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difputing a port, 12. 5 ir.
A poor woman weighing
wool, the fcales hanging
uncertain, to the doubtful
fates of two armies. I2»
^12. Boys building anc|

3^



130



POETICAL INDEX.



Similes.
deftroying houfes of fand,
to Apollo's overturning the
Grecian wall, 15. 416. A
child weeping to his mo-
ther, to PatrocIus*s fuppli-
cations to Achilles, 16. ii.

St M I L E s e^halting the cha-
raLiers of7nen by compare
in^ them to Gods.

Agamemnon compared to Ju-
piter, Mars, and Neptune,
2. 564. AjaxtoMars, 7.
252. Meriones to Mars
rufliing to the battle, i g.
384. He(51:or to Mars de-
llroying armies, 15. 726.

Similes dlfavantagious to
the Characters.



Paris running from Menela-
us, to a traveller frighted
by a fnake, 3.47. A gau-
dy foppiih foldier, to a wo-
man drelTed out, 2. 1063.
Teucer ilailking behind A-
jax's (hield, to a child, 8.
:;25. Theftor pulled from
his chariot, to a fifh drawn
by an angler, 16. 4Qj;. A-
jax, to an afs, patient and
llubborn, 11. 683. Patro-
clus weeping, tr an infant,
1 6. 1 1 .Cebiiones tumbling,
to ii diver, i6- 904.



Similes,

Miscellaneous
Similes.

Soft piercing words, to fnow,
3. 28s • The clofing of a
wound, to milk turning to
curd, 5. 1 1 14. The fall
of a hero, to a tower, 4.
528. Indefatigable cou-
rage, to an axe, 3. 90. A-
gamemnon weeping, to a
fountain, 9, 19. Juno fly-
ing, to the mind pafling o-
ver diftant places, 15. 86.
Dancers to a wheel turn-
ing round, 18. 695:. A
warrior breaking the fqua-
drons, to a mound dividing
the courfe of a river, ly.
839. Men feemfng to run
in a dream, to the courfe
of He«5lor and Achilles,

22. 257. A father mour-
ning at the funeral of a fon,
to Achilles for Patroclus,

23. 272. A fragment of
a rock falling, to the furi-
ous defcent of Hecftor, 13.
191. A poppy bending the
head, to Gorgythion dyings
8. 371. The fwift moti-
on of the Gods, to the e3'^e
pafling over a profpe^l:, 5.
960. The fmoothnefs of
their motion, to the flight
of doves, 5. 971,



POETICAL INDEX. 5-t



VER SIFICATION.



Exprejjing in the found the things defer ibed,

■*

Made abrupt (and without Bounding of a flone from a
conjunctions) in exprefling rock, 13. 198.

haite, 7. 282.— I J. 402. A fudden (top, 13. 199.

Short, in earnefl: and vehe- StifTiiefs and ilownefs of old
ment entreaties, 21. 420. age, 13. 649, 653. — 23.

— 23. 506. 423-

Full c/' Breaks yWhtx^d^ih"^- A fudden fall, 23. 146.

pointment is imaged, 18. The ruflling and crafhing of

101,144. — 22.378. _ trees falling, 23. 147.

— where rage and fury is The ratding and jumping of

exprefled, 18. 137. carts over rough and rocky

— where grief is fcarce able v/ay, 23. 139, 140.

to go on, 18. loi. — 22. A fudden ihock of chariots

616, :,6o. flopped, 16 445:.

Broken and difordsred'mdt' Leaping over a ditch, 16.

fcribing a ftormy fea, 13. 460.

1005. The quivering of feathers in
Straining, imaged in the the fun, 19, 415.

found, 15. 544. Supplanted by a ftream, 21,
Trembling, imaged in the 268. 269.

found, 10. 446. . The fiaOiing of waters, 21.
Panting, 13. 721. 273.

Relaxation of all the Jimbs Bounding and heaving on the

in death, 7. 18. 22. waters, 21. 350.

A confufed noife, 12. 410. Out of breath, 21. 419, etc.

A hard fought fpot of ground. Voice of different animals

12. 513, <f/^. expiring, 23. 41, 42, ^/f.

