Historical Society of Montana. Board of Trustees.

Biennial report of the Board of Trustees of the Historical ..., Volumes 1-10 online

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CATALOGUE

OF TME

LIBRARY

OF TME

Historical Society

OF TME

STATE OF MONTANA.



Also the Report of the Librarian for the Years 1891-92, being the First

Biennial Report and Catalogue Ever Published

by the State or Society.



IN TWO PARTS.



PART i...The Publications of this State and of Other States and General History.

PART 2— Publications of the United States which Have Been Received at this

Library to Novenfiber 30, 189a.



Prepared BY WM. F. WMEELER, Librarian.



HBLBKA, MOMTANA :

C. K. Wblls Co., Pbiktbbs akd Bindbbb.

1882.



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HISTORICAL SOCIETY )

OF THE STATE OF MONTANA. )

Helena, Montana, Dec. 3, 1892.
Gov. Jos. K. Toole,

Mem. State Ex. Com. Hist. Soc. of Montana.

SIR: ! have the honor to herewith transmit the first biennial
report of Wm. F. Wheeler, our very efficient and painstaking librarian,
which includes a well arranged Catalogue of all books, pamphlets,
manuscripts, etc., in the Library of the Society.

I heartily concur in the recommendations made by him, and
especially the one in reference to transferring the Miscellaneous
Division of the State Library, to the care of the Historical Society,
as under the present arrangement it cannot be properly assorted, cata-
logued, and cared for.

The present salary of the librarian is entirely inadequate for the
large amount of intelligent and valuable work performed by him.
The next session of the Legislature should increase it to $1,800 a year.

The thanks of the Society are due to the Board of Commissioners
of Lewis and Clarke County for giving it, free of cost, good rooms
in the attic of the Court House.

Very Respectfully,

GRANVILLE STUART,

President.



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HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF MONTANA

Report of the librarian for 1891-92.



To His Excellency y Joseph K, Toole, Governor of Montana, and Ex-
Officio Member of the Executive Committee of the Historical
Society of the State of Montana; also.

To Hon. Granville Stuart, President of said Society:

GENTLEMEN: — 1 have the honor to present this, my first biennial
report, of the collections of this Society enumerated in Jhe catalogue
following hereafter, which is the first catalogue of this Society or its
predecessor, "The Historical Society of Montana." The report also
includes an appeal to the friends of the Society, stating definitely its
purposes and objects; and also gives a statement of its receipts and
expenditures since its transfer to the State, on the 1st day of April,
1891, to December 1st, 1892, the close of the fiscal year. This state-
ment is taken from the books of the State Auditor and Treasurer,
where said accounts are kept and where all vouchers are filed.

The catalogue is not strictly an alphabetical one, but more one
of subjects grouped under the proper headings, which 1 consider
more practical. First, the books and pamphlets relating to general
historical subjects are given, together with State exchanges from
other Historical Societies and our own State publications; 2Xidi second,
Part 2 embraces all the publications of the United States which have
been received at our Library.

The Society hereby acknowledges with gratitude the generosity
and liberality of the Commissioners of Lewis and Clarke County in
giving it the splendid rooms in the Court house which it has occu-
pied for its Library since July 5, 1887, without cost or charge; also,
to the noble and public-spirited editors and proprietors of the news-
papers of Montana, who have donated free of charge over 400 vol-
umes of their publications to it since 1864 to the present time; also
to the many citizens who have given diaries, letters of historic value



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6 OF THE MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY,

and many manuscripts which will in the future be of great worth in
illustrating our history.

I wish to make two or three suggestions which I think neces-
sary for the good of the Library and its management. The Miscel-
laneous Department of the State Library consists almost entirely of
State and United States public documents, which are essentially
books of reference and should be transferred to the Historical De-
partment, as they are entirely of historical value. This will not in-
terfere with the Law Library, which is for the sole use of the courts,
and which should be left to a separate librarian, as at present. It
gives enough work for one person to do.

The second suggestion is that all publications made under the
authority of the State, of every description, should be deposited by
the person printing the same, to the extent of at least five copies of
each in the Library of this Society, for reference only, and not to be
removed therefrom. As it is, we have an incomplete set of laws,
journals of the Legislature, and but few reports of Territorial or
State officers, except those the Librarian has collected under great
difficulties.

