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Holyoke, Mass., Nov. 30, 1907.
To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen.

The Commissioners of the Sinking Fund for the pay-
ment of municipal bonds respectfully submit the following
report : %

Amount of fund reported Novem-
ber 30, 1906 $311,096.20

Received during the year:

Appropriated by Board of Alder-
men $15,000.00

From Board of. Water Commis-
sioners 22,045.16

From City Treasurer, Holyoke &

Westfield R. R 13,610.00

Interest on investments 9,262.37 59,917.53

$371,013.73

Paid during the year:

To City Treasurer to meet bonds

due June 1 $150,000.00

To City Treasurer to meet bonds

due December 1 16,000.00 166,000.00

Amount of Fund this date.. $205,013.73



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REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 257

Invested as follows :

Municipal bonds $85,100.00

Loans on real estate 25,300.00

Cash deposited at interest 94,613.73

$205,013.73

Respectfully submitted,

C. FAYETTE SMITH,
LEMUEL SEARS,
SAMUEL McQUAID,

Commissioners of Sinking Fund.



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REPORT OF THE

CITY ENGINEER.



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen.

Gentlemen: — The thirty-fourth annual report of the
City Engineering Department ending November 30th, 1907,
is herein submitted.

RECEIPTS.
By appropriation $7,500.00

EXPENDITURES.

Salaries of City Engineer and assistants $7,100.00

Office supplies , 157.68

Printing and binding 84.50

Car fare, horse hire, traveling expenses, etc.... 120.86

Telephone and telegraph 9 96

Directory, engineering periodicals 12.00

Towel supply, etc 15.00

$7,500.00

SEWERS.

The construction of the main trunk of the Pine street
storm water system, which was let by contract last year
and w r hich was described in the report of this Department
for 1906, had been finished in the early part of this year.
This main trunk is constructed of reinforced concrete block,
and is 39 inches in diameter from Appleton street to Ilamp-



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260 REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER

den street, and 54 inches in diameter from Hampden street
to the ice house, where it has been connected with the Wal-
nut street outlet, so called. This outlet for the storm water
sewer is to be considered only temporary, the plan being to
extend the main trunk at some future time from the inter-
section of Pine and Prospect streets directly to the river.

Because of the grade, the sewer, from the intersection
of Pine and Prospect streets in Prospect street to the Wal-
nut street outlet, was designed to be 45 inches only in di-
ameter. The contractor, however, on account of having no
forms to make blocks for this size, built it 54 inches in
diameter, or the same size as the preceding section in Pine
street.

This type of sewer is the first of its kind built in this
city, and, although doubts were expressed in the beginning
about its strength and durability, such were dispelled as
the construction of the sewer progressed. So far as can be
judged the sewer is equally as strong and durable, if not
more so than a brick sewer of the same diameter. The con-
tract for the construction of the sewer was let to Rivers &
Young at $2.02 per running foot for the 39 inch size and
$3.00 per running foot for the 54 inch size, including in both
cases all manholes which were nine in number.

The excavation, which was on an average 14 feet in
depth, and back filling, were done by day labor by the city
and brought the total cost of the 39 inch size to $4.84 per
running foot and the 54 inch size to $6.90 per running foot.

The improvements made in the sewer system in South
Holyoke last year, on the recommendations of this Depart-
ment, had the desired effect, as, in the two or three phenom-
enal rain storms we had since then, no complaints whatever
about flooded cellars had come from this source.

This only shows what can be done with a limited
amount of money wisely and intelligently expended to meet
such conditions. In the territory named some blocks and
houses which had been troubled for vears with flooded eel-



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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER 26 1

lars, in not only extraordinary but ordinary storms, had
been thoroughly drained at a comparatively small expense.

A like improvement has been made the past year in
the vicinity of Elm street and Walnut street between Cabot
and Essex streets. In this vicinity there has been trouble
for years from flooded cellars in all heavy rain storms.
During the past year this trouble seemed to have grown
worse, owing, of course, to the greater number of heavy
storms we have had, and some relief had to be rendered.

On investigation and after a. careful study of all the
conditions here, the sewerage system was somewhat over-
hauled at a cost of $380.85 with the result that flooded cel-
lars will never be heard of again in this vicinity.

