Copyright
Homer.

The Iliad of Homer (Volume 4) online

. (page 21 of 22)
Online LibraryHomerThe Iliad of Homer (Volume 4) → online text (page 21 of 22)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


etc. 18. 4^1, etc,
A vineyard, 18. 6 51.
Wall of the Grecians, 7.

523.
Winds, their court and man-

fion defcribed, 23. 24 u



D



Descriptions,
Defcriptions <?/" Per SONS,

Achilles's dreadful appear-
ance, 20. 59.-22. 3i,t'/(r.
393.—

Apollo's perfon, enfigns, and
defcent to earth, i. 16.

Apollo's appearance in tlie
war, 15 348.

Ajax, his lullen retreat de-
scribed, II. 675, etc* to
696.

Brothers two killed together,
20.531.

A coward, defcribed inTher-
fites, beaten, 2. 326. A
coward defcribed through-
out, 13. 359. — again in.
Theftor, 16 488. A cow-
ard farprized, 10. 443.

Diana culfed and buffetfd,

21. 570*

C^ods, Homer's gre g

of them in the defc. , ,s
of their armour, 5. 907.
Motion, 13. 30. — 15. 90.
— 5. 960. Battles, i5„
252. — 20. 63, <r;r.— 21.
450, etc.

Hours at the gates of Iieaven
5. 929.

Hector's horrible apearance
inbattlc, 8.417. — 12.553.
— 13. 1010—15. 730.
Hector's dead body drag-
ged at the chariot of Achil-

ICS, 22. 500.

Jupiter in his glory, i. 15,
172.'' — 8. 550.— in his cha-
riot, 8. 50, 542, etc,*^\i
his terrors, 17. 670.

d3



318



POETICAL INDEX.



Descriptions.

Jano, dreft, 14. 200.

Lycaon, his youth and un-
happy death, 21.40, etc.

Mars and Bellona before
Hedorin battle, 5. 726.
— Mars in arm^, 7. 252.
— 13. 385.— 15. 726 ^"
his moniirous fize, 2 1 . 47 3 .

Mercury defcribed, 24. 417.

Neptune, his chariot and pro-

grefs, 13. 28, etc.
Miobe, turned into a rock,

24. 773-
Old man, a venerable one, i.

330. Old counlellors of

Troy converiing, 3. 197.

etc. A miferable old man,

in Priam, 22. 80. etc.
Priam parting through his

people^ in forrow, to go to
redeem Hector, 24. 402.
Piiani weeping at the feet
of Achilles, 24. 636.

Pallas, her defcentfrom hea-
ven, 4« 99. Her armour
fpear, and veil, 5. 905. —
8. 466.

Teucer, behind Ajax*s
ihield, 8. 321.

Youth, a beautiful one kil-
led, 4. 542. — 1 7 • 5 5 • etc.
— 20. 537. Interceding
for mercy in vain, 21. 75.

A young and old man flain
in war, their pl^ures, 22.
100.



Descriptions,
Defcriptions <j/* Things.

Of an alTembly gathering to-
gether, 2. iio»

Battle. {_See the article Mi-
litary Defcriptions.]

Burning up of a field, 2 1 .
400. A bow, 4, 137 —

Bloodtrickling from a wound,
4. 170, etc,

Brightnefs of an helmet 5.

5..
Burial of the dead, 7. 494.

A breach made in an attack,

12. 485.— _
Boiling water in a cauldron,

18. 405. — 21. 425.
Beacon, 19. 405. — ''
Beads facrihced, 23. 41.
A bird Ihot through, 23.

1033.
Chariot of Jupiter, 8 . 50,

542. Of Neptune, 13.41.

Chariot defcribed at large,

24- 335- — 5- 889, etc. A

chariot-race, 23. 353, etc.

Chariots overturned, 16.

445. Chariots crulhing the

bodies, 20. 577.
A child frighted at a helmet

6. 595.
Golden chain of Jupiter, 8.

