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proven both beneficial and instructive. In a manufactur-
ing city like Holyoke, where a large number of the pupils
are obliged to have only a limited education, it is in my
opinion important that the common or most useful branches
be given special attention ; therefore I would like if possible
to give the first primaries more time than my program, con-
sidering the great number of rooms, will allow; so if it
could be arranged, as in the past, to have an assistant in
this department, I think it would prove beneficial enough
to warrant the expenditure. In closing, I wish to thank all
associated with me in my work, for their courtesy and con-
sideration.

Respectfully submitted,

ESTHER A. MacDONNELL.



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REPORT OF THE



Principal of the High School.



Mr. James}. O' Donnelly Superintendent of Schools.

Dear Sir : — All annual reports must, to a certain extent,
be similar, in that they show the work of the school, which,
frofn year to year, suffers no great change. Some of the
changes made this year cover the following matters: Ex-
aminations, Reports to Parents, Parents' Days, Courses of
Study.

EXAMINATIONS.

, A change was made in the time and form of examina-
tions. A written test, occupying the regular class recita-
tion period, is given from time to time, as the teachers deem
necessary. They occur at least once in five weeks. Formal
written examinations are given semi-annually, one coming
at the close of the twenty weeks of school, in the latter part
of January, the other being held shortly before the close of
school in June. The examinations occupy three full days
of school time, and are held both in the morning and after-
noon of these days. The students' semi-annual and annual
marks are based upon the examinations taken in connection
with the daily recitations, the value of the examinations
being to the recitation as one is to three. This places the
daily work of the scholar in a more prominent position,
but also shows the value of being able to answer definitely
and concisely in a limited space of time, questions based
upon the daily work.



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 77

The examinations of the College Entrance Board were
held at the High School building in June. Previously it had
been necessary for the students to go to Springfield or Mt.
Holyoke College to take these examinations. The results,
in the main, of these College Board examinations were quite
satisfactory, showing that the work in the school prepared
our scholars to pass successfully examinations given by the
College Board. One of the benefits of the school's semi-
annual examinations is to qualify a student to more intelli-
gently and successfully pass College Entrance and Civil Ser-
vice examinations.



REPORTS TO PARENTS.

Instead of sending regular reports to parents every
eight weeks, reports are now sent every ten weeks, or each
quarter of the school year. The report for the second quar-
ter shows the result of the student's work after he has taken
the mid-year examination.

Special report cards are also sent to parents at least
once in four weeks, where students are doing unsatisfactory
work. These cards are often accompanied with special
statements explaining as far as possible the reason for the
failing mark.

When scholars enter school in the fall, they are quite
apt not to properly estimate the time and energy required
for the successful completion of their studies. They en-
deavor to take too many subjects and the result is, in many
cases, failures. It is impressed upon the students that they
should take as few hours as are necessary, and to arrange
for systematic study from day to day in these subjects.

PARENTS 7 DAYS.

On September 13th of the present year, there was held
the first "Parents' Day", to which the parents and friends



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178 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

of the school were invited. The sessions of the school were
so aranged as to have school work both in the forenoon and
in the afternoon. Very little change in the routine work of
the school was made. It was desired that those who came
should see our school work as it is from day to day. Ex-
hibits were held in the Manual Training, Domestic Science
and Art Departments. The attendance on this day w r as
very satisfactory, and showed that the people had consider-
able interest in the daily work of the school. The second
"Parents' Day" was held with equal if not greater success,
on the 11th day of December. Other days of similar nature
will be held from time to time throughout the year. In
addition to the routine work, special programs for these
days will be aranged.



COURSES OF STUDY.

