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ORGANIZATION FOR 1907.



Office in Elm Street Building.



Hon. NATHAN P. AVERY, Mayor.

ODILON Z. E. CHAREST,
Chairman.

JAMES J. O'DONNELL,
Secretary and Superintendent of Schools.



At Large



JOHN J. KIRKPATRICK
DR. GEORGE H. CLARK
Ward 1— DANIEL M. FOLEY,
Ward 2— ODILON Z. E. CHAREST,
Ward 3— AUGUST H. BAU.SH, .
Ward 4— JOSEPH F. SULLIVAN,
Ward 5— JAMES T. McTIGUE, .
Ward 6— EDWARD J. GORMAN,
Ward 7— FREDERICK S. WEBBER,



Term expires Jan.
1908
1910
1910
1909
1910
1909
1908
1909
1908



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Holyoke School Committee

ORGANIZATION FOR 1908.



Office in Elm Street Building.

Regular Meeting, First Monday in the Month.
(January, First Tuesday.)



Hon. NATHAN P. AVERY, Mayor.

ODILON Z. E. CHAREST,
Chairman.

JAMES J. O'DONNELL,
Secretary and Superintendent of Schools.



At Large



THOMAS H. SEARS, .

DR. GEORGE H. CLARK,
Ward 1— DANIEL M. FOLEY,
Ward 2— ODILON Z. E. CHAREST,
Ward 3— AUGUST H. BAU.SH,
Ward 4-^TOSEPH F. SULLIVAN,
Ward 5— DANIEL F. WATERS, .
Ward 6— EDWARD J. GORMAN,
Ward 7— FREDERICK S. WEBBER,



Term expires Jan.
1911
1910
1910
1909
1910
1909
1911
1909
1911



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Standing Committees for 1 908



High School — Messrs. Clark, Foley, Webber.

First District — Messrs. Sullivan, Webber, Sears.

Second District — Messrs. Gorman, Clark, Baush.

Third District — Messrs. Waters, Foley, Charest.

Rules — Messrs. Webber, Charest, Foley.

Finance and Accounts — Messrs. Sullivan, Webber,
Clark.

Salaries — Messrs. Sears, Baush, Waters.

Text Books and Courses of Study— Messrs. Clark, Sul-
livan, Baush.

Printing and Supplies — Messrs. Gorman, Sears,Sullivan.

Music — Messrs. Baush, Webber, Waters.

Drawing and Writing — Messrs. Waters, Baush, Charest.

Health arid Physical Culture — Messrs. Clark, Foley,
Gorman.

Evening Schools — Messrs. Foley, Sears, Charest.

Attendance, Census and Truancy — Messrs. Foley, Sears,
Gorman.



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Calendar

SCHOOL YEAR 1907-1908.



Winter Term begins January 6, 1908.

Winter Term ends March 27, 1908.

Summer Term begins April 6, 1908.

Summer Term ends June 26, 1908.

Fall Term begins August 31, 1908.

Fall Term ends December 18, 1908.

Winter Term begins January 4, 1909.

VACATIONS.

March 28 to April 5, 1908, inclusive.
June 27 to August 30, 1908, inclusive.
December 19, 1908, to January 3, 1909, inclusive.

HOLIDAYS.

Every Saturday, Fourth of July, Washington's Birth-
day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Thanksgiving Day with
the. day following, New Year's Day, Patriot's Day, and
Labor's Holiday.

Regular Meetings of the School Committee — The first
Monday evening in each month at eight o'clock; except in
January, when the monthly meeting will be the first Tues-
day.

Accounting Committee's Meetings — Upon notification.



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REPORT OF

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.



To His Honor, the Mayor \ and the Citizens ofHolyoke :

The School Committee respectfully submit their annual
report for the year 1907.

The School Department has finished another prosperous
year, during which the high standing of the public schools
of this city has been well maintained. Holyoke's great edu-
cational mill has been running smoothly and effectually,
and the brand of future citizenship that is being turned
out is just cause for pride on the part of our citizens. The
sacred responsibility of directing the education of the youth
is fully appreciated by your Committee and their every act
has been to improve the character of our schools and pro-
mote the interests of the children.