The third suggestion is that there should be a small contingent
fund set apart upon which the Librarian can check for the payment
of postage, drayage, janitor work, for shelving and other small items
of expense for the use of the Library, which he has now to pay for
first out of his own pocket and then wait for reimbursement from the
State. From three to five hundred dollars would be sufficient for
this purpose, and the Librarian should give bond in double the
amount so set apart.

The fourth suggestion is that whereas there is now in the
Library a large number of letters and many valuable diaries and
other contributions of great historic value which are poorly written
— many in dim pencil marks — which need to be re-written and
properly edited, the Librarian should be allowed to employ an
assistant — a copyist or typewriter — to put this valuable matter in
good shape for preservation or for the printer. Six hundred dollars
would be a moderate estimate for this work for the next year.

The fifth suggestion is in relation to securing Indian relics, as all
in the State will soon be beyond purchase, and never will be repro-
duced. The old Society, for want of funds, never did or could pur-
chase any, or even pay for preserving the forms of the wild animals,
birds or fishes native to Montana. This should be done now, as far



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY 7

as possible. There has been deposited in the Library rooms a large
case of fine and valuable Indian hand work, which the Society can
buy at reasonable cost. ! know of but one other collection in the
State that can be purchased.

My sixth and last suggestion is that the Library and everything
contained in it should be insured to, I think, the amount of $10,000.
It will be for a committee of the Legislature to consider the above
suggestions and examine the condition, needs and wants of the
Libraries of the State.



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OF THE MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.



HISTORICAL SKETCH

OR THE

Or^aDizatioi) of the fli5torical Societij

OF MONTANA.



Its Objects and Purposes.



The following is quoted bodily from the able introduction to the
first volume of the " Transactions of the Society," and was written
by CoL W. F. Sanders, who for twenty-five years was its President:

" This society was incorporated by an act of the Legislative As-
sembly, approved February 2, 1865. To it was confided the trust of
accumulating information illustrative of the early history of the
region of country in what is now (1876) the Territory of Montana.
The trust seemed at first to be a barren and thankless one. There
is not, probably, in the United States a region of equal area about
which so little information can be gleaned as that parallelogram along
the northern border, which contains the springs of the Columbia
and the Missouri. In the discharge of the trust thus confided to the
society, it was sought to gather from this barren field such informa-
tion as books could afford, and to acquire from adventurers and early
pioneers whatever of interest their memories had preserved.

"The Territory seems to have passed between two lines of early
travel across the continent. To the north, the fur traders of Mon-
treal, passing through Lake Superior to Lake Winnipeg, and thence
up the Saskatchewan, across the Rocky Mountains to the Flatbow
River, proceeded down the Columbia. At a later day, but early in
the present century, adventurous traders from St. Louis and New



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY 9

York, passing up the Platte and through the South Pass, crossed
Green River to the Lewis Fork of the Columbia, and passed by Fort
Hall, down towards Astoria.

" The travelers along the northern line of communication do not
seem to have deflected so far from their route as to have familiarized
themselves with the topography or geographical features of the
Territory. Those who journeyed along the southern line, making
Deer Creek, Green River, Cache Valley or Fort Hall their rendez-
vous, pursued the vocation of trappers, hunters or traders through-
out the adjacent country, and not unfrequently visited our Territory.
These representatives of the white race among the red men of the
remote West seldom returned to civilization. The discovery of the
gold and silver mines, the settlement of the country, the develop-
ment of the various industries here, the history of towns and com-
munities, sketches of various officials and administrations; the story
of our social disorder; the perils, sacrifices and labors of our early
pioneers; the material, social, intellectual and religious progress of
our people — all justify the attention of the society. These various
subjects the society has sought to care for in a spirit of fidelity to its
mission. It has not considered that it was its province to pass judg-
ment upon events, but to gather facts with impartial justice. It does
not trouble itself to approve or condemn, but to preserve."

It is introduced here because it so fully explains the objects of
the Historical Society and some of its history.

Notwithstanding the almost total destruction of nearly all the
Library and manuscripts of the Society by the great fire of the 9th of
January, 1874, the officers and members have labored with unfalter-
ing zeal to replace what was lost and to gather new books and
precious manuscripts for its future publications. Although much
cramped for means, they have succeeded beyond their most sanguine
expectations. The manuscripts gathered number over 3,000 pages;
the books and pamphlets will number more. Many rare and valu-
able books have been purchased, but the greatest source of increase
to the Library is from the government publications at Washington
and from exchanges with kindred societies and State publications.
The Library contains upwards of 2,400 bound volumes, and 450
bound volumes of the territorial newspapers, some commencing as
far back as 1864, and are considered by the Society as valuable
beyond price. Nearly every paper published in Montana is sent to
the Society gratis, and these are finely bound and preserved in a
fire-proof vault, as are the manuscripts. As a rule the editors or pro-



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10 OF THE MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

prietors thus contribute their papers to our Library free of charge.