Some changes have been made in the courses of study.
One of the principal changes is that of a Special Commercial
Course, which is placed on the schedule of courses for the
purpose of interesting such students as may be unable to
complete a regular four years' course, and still are anxious
to qualify themselves for business positions. This course
is being taken by about 60 students and is confined largely
to strictly commercial branches. The English work for all
students taking commercial subjects has been changed from
four to five hours per week. The fifth or added hour is
used for special instruction in business forms and commer-
cial correspondence. Bookkeeping in the first year has
been made an unprepared subject, coming three times per
week, giving two hours for each recitation. This gives the
teacher time for considerable individual instruction so nec-
essary for accurate results and detailed work that a subject
of this kind demands.

In Manual Training and Domestic Science, four hours
per week are required of each student, and to get credit for



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 79

these subjects, a student must complete a certain amount
of work outlined for the course.

In taking up other matters of the school, I would first
speak of the graduation exercises of the class of 1907. This
class numbered 92; three of the members of this class re-
ceived certificates of completion instead of regular diplo-
mas. This was owing to the fact that while they had com-
pleted as many hours of work as the diploma required, they
had not completed the exact subjects for which the diploma
called. The honor students who represented the class at
the Commencement Exercises, and being the nine who had
the highest class standings for the four years, were as fol-
lows: Katherine Frances Connor, Anna Augusta Dalton,
James Frederick Gaylord, Hannah Mary Griffin, Elvina
Kristine Hansen, Bertha Alphonsine Laplante, Arthur Lister
Rae, Bernice Ethel Maxfield, Alice Elizabeth Turner. The
following is a list of members of the class who have been
nither absent nor tardy throughout the four years : Antoin-
etee Charest, Isabella Skinner and Ralph Armstrong. Not
absent: Earl Donahue. Not tardy: Ellen Fitzgerald,
Ruth Farr, Augusta Chapin, Marion Demond, William Cros-
by, Raymond Chapin, Mary Dougherty, Septa Lynn, Eva
Moynihan, Margaret Sullivan, Bertha Allen, Grace Taylor,
E\*a Dubois, Edith Kellogg, Myra Whitcomb, Anna Cronin,
Anne Halfpenny, Leonise Charest, Katherine Connor, Olive
Lynds, Myra Gould, Jean Lowe.

Twelve members of the class entered college, ten en-
tered normal schools, 11 continued their study in special
preparatory schools, and six have returned to this school
for postgraduate work.



The enrolment by classes for .September, 1907, was as
follows :



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l8o REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

Classes. Boys. Girls. Total.



Postgraduates


4


2


6


Seniors


32


50


82


Juniors


53


73


126


Sophomores


97


120


217


Presmen


137


130


267



323 375 G98

In the matter of the examination of the sight and hear-
ing of the High School pupils, I would report as follows:
Six hundred and eighty-nine students were examined ; out
of this number, 109 were found defective in vision and 11
defective in hearing. In many cases, especially of the eye-
sight, the students had never consulted oculists. About 40
notices were sent to parents. The other cases were either
well known to parents and had been under treatment, or
else were not serious enough to require a special notifica-
tion.

Some of the very urgent needs of the school are a sys-
tem of shower baths and lockers to be placed in the base-
merit for the use of the Department of Physical Training,
and also a set of lockers adequate in number and size, for
the use of the Manual Training Department. I would also
suggest that the Manual Training Department be equipped
with materials and tools for work in copper and brass, and
that steps be taken towards the introduction, in the near
future, of metal work, both for lathe and forging.

At other times and places, I have referred to the pur-
chase of land adjacent to the High School building, to be
used as an athletic field; where only a few students parti-
cipate in the games and compete for places on the teams,
the benefit of athletics is reduced to a very low minimum.
Could we have a field convenient in situation and adequate
in size, the nature and kind of athletic contests would be
materially changed, and under proper supervision a larger



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE l8l

proportion of our students might have the great benefits
that vigorous outdoor exercise adapted to the individual
needs would bring.

Allow me to extend through you to the members of the
Committee, my thanks and appreciation for their support
in the first full year of my principalship of this school.

Very truly yours,

HOWARD CONANT,

Principal.



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REPORT OF THE

Principal of the Evening High
and Grammar School.