In the schools of Holyoke today may be found a body
of teachers the personnel and ability of which is, in the main,
excellent. Probably there are no persons in our community
who exert so great an influence as they upon the child's
character and ideals, yet the public appreciation has never
been commensurate with their worth. During the year the
Committee voted to accede to the request of the teachers of
the city by granting them an increase of fifty dollars per
year, commencing December 1st, 1907. In doing this the
Committee feel that they have the support of the best public
sentiment. During the past few years teachers have been
obliged to meet the increased cost of living and the higher
requirements for professional training upon practically in-



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 163

adequate salary. The increase, which may be regarded as
a generous one under the present unfavorable financial con-
ditions, is highly satisfactory to the teachers.

Under ordinary conditions our school enrolment of last
year would be very high, especially in the congested dis-
tricts of Wards One and Four, were it not for the fact that
in both these districts new parochial schools were opened
in September. The majority of the pupils of those new
schools were drawn from the public schools and as a result
normal conditions are reported at the North Chestnut Street
and West Street Schools. In the South Holyoke district
the new Morgan School was opened in April and at the end
of the school term just closed the principal reports that the
new building has proven admirably adapted for the pur-
poses and he is well pleased with its arrangement and work-
ing. We are glad to state that the situation, which has been
acute in this .section for many years, is finally relieved.

The .Sargeant Street building is now undergoing ex-
tensive repairs, which will help to put this building in the
class of up-to-date school houses. During the year many
valuable improvements have been made by the Board of
Public Works in the different schools, chief among which
has been the repainting of the whole interior of the Ewing-
ville, the North Chestnut Street, the Springdale and the
Park Street buildings. This improvement was of great
merit and has given the schools a purer and more wholesome
atmosphere. We would recommend that the South Chestnut
Street and Highland buildings receive similar treatment,
as their needs in this particular are not less worthy of at-
tention than were those of the above mentioned schools.

At the Elmwood School there is an urgent need of a hall,
without which no school of sixteen rooms or even less, is
complete. The Board would recommend that steps be taken
at once to give to Elmwood what they are certainly entitled
to and what the best school work requires.

At the Nonotuck Street School there is but one exit.



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164 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

which we feel would prove fatally inadequate in case of fire
during school hours. Where the safety of the children is
menaced by school conditions there is no question about the
attitude of this Board, which is for immediate action to the
end that the danger be removed.

At the Elm Street School better and increased lighting
fixtures are required if the children's sight is to be protected.
There should also be additional drinking fountains placed
in the building.

An emergency toilet on the third floor of the Springdale
building would be a valuable, advantageous improvement.

At the Hamilton Street School a distinct improvement
could be effected by replacing the upper part of the class-
room doors by glass and thus remove the sepulchral gloom
of the corridors.

The sanitaries at the West Street, Appleton Street and
Elmwood Schools should be repaired and altered or removed.
Defective sanitaries have no place in any school house.

Such, in brief, is the list of major needs of the school
buildings of Holyoke which we trust the Board of Public
Works will fill during the coming year.

We have again to call the attention of the Mayor and
City Government to the fact that nothing has as yet been
done toward providing necessary accommodation for Oak-
dale and North Chestnut Street. In the former it is the
utter lack of accommodation, while in the latter place the
need is for a new school to take the place of the present out
of date building. The School Committee, which has already
gone on record in this matter several times in the past, feel
that some definite action should be taken by the incoming
City Government to improve these trying conditions of our
public schools, and will not agree to any policy of inaction
in this matter.

In all lines of educational effort the year of 1907 has
been one of steady progress. The Department of Domestic
Science and Manual Training has become a notable feature



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 65

of our school work and its important place in the education
of the youth of today is readily acknowledged by all good
school authorities.

The evening schools are growing each year, especially
in the number of those who attend by choice and not by
legal requirement. It is gratifying to observe the large
number who are taking advantage of the opportunities of
the Evening Grammar and High School. This branch of
school work is one worthy of the School Board's best effort.

