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The adventures

of Ulysses the wanderer

Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull, Homer



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THE ADVENTURES OF ULYSSES



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By the same Author.



THE HYPOCRITE.

Daily TelMrapb.— '* A book by an anon^ous antl^or always arouses a certain
inquiry, and wnen the book is clever and original the interest becomes keen, and
conjecture is rife, endowing the most unlikely people with authorship. ... It is
very brilliant, very forcible, very sad. ... It is perfect in its way, m style clear,
sharp and forcible, the dialogue epigrammatic and n>arkling. . . . Enoushhas been
said to show that * The Hvpocrite ' is a striking and powerful piece of wonc, and that
its author has established bis daim to be considered a wnter of originality and
briUUnce."

BACK TO LILAC LAND.

Tlie Fall Mall Oazette.— "A very mtelligent and well-written story. A de-
cidedly entertaining novel— fresh and well constructed, and evidently written by one
who understands the inwardness of the profession."



THE CIGARETTE SMOKER.

OraplliO.— " A powerful book."

The Bookman.— "A tale of cigarette smokers and what they come to ; told with
lurid power and eiimest intention.'

Birmlngliaia Daily Post.— "Undoubtedly a clever and powerful piece of
writing.**



MISS MALEVOLENT.

SOOtaniaiL — " You don't get far into this novel— about a couple of pages— before
the epigrams begin exploding and the repartee detonating, and the subtle terse and
quart of wit with wit fuflfumng, like so many squibs and crackers on the Queen's
fiirthdav ; and this coruscation is kept up in a way to make ^our hair curl until the
end of the story. . . . The author has abundant literary aptitudes, exemplified over
and over again by the pages of this clever book.**



PROM THE BOOK BEAUTIFUL.

Britiflll WetiU7. — " Amon^ the many attempts which have recently been made
to fill out the Bible stories with the realistic touches sujggested by our increased
knowledge of the conditions of life in ancient times, this anonymous volume will
take a high place. Seven stories are retold, some from the Old, some from the
New Testament. To certain tastes they may seem too elaborately wrought ; the
author evidently relishes what is g(»:geous, and his descriptions of Potiphar's house
are very richly inlaid with ornament, but whatever be the judgment of readers in this
respect, there can be no question as to the effective realism of the narratives. Cer-
tainly some of the stories will convey both to children and adults firesh and memorable
conceptions of Biblical scenes.'*



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HE STARED STEADILY AT THEM WITH HIS SINGLE EYE

FOR A FULL MINUTE.

Page 32. Frontispiece



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THE

ADVENTURES OF ULYSSES

THE WANDERER



Bit 9lb 0toqe iRetolb tv
C. RANGER. GULL N

' AUTHOR OF
*THE HYPOCRITE," "FROM THE BOOK BEAUTIFUL,"
"BACK TO LILAC LAND,'* ETC.



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\ W. G. MEIN



Xon^on

GREENING anu COMPANY, Ltd.

20 CECIL COURT, CHARING CROSS ROAD

1902



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HE STARED STEADILY AT THEM WITH HIS SINGLE EYE

FOR A FULL MINUTE.

Page 32. Frontispiece



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HE STARED STEADILY AT THEM WITH HIS SINGLE EYE

FOR A FULL MINUTE.

Page 32. Frontispiece



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THE NE.V VORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

404943B

Ajr/Lk. LHjiiOy. AND
B lb47 L



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TO

HERBERT BEERBOHM TREE

IN APPRECIATION OF HIS SCHOLARSHIP

IN ADMIRATION OP HIS ART

TO ONE OF THB FEW GREAT ARTISTS

WHO HAS NEVER BEEN UNTRUE

TO THE HIGHEST IDEALS OF HIS CALLING

AND IN SPECIAL MEMORY

OF THE FIRST NIGHT OF " HAMLET "

AT MANCHESTER



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Of this Edition only one hundred and ten copies
have been printed^ this being No. kfr.