Tumbling of a wall, 7 . 5 s 2 .



I



N D E



X



O F



Arts and Sciences.



The frft number marks the hooky the fecond the verfe.



p



Art Military.

Raife of art military, 4,

_ 631.

Ambujh e(teemed a ventur*
ous manner of fighting,
/. I. ver. 299. /. 13. V,

Ambufcade defcribed, 18.

605.
Attack^ \l*^^. etc, ihid»

171. ibid. 305, etc.
Arrningf the policy of giving

thebeft arms to the (Irong-

efl, 14. 438.
Befieging, 11. 61 — 12,170,

Z^h 534- — 2' 262. —

22. 5,
Single coinhate^ 3. 323, etc*

— 7. 80, etc.
Courts ofjufUccin the camp,

II 938.
Councils oj nvar, 7.41 J—

8. 610. — 9. ,130, etc. —

10, 146. — 232. — 357—

18. 290

3iilitary exercife, 7. 289,

etc.



Encamping, the manner of
encampment of the Tro-
jans, lO. 406. Of the
Thracians in three lines,
their weapons on the
ground before them, the
chariots as a fence, out-
ward, 10. 544.

Fortification, walls with bat-
tlements, in the line, tow-
ers upon thofe walls, gates
at proper diftances, and
trenches inclofed with pa-
liladoes, 7. 406, 5 2 3. The
ftrong gates to a fortilica-
tion, how compofcd, 12.

MarfljaUing armies ,2.667.
etc. Cantoning the troops
of each nation under their
own leaders, 2. 433. Em-
bodying in an orb, 4. 312,
Difpofing in order of bat-
tle, 4« 342, etc. Lines
of battle in exacl order,
5. 641, etc. Wlicve to
place the word loldiers,

4- 344-.



3f4



INDEX c/AKTS ^W Sciences.



Another order of battle, if.
62. In an Orh^ 17, 41 1.
Clofe fight, 15. 860. in
the Phalanx, 13. 177,
etc. I -. 744. In the
Teflttdn, 22. 6.

Arinies drawn up in iivo
numgSy with a centre y 1 3 .

396.
The flrength of an army

placed in tlie centre, 1 3 .

401.
Marching an army in fi-

]ence and difcipline, 3.

II " 4. 487.
Method of pailing a trench
' and palifadoes, 12. 65.

etc.
Plunder and pillsge forbid-
den till the conqueft is

compieat. 6. 85.
Retreat. The manner of

retreat prefcribed, 5. 746.

That oi Jjaxy il. 67^.

- — 17^837.
Soldiers taught to row in llie

gallics, ferving both as

fbldiers and failors, 2.
- 876.
Scouts, 10. 43, 245:. and

at large in the flory of

Dio7ned, Ulyffes, and Do-

Ion, in that book.
Spks^ 18. 605.
IVatch iciversy to obferve

tliC motions of the foe,

2- 261. — 22. 192.

Watch, at fet (iaiions, 7,
4^5. Nightly watch by
fires, 8. 632. At thefor-
tiiications in regulr bodies
under difHnd captains, 9.
110, etc. Management of



the anny by night, under
fears of furprize, ic. 63
to 226. The manner of
the warriors fleeping, 10.
170. The poflure of the
guards, 10. 210. Better
to truft the guard to na-
tive troops than to fereign-
era, j o. 490, etc.



Agriculture aT2d
Rural Arts,

Tillage. The manner of
plowing, 10. 420 — iS."

627. Plowing with oxen,
13. 880. with mules, ro,

" 420. Ufual to plow the
fielu three times over, 18.

628. Reaping, 1 1, 89.—
18.637. Treading out
the corn by oxen inftead
of threfhing, 20. 580.
Fanning the chaff, 5^.
61 1. 13. 740.

P aftur age y 1^.661. Mea-
dow grounds with running
water, ibid. Vintage^ 1 8.
651. Bringing currents
to water gardens, 21,
290

Tijloing, by angling, 24. 107.
by diving, 16.905^,

Huntings the boar, 17.814.
■ — II. 526. Lion, II.