During the year irregularities were discovered in one
department, but vigorous and salutary measures were at
once originated by t,he School Board to prevent a recurrence
in this or any department connected with the schools and
we believe the system will be all the healthier for these dis-
coveries.

In a report of this character we will state but the totals
involved in financing our department. For the year 1907
the appropriation and transfers were $182,154.19, the re-
ceipts $2,689.44, additional transfer to meet overdraft
$588.49, making a total income of $185,432.12, as well as a
total expenditure of this same amount. But provision must
be made for the fiscal year of 1908, not only for the growing
school activities, but also for the additional salaries referred
to in another part of this report. As this matter will be
handled specially by the Committee on Finance, we do not
deem it our duty to go into it here in detail, only to say that
the proportion of money spent by the City of Holyoke itself
for its schools is as little as any of the manufacturing cities
in the state. A detailed schedule for all of the moneys
received and spent will be found in the printed report.

Respectfully submitted,

JOSEPH F. SULLIVAN,
AUGUST BAUSH,
FRED S. WEBBER,

Committee on Annual Report.



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REPORT OF THE



Superintendent and Secretary.



To the School Committee of Holyoke.

Gentlemen: — I take great pleasure in offering for your
consideration the forty-fourth annual report of the Superin-
tendent of Schools.

VARYING CONDITIONS.

There have been numerous changes of the school pupils
and school buildings during this past school year.

In the South Holyoke district the new Morgan School,
with its full complement of teachers and school equipment,
has been a great relief to the former congested conditions in
that quarter. The possession of this building helps both on
the grounds of economy and also as a safeguard against
dangers, affording increased and better school facilities; it
has enabled the school authorities to abandon those out-
side rooms in that district, which at their best are poorly
adapted to school purposes as well as a source of increased
expense.

The former Park Street School teachers, with their
principal, Miss Jennie E. Scolley, were transferred to the
Hamilton Street .School, while Miss Emily L. Curran, form-
erly principal of the Sargeant Street School, was transferred
to the Park Street School.

Other transfers will soon be realized, and there is a good
prospect of a well heated, well ventilated, sanitary building
in the place of the present Sargeant Street School building.
Active steps are already being taken to bring about those
results.



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 67

Again, there has been a distinct change in Ward One.
The Bridge Street School, four rooms of which were form-
erly used, has been vacated as a public school and the
building itself and the grounds have been sold by the city
authorities. The former pupils have for the most part been
transferred to the -West Street School. However, the time
is not far off when, according to the normal growth of the
school population in that district, it will be necessary to
have increased accommodations in Ward One, but the city
is fortunate in having the East Dwight Street .School which
can be put in proper physical condition within a reasonable
length of time.

Although much has been done to beautify and make
wholesome the present North Chestnut Street School, yet it
is unfit for a proper school building.

The Board of Public Works, during the year, has made
many improvements in the Nonotuck Street, Ewingville,
North Chestnut Street and Springdale Schools. Many things,
however, remain to be done. The Elm wood School could
have its sphere of usefulness greatly increased if it had a
public hall. The sanitaries should be located outside of
the building proper, and the unpleasant and unhealthy odor
that is driven through the main corridor could be thus done
away with, as well as increased room capacity could be
given to that building now crowded with pupils.

EVENING SCHOOLS.

The interest in the evening school has been continued,
and even increased, as the numbers in constant attendance
will attest. The present evening school has grown beyond
the stage of experiment and entered into a field of educa-
tion and utility beyond any question. The personnel of
the evening school teaching force has been held up to as
high a standard as could be obtained, preference being given
to normal school and college graduates before all others.
The advantage to be gained from such a selection must
appeal to every disinterested person.



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1 68 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

The evening grammar school has been more largely
attended than ever before, and the evening high school has
had a more constant attendance. The curriculum is com-
posed of bookkeeping, typewriting, shorthand, advanced
English, modern languages, algebra, mechanical drawing,
with its work so arranged that these subjects will be in-
creased or decreased accommodating themselves to the
needs of the pupils. The general work of the evening
schools is highly satisfactory.

