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can 18
goes to Vulcan 18
befeeches Vulcan to
make Achilles's
armour 1 8
carries the armour
made by Vulcan
to Achilles 19
Thoas 2
kills Pirus ^ 4
Titarefius a river 2



book ver. book ver.

683 Tlcpoleraus 2 793

lights v/iih Sarpedon

456 . 5 77^

Trojans and Grecians

921 march to battle 3 "^

they fign a treaty 3 33S
Trojans and Greeks
320 in baide 4 S^S

m:iny of the Trojans
387 killed 6 5

227 the Trojans watch 8 606
522 Trojans march, at-
tack the Greek
544 trenches 12 9;

755 12 29s

721 Trojans fly 14 596

lYojans make a great

fici lighter 15 372

96 Tlie Trojans fight
bravely at the
255. Gieclan fleet 25 842 '

they ily before the
540 Greeks 17 676

An AiTemby of the
652 Trojans ^' - ' ' 18 289

V
Venus conveys Paris
69 from the fight 3 467
96 befpeaks Helen 3 481
is angry with Helen 3 513
carries Helen to
172 Paris 3 533

431 conveys ^lineas out

of the batde 5 385

is wounded by Dio-
529 med 5 4I7

complains of her be-
ing wounded to
13 Dione 5 465

775 is laughed at by Mi-
610 nerva 5 499

910 with Apollo keeps

Go 2



9-04 INDEX ^/Persons and Thisgs,



book ver.
the body of Hec-
tor from putrrfy-
ing 2 3 226

Ulysses 2 765

3 245
tielivers Chryfejs to

her father i 575

contends with Ajax

in the courfe 23 828
prevents the Greeks

from retreating 2 22 j
provokes Therlltes 2 305
exhorts the foldiers

to battle 2 347

infwers Agamemnon

4 402
Lis fpeech to Achil-
les to reconcile

him and Agamem-
non 9 562

cxliorts Diomed to
battle II 4c 8

iS furrounded by the
enemy il 510

k wounded by Socus

. II 547

Icills Socus II 561

advifes to give the
foldiers refrefhraent



book ver.
before the battle 19 153

advifes Achilles to
refrefh himfelf 19 215
Vulcan admonifhes

Juno 1 746

remembers the bene-
fits he has received
of Thetis 18 461

enquires of Thetis
the caufe of her
coming 1 8 496

makes a fuit of ar-
mour for Achil-
les 18 537

dries up the river
Xanthus 21 400

Xanthus, Achilles's
horfe, forefhews
the deflru(5lion of
Achilles 19 452

Xanthus, the river,
fpeaks to Achil-
les 21 232

rifes againd Achil-
les 21 258

invokes Simois a-
gainft Achilles 2 1 364

fupplicates Vulcan
«nd JunQ 21 423



POETICAL INDEX



T O



HOMER 's ILIAD.



The firfl number marks the booky the fecond the verfe.



FABLE.



Tx4E great moral of the
Iliad, that concord a-
moncr governors, is the
prefervation of ftates, and
difcord the ruin of them :
purfued through" the whole
fable.
The anger of Achilles breaks
this union in the opening
of the poem, /. f . He with-
draws frOm the body of
the Greeks, which firil: in-
terrupts the fiiccefs of the
common caufe, Hid. The
army mutiny, 2. TheTro-
jans break the truce, 4. A
gr^cit number of the Greeks
flain, 7. 392, Forced to



build fortifications to guard

In great



their fleet, ihid.
diflrefs from the enemy,
whofe vidory is only ftopt
by the night, 8. Ready to
quit their dcfign, and re-
turn with infamy, 9. Send
to Achilles to perfuade him

C



to a re-union, in vain, ibid.
The diftrefs continues ; the
generals and all the beft
warriors are wounded, If.
The fortification over-
tlirown, and the fleet fet
on fire, 15. Achilles him-
felf (hares in the misfor-
tunes he brought upon the
ailics, by tlie lofs of his
friend Patroclus, 1 6. Here-
upon the hero is reconcil-
ed to the general, the vic-
tory over Troy is com-
ple^it, and He<fi:A>r flain by
Achilles, 19, 20, 2 J, 2 2^
etc ,



Efi sodes or Fa ble s-
nxjbich are interivo'ven in-
to the poevii but foreign
to its dejlgn.