25.
A conflagration, 21. 387,

400.
C&)okery defcribed, 9. 277.
Ceftus, the game defcribed,

23. 766, etc»
Deformity, 2. 263, —
Dancing, i8. 681, et^.
Difcus the game defcribed.



POETICAL INDEX.



;I9



Descripti ons.

23. 927> etc.
Diving, 24. 10 J.
Driving a chariot 1 1 <

655



Dreadful appearance of the
Myrmidons, I6» I92» — of
Achilles, i8. 254*

Darknefs, 17. 422*

Death, j6«io33, — 22'4^5.
'The aejcriptior.s of
(liferent f^rts of deaths in
Hofner^ are innu7nerabley
and fcattered thioughout
the battles.

^gis or fhield of Jupiter,
2. 52',— 5. 509- — IS-

3>o. 21. ^6S'

An entrenchment, 7. 520.
Eagle iKmg by a ferpent,

12. 233. Eagle fearing,

24. 390.
Furnace and forge defcrib-

ed, 18. 540.
Fifhes fcorched, 2I« 4I3.
Flowers of various kinds,

I4. 396. ■!
Famine, 19. 1 60, etc*
Fall of a warrior headlong

into the deep fands, 5.

715.
Fatigue in the day of battle,

2. 458- — 16. 132. — 17.

445-
Fainting, 5. 856. II.

460. — 14. 487, S09.~-~
Fires by night, defcribed,

8. 685, etc.
Recovery from fainting, 15.

27T.
Fortification attacked, 12.

170, etc* 201, 304, 407.
Funeral of a warrior, 23.



Descriptions.

156. — funeral pile defcrib-
ed, 23. 200.
363. Gates of a fortification bro-
ken, 12 ♦545-

Goblet defcnbed, Ji, 774.

Girdle of Venus, 14. 245.

Horfes, the famous ones of
Eumelus, 2. 924. Of Hec-
tor, 8. 226. Of Achilles,
16. iSi. Of 1 ros, 5/
327. of Eridhonius, 20.
262.

Horfe pampered and pranc-
ing, 6. 652. Horfe killed
by a dart; 8. 105. Horfes
afraid ot leaping a ditch,
12. 57. Horics of Achil-
les mourning for Patroclus,



17. 490.
A feat of horfemanlhip, 15,

822.
Helmet of Jupiter, ^ . 9i8«

Helmets nodding their

plumes, 13, 945.
Hofpitable life of a good

man, 6. 16.
Harve(h i8i 637.
Herds of oxen, 18. 66s.
Inundation, 12. 13. — 15',

46). of Scamander, againit

Achilles, 21. 258, etc,

250, etc.

Lightnings and thunder, 7.

571. — 8. 93, etc. i6i,

etc.
Light coming over a plairl,

15. 8io» — 17.430.

Light Itreaming from a

beacon by night, 19. 405.
Majelly of a prince, 2. 564.

—3. 221.
Majeltic march of Sarpedon,



320



POETICAL INDEX.



Descriptions.

12. 556. Of Juno, 14 26.
Melancholy, 6* 245.
Moon and ftars defcribed,

8. 687-
Marriage-pomp, i8- 570. -
Monument over the dead,

17. 492.

Noife, aloud one, 5. 105 4.
— 13. 1055 —1.4. 172,
457.— 16. 767. _

Night paft in inquietude by
the foldiers, and their fe-
veral poitures of taking reft,
10. 82, 170.

Old age, 3. I 50. The pic-
ture of its miferies in a ftate
of war, 22. 80.

Orphan, its miferies, 22.
620. etc,

Proceffion defcribed, 6» $6y.

Peaceful life, 9. 520.

po(ture of a man receiving a
dart on his fhield, lifted up,
13.51 1. — 20. 325, etc.

Panting defcribed, 13, 555,
720.-— •

Perfumes, 14. 198.

plume of a helmet, 19. 4 10.

;I3- 947-

Plowing, 12. 627.

