYS;

OR,

VACATIONS IN HISTORIC LANDS.


[Illustration: {STATUE OF WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR AT FALAISE.}]


[Illustration: IT IS VACATION.]

CHAPTER I.

THE JOURNEY PROPOSED.


"The school - is - dismissed."

The words fell hesitatingly, and it seemed to us regretfully, from the
tutor's lips.

The dismission was for the spring vacation. It was at the close of a
mild March day; there was a peculiar warmth in the blue sky and
cloudless sunset; the south winds lightly stirred the pines, and
through the open window wandered into the school-room.

"Dismissed!"

Usually at this word, on the last day of the term, every boy leaped to
his feet: there would be a brief bustle, then Master Lewis would be
seen seated alone amid the silence of the school-room.

But to-day there was something in the tone of the master's voice that
checked the usual unseemly haste. Every boy remained in his seat, as
though waiting for Master Lewis to say something more.

The master saw it, and choked with feeling. It was a little thing, the
seeming unwillingness to part; but it indicated to both teacher and
school an increasing respect and affection.

Master Lewis had learned to love his pupils: his hesitating words told
_them_ that. Every boy in his school loved Master Lewis: their conduct
in remaining in their seats told _him_ that.

The master stepped from his desk, as was his custom when about to say
any thing unusually social and confidential.

"Boys," he said, "I wish to tell you frankly, and you deserve to know
it, that I have become so attached to you during the winter term that
I am sorry to part from you, even for a week's vacation."

"I wish we might pass the vacation together," said Frank
Gray, - meaning by "we" the teacher and the school.

"I once read of a French teacher," said Ernest Wynn, "who used to
travel with his scholars in the neighboring countries, during
vacations."

"Wouldn't it be just grand if we could travel with Master Lewis during
our summer vacation!" said Tom Toby, who, although the dullest scholar
in the school, always became unexpectedly bright over any plan that
promised an easy time.

"We might visit some country in Europe," said Ernest. "We should then
be learning geography and history, and so our education would go on."

"It would help us also in the study of modern languages," said Frank
Gray.

Tom Toby's sudden brightness of face seemed to be eclipsed by these
last remarks.

"I think we had better travel in places nearer home, then."

"Why?" asked Frank.

"I was seasick once: it was _orful_."

"The sickness is a short and healthy one," said Frank.

"You will find it a healthy one, if you ever are rolling on the
Atlantic, with

'Twice a thousand miles behind you, and a thousand miles before.'

I wouldn't be sick in that way again for any thing. I tell you 'twas
_orful_!"

Master Lewis laughed at Tom's pointed objection.

"As to learning the languages," continued Tom, "I've noticed all the
Frenchmen and Germans I have tried to talk with speak their own
language very poorly."

Tom's percentages in the modern languages were the lowest of his
class, and Master Lewis could not restrain a smile.

"I once tried to make a Frenchman understand that I thought Napoleon
Bonaparte was the greatest man that ever lived. He kept saying, _Cela
va sans dire, cela va sans dire!_ [That is a matter of course.] I
never knew what he meant, to say: all I could make of it was, _That
goes without saying any thing_."

"The French teacher of whom I spoke," said Ernest Wynn, "used to allow
his pupils to travel much on foot, and to visit such places as their
love of history, geography, and natural science, made them most wish
to see. So they journeyed in a zigzag way, and published a book called
'_Voyages en zigzag_.'"

"I would not object to learning history, geography, and natural
science in that way," said Tom Toby. "I should rather walk after
history than study it the way I do now. I should prefer _riding_ after
it to walking, however. I wouldn't be cheated out of having a real
good time during my summer vacation for any thing."

A shadow fell on Master Lewis's face, as though his feelings were hurt
by something implied in Tom's remarks. Tom saw it.

"But - but I should have a real good time if I were with you, Master
Lewis, even if it were on the Atlantic, or studying French in France."

"I have often thought I would like to travel with my boys abroad. I
could take my first class, if I could secure their parents' consent,
the coming summer."

"Good!"

Every boy joined in the exclamation. Tom's voice, however, was a
little behind the others, - "-o-d."

"Let me suggest to the class," said Master Lewis, "that each member
speak to his parents about this matter during the present vacation;
and let each boy who can go send me in a letter during the week a map
of the country and the places he would most like to visit. He can draw
it in ink or pencil, and he need only put down upon it the places he
would most like to see."

"Good!"

The exclamation was unanimous.

The boys left their seats.

Tom Toby's face had become very animated again. Presently the boys of
the class were all gathered about him.

"I have a plan," said Tom. "It is just grand. Let us form a secret
society, and call ourselves the Zigzagers!"

"Good!" unanimously.

"But why a secret society?" asked Frank Gray.

"There is something so mysterious about a secret society," said Tom.
"Gives one such a good opinion of himself. Have a constitution, and
by-laws, and wear a pin!"

The first class in Master Lewis's school parted in high spirits, their
faces bright with smiles as they went out into the light of the March
sunset.