The fable of the confpira-
cy of the gods againll Jiipi-

C3



3o6



POETICAL INDEX.



Fable.
ter, T. 516. Of Vulcan's
fall from heaven on the if-
land of Lemnos, i. 761.
The imprifonment of Mars
by Otus and Ephialtes, 5.
475. The ftoryof Thamy-
ris, 2.-721. The embafiy
of Tydeus to Thebes, 4.
450. The tale of Ikllero-
phon, 6. 195. Of Lycur-
gus and the Bacchanals, 6.
161. The war of the Pyli-
ans and Arcadians, 6- 165.
The flory of Phoenix, 9.
572. Of Mcleager and the
wars of the Curites and M~
tolians, 9. 653. The wars
of Pyle and Ehs, li. 818.
The birth of Hercules, and
labour of Alcmena, 29. 1 03.
The expulfion of Ate from
heaven, 19. 93. Vulcan's
abode wnth Thetis, and his
employment there, 18.
^63. The family and hif-
tory of Troy, 20. 25:5.
The transformation of Ni-
obe, 24. 757. Building of
of the walls of Troy by
Neptune, 21. 518,



Allegorical Fables.

Moral .1 Prudence reftraln-
' ing Paffion, reprefented in
the machine of Minerva de-
fcending to calm Achilles. J .
261. Love alluring, and
extingiiirning honour, in
Venus bringing Paris from
the combate to the arms of



Fable.
Helen, 3. 460, etc. True
Courage overcoming PaiH-
on, in Diomed's conqueft
of Mars and Venus by the
affiflance of Pallas, 5. 507,
etc. through that ivhole
hookm Prayers the daugh-
ters of Jupiter, following
Injufbce, and perfecuting
her at the throne of heaven,
9. 625. The Celtus, or
girdle of Venus, 1 4. 247.
1 he allegory of Sleep, 14.
265. The allegory of Dif-
cord calf out of heaven to
earth, 19. 93. The alle-
gory of the two Urns of
Pleafure and Pain, 24. 663.
Phyfical or Philofophical.J
The combate of the ele-
ments till the waters fub-
fided, in the fable of the
uars of Juno or the Air,
and Neptune or the fea,
with Jupiter or the -^Lther,
till Thetis put an end to
them, I. 516. Fire derived
from heaven to earth, ima-
ged by the fall of Vulcan
on Lemnos, I. 761. The
gravitation of the Planets
upon the Sun, in allegory
of the golden chain of Ju-
piter, 8. 25. The influence
of the ^Ether upon the Air,
in the allegory of the con-
grefs of Jupiter and Juno,
14. 395. The Air fuppli-
ed by the vapours of the
Ocean and Eardi, in the
ftory of Juno nouiifhed
by Oceanus and Tcthys,



POETICAL I K D E X.



07



Fable.
1 4. 231. The allegory of
the Winds, 23. 242. The
quality of Salt preferving
dead bodies from coriapti-
on, in Thetis or the fea
preferving the body of Pa-
troclus, 19. 40.

For the reji of the Alle-
gories fee the Svfiemofthe
Gods as a^ing in their al'
legorical chara6lersyunder
the article Characters,

Allegorical or fiditious per-
fons in Homer.