Rainbow, 11, 37. 24.

100. — 17. 616.
.Reaping, 18. 637.

Running away, 2 1 . 634.

Running round Troy, Hec-
tor and Achilles, 22. 250,
etc. Seeming to run in a
dream. 22 • 257.

Rough way defcribed, 23.

i39«

A race defcribed, 23. 88 £•

etc.



271.
light

625:.



Descriptions.

Shield of Achilles, defcribed
at large, 18. 550. etc Of
He<5tor, 6. 143. Of Ajax.
7.265.

Scales of Jupiter, 22.

Smoke cleared, and
returning, 16. 3^0.

Sailing of a fhip, i .
Ship anchorin].r and coming
into port, r. ^66*

Theltatelyllalk of a hero,
7. 251. — 15. 81 J.

A facriiice defcribed, i.
600. 7. 380.-—

Sleep, 2. imt* — 24. 265*
etc.

A flaughter by night, 10.
560.

Snow, 12. 331.
Soldiers, when off from du-
ty, their amufements, 2.

938.
Shooting with the bow, 4,

I44. to i<6. — 23. 1005,

8. 389.

Spear of Achilles, 19. 420,

A fpear driven deep into

the earth, 21. 188.
A flone whirling on the

ground with v aft force 14.

174-
Stone, thrown by a hero, ^,

570. — 7. 320, 12.

537 — 14 472

Swittnefs ^f horfes, 20. 270.

Swooning 16. 955.

Vintage, 18. 651.

AVall, overwhelmed by wa-
ters, 7, 550, — 12. 23.

W oodman'a dinner, 11.
120.

Woods felled down 23.



POETICAL INDEX,



a2t



Descriptions.
i44> - >6. 767.

War, its miferies, 9. 709.

Watch by night, 10. 208.

Wreftling defcnbed, 23.
821

Wound of Venus defcribed,
5. 4i7.Diomed wounded,
5. A wound healing, 5.
nil.

Water, troops plunging in,
21. 9. A fight in the wa-
ter 2 1 • A tree falling in
the water, 26. 269. Wa-
ter rolling down a hill in a
current, 21. 290. Arms
floating uponthewater,2i.
351.

Winds rifing, 23* 261. ^

Dcfcriptions of Times
and Seasons.

Day break, 10. 295. •

Morning, 2. 60— »7* 515'.
— 8- 183. — 9. 833 — 11.
I.— II. 1 15. — 19. I.

Sun-rifing, 11. 871.

Noon, 19. 938.

Sun-fetting, i. 716. 7»

556 8. 6C5.

Evening, 16. 942



Night. 2. init. — leth book
throughout. A Harry
night, 687.

Spring, 14. 3, 5.

Summer, 18. 637.

Autumn, 18. 651.— -5.
1060 —22. 40.

Winter. 12. I75j 331.



Descriptions,

Military Dcfcriptions,

An army defcending on the
fhore, 2. 117. An army
marching, 2 I Si, 940.
The day of battle, 2. 458.
A vaft army on the plain,
535, etc, to 563. An ar-
my going forth to battle, 2.
976 — 13. 59. — 16. 25J»

19- 377.

A chariot of war, 5. 890.
etc^

Confufion and noife of bat-
tle, 16. 621

A fmgle combate, with all
the ceremonial, 3. 12'^. etc.

The combate between Paris
and Menelaus. 3. 423.

—Of Hector and Ajax,
7. 2SO to ^35.

Of Hedor and Achil-
les, 22.

Squadrons embattled, 4;
322.-5. 637. — 8. 260.

Firft onfet of battle, 4.498,
10515.

A circle enclofing the foe, 5.
772.

Stand of an army, 7. 75,
Joining in battle, 8. 75,
etc. — 13. 422. A rout,
II. 192, — 14. 166. "i6«
440. etc. — 21 720. A
fortification attacked, 1 2.
170, 201, 304. A breach
made, 12. 485. An obfli-
nate clofe fight, 12. 51c.