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CONTENTS

PAGB

Foreword ...... 9

Brief Account of Principal Characters

IN THE Odyssey . . '13

The First Episode— How They blinded the
Son of Poseidon . . . .21

The Second Episode— The Adventure of
THE Palace in the Wood ... 39

The Third Episode— How Ulysses walked
IN Hell, and of the Adventure of
THE Sirens and Scylla ... 48

The Fourth Episode— How Ulysses lost
HIS Merry Men and came a Waif to
Calypso with the Shining Hair . 63

The Last Episode— How the King came

Home again after the Long Years 80

A Note on Homer and Ulysses . . 98



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

HE. STARSD STBAD1LY AT THEM WITH HIS SINOLB BTB

FOR A PULL MINUTE . . FrmUispUce

THEN HE CAME SWIPTLY UPON THE GLEAMING PALACE

faeittgpage 45

THEN HE WAS, IN AN INSTANT MOMENT,
AWARE OF A MORE THAN MORTAL
PRESENCE .... ,,49

THEY CAME TO THE BRINK OF THE RIVER „ $2

"WHO AM I THAT I CAN COMBAT THE
WILL OF ZEUS OR THE HARDNESS OF
YOUR HEART?" ... » 78

"NAY, IF YOU LOVE MB," HB SAID, "NONE

OF THAT, MY FRIEND" . . f» 83



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FOREWORD

Seven fair and illustrious cities of the dinty
ancient worlds Argos, Athena^ Chios^ Colophon^
Salamis^ Rhodos^ Smyrna^ fought a war of
words ever Homrics birthplace.

Each claimed the honour.

And if indeed^ such an accident of chance con-
fers an honour upon a town^ then the birthplace
of the Greatest Poet of all time should be a
place of pilgrimage.

For, among the weavers of EpoSy Drama^ and
Romance^ he who was called Melesegenes is first
of all and wears an imperishable crown.

For 2poo years his fame has streamed dovon the
ages.

The world has changed. Great empires have
risen^ flowered and passed. Christianity came^
flooding mankind with lights at a time when,
though Homer was a dim tradition^ his work
was a living force in the world. When Christ
was bom, Homerus was dead goo years.

A man with such immensity of glory ceases to
be a man. He becomes a Force.

Of the two imperishable monuments Homer has

left us, the decision of critical scholarship has

placed the Iliad first. It has been said that the

Iliad is like the midday, the Odyssey like the

9



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lo FOREWORD

setting sun. Both are of equal splendour^ though
the latter has lost its noonday heat

But I would take that adroit simile and draw
another meaning from it.

When deferredy ea^ected night at last ap-
proachesy when the sun paints the weary west
with faery pictures of glowing seas^ of golden
islands hanging in the sky^of lonely magic water-
ways unsailedby mortal keels ; then^ indeed^ there
comes into the heart and brain another warmth^ —
the mysterious quickening of Romance.

For I think that the ringing sound ofarmSy the
vibrant thriddings of bows ^ the clash of heroes^ are
far less wonderful than the longj lonely wander-
ings of Ulysses.

Through all the Odyssey the winds are blowings
the seas moaning^ and the estranged sad spectres
of the night flit noiselessly across the printed page.

Through new lands^ among new peoples— friends
and foes — touching at green islands set like
emeralds in wine-coloured seas^ the immortal
mariner moves to the music of his creator^ s verse.
The Siren^ voices^ the Fairy s enchanted wine^ the
Twin Monsters of the Strait pass and are for-
gotten.

His wif^s tears bid him ever towards home.

I sometimes have wondered if Vergil thought
of Ulysses when he made his own lesser wanderer
say: —

" Per varios casus per tot discrimena rerum^
Tendimus in Latium^ sedes ubifata quietas
OstenduntP



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FOREWORD II

And naWy since we are to have^ on that so
magical a stage ^ a concrete picture : since we are
to take away another storied memoty from beneath
the copper domCy I feel that the story of Ulysses
may once more be told in English,

A fine poety a great player^ are to give us an
Ulysses who must perforce be not only full of the
spirit of his own age of my thy but instinct with the
spirit of this.