The lying dream fent to Aga-
memnon by Jupiter, 2. 7.
Fame the meffenger of
Jove, 2. I2T. Furies, pu-
ni(hers of the wicked, 3.
351. Hebe, or Youth, at-
tending the banquets of the
Gods, 4. 3. Flight and
Terror attendants upon
Mars, 4. 500, Difcordde-
fcribed, 4. 502. Bellona
Goddefs of war, 5. 726.
The hours, keepers of the
gates of heaven, 5. 929.
Nymphs of the mountains,
6. 532. Night, a Goddefs,
6. 342. Iris, or the rain-
bow, 8. 486. Prayers the
daughters of Jupiter, 9.
625. Eris or Difcord, II.
5. Illythias, GoddefTes pre-

• fidins in womens labour,
II. 349. Terror the fon of
Mars, 13. 386. Sleep, 14.
265. Ni^ht, 14. 293.
Death and Sleep, two twin?.



Fable.
16. 831. Nerieds, or
nymphs of the fea ; a ca-
talogue of them, 18. 45;.
Ate, or the Goddefs of
Difcord, 19. 93. Scaman-
der the river-God, 2?.
231. P'ire and Water
made perfons in the battle
of Scamander and Vulcan*
2 1. 3 87. The Eaft and Weft
Winds, ibid. Iris, or the
Rainbow, and the Winds,



23. 242.



The Marvellous or fii-
pei natural Fictions in

HOMESL.

Omen of the birds and fer-
pent, reprefenting the event
of the Trojan war, 2% 370.
The miraculous rivers Ti-
tarefius and Styx, 2. 910.
The giant Typhon under
the burning mountain Ty-
phosus, 2. 952. Batde of
the cranes and pygmies, 3.
6. Prodigy of a comet, 4,
1 01, Diomed's helmet e-
jedingiire, 5. 6. Horfes
of coelefiial breed, 5 327*
Vaft (tone heaved by Dio-
med, 5. 370. And Hedlor,
12. 537. And Minerva, 20.
470. The miraculous cha-
riot, and arms of Pallas, 5,
885,907, etc. The Gor-
gon, helmet and -^tgis of
Jupiter, ibid. The gates
of heaven, ibid. The leap
of immortal horfes, j, 960.
Shout of Stentor, % V78.



3o8



POETICAL INDEX.



Fable.
Roaring of Mars, 5, Iof4,
Helmet ofOrcuSjWhich ren-
dered the wearer invifible,
5 . I o 3 6 ♦ The blood of the
Gods, 5 422. The im-
mediate healing of their
wounds, 5. fll6 Tiie
chimera, 6. 220. Deftruc-
lion by Neptune of the
Grecian rampart, 12. 15.
Wall pufhed down by A-
pollo, 15. 415. The gol-
den chain of Jupiter, 8.
2 J. Horfes and chariot of
Jupiter, 8. 50. His balan-
ces, weighing the fates of
men, 8. 88. — •22. 271.
Jupiter's ailiiling the Tro-
jans by thunders and light-
nings, and vifible declarati-
ons of his favour, 8. 93.
16^, etc, — 17. 670. Pro-
digy of an eagle and fawn,
8. 297. Horfes of the
Gods, (tables and chariots*
pompoufly defcribed, 8.
535, etc. Hedor's lance
often cubits, 8. 61 J. O-
men of an heron, lo, 520.
The defccnt of Eris, 1 1 .
5 . A fliower of blood 1 1 .
70. — 16.560. Omen of
an eagle and ferpent, 12.
230. The progreis of Nep-
tune through the feas, 1 3
42. The chain of War and
Difcord Itretched over the
the armies, 13. 451. The
loud voice of Neptune, 14.
173. Solemn oath of the
Gods, I4. 307.— 15. 41.
Minerva fpreads a light 0-