Many of the early pioneers, County, Territorial and Federal
officials, and persons who contribute to the archives of the Society,
have or can be elected honorary members. The manuscripts already
collected contain narratives of early events and personal history,
precious beyond any price.

A number of diaries, which were made by persons who crossed
the plains from St. Paul or Leavenworth in 1863 or 1864, have been
collected. These are full of interesting events and after the lapse of
twenty-five years read like a romance. Many more are supposed to
be in the hands of those who wrote them, and the Society would like
to obtain them. If sent to the Librarian they will be copied and re-
turned if the owners so desire.

The persons named in the act incorporating the Society are:
Hez. L. Hosmer, Christopher P. Higgins, John Owen, James Staurt,
W. F. Sanders, Malcolm Clark, F. M. Thompson, William Y.Graham,
Granville Stuart, W. W. De Lacy, Caleb E. Irvine and Chas. S.
Bagg. These incorporators met on the 21st of February, 1865, at the^
office of Dance & Stuart, Virginia City, Montana, and made a tem-
porary organization and appointed a committee on permanent organ-
ization, and framed a constitution and by-laws. These were subse-
quently reported and adopted. On April 20, 1865, the Society met
and elected the following named officers for the ensuing year:

President, Wilbur F. Sanders.
Vice-President, Granville Stuart.
Corresponding Secretary, Wm. E. Cullen.
Recording Secretary, Cornelius Hedges.
Librarian, Chas. Rumley.

It is a noticeable fact that all are now living in Montana after
more than twenty-five years. They evidently came to stay.

The following list contains the names of the first twenty-five
active members: Hezekiah L. Hosmer, ♦Christopher P. Higgins,
♦John Owen, ♦James Stuart, Wilbur F. Sanders, ♦Malcolm Clark,
Francis M. Thompson, ♦William Y. Graham, Granville Stuart, ♦Wal-
ter W. De Lacy, ♦Caleb E. Irvine, ♦Chas. S. Bagg, ♦Walter B.
Dance, James Fergus, Samuel T. Hauser, Chas. S. Warren, Cornelius
Hedges, William W. Alderson, Matthew Carroll, William E. Cullen,
Chas. Rumley, Louis R. Maillett, Erasumus D. Leavitt, Perry W.
McAdow, William A. Clark, Henry N. Blake.

The following were duly elected corresponding members at the



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY 11

organization of the Society: ♦Hon. George Bancroft, ♦John Lathrop
Motley, ♦Chas. Francis Adams, ♦Francis Parkman, ♦Louis Agassiz,
♦Joseph Henry.

[♦The names marked with a star in the above list are those of
deceased members.]



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12 OF THE MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.



An Appeal to Our Friends.



The Montana Historical Society earnestly requests its friends
and correspondents to secure and forward to it whatever they may
have to donate, of a printed nature. We ask for books and pam-
phlets on American History, Biography and Genealogy, particularly
those relating to the West; works on our Indian Tribes, and Ameri-
can Archaeology and Ethnology; Statistical and Scientific Publica-
tions of States or Societies; books or pamphlets relating to the Great
Rebellion; privately printed works; Newspapers, Maps and Charts;
En^gravings; Autographs; Coins; Antiquities and Encyclopaedias;
Dictionaries and Biographical works of every kind. Entire sets of
works are especially solicited, or collections of books on any subject,
but single volumes, or pamphlets even, will be gratefully received.
Especially do we desire —



Everything Relating to Our Own State, Viz:



1. Travels and Explorations; City Directories; Hotel Registers;
Ordinances of Cities, and, in short, every book on any subject
printed in the State, or elsewhere, relating to it.

2. Pamphlets of all kinds; catalogues of Montana Colleges
and other institutions of learning; Annual Reports of Societies; Ser-
mons and Addresses delivered in this State; Minutes of Church Con-
ventions, Synods, or other ecclesiastical bodies of Montana; Railroad
and Board of Trade reports, and other pamphlets relating to this State.

3. Files of Montana newspapers or magazines, especially com-
plete volumes of past years, or single numbers even. Publishers
are earnestly requested to contribute their publications regularly, all
of which will be carefully preserved and bound. We trust that every
newspaper in the State will send us its publication for the vear 1893,
commencing January first.