378. 17. 743. The

deer, 11. 595 — 15. 697.
The panther, 21. 68o«
The hare, ic 427.

Sbootingy flying, 23. ipgo.



INDEX 0/ Arts a?id Sciences.



535:



Architecture.

Archlte(5lure the gift of Mi-
nerva ^ 5. 80.

Architeduve of a palace up-
on arcVies,wIth apartments
round a court built entire-
ly of marble. 6. 304.



Pans il<ilful in archl-
tefture, brings together
archite<5ls to erect his pa-
lace, 6. 391.

Hafters, how placed, 23.
827.

Building walls, 16. 256.

The rule and line, 15.477.

Architecture of a tent, with
a fiiit of apartments with-
in one another, 24. 555,
etc.



Astronomy.

In general, i3. ^60.
C?r//j« and the Bear, 18. 563.
The rifing of the dog-Jlar^

5. 10.
A comet defcribed, 4.101.

The rainbow, 11. 36.
power of the flars in nativi-
ties, 22. 610.



Divination.

l;)ivlnatIon by augury, 2.

375, £?/j.— 8. 297. —

10.320 — 12 230. — 13.
1039.— 24, 36I; etc.



Hcfiorh opinion of augury,

12. 277.
V>v omens y thunder and light-
nings, 7.57 1. —9. 310.—
II. 58 — 13. 319.
The rainbow, 1 1. 38. — 17.

616.

Comets, 4. 1 01.

Showers of blood, il. 70.

— 560
By Lots, 7. 215.
hyDreuffiSy 1.81.— 5. T91.
By Oracles, 16. 54. — i 6.

290. that oi Dodonay and

the manner of it, etc.

Gymnastics.

Dancingy 16217. The dif-
ferent kinds for men and
women, 18. 687. — The
circjiar, 18.573.— Mix-
ed, 18. 690.

Dancing pradifed by war-
riors, 16. 746.

— — withfwords, 18. 688.

Diving, 16. 905, 495.

Tu7nblers, 18. i'-.98.

Horje man ship.'} Manage of
the horfe, 5. 2 So. Pre-
cepts of horfemanihip, and
the art of racing, 23. 391.
etc. Four horfes rid by
one man at once, 1 5 . 1 2 2 .
Three thoufand breeding
mares at once in die (tables
0I Efi^honiusy 20. 2j2.

The Cejlusy 23. 75'3, etc.

The ^oity or Dijcus^ 23.

972> f"^'-"*



!?36 I ND EX <y^ Arts ^//r/ Sciences.



Wrcftlln^^ 23.820, etc.
Racing, 23. 880, etc.

Geography,

.A TAB LE ofthofe places

luhofe fttuat'ion, prodinl s ^

peopL', or hi /lory, etc.

- are particularized by

Homer.

JEioha, and its royal fami-
ly, 2. 780.

^j^rcadia^ and the genius of
the inhabitants, 2. 735.

Aiilis, its rocky (ituation, 2.
590.

hribrut and Tenedos^ iflands
near Tm, 13- 50,

IjVixa, famous for vineyards,
2. 645-.

Ithaca^ and the neighbour-
ing iflands in profped;, 2,
769, etc.

X^r/.^, its ferti!!t3^ 2.1019.

Leciot, fituate on die top of
mount Ida^ 4. 320.

Lfvinoiy traded in wines, 7.

IMaatidery the river, 2.IO?6
Ma'SKta, under the moun-
tains o^TmoluT, 2. 1052.
Ahfe, a town in Sparta^
abounding in doves, 2i

705.
MycctlefTus, its plain, 2.593.
A)ithedoTi, the lafl town in

Bosotia, 2. 607.
Arenct its plain, watered by
the river Minyasy 1 1 .
860.
Ariiba, on the river Selleis^
2. 1014.



Arne^ celebrated for vineS|
2. 606

JEfep-'.s^ a Trojan liver of
black water, 2. 1000.

Argofy its fea coafl defcrlbed,
with the products of that
part cf the country, 9.
I98, ttc.

At' ens, and feme cuiloms
of the Athenians, with
mention of the temple of
Miner\'a, 2. 657, 663.