Fablf.
ver the army, 15. 808.
Jupiter involves the com-
batants in thick darknefs,
16 422,695. Horfes be
got by the wind on a har-
pye, 16. 183. A fnower
of blood, 16. 560. Mira-
culuous tranfportation and
interment of Sarpedon by
Apollo, Sleep and Death,
16. 810, etc* Prophecy at
tlie hour of Death, 16.
1026. — 22.450. Achilles
unarmed puts the whole
Trojan army to flight on
his appearance, 18 240,
etc. Moving tripods and
living flatues of Vulcan,
18. 440. 488. Thehorfe
of Achilles fpeaks by a
prodigy, {9. 450. The
battle of the Gods, 20.
63, etc. Horfes of a mira-
culous extraction , the tranf-
formation of Boreas, 20.
" ^^4. The wonderful bat-
tle of the Xanthus, 21.
230, etc, Hed:or's body
preferved by Apollo and
Venus, 23. 226 The
gholt ofPatroclus, 23. 77.
The two urns of Jupiter,
24. 663. The vaft quoit
of Action, 23. 975. The
transformation of Nicbe
and her people into flones,

24' 7S7.



Under this head of the
marvellous m:iy alio be in-
included all the immediate



POETICAL I N D E X»'



30(>



Fable.

machines and appearances
of the Gods in the poem,
and their transformations ;
the miraculous birth of he-



Fable,
roes ; the pafTions in hu-
man and vifible forms, and
the relh



CHARACTERS or MANNERS.



CharaSIers of the Gods i?/*HoMER, af aSling in ike
Phyfical cr >Jordl capacities of tkofe deities.



JUPITER.

A^ing and governing ally
as the fupreme Being ^
See the article Theology
m the next Index,

JUNO.

As the elsment ofair,'] Her
congrefs with Jupiter, or
the iEther, and produdion
of vegetables, 14. 390,
etc, Ker loud fliout, the
air being the caufe of found,
5. 97 8« Nourifhed by O-
ceanus and Tethys, 14.
231.

As Goddefs of empire and
Honour.'] Stops the Greeks
from flying ignominioufly,
2. 191. and in maJiy other
places. Incites and com-
mands Aciiilles to revenge
the death of his friend, 1 8.
203, etc. Infpires into He-
len a contempt of Paris,
and fends Iris to cull her to



behold the coj-nbate with
Menelaus, 3, 185.

APOLLO.

As the Sun.'] Caufes the
plague in the heat of fum-
mcr, I. 16. Raifts a
phantom of clouds and
vapours, 5. 545. Difco-
vers in the morning the
flaughter made the night
before, 10. 606. Reco-
vers Heclor from fainting,
and opens his eyes, j^.
280. Dazzles the eyes of
the Greeks, and fhakes his
Agis in their faces, 15.
362. Re{tores vigour to
Giaucus, 16. 647. Pre-
fer ves the body of Sarpe-
don from corruption, 16,
830. And that of Hec-
tor 23. 230. Raifesa cloud
to conceal i^^neas, 20.
515.

As Dejlim.] Saves if neas



5IO



POETICAL IN-DEX.



Characters.
from death, 5, 441. And
Hedor, 20. 71^. Saves
Agenor, 21. 706^ Deferts
Hedor when his hour is
come, 22. 277.

As ivifdom 3 He and Miner-
va infpire Helenas to keep
off the general engagement
by a fingle combate, 7. 25.
, Advifes He<^or to fhiin en-
countering Achilles, 20.

MARS.

jlf mere mart hi courage
nvithout condii^.'] Goes to
the fight againft the orders
of Jupiter, 5. 716. Again
provoked to rebel againft
Jupiter by his paflion, 1 5.
126. Is vanquiflied by Mi-
nerva, or Conduv5t, 21.
480.

MINERVA.

As tJiartia! courage iviih
IVifdo??!.'^ Joins with Juno
in reftrainino the Creeks
from flight, and infpires U-
lyffes to do it, 2. 210. A-
nimates the army, 2. 525.
Defcribed as leading a hero
fafe through a battle, 4.632.
AffiftsDioraedto overcome

\ Mars and Venus, 5 >4o7.
104 2. Overcomes them her-
felf,2 1.480 Retrains Mars
from rebclii:.n againft Jupi-
ter, 5. 4 J. 15 140.