The new sewers built during the year, with their loca-
tions, alignments, costs, etc., are shown in the following
table, as are also shown all the sewers of the Pine street
storm water system built to date.

When the Geary tract, so-called, is sewered, which, it
is expected will be done early in the coming season, Hol-
yoke will have a sewerage system unsurpassed in complete-
ness by any city in the whole country.

This statement can only be appreciated when we con-
sider that then there will not be more than twenty-five
houses within the city and suburban limits — that is, be-
tween the Northampton boundary line on one side and the
West Springfield line on the other — that will not be con-
nected with the public sewer, and not more than seventy-
five houses withing the boundary lines of the whole terri-
tory of Holyoke which covers an area of 16 1-3 square miles.

This, it must be admitted, will be an unique record and
will not be surpassed or even equalled by any town or city
not only on this continent but throughout the whole world.



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264 REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER

HIGHWAYS.

Perhaps there is no department of the city that has
shown to greater advantage for some time past than the
highway department owing to the greater improvements
that are being made in the streets from year to year.

And the past year has been no exception to this rule,
for Appleton street has been paved with vitrified brick from
Beech street to Dwight street; Pleasant street from Apple-
ton street to Dwight street; Cabot street from High street
to the westerly side of Maple street; Suffolk street from
High street to Railroad street and Division street from High
street to Railroad street.

Creo-resinate blocks have been laid on the easterly side
of Main street from Appleton street to Spring street. Mac-
adam tarvia has been laid on Linden street from Hampden
street to Dwight street; on Hampden street from Brooks
avenue to Nonotuck street; on South street from Chapin
Square to Northampton street while macadam proper has.
been laid on Beech street from Appleton street to Cabot
street; on Chestnut street from Prospect street to Dwight
street; on Bridge street from ,Sargeant street to Jackson
street and on Mosher street from Bowers street to Bridge
street.

The total length of streets improved was 2.02 miles, of
which 0.59 miles were of brick pavement, 0.09 miles wood
block pavement and the remaining 1.41 miles macadam
tarvia and macadam proper.

The cost per square yard of these pavements including
all excavation and foundations are shown in the following
table.



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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER



265



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266 REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER

In the improvements to be made in highways the com-
ing year, Suffolk street, from Walnut street to Oak street,
should not be forgotten.

After a long agitation regarding the opening of Jack-
son street under the tracks of the Holyoke & Westfield rail-
road, the matter was finally agreed upon by the city and
the railroad company, and in consequence a decree for the
opening of the street was granted by the County Commis-
sioners.

The work, which has just been started, cannot very well
be prosecuted through the winter months, and is likely to
be deferred until the coming spring, when, it is expected,
it will then be prosecuted to completion as rapidly as pos-
sible.

CURBING AND .SIDEWALKS.

Although considerable work has been done in the laying
of curbing and sidewalks for some years past, there is still
a very large amount of this work to be done. Consequently,
it might be advisable to make a permanent loan so as to
enable this work to be done with greater despatch, as it is
hardly reasonable or fair to make some of the taxpayers,
who want curbing and sidewalks around their properties
and are willing to pay their share of the cost of the same,
to wait for several years before they receive either. Such
a policy is not a proper one and certainly no incentive for
people to improve their properties.

It is, therefore, suggested that some system be devised,
whether by the use of a permanent loan or otherwise, that
property owners can promptly get curbing and sidewalks
on application, so long as they are willing to pay their share
of the cost of the same.

For the number of lineal feet of curbing and square
yards of sidewalks laid and recovered during the year, you
are respectfully referred to the report of the Board of Pub-
lic Woks.



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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER 267

ACCEPTED STREETS.

The following table gives the locations, measurements
and grades of the streets accepted during the year 1907, viz :

Name of Street Prom To Length Width

Jackson A point 424 ft. east of the cen-
ter line of Commercial st. Commercial st. 424 ft. 60 ft.

Hitchcock The center line of Northamp-
ton st. WestBeldrd. 1539 ft. 50 ft.