That is as inevitable as it is interesting.

The " Gentle Elia " (^how one wishes one could
find a better nam£ for him — but custom makes
cowards of us all) has written his own version of
the Odyssey. / cannot emulate that. But I think
I can at least be useful.

There are three stages of knowing Homer : the
time when one do£fs ears and dogrells him at
school^ the time when one loves him^ a literary
love I at Oxfordy and the time when the va et
vient of life in great capitals wakes the dormant
Ulysses in the heart of every artisty and he begins
to understand.

" The long day wanes : the slow moon climbs : the deep
Moans round with many voices. Comey myfriendsy
*Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
Push offy and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows ; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset "

C. RANGER'GULL.



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A BRIEF ACCOUNT

OF THE

PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS IN THE
WANDERINGS OF ULYSSES, ACCORD-
ING TO THE ANCIENT WRITERS AND
LEGENDS.

Ulysses. The hero of Homer's great poem
was known to the Greeks under the name of
Odysseus. He was king of the pastoral islands
of Ithaca and Dulichium. Most of the petty
Greek chieftains became suitors for the hand of
the beautiful Helen, and Ulysses was among the
number, but withdrew when he realised the
smallness of his chances. He then married
Penelope, the daughter of Icarius, and at the
same time joined with the other unsuccessful
lovers of Helen in a sworn league for her future
protection should she ever stand in need of it
He then returned to Ithaca with his bride. The
rape of Helen soon compelled him to leave Pene-
lope and join the other Grecian princes in the
great war against Troy. He endeavoured to
avoid the summons by pretending madness.
13



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14 PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS

Yoking a horse and a bull tc^ether, he began
to plough the sands of the sea shore. The
messenger who was sent to him took Tele-
machus, the infant son of Ulysses, and placed
the child in the direct course of the plough, in
this way circumventing his design. Ulysses was
one of the most prominent figures during the
Trojan war, his valour, and still more his
cunning, making him of supreme importance
in the councils of the princes. After the Trojan
war Ulysses set sail for home, and at this period
of his career the story of the Odyss^ begins.
He was driven by malevolent winds on to the
shores of Africa, where he and his mariners
were captured by the one-eyed giant, Poly-
phemus, who ate five of the band. Ulysses
escaped by thrusting a stake into the giant's
eye and then leaving the cave in which he was
confined by crawling under the bellies of the
sheep when the Cyclops led them to pasture.
He next arrives at iEolia, and iEolus gave him,
imprisoned in bags, all the evil winds which
were likely to obstruct his safe return home-
wards. The sailors, curious to know what the
bags contained, opened them, and the im-
prisoned winds, rushing out with fearful
violence, destroyed the whole fleet save only
the vessel which bore Ulysses. The ship was
thrown on the shores of the Goddess Circe's
enchanted island, and the companions of Ulysses
were changed into swine by the enchantress.
Ulysses escaped the like fate by means of a



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PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS 15

magic herb he had received from Mercury, and
forced the goddess to bring his friends to their
original shape. He then yielded to her solicita-
tions and made her the mother of Telegonus.
The next stage of his adventures brings him to
Hades, where he goes to consult the shade of
the wise Tiresias as to the means of reaching
home in safety. He passes the terrible coasts
of the Sirens unhurt, and escaped the monsters
Scylla and Charybdis by a series of narrow
chances. In Sicily his sailors, urged by extreme
hunger, killed some of Apollo's cattle, and the
Sun-God in revenge destroyed all his com-
panions and also his ship. Ulysses alone
escaped on a raft and swam to the shores of
an island belonging to Calypso, with whom he
lived a lotos life as husband for seven years.
The gods eventually interfered, and Ulysses,
once more properly equipped, set out on his
travels again. However, Neptune (Poseidon),
the lord of the sea, still remembered the injury
done to his son, the giant Polyphemus, and
wrecked this ship also. Ulysses was cast up
on the island of the Phoeacians, where he was
hospitably received by King Alcinous and his
daughter the Princess Nausicaa, and at last sent
home in safety to his own kingdom after an
absence of more than twenty years. The
Goddess Athene befriended him, and informed
him that his palace was crowded with de-
bauched and insolent suitors for the hand of
Queen Penelope, but that his wife was still