Characters.
Submits to Jupiter, 8. 40.
Ad\ires UlyiTes to retire in
time from the night expe-
dition, 10. 5'93. Affiftshim
throughout that expedition,
10. "^ 50, etc. Difcovers the
ambufh laid againft the Py-
lians by night, and caufes
them to fa!ly, rr. 85 r.
Afiifts Achilles to conquer
Hecior, 22. 277, etc.

As nvifdojfi feperately conft-
dered.'] SupprefTes Achil-
les's paflion, I. 261. Sup-
preiTes her own anger againlfc
Jupiter, 4. 31. Brings to
pafs Jupiter's will in contri-
ving the breach of the truce
4. 95'. Teaches Diomed to
diicernGods from men, and
to conquer Venus, 5. r^j,
etc. Called the bell belo-
ved of Jupiter, 8. 48. Ob-
tains leave of Jupiter, that
while the other Gods do not
aflift the Greeks, fhe may
diie(fl them with her coun-
fels, 8. 45. Is again chec-
ked by the command of Ju-
piter, and fubmits, 8, <;6o,
580. Is faid to aflift, or fave
any hero, in general through
the poem, when any a<ft of
prudence preierves him.

VENUS.

As the paffion of love'] Brings
Paris from the fight to the
embraces of Helen, and in-
flames the lovers, 3. 460^



POETICAL I N D B: X.



qir



Characters.
530, etc. Is overcome by
Minerva or Wifdom, 5,
407. And again, I2 500.
Her Ceftus or girdle, and
the effe6ls of it, 14. 247.

N E P T U N E.

j^s the Sea.'] Overturns the
Grecianwail v\'ith his waves,
-12. 15. AMs the Greeks
at their fleet, which was
drawn up at the fea-fide,
13. 67, etc. Retreats at
tlie order of Jupiter, j 5.
245. Shakes the whole field
of batde and fea-rtiore with
earthquakes, 20. 77.

VULCAN.

Or the ElemeJit of Fifer\
Falls from heaven to'earth,
I. 761. Received in Lem-
nos, a place of fubterrane-
ous fires, ibid. His opera-
tions of various kinds, 18.
440, 468, 540. Dries up
the river Xanthus, 2 1 . 460.
afliiled by the winds, 21.

. 390.

Chara^ers of the Heroes.

N. B. The Speeches nuhich
depended upon^ and flo^w
from tkefe Jeveral cha-
raSiers, are diftingiajh-
ed by an S.

ACHILLES.

rurlous, paiTioiiate, difdain"



Characters.
ful and reproachful, /. i .
V. 155. S. 195. S. 295. S.

— 9. 405. S. 746. s. ■■

24705.

Revengeful and implacable in

the higheil: degree, 9. 755,

765 — 16. 68. S. 121. S.

— 18. 120, 125. S. — 19.

211. S. 22. 2>ll' s.

437. s.
Cruel, 16. 122.'— 19.

395.— 21 112.— 22.437.

S. 49J. S. — 23. 30. ■

24. ?!



Superior to all men in va-
lour, 20. 60, 437, etc. —
2 1, 22. throughout.

Conflant and violentinfriend-
iliip, 9. 730. — 18.50,371.
—23, 54. 272—24. 5.
— 16. 9^. S. 208. S.— 18.
loo.S. 380. S, — £9. 335.
S. — 22. 482. S. — Achilles
fcarce ever fpeaks without
mention of his friend Pa-
troclus.

.ENEAS.

Pious to the Gods, 5. 226.S.

— 20. 132, 290, 345. —
Senfibie and moral, 20. 242,

293, etc. S.
Valiant, not ralli, 20. 1 30.

240. S.
Tender to his friend, 13,

59b. ^ ^

See his charaUer in ihs
notes 0// 1. 5. V. 2 12. ajid
on I. 13. V, 578,



512 P O E T I G AL I N D E X.

Characters.

AGAMEMNON.



Imperious and piflionate, l .
34, 729. ^



' Characters.
dom, and chufes UlyfTes to
direct hini, 5. throughout,
10. 287, 33^



See his character in the
notes ij;; 1. 5. V. I,

HECTOR.