Tom's last words on parting were: "Try to think up a secret for the
society: it should be something surprising."

The first class in Master Lewis's school numbered six boys: -

Frank Gray,
Ernest Wynn,
Wyllys Wynn,
Thomas Toby,
George Howe, and
Leander Towle.

Frank Gray was the oldest boy and finest scholar in the school. He
was about fifteen years of age; was tall and manly, and was more
intimate with Master Lewis than with any of his schoolmates. Thomas
Toby, who disliked Frank's precise manners and rather unsocial ways,
used to call him "Lord _I_." Frank, however, was not intentionally
reserved: he was merely studious in his leisure, and best liked the
society of those from whom he could learn the most.

Ernest and Wyllys Wynn were brothers. Ernest had made himself popular
at school by his generous, affectionate disposition, and his ready
sympathy for any one in distress. He lived, as it were, a life outside
of himself; and his interest in the best good of others made for
himself unconsciously a pure and lovable character. He was fond of
music, and an agreeable singer: he liked the old English and Scottish
ballads, and so sung the songs of true feeling that every one is eager
to hear.

He often went to an almshouse near Master Lewis's to sing to the old
people there. The paupers all loved him, and clustered eagerly around
him when he appeared. His songs recalled their childhood scenes in
other lands. On fine summer evenings he might often be seen on the
lawn before the charitable institution, with a crowd of poor people
around him, whom he delighted with "Robin Ruff and Gaffer Green," "The
Mistletoe Bough," "Highland Mary," "The Vale of Avoca," "Robin Adair,"
or something aptly selected to awaken tender feelings and
associations.

Nearly all the children of the town seemed to know him, and regard him
as a friend, and used often to run out to meet him when he appeared in
the street. Master Lewis, in speaking of Ernest, once quoted Madame de
Sévigné's remark, "The true mark of a good heart is its capacity for
loving." It was meant to be a picture, and it was a true one.

Wyllys Wynn was much like his brother, and a very close friendship
existed between them. He was fond of history and poetry; he wrote
finely, and usually took the first prize for composition.

Tom Toby was quite a different character. He was just a _boy_, in the
common sense of the word. In whatever he attempted to do, he was sure
to blunder, and was as sure to turn the blunder to some comical
account. He had a way of making fun of himself, and of inciting others
to laugh at his own expense, which Master Lewis was disposed to
censure as wanting in proper self-respect.

Tom had no particular friend. He seemed to like all boys alike, except
those whom he thought insincere and affected, and such were the butt
of his sharp wit and ready ridicule.

Tom was famous among the boys for telling stories, and these often
related to his own mishaps. A knot of boys was often seen gathered
around him to listen to his random talk, his wit, and his day dreams.
Though a poor scholar, he was an apt talker, and almost any subject
would furnish him a text.

His father was a Maine lumber-dealer, and he had spent much time with
his father in the logging camps and backwoods towns of the Pine Tree
State. His adventures in these regions, told in his droll way, often
excited the wonder of his companions.

"Did you ever see a bear in the backwoods?" one of the boys asked him
one day.

"I never saw a live one but once."

"What did you do?"

"Do? I received a polite bow from him, and then I remembered that I
was wanted at home, and went home immediately.

"It was this way." - All of the boys of the class now gathered around
Tommy, as was the custom when he seemed about to tell one of his odd
stories.

"I attempted one day to rob a pigeon-woodpecker's nest which I had
found in one of the old logging roads that had not been used for
several years. The nest was in a big hollow tree. The top of the tree
had blown off, leaving a trunk some twelve or fifteen feet high.

[Illustration: {TOMMY AND THE BEAR.}]

"These woodpeckers make a hole for their nest so large that you can
run the whole length of your arm into it. I had long wanted a few eggs
from one of these birds' nests. I had heard the lumber-men tell how
white and handsome the eggs are.

"I was climbing up the tree very fast, my heart beating like a
trip-hammer, when I heard a scratching sound inside the big trunk, and
then a shaking at the top. I thought it very mysterious. I stopped,
and looked up. I saw something black, like a fur cap. I opened my eyes
and mouth so as to take a big look, and just then _out popped a bear's
head_ from the top of the trunk, and looked over very inquiringly. I
just looked once. He seemed to recognize me. He bowed. Then I
remembered that father had said I must come home early. I dropped to
the ground, and I never picked up my feet so lively before in my life.
I _flew_. When I got safely out of the woods, I thought of the
woodpecker. I never felt so glad for any bird in my life. What a
narrow escape that bird had! _I had been there myself_, and knew. I
wouldn't have robbed her nest for any thing after that.

"'No, not I.'"

[Illustration: {TOMMY'S ADVENTURE.}]

When Tommy first came to the boarding-school, he greatly amused his
companions one day by attempting to ride on the hose of a
street-sprinkler's cart, when it was not in action. He had never seen
such a carriage, and thought it offered a wonderfully convenient
arrangement for riding behind. Presently the driver raised the lever,
and the amazed lad found himself caught in the shower, and tumbled
into the dirt.


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