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY 13

4. Materials for Montana History; old letters, journals and
manuscript narratives of the Pioneers of Montana; newspaper cut-
tings; original papers on the Early History and Settlement of the
Territory; Adventures and Conflicts During the Indian Wars;
Biographies of the Pioneers of every county, either living or de-
ceased, together with th^eir portraits and autographs; a sketch of the
settlement of every town and village in the State, with names of
the first settlers. We solicit articles on every subject connected
with Montana History.

5. Maps of Townsites or Counties, of any date; views or en-
gravings of buildings or historic places; drawings or photographs of
scenery; paintings, portraits, etc., connected with Montana History.

6. Curiosities of all kinds for our Museum; medals, paintings,
portraits, engravings, statues; autographs; letters of distinguished
persons, etc., and especially mineral specimens, giving the name of
the mine, county, etc., from which they came.

7. Facts illustrative of our Indian troubles; their history, char-
acteristics, religwn, etc.; sketches of their prominent chiefs, orators
and warriors, together with contributions of Indian weapons, cos-
tumes, ornaments, curiosities and implements. Also stone axes,
spears, arrow-heads, pottery or other relics of the pre-historic races.

In brief, everything that, by the most liberal construction, can
illustrate the History of Montana or its people; its early settlement,
its progress or present condition, which will be of value or interest
to succeeding generations. All works presented to our Library
will be acknowledged in our biennial reports, and will be carefully
preserved for the use of the public of the State.

Nearly every gentleman accumulates at his office or home a
great number of pamphlets. Do not sell them to the paper mill, but
send them to

wm. f. wheeler,

IJbrarian.



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY



15



omeDis OF T|i[ ?oeim aiq oicuiiye gomihim



PRESIDENT Granville STUART

VICE PRESIDENT CORNELIUS HEDGES

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY WM. E. CULLEN

RECORDING SECRETARY HENRY N. BLAKE

TREASURER SAMUEL T. HAUSER

LIBRARIAN WILLIAM F. WHEELER

JOS. K. Toole, Governor, ex-officio Member of Ex. Com.
LOUIS ROTWirr, Secretary of State, ex-officio Member of Ex. Com.
Henri J. Haskell, Attorney General, ex-officio Member of Ex. Com.



PVI MEMBEilS OK DipiOt^.



WILBUR F. SANDERS,
GRANVILLE STUART,
JAMES FERGUS,
SAMUEL T. HAUSER,
CHARLES S. WARREN,
CORNELIUS HEDGES,
WILLIAM W. ALDERSON,

MATTHEW Carroll,

FRANK H. WOODY,

JAMES U. Sanders,



CHARLES RUMLEY,
LOUIS MAILLET,

Erasmus D. Leavitt,

PERRY W. MCADOW,
WM. A. CLARKE,
HENRY N^ BLAKE,

WM. F. Wheeler,
hiram knowles,
James h. mills,
Wm. e. Cullen.



Note.-— The names of over three hundred honorary members of the Society
will be printed in the second volume of its contributions.



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY



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CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY 19



HOW THE SOCIETY TRANSFERRED ITS LIBRARY
AND PROPERTY TO THE STATE.



The following is a copy of the first two sections of the Act, ap-
proved March 4, 1891, authorizing the making of the transfer:

'• HISTORICAL SOCIETY."



^^ Be it Enacted by the Legislative Assembly of the State of Montana:

"Section l. That the Historical Society of the State of Montana,
now organized under the provisions of an Act of the Legislative
Assembly of the Territory of Montana, entitled, an ' Act to incorporate
the Historical Society of Montana,' approved February 2, 1865, may
become the Historical Society of the State of Montana, by complying
with the terms, conditions and provisions hereinafter contained, and
such terms, conditions and limitations as may hereafter be enacted
for its government or control by the Legislative Assembly. Said
Society shall be the trustee of the State, and as such shall faithfully
expend and apply all money received from the State to the uses and
purposes directed by law, and shall hold all its present and future
collections and property for the State, and shall not sell, mortgage,
transfer or dispose of in any manner, or remove from the capital any
article thereof, or any part of the same, without authority of law or
the consent of the Legislative Assembly; Providedj\}cizX this shall not



Online LibraryHistorical Society of Montana. Board of TrusteesBiennial report of the Board of Trustees of the Historical ..., Volumes 1-10 → online text (page 1 of 32)