Soraerirnes cruel, 6. 80. — 2.

T40. S.
Artful and defignlng, 2. (^'^^

C)<

Valiant, and an excellent ge- ^ ^j-uc lover of his country,

neral, 4. 2j6, 265, etc. — g. 62I. S. 12. 284.—

ir. throughout. r^^ c82. S.

Eminent for brotherly affec- Valiant in the higheft degree,

tion, 4.183.^/^.8.-7. 3.89.— 7.80. — 12.270.



120.

See his chara^er in the
notes on\. 11. v. i.

A J A X.

Of fuperior flrength and
^fize, and fearkfs on that
'account, 13. 410.— 7.227.

S. 274. S — 15. 66'6.
Indefatigable and patient, 11.

638, etc. — 13. 877. — 15.

throughout — 14. 535. —

fliort in his fpeeches, 7.

227. 9. 742. 15.

666, etc.

See his chara&cr in the
notes on I. 7. v. 226.

D I O M E D.



S. — iS. 333. S. — etc.
Excellent in condudl, 8.610.

S. ir. 663 —
Pious, 6. 140, 339, 60^. —
Tender to his parents, 6.31 5.

. to his wife, 6' 456.

to his child, 6. 606.

to his friends, 20,485.

— 24. 962. —

See his charaSier in the
notes on 1. 3. v. 53.

I D O xM E N E U S.

An old foidier, 13. 455;,

648.

A lover of his foldiers, 13.

280

Talkative upon fubjedls of

war, 13, 340, 355, ^/i:.-—

4 305. S.



Daring and intrepid 5. thro'- Vain of his family, 13. 565,

out, and 8. 163, 180. S.— etc,

9. 65,820.— 10. 260. - Stately and infultt-ng, I3»

Proud and bo:.fling, 6.152. 472, etc,

n. 5 CO.

Vain of his birth, 14. 152.

Generous, 6. :*6,. See his charader in the

Is guided by Pallas or Wif- nc^tes on 1. 13. v. 279.



POETICAL I N D K X.






Characters.

M E N E L A U S.

Valiant, 3. 3^.-13. 733.

— 17 throughout.
Tender of the people, 10

32

Gentle in his nature, 10

138 2;?. 685.

But fired by a fenfe of his

wrongs, 2. 711 — 3. 45.

— 7. 109. S — 13, 780. S.

— 17. 640.

See his chamber in the
7iotes on 1. 3. V. 287.

NESTOR.

Wife and experienced in
council, I. 331, 340.— 2.
441.

Skilful in the art of war, 2.
432, 670 — 4. 338, etc,

S.— 7« ?92- S.

Brave, 7. 165* — 1 1. 817.

15. 796. S.

Eloquent, I. 3:^2, etc.
Vigilant, 10. 88, 186, 624*
Pious, 15. 427.
Talkative through old age,

4. 370. 7= 145.

II. 800.-^23. 373> 718.

and in general thro'

the book.

See his charaBer in tire
tiotcs on \. 1. V. 339.—
en 2. 402 i etc*

P R I A xM.

A tender father to Hedlor,
22. 5 1. S.— 24.275.
Vol. IV.



Characters,

— —to Paris, 3. 381.

. to Helen, 3. 212. S.

An eafy prince of too yield-
ing a temper, 7. 443.,

Gentle and compafiionate, 3,
211, 382.

pious, 4. 7c— 24. 520I S,

Seo' his characJer in the
notes on I. 3. v. 211.

P A Pv I S.

Effcniinftte iti drefs and per-r
fon, 3. 27, 59, 80, 409.

Amorous. 3. 55c.

Ingenious in arts, mufic, 3;
80. Building, 6. 390,

Patient of reproof, 3. 86.

Naturally variant, 6. 669.
13. 985-

See his charaCler in the
notes on 1. 3. v. 26, 37>
86.