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i6 PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS

faithful and unceasingly mourned his loss.
Adopting the advice of the goddess, he dis-
guised himself in rags to see for himself the
state of his home. He then slew the suitors
and lived quietly at home for the remaining
sixteen years of his adventurous life. Tradi-
tion says that he at last met his death at the
hands of his ill^itimate son Telegonus.

Penelope. A famous Graecian princess, wife
of Ulysses. She married at about the same time
that Helen wedded King Menelaus, and returned
home to Ithaca with her husband against the
wishes of her father Icarius of Sparta. During
the long absence of Ulysses she was besieged
by suitors for her hand, who established them-
selves in the palace. She became practically
their prisoner, and was compelled to dissimulate
and put them off by various excuses. She
managed to keep her importunate guests in
some sort of good humour by giving out that
she would make a choice among them as soon
as she had completed a piece of tapestry on
which she was engaged. Each night she undid
the stitches she had worked in the daytime.
On the return of Ulysses she was, of course,
freed from the suitors by her husband. Accord-
ing to some ancient writers, after the death of
Ulysses she married Telegonus, Ulysses' son
by the Goddess Circe. Her name Penelope
sprung from some river-birds who were called
« Penelopes."



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PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS 17

Telemachus. The son of Ulysses and Pene-
lope. When his father left for the Trojan war
Telemachus was but an infant, but at the close
of the campaign he went to seek him and to
obtain what information he could about his
father's absence. When Ulysses returned home
in disguise Athene brought son and parent to-
gether, and the two concerted means to rid the
palace of the suitors. After the death of Ulysses,
Telemachus is said to have gone to the island
of Circe and married the enchantress, formerly
his father's mistress. A son called Latinus
sprung from this union.

Athene (Minerva). The Goddess of
Wisdom was born from Zeus' brain without
a mother. She sprang from his head in
full armour. She was the most powerful of
the goddesses and the friend of mankind
She was the patroness of Ulysses, and it
was believed she first invented ships. Her
chastity was inviolable. Her worship was
universal.

Zeus (Jupiter). Chief of all the gods. His
attitude towards Ulysses was friendly owing to
the persuasion of his daughter Athene.

Poseidon (Neptune) was the Sea God and
next in power to Zeus. He was the father of
the giant Polyphemus whom Ulysses blinded,
and is the consistent enemy of Ulysses through-

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i8 PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS

out the whole Odyssey. Neptune was the brother
of Zeus.

Hermes (Mercury) was the messenger of
the gods and a son of Zeus. He was
especially the patron of travellers and well
disposed to Ulysses.

TiRESlAS was in life a celebrated sooth-
sayer and philosopher of Thebes. His wisdom
was universal. Having inadvertently seen the
Goddess Athene bathing in the fountain of
Hippocrene, he was blinded. Ulysses visited
his spirit in Hades, in order to obtain
his advice as to the journey homewards to
Ithaca.

Circe. An enchantress celebrated for her
knowledge of the magic properties of herbs.
She was of extreme personal beauty. In girl-
hood she married the prince of Colchis, whom
she murdered to obtain his kingdom. She was
• thereon banished to the fairy island of iGsa.
When Ulysses visited her shores she changed
his companions into swine, but Ulysses was
protected by the magic virtues of a herb called
moly. Ulysses spent a year in the arms of
Circe, and she gave birth to a son called
Telegonus.