Mr. James J. y Donnelly Superintendent of Schools.

Dear Sir: — For the first time since the Evening High
School was opened all classes are now conducted in the
High School building, and this is a distinct advantage, for
there is an atmosphere of advancement about this fine build-
ing, and the pupils seem to catch more readily the proper
High School spirit and the inspiration to do better things.
It was feared last year that the attendance in certain classes,
if conducted in this building, would be so small that the
subjects might have to be abandoned, but this fear was
wholly groundless as is evidenced by the present good at-
tendance in such classes as Mechanical Drawing, Civil *Ser-
vice, English Literature and the modern languages; the
inconvenient location of the building having no effect what-
ever on the attendance.

The school opened two weeks earlier than usual this
year with a very large enrollment which at present num-
bers 340, divided as to sexes, 195 males and 145 females.
This is the largest number enrolled since the school was
established. An average attendance of 72 per cent has
been maintained.

As in past years, the strongest demand is for the Com-
mercial course, and the work of this department has been
broadened and strengthened during the present year to such
an extent that I believe we now offer as good a course in
business training in our Evening High School as can be
obtained in any school in the city.

It is pleasing to announce that during the present year
a course of stud\- has been outlined for the different classes



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 83

and when a pupil has satisfactorily completed the work
outlined for one year in any subject, he is awarded a cer-
tificate, and the holders of these certificates may enter the
school the following or subsequent years for advanced work.

At the opening of our evening schools each year we
meet a considerable number of young men who are looking
for classes in which they may receive a course of training
directly connected with a particular line of work or trade;
and this fact is evidence of the need in the near future of
establishing an evening trades school. Of course, it is a
question whether it is not too much to expect that our School
Board should be called upon to maintain such a school, at
least for several years; nevertheless, in a manufacturing
"city like ours, with such a large per cent of population en-
gaged in daily labor in the mills, much of it unskilled, it
seems to me that an evening school of this kind where prac-
tical courses in trades and crafts could be offered would
have a far reaching effect and result in much good. These
courses could be carried along with our Evening High
School classes, for this fine building is easily adapted for
such work and it is only just and right that our hard labor-
ing people should enjoy some of the privileges which this
building affords, as well as the more favored individuals.

While as above stated, it may be altogether too early
to burden the taxpayers with the additional expense of
maintaining a trades evening school, yet a beginning might
be made with little additional expense by opening the Man-
ual Training Department of the Day High .School for the
use of the evening classes. And when we consider that the
expense of maintaining our evening schools is only about
$10 per year for each pupil, we surely cannot be accused of
extravagance, and I have confidence enough in the generos-
ity and public spirit of our citizens to feel assured that they
consider this money well invested, for certainly the result-
ant benefits are immeasurable.

Respectfully submitted.

P. J. GAKVEY.



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Finances and Statistics



GENERAL STATISTICS.

Population of Holyoke, September, 1905 51,666

Total valuation of property. $44,753,780

Total number of children of school age (5

to 15) 10,460

Total number from 7 to 14 years of age 8,067

Total number of pupils in all schools, year end-
ing June, 1907 7,142

Number under 5 years of age 348

Number over 15 years of age 683

Number between 7 and 14 years of age 4,505

Average membership in all schools 6,144.9

Average attendance 5,609.1

Per cent, of attendance . 91.2

Total income of school department $184,843.63

Total expenditures $185,432.12

Overdraft $588.49

Expended by Board of Public Works (repairs,
fuel, power, light, water, janitors and jan-
itors' supplies) $46,124.72

Total expenditure for support of schools.... $214,383.14

Cost per pupil based on average membership. . 34.887
Cost per pupil based on average membership

1906 32.683

Average for the state, report of 1905-1906 28.79

Tax on one dollar of valuation .00474



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



«*5



FINANCIAL STATEMENT.

RECEIPTS.

Dog taxes $2,200.30

Tuition 449.14

Sales N 40.00

Appropriations and transfers ....