TEACHERS ' INSTITUTE.

Preparation is already well in hand for conducting a
Teachers' Institute, which is intended to be not only one of
theory but of practice. A list of eminent speakers and in-
structors, both national and state, has been selected and we
can with every confidence look forward to an institute whose
direct influence on the teaching force of our city ought to
be strong. The State Secretary of Education, Mr. George
H. Martin, has kindly agreed to be present, and he has at
all other times shown a disposition to be of assistance to
our city.

TEACHERS.

. If reference is made to the annual reports of the years
1905 and 1906 you will there find means which I have be-
lieved most feasible for the selection of new teachers.

There are many problems at the present time, but the
one aspect that is deserving of strong attention is, how to
properly treat the teacher who has grown old in the serv-
ice. What is the best way by which the greatest amount
of justice can be done to her and by which the greatest
amount of justice can be done to the city? When a teacher
has ceased her days of usefulness to the schools on account
of lack of health or age, should not some steps, considerate
of her, be taken by those in whose service she has come to
that state? On the other hand, is it an act of justice to



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 69

the growing pupils to be taught by a teacher under those
conditions? There are different solutions of this problem;
opinions vary; but the problem ought to be examined with
clearness and intelligence by the authorities who have such
matter in charge and the most equitable conclusion for the
teachers and the city drawn.

This problem does not exist to as great an extent in
our city as it does in a great number of other cities through-
out even our commonwealth. Here our teaching force is to a
great degree composed of men and women whose personal-
ity and teaching capacity are in every way conducive to
developing the best there is in the child. Ability and will-
ingness are the characteristic marks of the vast number of
Holyoke teachers.

FIRE DRILLS.

Fire drills occur * regularly in our schools, and strong
precautions are taken to avoid any dangerous liabilities.
The vigilance of the authorities in charge is being exercised
to develop every reasonable security for the protection of
the school children.

MEDICAL INSPECTION.

The present school year has witnessed in our schools
the medical inspection as a reality. Although it is not con-
ducted at the present time on an expensive scale, still its
influence is deep. The great assistance given by the sug-
gestions and examinations, the help toward better physical
development, is very manifest, for there are a great mass
of children whose parents cannot afford to pay for the med-
ical help and yet whose condition demands this help, to
whom this word in time would set their whole physical being
right, would prevent poor sight, would destroy adenoids,
would prevent in its early stage forms of contagious dis
ease, would help the public health in a great measure.



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170 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

The usefulness of medical inspection is impaired by
lack of funds, but its field of usefulness is large and effect-
ive both as a destroyer and preventer of disease. The wis-
dom of medical inspection cannot be questioned and its
field ought to be extended. Children affected by sickness
deserve the helping hand of the state, and insurance against
sickness is a splendid investment for our city.

PLAYGROUNDS.

Playgrounds are a vital part of school life. The devel-
opment engendered in the playing field is very valuable.
The health of body and mind, the force of character that is
developed herein, are unquestionably recognized. The care
and protection that a child would have in such playgrounds,
and the removing of the street hazards, make playgrounds
a part of school life almost invaluable.

All the grammar schools should have playgrounds, and
the High School one large campus particularly for the High
School scholars, and at times wjiere all the other scholars
of the city could play with the fullest freedom.

While almost all of our citizens concede the necessity
of playgrounds, yet as our modern school buildings are con-
structed, one after the other, we do not have adjoining them
proper playgrounds. Why is this? With our growing pop-
ulation it can hardly be thought proper economy to delay
the purchase of such sites. Such a delay under ordinary
aspects would look like false economy. In the meanwhile,
the need of fitting playgrounds constantly grows.

Respectfully yours,

JAMES J. O'DONNELL.



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REPORT OF THE



Supervisor of Drawing.



Mr. James J. O'Donnell, Superintendent of Schools.

Dear Sir: — The work in Drawing and Art Education
has been carried on, during the past year, very nearly along
the same lines as for the two or three years preceding.