• 15. 860. An army in

clofe order, 13. 177. to
185.— 17. 406. An attack
on the fea-lide, 14. 452,



322



POETICAL INDEX.



Descriptions.
Levelling and pafimg a
trench, 15. 408. Attack
of the fleet, 15, 677, <^tc»
786, 855, etc, A hero ai-
ming at all points, Aga-
memnon , I r ^ 21. Patro-
clus, 16. 162. Achilles,

19. 390. Siege of a town,
18. 591. etc. Surprize of
a convoy, ibid. Sk.irmi(h,
ibid. Battle of the Gods,

20. 6 1, to 90. Two heroes
meeting in battle, 20. 192.
The rage, deilirudion, and
carnage of battle, 20. 574.

Defcriptions oft/;elsTEK-
a^L Passions, or cf
ib sir vifible Effects.

Anxiety, in Agamemnon,
10. 1 3,. if/if. 100, etc.

Aflivity, in Achilles, 15.

416. .
.Admiration, 21.62. — 24*
800. ■



Affright, 16. 968.

Amazement, 24. 590.
Ambition, 13. 458.
Anger, i. 252.
Awe, I. 430.
Buffoonry in Therfites, 2.

295. etc.
Contentment, 9. 520.
Conjugal love, in llej^tor and

Andromache, 6. 5 10. etc.
Courage, 13. 109, 366.

■17. 2)0.

Cowardice, 13. 359. — 1 6.

483..—
Curiofity, in old men, 3.

194. etc.



DESCRIPTJtONsi

Defpair, 22« 377.
Diffidence 3. 280*
Diftrefs, 8. 290. — 9, T2.

etc. — 10. 96
Doubt, 14. 2r, etc* — 21.

651, etc. — 22. 138.
Fear, 10. 443. — 24. 44I.
Fear m Priam, 2 r . 6 1 J . For

hisfon, 22. 43, 51, etc.
Fear of a child, 6. 596.
Fidelity, in Lycophron, fer-

vant, of Ajax, I;;. 502.

Caleiius,fervantof Axylus,

6. 20.
Grief in a fine woman, i.

150. -3. 185. — —I.

450,

Grief of a fider for her dead

brothers, 3. 300. etc.
Grief in two parents in ten-

dernefs for their child 6.

Grief occafioned by love of
our country, in Patroclus,
16. init.

Grief for a friend in Achilles
for Patroclus, 18. 2 5 1 00,

etc — ^19. 335. 23.

482. 24 5.

Funous grief, 18. 367.

Frantic grief, 24, 29 1.

Grief of a father for his fbn,
in Priam, 22. 522, <?/^.— ■

24. 200, 275, 291.

Grief of a wife for her huf-
band, 22. 562. to the end,
the epifode of Andromache
and again, 24. 906.

Grief out of gratitude, in Bri-
feis, 19. 319. in Helen, 24.

Hafie, expreffed in Hedor,

*5. 395» 403> ^^^'



P O E T I C A I. INDEX.



323



T)escriptions.

Hate, in Achilles to He<flor,
22. 3^5, 43:;, etc.

Hardnefs of heart, Q.yjo- —

Infolence, in Tiepolemus, 5.
783. in Epeus, 24. 767.

-Joy its vifible effe^fts, 23.
678.

Love in Helen and Paris, 3.
551, etc. in Jupiter and Ju-
no. 14, 332, ctC' 3:7- —

Conjugal love, in !Ie<5tor
and Andromache, 6, etc.

Love of a mother to her fon,
in Thetis to Achilles, 18,
70. — 24. 117.

Brotherly love, in Agamem-
non and Menelaus, 4, 183.

Filiai love, in Harpalion, 13.
805.

Lovers forrow at parting, in
Achilles and Brlfcls, i. 450.
In Hector andAndromac he,
6. 040. Effeds of beauty
on old men, 3, 203. •

Malice in Therfites, 2 255.
— Modefty, 14. ^7:?.