The established grades of the above named streets are
as follows:

Name of Street Interaction with Grade

Jackson Commercial st. 1 1 5.08

Jackson A point 214 ft. east of Commercial st. 96.10

Jackson A point 424 ft. east of Commercial st. 95-5°

Hitchcock Northampton st. 257.69

Hitchcock Dexter st. - 2 59-5°

Hitchcock Martin st. 262.25

Hitchcock Center of Holyoke St. Ry. Co., location 264.50

Hitchcock At a point 1200 ft. west of Northampton st. 267.00

Hitchcock At a point 1450 ft. west of Northampton st. 282.50

Hitchcock Westfield rd. 285.00



BRIDGES.



It is unnecessary to repeat again what has been stated
so many times before, regarding the wisdom of the con-
struction of a new bridge each year until all the older and
weaker bridges would be replaced by more modern struc-
tures. It seems that a new structure should be built, if no
more than for aesthetic reasons, on Sargeant street over the
first level canal, as the present structure is certainly, to
say the least, no addition to the city beautiful.

Following is a tabulated list of the bridges under the
care of the city, together with their widths of roadway,
sidewalks, and areas of the same.



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268 REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER

LIST OF BRIDGES UNDER CARE OF THE CITY.



Location


a

a*-


O it

n


Area of
Roadway


*- •


Width of
Walks


Area of
Walks


South Hadley Falls (county bridge)


1,280
140
140
140

130

130
120
120
110
110

100
Ti

100
90

100

516
104

192
3,699


30 ft
38 ft.
23 ft.

23 ft.

40 ft.

40 ft.

24 ft.
30 ft.
26 tt.
24 ft.

40 ft.
20 ft.

24 ft.

25 ft
46 ft.

30 ft.
30 ft.


38,400 sq. It.
5,320 sq. ft.
3,220 sq. ft.
3,220 sq. ft.

5,200 sq. ft.

5,200 sq. ft.
2,880 sq. ft.
3,600 sq. ft.
2,860 sq. ft.
2,640 sq. ft.

4,000 sq. ft.
1.540 sq. ft.
2,400 sq. ft.
2,250 sq. ft.
4,600 sq. ft.

15,480 sq. ft.
3,120 sq. ft.


2
2
2
2

2

2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2

2
2

1


8 ft.

6 ft.

7 ft. '

7 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

8 ft.
10 ft.

7 ft.
8ft.

10 ft.

7 ft. 6 in.

8 ft.

6 ft. 10 in.
12ft.

8 ft.
8 ft.

12 ft.


20,480 aq. ft.


Bridge street at Valley Mill


1380 sq. ft.


Lyman street over ist level canal

Lyman street over and level canal

Dwight street over ist level canal


1,980 aq. ft.
1,960 sq. ft.

2,600 aq. ft.


Dwight street over 2nd level canal
(brick road and concrete walk

Appleton street over 1st level canal...

Appleton street over 2nd level canal...

Cabot street over ist level canal

Cabot street over and level canal

Cabot stieet over 3rd level canal
(granite road and concrete walk)

Sargeant street over ist level canal...

Sar grant street ovrr 2nd level canal...

Jackson street over and level canal....


2,600 sq. ft.
1,420 sq.ft.
2,400 sq. ft.
1,540 aq. ft.
1,760 sq. ft.

2,000 sq. ft.
1,155 sq. ft.
1,600 sq. ft.
1,230 sq.ft.
2,400 sq. ft.


Williamansett (county) bridge, three


8,256 sq. ft.




1,664 sq. ft.


Foot bridge over 8. & M. R.R. tracks
at Dwight street


2,304 sq. ft.










Total




105,930. q. ft.






59,509 sq. ft.







PARK AND LIGHTING DEPARTMENTS.

With the exception of alignments for pipe laying, little
if any work had to be done for the Lighting Department
during the year.

The same, however, cannot be said of the Park Depart-
ment which demanded the attention and time of an assist-
ant from this office practically throughout the whole work-
ing season.



WATER DEPARTMENT.

A new section of 20-inch pipe-line 1634 feet in length
has been laid from a point in the High Service pipe-line.



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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER 269

adjacent to the Wright gate house, and connected again
with the same line at the end of the new canal or rock cut
so called.

This new section of pipe-line has been laid because the
old pipe-line, which was the original main from Wright's
reservoir to the city and which was made part of the High
Service line after the new canal was constructed, was found
to be inefficient owing to leakage.