It has sometimes appeared in the past as if many
thought that constant changes — the adoption of new ideas
and methods, with apparently little regard paid to the ques-
tion of their being any better than those already in use —
must invariably be manifestations of growth and improve-
ment, but at the present time this tendency has mostly dis-
appeared. In fact, as the ends to be secured by the intro-
duction of Art Education into the public schools have be-
come more thoroughly understood, the work has been more
thoroughly systematized, until now, the courses followed
in the more progressive of the leading cities of the country,
as far as circumstances will permit, are very nearly iden-
tical.

One hour a week in the grammar grades is a discourag-
ingly small amount of time in which to attempt to teach the
many topics that are included in our course.

Then again, design and construction are so closely re-
lated that it seems absolutely necessary that some construc-
tion of objects should be attempted in order that pupils may
realize this close relation, but this takes time from our
already small allowance, while in many cities time is pro-
vided for such work as Manual Training outside of the
regular time allotted to drawing. I earnestly hope that
this matter will be given serious consideration.



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172 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

I would like to call attention to the fact that an " In-
ternational Congress for the Advancement of Drawing and
Art Teaching is to be held in London next summer. Lead-
ing educators from nearly every part of the civilized world
will meet there to discuss problems connected with this
subject.

An interesting point to be noted in connection with
the congress is the prominent part to be taken by Americans
— and this is noteworthy because it indicates the rapid ad-
vance that has been made in the teaching of this subject
in America during the last score of years.

Twenty years ago America, as a whole, would have
made but a poor showing in the line of Art Education com-
pared with the work that was being done in Germany and
France; but today the best of our public school work will
compare favorably with the best that can be shown from
any other country in the world.

Excellent work has been done in the High School dur-
ing the past year, and it has been the source of much grat-
ification to hear the favorable comments that have been
made by visitors concerning the drawings and paintings
that have been on exhibition. The remark has more than
once been made, "I had no idea that such work was done
here."

The graded schools have been visited every two weeks
by the supervisors, and the regular visits of inspection have
been made. Teachers' meetings also have been held as usual.

In conclusion, I wish to express to the principals and
teachers in our schools, my appreciation of their intelligent
support in our work together during the year, and to thank
the superintendent and members of the School Board for
the kind consideration that has been given to my depart-
ment.

Respectfully submitted.

ISABELLE II. FERRY,

Supervisor of Drawing.



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REPORT OF THE

Supervisor of Music.



Mr. James J. O'Donnell, Superintendent of Schools.

Dear Sir: — There has been no change of importance in
the instruction of music in the schools the past year. We
have just been trying to enforce some of the problems of a
music course.

I can see some advancement in the past year, but not
as much as I expect in the future. On the whole, we have
an excellent corps of teachers, who seem to work with en-
thusiasm; and work in this manner is sure to accomplish
good results.

In May, I was requested by the Grand Army Committee
to arrange a chorus for Memorial Day exercises. I organ-
ized a chorus of four hundred boys from the various gram-
mar schools, who demonstrated a singing quality of voice
which was greatly enjoyed by the vast audience.

My reason for selecting boys only was to show the
people that a boy can sing, and that he enjoys it as much
as a girl.

The grammar school graduation was held in the opera
house and was pronounced a success, being one of the best
that has been given, the different classes giving part songs,
of a class of music that we would not have dared to try
several years ago ; and to do this shows a decided improve-
ment.

At the High School we have had all students take music,
dividing the school into two choruses, which have worked



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174 • REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

very well. I also had a chorus for the graduating exer-
cises which did excellent work.

Allow me to express my thanks to the superintendent,
principals and teachers for their hearty co-operation.

Respectfully submitted,

HUGH CRAIG.



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REPORT OF THE

Supervisor of Writing.



Mr. James J. O'Donnell, Superintendent of Schools.

Dear Sir: — In the perfection of the school course, a
great deal depends upon the writing of the pupil. With
this in mind, it has been our aim to have all work of a high
order, and results show our efforts have been most success-
ful. Two new books, containing business forms, were added
to the course now in use in our schools. These books have



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