Calypso. One of the daughters of Atlas, was
known as the " bright-haired Goddess of Silence,"



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PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS 19

and was queen of the lost island of Ogygia.
Ulysses spent seven years with her, and she
bore him two sons. By order of Zeus, Hermes
was sent to the island ordering Ulysses to leave
his voluptuous sloth, and Calypso, who was in-
consolable at his loss, was forced to allow him
to depart. The legend runs that the goddess
offered him the gift of immortality if he would
remain with her.

SCYLLA and Charybdis. Scylla was a terrible
female monster who devoured six of Ulysses'
crew, though the hero himself escaped her.
Below the waist she was composed of creatures
like dogs who never ceased barking. She was
supported by twelve feet and had six different
heads. The monster dwelt in a cave under the
sea on one side of a narrow strait off the coast
of Sicily. On the other side of the strait was
the great whirlpool Charybdis. It was invested
with a personality by Homer, and Charybdis
was said to be a giantess who sucked down
ships as they passed.

The Sirens. Monsters with sweet alluring
voices who inhabited a small island near Sicily.
They had bodies like great birds, according to
some writers, with the heads of beautiful women.
Whosoever heard their magic song must go to
them and remain with them for ever. Ulysses
escaped the enchantment by causing himself to
be bound to the ship's mast.



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20 PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS

Polyphemus. The son of Poseidon. He
was the giant king of the Cyclopes who were
workers in the foi^e of Vulcan and made
armour for the gods. Ulysses and his com-
panions blinded him in order to escape from
the cavern where he had imprisoned them.

Antinous. a native gentleman of Ithaca,
one of Penelope's most persistent suitors.
When Ulysses came home disguised as a
beggar Antinous struck him. He was the first
to fall by Ulysses' bow.

EURYCLEA. The nurse of Ulysses in his
infancy, and one of the first to recognise him
on his return from his wanderings. She was in
her youth the lovely daughter of Ops of
Ithaca.

EUMi£US. The herdsman and steward of
Ulysses who knew his master on his return
after an absence of twenty years. He was the
king's right-hand man in the plot against, and
fight with, the suitors of Penelope.



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THE ADVENTURES OF ULYSSES

THE FIRST EPISODE

How They blinded the Son of Poseidon

A WARM mild wind, laden with sweet scents, blew
over the sailors from the island, which now lay far
astern.

In the weary west the charmed sunset still
lingered over Lotus Land.

A rosy flush lay on the snow-capped mountains
which were yet spectral in the last lights of the
day, but looking out over the bows the sky was
dark purple changing into black, and where it met
the sea there was a white gleam of foam.

The companions of Ulysses sat idle from the
oars, for the wind filled the belly of the sail and
there was no need for rowing. A curious silence
brooded over them all. No one spoke to his
fellow. The faces of all were sad, and in the eyes of
some the fire of an unutterable regret burnt steadily.

The heads of all were turned towards the island,
which was fast disappearing from their view.
Some of the men shaded their eyes with their
hands in one last long look of farewell.

As the curtain of the dark fell upon the sea, the
warm oflTshore wind died away. A colder breeze,



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22 THE FIRST EPISODE

full of the sea-smell Itself, came down over the
port bow ; it moaned through the cordage, and
little waves began to hiss under the cutwater.

Every now and again the wind freshened rapidly.
The mournful whistling became a sudden snarling
of trumpets. The ship and crew seemed to have
passed over the limits of a tableau. Not only was
it a quick elemental change of scene, but the
change had its influence with the spectators.

The sad fire — if the glow of regret is indeed a
fire — died out of heavy eyes half veiled by
weary lids. The sea-light dawned once more
upon the faces of the mariners, the bright warm
blood moved swiftly in their veins.

One man ran to the steering oar to give an aid
to the helmsman as the ship went about on the
starboard tack, three more stood by the sheet, a
hum of talk rose from the waist of the boat.
Ulysses stood in the bows looking forward into the
night. His tall, lean figure was bent forward, and


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