Pnde, in Orthryoneus, 13.

4S7.
Pity, of a people for their

prince in raifery, 24. 402.



DESCRIPTIONS,

Repentance, in Helen, 3,

23c, /|f;3. 6. 432. to

4SO —

Raihnefs, in Afius, i2- 125,
etc.

Rcfentment, in Achilles, i.
635 — 15- 72. —

Revenge, in Menelaus, 2»
7 10. in Achilles, for Parro-
clus, i8« 125, etc. — 19.
211. 394 —

R evenge and glory.. 16. 123.

Refolution, 19. a66. In
Hedor, 22. 47, 107.

Shame, in Helen, 3, 185:.
etc 521 — in Juno, 14.
373 —

Sptie, in Juno.ij. Ilo.

In Menelaus, 17. 6)0.

Tendevnefs, of parents for
their child, in Hedor and
Andromache, 6. 504, 598,
616 —

\\ ifh, of He<5lor, to. be im-
mortal ,13. 1046.

— of /.chllles, for a genera!
deftrudion, 16. i22.

— of ^jax, to die in the -day-
light, 17. 730.



324



POETICAL INDEX



SIMILE S.



From Beasts.

The Hatelinefs of a bull, to
the port of Agamemnon, 2,
566* — Ofa ram iblking be-
fore tlie flock, to UlyfTes,
3. 2^9. A wanton flahion
breaking from the paflures
and mares, to Paris iflliing
from his apartment, 6. 6^ 2
A hound following a lion,
to He<5lor following theGre-
cians, 8 407. Dogs watch-
ing the folds, to the guards
by night, 10. 2 1 1 . Hounds
chafing a hare through thick
woods, to Diomed and U-
lyfTes purfning an enemy by
night, 10. 427. A hind
flying from a lion, to the
Trojans flying from Aga-
memnon, II. 11^3. Beads
.flying from a lion, to the
fame, lo, 227. Hounds
cheared by the hunter, to
troops encouraged by the
general, ji. ^78. A hunt-
ed boar, to Ajax. 11, 526.
A wounded deer encorapaf-
fed with wolves to UlyfTes
ilirrounded by enemies, i r .
595; , An cfs furrounded by
boys, to Ajax, 11 68:;. A
fawn carried of] by two lions
to the body of Imbrius car-



ried by the Ajaxes, 13.
265. A boar enraged to I-
domeneus meeting his ene-
my, 13. 595. An ox rol-
ling in the pangs of death,
to a dying warrior, 13,
72). Beaits retreating from
hunters, to the Greeks re-
tiring, 15. 303. Oxen fly-
ing from lions, to theGreeks
flying from Apollo and Hec*
tor, 15. 366. A hound
fadening on a roe, to a he-
ro flying on an enemy, 1 5,
697. A wild bead: wound-
ed and retiring from a mul-
titude, to Antilochus his re-
treat, 15. 702. A hideous
afTembly of wolres, to the
fierce figure of the M^Tmi-
dons, 16. 194. Wolves in-
vading the flocks, to the
Greeks, «6. 420. A bull
torn by a lion to Sarpedon
killed by Patroclus,i6»6oo.
A bull facrificed, to Aretus,
17. 5 88. Hounds follow-
ing a boar, to the Trojans
foilov;ing Ajax, 17. 811,
INTules dragging a beam, to
heroes carrjdng adead body,
17. 832. A panther hunt-
ed, to Agenor, 2\ •978. A
hound purfuing a fawn, to
Achilles purfuing Hedtor,
22. 243,

From



POETICAL INDEX.



g2j



:-){M)LES.