PATROCLUS.

CompafTionate of the furfer-
ings of his countrymen.

It. 947. 16. 5. 31.

S.

Ra^, but valiant, 116. 709.

Of a gentle nature, 19. 320.
17. 755-

SARPEDON.

Valiant out of Principle and
honour, 5. 575. S. — .

12. 371. S.
Eloquent, ibid*



D d



314



POETICAL INDEX.



Characters.

CareP-il only of the common

caufe in his death, i6. 605.

S.

See his chnrafter in the
noisf on I. 16, v. 512.

ULYSSES.

Prudent, 3, 261.-^10.287.
■ 19 218.

Eloquent, 3. 283. — 9.295:.
S. etc*

Valiant in the field withcau'

tion, 4. 566, U.515.

etc.

Bold in the council with pru-
dence, 14. 90.

See h'ti charafier in the
notcf on 1. 2. V. 402. et
/par Jim.

CharaPiers of other
Heroes.

i\gcnor, valiant and confide-

rate, 21. 648
Antenor, a prudent counfel-

4or, 7. 418.
Ajax Oileus, famous for

iwiftncfs, 2. 631.- - "- 14.



Characters,

Antilochus. bold-fpiritedjbut

reafonable, and artful, 4.

?22. 23. 505, 618.

666. S. 23. 920, 930.

Euphorbus, beautiful and va-
liant, 16, 973. — - 17.

11. 57. ,« ^

Glaucus, pious to his friend,
16. 660. — 17. l6j, 180.

Helenus, a prophet and he-'
ro, 6. 92.

MerioneSjdauntlefs and faith-
ful, 13.. 325:, etc.

Machaon, an excellent phy-
fician, 2.890. — 11.630.

Phoenix his friendship and
tendernefs for Achilles, 9.

Polydamas, pmdent and elo-
quent. See hit Speeches,

12. 70> 245. — 13. 907.
— — t8. 300.—
Teucer, famous for archery,

^. 320 — 15. 510, etc,
Thoas, famous for elo-
quence, 15. 322.

For other lefs diJIitigui/Ij"
ed chara£lcrSifee the ar*
tic/c, Dcfcriptions of the
pa/lions.



POETICAL INDEX.



31J



SPEECHES or ORATIONS-

A TABLE of the moji confiderable in the Iliad.



In the exhort at ory or delihe"
rativs kind.

The oration of Nefbr to A-
gamemnon and Achilles,
parru:-.ding a reconciliation,
I. 340. Tiic orations of
Neftor, UlylTcs, and Aga*
memnon, to perfuade the
army to ftay, 2. 350, 402,
452 Of Sarpedon to Hec-
tor, 5. 575. Of Neftor to
encourage the Greeks to
accept the challenge of
Kedor, 7. 145. Of Hec-
tor to the Trojans, 8. 62 t.
Of Ne'ior to fend to Achil-
las, 9. 127. Of UlyilVs,
Phoenix, and Ajax, to
inove Achilles to a recon-
ciUation, 9. 295, 562,
742. Achilles's reply to
each, ibid, Sarpedon to
Glaucus, 12. 271. Of Nep-
tune to the Greeks, to de-

. fend the fleet, 13. 1 3 i . Of
Ajax to the Greeks, 15.
666. Neflor to the fame,
15. 796. Of Ajax again,
15» 890. Scamander to
the river Si niois, 2T. 360.
Juno to Vulcan, 21. 387.
'Achilles to Fatroclus, 16.
70, etc*



D



In the vituperative kind*

The fpeech of Therfites, 2.
27 s« That of Ulylfes an-
fwering him, 2. 306. Of
Hciftor to Paris, 3* 5 j. Of
Agamemnon to Biomed,
4.422. Of Heftor to Pa-
ris, 6. 406. Of Diomed
to Agamemnon, 9. 43. Of
Ulyl'ies to the fame, 14.
90. Sarpedon to Hedor,

5. 575* Glaucas to Hec-
tor, 17. 153.