Alybe, famous anciently for
filver mines, 2. 1045.

Axtus, the river defcribed,
2. IC30.

Boagrius, the river and pla-
ces adjacent j 2. 638.

Bopbe the lake and parts
adjacent, 2. 865.

Calydon, its rocky fituation,

2. 777.-9/ 653.

Cephijfus ,the river and places
upon its banks, 2. 622.

Cerinthus, fituate on the
fea-lhore, 2. 648,

Cyliene, the Arcadian moun-
tain, with the tomb ofiE!-
pytus, 2. 731.

Crete, its hundred cities, 2.
790.

Carians, a barbarous, mixed
people, 2. io?9

Dodona, its fitc, temple,
grove, <r^£-. 16. 287. — 2.
909.-

Donnn, the place of Tha-
myris's death, the cele-
'trated xnufician, 2.721.

Elis, its exatft boundaiies,
2. 747. and the iflands
oppofite to that continent,
760 to 714.

EphyrCf



INDEX sf Akts and Sciences. 337



E^hyre^ the ancient name of

Corinth, 6. 193.
Epidauruf^ planted with

vineyards, 2. 679.
Eicon, Its hills, 2. 591.
HalidrtuSy paltare grounds.

2. 598*
Helhfl>ont, 2. 1024;
Helos^ a maritime town, 2.

708.
Henetia, famous for its

breed of mules, 2. 1035;.
Herm'ton and Afine, feated

on the bay, 2. 6S0.
Hippemolgians, their long

life and nutriment, 13.

12.
Eippoplacian woods, 6.539

— 22. 611. — '

ByUi its watry fitA.iation and
the genius of the inhabi-
tants, 5. 875.

Hyperiay its fountains, 2.

895.
Mount Ida, its fountains and
forefts, 14. 321.

Catalogue of the rivers that
run from mount Ida, 12.

17-
Jardanus and Celadon, two

rivers, 7. 163. .

Mjcen^y and its maritime
towns, 2. 686,

Oncheflus, and the grove of
Neptune, 2. 600.

OrchomenusyOVi^oi^t prin-
cipal cities for wealth m
Homer's time, 9. 498.

Partheniusy the river and
places adjacent, 2« 1038.

Pedajius, feated on the ri-
ver Satnio, 6. 41*

Peneus., the river running

Vol. IV.



thro* Tempe, and mount

Pelion, defcribed, 2. 918.

Phthiay its fituation, 1 . 204.

famous for horfes, 203.
PhyUce and Phyrrhafus, a
beautiful country with
groves and flowery mea-
dows, defcribed, 2. 850,
Rhodes y its wealth, its plan-
tation byTlepolemus, and
divifion into three dyna-
fties, 2. 808, etc,
Sarnothraciay the view from

its mountains, 13. 19,
Scamandery its two fprlngs,
22. Its confluence with
Simois, 5. 965.
Scyrosy theifland, I9.35'3.
Sidof:, famous for vv'orks of
fculpture, 23. 866. and
embroidery, 6. 360
SipyluSy its mountains, rockS

anddefarts, 24. 775.
Sperch'iuiy a river in Thef-

faly, 23. 176.
StyXy the river defcribed, 2.

915.

Thchsy in -^gypt, anciently

the riche(t city in the

world, with a hundred

gates, defcribed, 2. 506.

Thcjfaly<i its ancient divlGon,

and inhabitants, 2. 833.

Thisbe-y famous for doves, 2.

601.
Thrace y its hills and promon-
tories, 14. 260, etc.
Titarefius, the river, 2.9 1 o.
Trovy its fituation and re-
markable places about it,

2. 982. I I. 217.

Typhceusy the burning moun-
■tain, 2. 95 3«

F f



3^^



INDEX (j/'Arts afid Sciences.



y^uihusj the river of Troy,
defcribed^ it banks, and
plants produced there, 2 1 ,
507, etc.
Xanthiu, the river of Ly-
cia, 2 V, ult.

Zelia^ lituat-e at the foot of
mount Ida, 2. V9S.

H I S T O R Y.