Fr-Giu LiONS,

A Uonrouzing at his prey,
to Menclaus at light of Pa-
ris, 3. 37* A lion falling
-on the flocks and wound-
ed by a (hepherd, to Dio-
med wounded, 5. 1 74. A
lion among heifers, to the
fame, 5. 206. Two young
lions killed bv hunters, to
two young warriors, 5.
68 1 . A lion deftroying the
Ifhecpin their folds, te Ulyf-
fes^flaughtering dieThraci-
ans afleep, to. 564. The
four retreat of a lion, to
that of Ajax, 1 1. 675. A
lion, or boar hunted, to a
hero dilirefTed, .1 2. 47. A
lion ruihing on tlie flocks,
to Sarpedon's march, 12.
557, A lion killing a bull,
to Hedor killing Periphas,
15. 760. A Hon (lain, af-
ter he has made a great
(laughter, applied to Patro-
clus, 16. 909. Two lions
fighting, to He(5lor and Pa-
troclus, 16. 915:. A lion
and boar at a fpring, to the
fame, 16. 993. A lion
putting a whole village to
flight to Menelaus, 17. 70.
Retreat of a lion, to that of
Menelaus 17. 1 17. Alio-
nefs defending her young,
to his defence of Patrocl us,
17. 14s. Another retreat
of a4ion, to tl:at of .Menc-

\ o L. IV,



Similes.
laus, 17. 741. The rage
and grief of a lion for his
young, to that of Aciiilies
for Patrodus, 18. 371. A
jion lulliing on his foe, to
Achilles io. 200.

Trc7n Bjrds,

A flight of cranes or fwans,
to a numerous army, 2.
540. The noife of cranes,
to the fnouts of an army,

3. 5. zAn CcTgle prefer-

ving and fahtinij for her
young, to Achilles protec-
ting the Grecians, 9. 424.
A falcon flying at a cjuarry,
to Neptune's flight, -13. 91.
An eagle '(looping at a
fwan, to ilecStor's atr?.cking
a fliip, I*;. 836. l^\o vul-
tures fighting, to Sarpedon
and Palroclus, 16. 522. A
vulture driving gcefe, to
Automedon, (cattermg "'.o
Trojans, 17. 527. /I, p.
eagle carting his eyes on
•the quarry, to IMenelaus
looking through the ranks
for Antilochus, 17. 761*
Cranes afraid of falcons, to
the Greeks afraid of Hec-
tor and Apneas, 17. 84 f,
A dove afraid of a falcon,
to Diana afraid of Juno,
21. 576. A falcon follow-
ingadove. to Achilles pur-
fuing Hedor, 22. 18^.
An eagle at an hare, to A-
dailies at Heftor, 22, .;9(.

E e



326



POETICAL I N D E X.



Similes.
The broad wings of ;in
eagle extended, to palace-
gates fet open, 24. 39 [.

Frcm Se B.?E ST s.

A traveller retreating From
a ferpent, to Paris afraid
of Mendaus., 3, 47. A
fnake rolled up in his den,
and coUe^fiiing his anger, to
Hedor expecting Achilles,
22. 130.

From Insects.

3ees fwarming, to a numer-
ous army iffuing out, 2.
III. Swarms of flies, to
ihe fame, 2. 5 52. Graftiop-
pers chirping in the fun, to
old men talking, 3. 201.
Vv'afps defending their ndl:,
to the muititude and vio-
lence of foldiers defending
a battlement, 12. 190.
"Wafps provoked by child-
ren flying at the traveller,
10 troops violent in an at-
tack, 16. 314. A hornet
;irp;ry, to Menelaus incen-
fcd^ 17. 642. Locu(!s dri-
ven into a river, to the
Trojans inScamander, 21.



14.



FroTu Fires,



A forcd in flames, to the



Similes.
In fire of armour* 2. 534^
The fpreading of a confla-
gration, to the march of an
army, 2. 948. Trees fink-
ing in a confl agration, to
fquadrons falling in battle,
II. 2CI. The noife of fire
in a wood, to that of an
army in confufion, 14.461.
A conflagration, to Hecftor,
15. 728, The rumbling
and rage of a fire, to the
confulion and roar of a
routed army. 17. 82 J.
Fires on the hills, and bea-
cons to give (ignals of dif-
trefs, to the blaze of A-
chilles's helmet, 18. 24^.
A lire running over fields
and woods, to the progvefs
and devaitations made by
Achilles, 20. 569. Fire
boiling tlie waters, to Vul-
can operating on Seaman-
der, 21. 42 s • A fire rag-
ing in a town, to Achilles
in the battle, 21. 608. A
tov/n on fire, 22. 518.