Total income

Total expenditures

Overdraft



$2,689.44
182,154,19

$184,843.63
185,432.12

588.49



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l86 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



ESTIMATES.






Estimates


Expenditures


Eatlmatet


1906-1907


1906-1907


1907-1908


Day school teachers $142,660.00 $142,237.32 $152,315.00


Evening school teachers 5,000.00


5,397.00


5,400.00 »


Supervisors 4,100.00


4,250.00


4,250.00


.Superintendent 3,000.00


3,000.00


3,000.00


Clerks 2,050.00


2,083.33


2,200.00


Truant officers 2,800.00


2,791.66


2,850.00


Janitors 15,370.00


2,971.19




Building supplies 1,150.00


191.12


150.00


Educational supplies 7,000.00


8,521.36


8,000.00


Furniture 2,500.00


2,055.45


2,100.00


Text books 5,000.00 '


5,454.41


6,000.00


County truant school ' 400.00


253.42


385.00


Freight, express and cartage 300.00


276.14


300.00


Laundry 190.00


196.98


200.00*


Livery 100.00


136.00


130.00


Office expense 100.00


149.13


100.00


Printing and advertising 800.00


1,175.03


800.00


Rentals 2,556.00


1,608.00


720.00


Transportation 600.00


622.50


750.00


Telephones 350.00


339.01


370.00


Special help 700.00


128.00




Census 250.00


311.00


200.00


Unclassified 1,200.00


1,284.07


1,000.00



$198,176.00 $185,432.12 $191,220.00



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1 87

CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES.

SALARIES OF SUPERINTENDENT, CLERKS AND TRUANT

OFFICERS.

Superintendent-^James J. O'Donnell $3,000.00

Clerks— Agnes M. Cadieux 700.00

Mary J. Callahan 750.00

Ida A. St. Martin 633.33

Truant Officers— Thomas W. Doyle 950.00

Edouard Cadieux 950.00

Thomas E. Gallagher 891.66

Thomas J. Ashe (census) 150.00

John Ryan (census) 150.00

Total $8,174.99



EDUCATIONAL SUPPLIES.

Bookkeeping $111.36

Busy Work 215.98

Crayon 65.66

Domestic science 227.13

Drawing 118.29

Erasers — blackboard 12.00

Erasers — rubber 70.80

Geography 432.00

History 53.13

Kindergarten , 11 8.65

Manual Training 2,188.83

Music 63.85

Paints, brushes etc 213.52

Paper 2,659.95

Pencils 504.75

Pens and penholders 195.00

Rules 62.70



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1 88 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE

.Science 124.36

Stenography 412.88

Writing . 501.46

Unclassified . . . 169.06



$8,521.36

TEXT BOOKS.

Drawing $14.72

Elocution 8.75

English 2,323.21

French and German 199.13

Geography 1,094.88

History 594.13

Latin and Greek 101 50

Library 4.05

Manual Training 6.60

Mathematics 521.20

Music 337.98

Physiology and Hygiene 3.15

Science 68.96

Spanish 26.25

Stenography 102.15

Unclassified 47.75

$5,454.41



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190 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES BY MONTHS.

December $19,023.91

January 19,445.92

February 17,814.87

March 16,406.59

April '. 17,837.22

May 16,778.50

June 16,554.20

July 2,975.43

August 3,606.42

September 18,460.37

October 18,823.02

November 17,705.67

Total for year $185,432.12

Total receipts 184,843.63

Overdraft 58849



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



I 9 I



COST PER PUPIL BASED ON AVERAGE
MEMBERSHIP.