Hifiory prefcrved by Ho-
jaier.] ^f the heroes be-
fore the fiege of Troy,
Centaurs, etc, i. 347. to
358. of TIepolemus plan-
ting a colony in Rhodes,
2. 808. Of the expuifion
of the Centaurs from
Greece, 2. 902* Of the
wars of the Phrygians
and Amazons, 3. 245.
Of the war of Thebes,
and embafTy of Tydeus,
4. 430. Of Bellerophon,
6. 194. Of Erythalion
and Lycurgus, 7. 164.
Of the Curites and ^to-
lians,9. 653. Of the wars
of the Pylians and i^to-
iians, II. 818. Of the
race of Troy, 20. 25j,
etc, 'To this head may be
referred the number I efs
Genealogies in our au-
thor*

Music,

Mufic pratfllfed by princes,
the ufe of the harp in A-
chilles, 9. 247. in Paris,



3. 80.
The ufe of the pipe- lo. 15.

I iS. 609.
Vocal mufic, accompanying

tiie indruments, i. 777.
Chorus's at intervals, 24,

9c 2
Mufic ufed in the army, t©»

at funerals, 24. 900.

^inthe vintage, r 8c 6jI.

Trumpets in war, 1 8. 26o#

Mechanics.

Jrchery^ making a bow, and
all its parts, defcribed, 4.
135, etc,

Chariot-makingy a chariot
defcribed in all its parts,
5. 889, ^-z^. 24* 33^.

Poplar proper for wheels,

4- 554.
Sycamore fit for wheels, 2 1.

44.
Clocknvorkt 18. 44I.
Enamelling, 18, 63 J.
Ship-building, 5. 8o«

Pine, a proper wood for the
mafl of afliip, 16. 592.

Smithery, iron n^ork, etc.
The forge defcribed, 18.
435> 540. Bellows, 431,
482, 540. Hammer,
tongs, anvil, 547.

Mixing of metals, ibid.

Spinnings 23. 890.

Weaving, 3. 580.-6.580.

Embroidery, 6. 3 6 1.

Armoury and injlru7nenis
of ivar»

A compleat fult, chat of Pa^



INDEX o/Arts and Science?.



33>



ris, 3. 410, etc. of Aga-
memnon, ir.22, — etc.
Scale armour, r;. 629. —
Helmet', with four plumes,

5. 919.
——without any cre^s, lo.



30s ^

■ ' ■ • lined with wool, and
ornamented witli boars
teeth, of a panic ular
make 10. 311.

—lined with fur, 10. 397.

Boivsy how made, 4. 137,

Battle-ax, defcribed, 1 3.
766.

Belts, croffing each other,
to hang the fword and
the fliield, 14. 468.

Corfeletf, ornamented witb
fculpture, II. 33.

how lined, 4% 165'. —

/f!/"<?r<?, or club, 7* 170.—^
15^ 816.

Shields, fo large as to cover
from the neck to the an-
kles, 6. 14J. — How made
and covered, 7- 267. de-
fcribed in every particu-
lar, II. 43, etc»

Slings, J 3. 899.

Spears, with brafs points,
8. 617.

Afli fit to make them, 16.
I43. 19. 422.^

How the wood was joined
to the point, 18. 618.

Snvords, how ornamented
with ivory,, genis,, 1 9*400,



Oratory.



See the article Speeches in
the poetical index*

Policy.

Kings J] Derive their ho-
nour from God, 2< 235;
— !• 315. Their names
to be honoured, 2. 3 i 3»
One fule monarch, 2.
243. Hereditary right of
kings reprefented by thr:
fceptre of Agamemnon gi-
ven by Jove, 2. 1 29. Kings
not to be difobeyed on the
one hand, nor to tlretch
too fir their prerogative
on the other, i 365.
etct Kings not abfolute iii
council, 9. 133. Kihg<5
made ^o, only for their
excelling others in viitue
and valour, 12. 337. Vl-
miance continuaiiy necef-
lary in princes, 2. 27. —
10. 102. Againft mo-
narch s deli oh tin" in war,
9. 82, etc* 24. 55. 7 he
true valour, that v.'hich.
preferves, not deftroys
mankind, 6. 196. Kings
may do wrong, and are
obliged to leparation, 9..
144. Chara^^ter of a gre:ur
prince in war and peace,
3. 236.