//; the narrative.

Achilles to Thetis, i. 47 6 >
Pandaras to /Eneas, j,
230. Glaucus to Diomed,

6. 190. Phcenix to A-
chilles, 9, ^62, 652- A-
gamenmon to the Greeks,
19. 90. ^Sneas to Achil-
les, 2C» 240. Of Nedor,

7. 163. JI. 800

and the fpeeches of Neftor
in general.

In the pathetic.

Agamemnon on Menelans
wounded, 4. 186.
Andromache to Heclor,
and his anfwer, 6. 510.
570.

d2



3i6



POETICAL INDEX.



Speeches,

Patroclus and Achilles, i6,
lO, etc,

Jupiter on fight of Hedor,
17. 231.

.Lamentation of Brifeis for
Patroclus, 19. 303.

' ' of Achilles for Patro-
clus, 19, 335.

— — of Priam to Hedor, 22.
51. 5-30.

-of Hecuba to the fame,



22. 119. and again, 24.
^43, 943.

-of Andron>ache at Hec-



tor's death, 22. 608.
■ ' of Andromache at his

funeral, 24. 908.

of Helen, 24. 962-

Lycaon to Achilles, 21.8^*
Tiietis to the Nereids, 17,

70.
7~iie gho(t of Patroclus to

Achilles, 23. 83.
Priam to Achilks, 24. 600.



Speech E St
In the ironyy or farcafm*

The fpeech of Pallas on Ve-
nus being wounded, 5.509;

UlylTes overSpcus, 1 1. 566.
Idomeneus over Othryone-
us, 13. 472.

Four farcaftic fpeeches over
the dead, 14. 529, 550,
561,587. Juno to Mars
concerning Afcalaphus, 15,
I20« -^Lneas to Meriones,
16. 745. Patroclus on Ce-
briones, 16. 903. He<5tor
on Patroclus, 16. 1 003.
Achilles to Otryntides, 20.
450. — toLycaon, 21.135.
— to Hedtor, 22t 415,

Speeches to horfes,

He<5lor to his horfes, 8*2 15".

Achilles to his horfes, 19,
440.

Jove to the horfes of Achil-
les, 17. 504.

Antilochus, 23« 483.

Menelaus, 23. 522.



I



Descriptions of IMAGES.



^i ColU'Oion of the f?wj} remarkahh throughout the Poem*



Defcrlptions of^i.kQ's.^*

t)f the apartment of Juno,
14. 191



City in flames, 17. 825.
Court of judice, 18. 577.
Ends of the earth and fea,

the rcfidcnce of Saturn and

lapctus, 8. ^97.



Of a burning mountain, 2. Fountains of Scamander, 22.



9. SO.



195.



POETICAL INDEX.



317



Descriptions.
Field, plowed, 18. 627.
Foreft, when timber is felled,

ir. 120. — 2i,. 144.
Heaven, the feat and plea-
lures of the Gods, I. 690,

772. — 4. 3. The gates of

heaven, 5. 928 — 3. 478.

TheGods aflenibled, 20. 9.
Ida, its foreds, temple, and

profpe6l, 8. 57. — L4. 320.
Landfcapes of a fine country,

2. 840, 1036, 1040. of

pafture-grounds and flieep,

18. 677.
Mount of Hercules near

Troy, 20. 174.
Palace of Neptune, 13. 3^.
Palace of Priam defcribed, 6.

304. Of Paris, 6. 59,
River Axius delcribed, 2.

1030.
River Titarefius and Peneus,

2. 910.
Sea and idands riling out of

it, 2. 770.
Tempc defcribed, 2- 9iS.
Tent of Achilles defcribed,

24. 5^3.
Troy, the country about it,

and roads, 22. 191 — 13«

20. — 14. 260.
Tomb of'llus, 1 1 , 477. Of

Bateia, 2. 984. Of Sar-

pedon, 16. 820.
Vulcan, his palace, forge,


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