Coet based on
tottl expense*


Cost based on
teaching only




High School


$66,012


$43,525








Grammar and


Klndtr-






Primary


farten


Appleton Street


27.21


20.216




Bridge Street


24.068


14.231




Elm Street


26.679


20.241


28.446


Elmwood,


26.386


19.291


25.788


Ewingville


28.23


21.097




Hamilton Street


20.245


14.196


27.53


Highland


30.431


23.414


30.023


Ingleside


24.072


19.99




Morgan


26.726


20.328




Nonotuck Street


32.186


23.821




North Chestnut


26.898


22.568


28.969


Park Street


24.395


18.656




South Chestnut Street


22.888


16.465


22.832


Springdale


32.208


23.406


30.696


West Street


28.76


24.162


32.285


West Holyoke


35.822


30.716




Evening Schools:








High


18.025


15.333




Appleton Street


10.284


7.056




Hamilton Street


6.497


5.025




North Chestnut


5.619


4.58




Springdale


22.00


10.00




West Street


8.782


6.872





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[92



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



EXPENDITURES FOR SEVERAL YEARS COMPARED.



1904



1905



1906



1907



Salaries of day teachers and










superintendent . $124,728.67 $


129,401.38 $133,699.54 $i


41,654.05


Kindergarten teachers


6,729.75


6,923-94


7,7io.33


7,833 27


Evening elementary










schools


2,680.50


2,466.25


2,209.75


2,638.00


Evening grammar school


756.50


531.00


676.75


719-75


Evening high school


870.00


1,872.25


1,752-50


2,039.25


Truant officers .


1 ,900.00


2,100.00


2,700.00


2,791.66


Janitors ....


M,3635i


15,651.64


15.369-5I


2,971.19


Clerks ....


1,450.00


1,450.00


2,050.00


2,083.33


County truant school


779-99


624.57


303-41


25342


Text books


2,459.60


2,881.43


4,825.66


5,454-41


Educational supplies


6,607.89


4,333-85


7,224.39


8,521.36


Printing and advertising .


541.18


567.56


829.79


i,i75-03


Furniture ....


1,971.74


2.245.58


2,119.18


2,055-45


Building supplies


1,102.48


840.21


1,106.89


191. 12


Telephones




367.85


318.35


339-01


Livery ....


120.50


117.50


83.50


136.00


Transportation .


480.40


467.00


574.50


622.50


Freight, express and cartage


288.62


264.28


266.47


276.14


Rentals ....


570.00


1,580.00


2,556.00


1,608.00


Laundry ....


172.18


175-24


181.81


196.98


Miscellaneous and contingent,


M33-90


1,512.40


2,275.65


1,872.20



$169,707.41 $176,373,93 $188,833.98 $185,432.12



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REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



*93



STATISTICS OF ATTENDANCE.



n=



SCHOOL.



High

Appleton Street

Bridge Street

Elm Street

Elmwood

Ewingville

Hamilton Street

Highland

Ingleside

Morgan

Nonotuck Street

North Chestnut Street .

Park Street

South Chestnut Street

Springdale

West Street

West Holyoke



Evening Schools :

High

Grammar

Hamilton Street

No. Chestnut Street..

Springdale

West Street







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152


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410


16


17


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2


2


87


14


■5


653


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16

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567

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16


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7


256


10


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8


8


354


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587


7


8


260


16


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37


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275


5


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197


7


20


339


7

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415.'
120

350-6
603.1

66.8
545-4
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593-6
212.6
421

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506.8

223.5
510.6

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20.4
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201.5 28.7

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92.4 15.4



625.7

3891
in

308.7
537-6

61.4
496.3
444-5

476

554.5
206.2

354
3U-8
4628
207.4
461.6
29-3



100

83
170



95-5

93-7

92.5

88

89 1

91.4

90.9

89
91.6

93
96.9

84

92

9'

92.7

904

9'



75
81

85



181.7) 90

6 75

81 87






8
43
35-5
28

7

34

5-5

57

114

5
'9-5

1
82.5



z=s



*3
23
09

3
9



Digit



zed by G00gle



194 REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE



NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED.

There are now on the pay roll (December) the following
number of persons:

Superintendent of schools 1

Clerks 3



Online LibraryHolyoke (Mass.)Municipal register ... → online text (page 9 of 28)