Councils .~] The danger of a
fubjed's toO'bold advice.



340 INDEX cf Arts and Sciences.



1 . 103- The advantage of
wife councils feconded by
a wife prince, 9. 101. The
ufe of advice, 9. 137. The
lingular blefling to a nation
and prince, in a good and
wife counfellor, 13, 918.
The deliberations of the
council to be free, the
prince only to give a fanc-
tion to the beft, 9. 13.3.
Lanjuf.J Derived from God,
and legiflators his delegates,
1 . 315. Committed to the
care of kiflgs, as guardians
of the laws of God, 9.
129.
Trihutj paid to princes from
towns, 9. 206.
^iixes upon fubjefls to aflid:
foreign allies, 17. 266.
j^rfibajl'adors, a facred cha-
racter, I. 435. — 9. 261.
Volunteers i lifled into fer-
vice, II. 904.

See the article Art Military,
Physic.

The praife of a phyndan, 1 1 .

637.

Chiron learned it from iEf-
culapilis, 4. 251.

hiachaon andPodalirius pro-
fefTors of it, 2 890.

BotaTiy.'\ Profeffed by fldl-
fui women, Agamede fa-
mous for it, II. 877.

AnatonijJ^ Of the head 16.
415;, etc.

The eye^ 14, 577.

Under the earyx. wound there
mortal, 13. 841 •



The jun(5lureofthe head^n^



nerves, 14, 544.



The jundlure of the neck
and chejl, the collar-bone^
and its infertion, the dis-
jointing of which renders
the arm ufelefs, 8. 393 >
etc.

T\^^ fpinal inarroiv expref-
fed by the vein that runs
along the chine; a wound
there mortal, 13. 692. -r—

20. 559-—

The elbo'vjy its tendons and
ligaments, 20. 554.

Blood, a great efflifion of it,
by cutting off the arm ; the
caufe of immediate death ,
5.105.—

The heart and its fibres, 1 6.
590.

The force of the mufcle of
the heart, 13. 55,4.

A wound in the bladder by
piercing the ifchiatic joint,
mortal, 13. 813.

The infertion of the thigh-
bone, and its ligaments de-
fcribed, 5. 375.

The wounds o{^-\^ Abdomen
mortal and exceffivly pain-
ful, 13. 718.

The tendons of the ankle, 4.

497.
Cbirurgery.'] Extra(5tion of

darts, 4. 228.
Sucking the blood from the

wound, 4« 250.
Ipfufion of balms into

wounds, 4. 250* ■ '5*

iiiii
WaOiing the wound wlt'R

warm water, and the ufs



INDEX tf/* Arts an<i Sciences; 341



of lenitives, 11. 965:.
Stanching the blood by the

bitter root, i r. 983.
Ligatures of wool, 13. 752.
Ufe of baths for wounded

men, 14. 10.
Sprinkling water to recover

from fainting, I4. 509.
Phanuacy and DicEtetics.

The ufe of wine forbidden,

6. 330.
Cordial potion of Neftor, 1 1 .

782, etc.
Infection, feizing firft on a-

nimals, then men, i. 70.

Nine days the crifis of dif-

eafes, !• 7I« Fevers and

plagues from the dog-flar,

5. 1058. 19. 412.

—22. 41.

Painting, Sculpture,
etc.

See the ivhcle Jlneld of A-
chitles, and the notes on
lib. i8«



The CHARACTERS. Ho-
mer diitinguilhes the cha -
rader in the figures of Gods
foperior to thofe of men,
iS. 602.

Charaaersofmajefiy.'] The
majefty of Jupiter, from
whence Phidias copied his
ftatue, I. 683. of Mars
and Neptune, 2. 569.

The majefty of a prince, in
the figure of Agamemnon,
3. 564, etc* Of a wife
man, in UlyiTes's afped, 3 .