Frof/i Arts.

The flaining of ivory, to tli€
blood running down the
thigh oflVlenelaus, 4. 170.
An archite«5]: obferving the
rule and line, to leaders
preferving the line of bat-
tle, 4. 474. An artift ma-
nadn(T four horles, and
leaping from one to ar.o-
liier, compai"ed to «Ajax



POETICAL INDEX,



327



S r M I L K s .
ftriding from ftip to fliip,
15. 822. A builder cement-
ing a wall, to a l'.'ader em-
bodying his men, 16. 256.
Curriers flnunin" abide, to
foldiers tugging for a dead
body, 17. 450. Bringing
a current to water a gar-
den, to the purfuit of Sca-
mander after Achilles, 2I;
290. The placing of raf-
ters in a building, to the
pofture of two wrefllers,
23. 825. The morions
of a fpinfler, the fpindle
. and thread, to the fwift-
nefs of a racer, 23. 889.
The finking of a plum-
met, to the pafTage of
Iris, through the fea, 24.
107.

From Trees-,

The fall of a poplar, to that
of Simoifius, 4. 552. Of
a beautiful oHve, to that of
Euphorbus, 17. 57. Two
tail oaks on the mountains,
to two heroes, 12. 145'.
The fall of an afn, to that
of Imbrius, i;;;. 24 T. Of a
pine or oak flretchcd on the
ground, to Afius dead, 13.
493. An oak overturned
by a thunderbolt, to Heeler
felled by a ftone, I4. 408.
An oak, pine or popjar fall-
ing, toSarpedon, 16. 591.
The fliort duratlcn and
quick fucceinou of leaves on



veneration
21.



Similes,
trees, to the
of men, 6. 1 81.
540.

Fro7n the Sea.

Rolling billows, to an army
in motion, 2. 175. The
murmurs of waves, to the
noife of a multitude. 2»
249. Succefiion of waves,
to the moving of troops, 4.
478. A freih gale to wea-
ry mariners, like the com-
ing of Hciflor to his troops,
7. 5. — The feas fettling
themfelves, to thick troops
compoled in order and li-
lence, 7.71. The lea a-
gitatcd by different winds,
to the army in doubt and
con fu (ion, 9. 5. The
waves rolling neither way,
till one wind fways them,
to Nelior's doubt and Hid-
den refolution, 14. 21. A
rock breaking the billows,
to the body of the Greeks,
refifting the Trojans, 15,
746. The fea roaring at
iis reception of a river in-
to it, to the meeting of ar-
mies at a charge, 17. 310.
A beacon to marine is at
fea, to the light of Achil-
les 's fhield, 19. 405. A
dolphin purfuing the kfTer
iifh, to Achilles in Seaman-
der, 21. 30.



328



POETICAL INDEX.



SlMlLER.

From the Son, Moon,
tf/?^ Stars.

The moon and ftars in glory,
to the brightnefs and num-
ber of the Trojan fires, 8.
^87. A flar fonietlmes
(hewing and rometimes hid-
ing itfelf in clouds, to Hec-
tor feen by fits through the
battalions, 11. 83. The
fun in glory, to Achilles,
19. 436. The evening (hir^
to the point of Jiis fpear, 22.
599' The dog-lhr rifing,
to Diomed's dreadful ap-
pearance, 5. 8. to A-

chilles, 22.37. The red
rays of the dog-ftar, to A-
chiJks's helmet, 19. 412.
The morning-{iar. its beau-
ty, to young Allyanax, 6.
499^

From Tor r. E n t s^
Storms, Winds.