At first, when the High Service water was conveyed
through this pipe-line, no leakage appeared, and it was not
until the High Service water was shut off and turned on
again that a number of leakages appeared all over the sub-
merged portion of it.

What caused these leakages has never been ascertained,
as, certainly, they could hardly be attributed to any extra
pressure caused by the High Service water, since the static
pressure along this section of line was only about 52 lbs.
This submerged line should be put in repair, as in case of
extremely low water in Ashley and Wright reservoir, or
in case of odors and tastes in these reservoirs, its usefulness
would make' itself apparent because of the low depth at
-which it is laid.

Another excellent work which has been done the past
year was the laying of a 16-inch pipe-line from the end of
the 12-inch pipe-line in Madison avenue to Hampden street
at what was formerly called Washington street but now
Lincoln street.

The laying of this pipe-line partially completes the
plans outlined some years since, which showed that the pip-
ing system ought to be so regulated that surplus water from
any of the distributing reservoirs should be controlled and
not allowed to waste until all the reservoirs were first filled.
Until this line was constructed, conditions were such that
the Whiting Street reservoir could be overflowing and wast-
ing water into the Connecticut river while the Ashley and
Wright reservoirs would still be far below high-water mark.



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270 REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER

Another value which this line has added to the water
system, is that it enables Whiting Street to be used as a
high and low service system at the same time. This seems
a paradox but it is true nevertheless. So true, indeed, that
it is actually performing these functions at the present time.

In the beginning of November or late in October odors
and tastes were noticed in the faucet water down town. On
investigation it was found that this condition of the water
was caused by an organism known as Synura which infested
Wright's reservoir, the main intake of the low service sys-
tem. So clear and unmistakable was the cause of the trou-
ble as pointed out, that on the shutting off of Wright res-
ervoir all odors and tastes had disappeared within ten hours
after.

This shows what progress has been made in the science
of water supply by your Engineering Department as com-
pared with the days when experts were called in by the city
from all over the country to solve the same kind of prob-
lems but failed to do so as some of the early reports of the
Water Department tell us.

It is gratifying to notice that the consumption of water
in the city is being gradually cut down, the average for the
year ending November 30th being 103 gallons per capita
as against 114 gallons per capita in 1906; 117 gallons per
capita in 1905 and 144 gallons per capita in 1904.



SUPERVISION OF ELEVATORS.

Until recently the elevators of this city, which are
about 225 in number, had always been tested and super-
vised by the State police.

During the past year, however, the Attorney General
rendered an opinion stating that such work did not come
under the duties of the State police but under the duties of
the building inspectors in cities and towns in which there
were such officers. This places a new duty of no small im-



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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER 2jl

portance and responsibility upon your Engineer who is by
ordinance inspector of buildings in this city.

To assign such a duty as the supervision of elevators
to an inspector of buildings who gives his whole time to in-
spection alone, and who has no other duties to perform,
as is the case in many cities, would seem reasonable, but. to
assign such a duty as the testing and supervision of 225
elevators to the City Engineer, who has already so many
other duties to perform, would not seem reasonable or fair.

What are the duties of the City Engineer at present?
His duties are such that to perform them with that skill and
intelligence expected nowadays from technical men, he has
not only to know the science of civil engineering in general,
but to be an expert in sewerage, water supply, highway,
and bridge construction, in the strength and stability of
building materials and in all things relating to the physical
development of the city where technical knowledge is re-
quired.

The city has now well passed in population its fifty
thousand mark, and, consequently, it may be expected that
new engineering problems of greater magnitude will have
to be met in the future than those which had to be met in
the past. When such problems have to be met your Engin-
eering Department should have ample time for their proper
study, conception and method of development, so that the
best results may be obtained for the amount of money ex-
pended.

It is therefore suggested that the supervision of ele-
vators, together with the inspection of buildings, be cut
off from the Engineering Department and put in a depart-
ment for themselves.

This could be done without adding any extra expense
to the city, by electing or appointing, if the suggestion
might be made, the head of the new department from the
present staff of the Engineering Department.



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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER



INDEXING.

A considerable length of time was given in the early-
part of the year in re-arranging and indexing again all the
drawing on file in this Department.

These drawings are over fifteen hundred in number


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