Torrents rufliing to the val-
iies, to armies meeting in
an engagement, 4. 516.
Torrents drowning the field
to the rage of a hero 5.
If 6. A torrent flopping a
ihepherd, to Heftor (topping
Diomed, 5. 734. The
violence of a torrent, to A-
jax, II.615. A itorm o-
verwhelming a fliip at fea,
to the Trojans mounting a



Similes.
breach, 15. 440. An au-
tumnal florm and a deluge,
to the ruin of a routed ar-
my, 1 6. 467- A Itorm roar-
ing in a wood, to armies
fhouting, 16. 923. The
wind tolling the clouds, ta
He(fl:or driving the Greeks,
II. 396. Different winds
driving the duff, to differ-
ent palfions urging the com-
batants, 13. 425. A whirl-
wind on the waters^ to the
hurry of an army in moti-
on, 13. 1000. Winds
roaring through woods, or
on the feas, to the noiie of
an army, 14. 457. A
tempefl and fliipwreck,
compared to the rage of
Hedor and terrors of the
Greeks, 15. 752. The
north wind drying a gar-
den, to Vulcan drying the
field after an inundation,
21. 4Q3-

Froni heavenly appearances ,
Thunder and LiGHX-
NiKGjGoMETs, Clouds,
et£.



A mountain fliaken by thuji-
der, to the trampling of an
army, 2. 950. The blaze
of a comet, to the defcent
of rallas4. loi. The dark*
nefs of troops, to the gather-
ing of clouds, 4. 314. The
regular appearance of clouds
on the mountain tops, to a



POETICAL INDEX.



329



Similes.
line of battle, 5. 641. Pe-
ftllential vapours afcend-
ing, to Mars flying to hea-
ven, J. 1058. The quick
flafhes of lightning, to the
thick fighs of Agamemnon,
10. 5. Thick flakes of
fnow, to fliowers of ar-
rows, 12. 175. Snow co-
vering the earth, to heaps
of ftones hiding the fields,
12. 331. The blaze of
lightning, to the arms of I-
domeneus, 13. 318. Clouds
difperfed and the profpecfl
appearing, to the fmokes
being cleared from the
fliips, and the navy appea-
ring, r6. 354. A cloud
fhading the field as it rifes,
to the rout of the Trojans
flying over the plain, 16.
434. The figure of a rain-
bow, to the appearance of
"Pailas, 17. 616. Theluftre
of fnow, to that of ai mour,
19. 380.

Trom Ru r a l A i f a i s^ s .

Waving of corn in the field,
to the motion of plumes
andfpears, 2. 172. A fl^ep-
herd gathering his flocks,
to a general ranging his ar-
my, 2. 562. A thick milt
On the mountains, to the
duft raifed by an anmy, 3.
15. The bleating of flocks,
to the noife of men, 4.492.
Chafl'flvin;^ from the barn-

£e



Similes.
floor, to the duft, 5. 61 1.
Corn falling in ranks, to
men flain in battle, 10. 90.
The joy of a fliepherd fee-
ing his flock, to the joy of
a general furveying his ar-
my, 13. 620. The corn
bounding from the threfli-
ing-floor, to an arrow
bounding from armour, 1 3 ,
739. Two bulls plow-
ing, to two heroes labour-
ing In a battle fide by fide,
13. 879. Felling of tim-
ber, to the fall of heroes
in batde, 16. 767. Oxen
trampling out the corn, to
horfes trampling on the
flain, 520. 80. The morn-
ing dev/ reviving the corn,
to the exhaltation of joy
in a man's mind, 23.678.

From Low Lif^,

A mother defending her child
from a wafp, to Minen^a's
flieltering Menelaus from
an arrov/, 4. 162. An hei»
fer flanding over her young
one, to Menelaus guarding
the body of Patroclus, 17.
5. Two countrymen dif-
putlng about tlie limits of
their land, to tVvO armies


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21

Online LibraryHomerThe Iliad of Homer (Volume 4) → online text (page 21 of 22)