280. Of an old man, ia
Neftor and- Priam, i . 3 30.
— 24. 600. Of a young
hero, in Achilles, 19. 390.
etc. All varioufly charac-
terized by Homer.
CharaCiers of beauty."] Al-
luring beauty in the goddefs
Venus, 14. 250. Majeftic
beauty in Juno, 14. 216.
Beauty of a nvoman in He-
len, 3. 205 Beauty of a
young man in Paris, 3. 26.
Euphorbus, 17. 53,^"/^:.
Beauty of a Jine infant in
Aityanax, 6, 499.
Beauties of the parts of the
hody.~} Largenefs and ma-
jefly of the eyes in Juno's.
Hlacknefs , in thofe of Chry-
feis. Blue, in Minerva's,
etc. Eye-brows, black,
graceful, i. 683. The
beauty of the cheeks^ and
the fairnefs of hair, in the
epithets of Helen. White-
nefs of the arms in thofe of
Juno. Fingers rather red
than pcJe, in the epithet
of rcfy-fingered to Aurora.
Whitncfs of the feet in that
oijihirr-footsd to Thetis,
etc. Colour of the fldn to
be painted differently ac-
cording to the condition of
the pei-fonages, applied to
the whitenefs of the thigh
of Menelaus, 4. 275.
Chara&er of Deformity-']
The oppofites to beauty in
the feveral parts confidered
mthe figure, of Therlites,
2. 263, etc^



342 INDEX (t/* Arts ^«i Sc«FNCE^.



For p'tSlures of particular
things i fee the article I-
mages in /^f Poetical
Index,

Hijlory, laridfcape, paint*
iiigy animals^ etc. in the
buckler of Achilles, i8.
at large.

The defign of a goblet in
Jcuipiurey ii. 775.

Sculpture of a corfelet, 1 1.
33, etc. Of a bowl, 23.
Horfes carved on monu-
ments, 17. 495.

Enamelling and Inlaying^
in the buckler of Achil-
les, 18. 635. (yf^fi* and
breaft- plate of Agamem-
non, If. 35".

Tapejlryy or weaviag hiilo-
ries, flowers, etc, 3. 171,
— 6. 580. — 22. 569. —

Embroidery of garments, 6.
360.

POETRY.

See the entire Ini>ex»

Theology.

^ vieiv <5/" H o M E r's
Theology.

Jupiter, or the Supreme
Being.

Superior to all powers- of
heaven, 7. 244. — 8. 10,
etc. Enjoying himfelf in
the contemplation of his
glory and power, 1 1. 1G7.



Self-fufficient, and above j
all fecond caufes, or infe-
rior deities, 1. 647. The
other deiries refort to him
as their fovereign appeal,
5. 1065. — 21 590. Kis
will is fate, 8. 10. His
fole will the caufe of all i
human events, / . 8» His
will takes certain and in-
ftant effetSl, i. 685. his-
will immutable and always
jufl:, i» 730. Ail-feeing,
8. 65. — 2. 4. — Supreme
above all, and fole- fuihci-
ent, II. T07. The fole
governor and fate of all

things, 2. 147. 16.

845'. Difpofer of all the
glories andfuccefs of men,-
17. 198. Fore-feeing all
things, 17. 228. The gi-
ver of vidory, 7. I18.
Difpofer of all human af-
fairs, 9. 32. His lead re-
gard, or thought reftorea
mankind,. 15.. 274. or
turns the fate of armies,
17.675^ Difpenfer of all
good and evil that befalls
mankind, 24. 663. His
favour fuperior to all hu-
man means, 9. 152. His
counfels unfearchable, i.
705. Themis or judice
is his meffenger, 20. 5.
God profpers thofe who
worflup him, I. 2.90. ■«
Conilantly punilhes the
wicked, though late, 4.
194. The avenger of in-
juiUce, 4. 202. Nothing
fo terrible as his wrath,
5. 227. His divine ja»



INDEX ^/"Arts tfW Sciences.



343



ftice fometimes puniflies
whole nations by general
calamities, 16.468 Chil-
dren punifhed for the fins
of their parents, 11. 166.
and 16. 393.

The inferior Deities.

Have different offices under
God: fome prefide over
elements, 18. 46.' — 23.
240.

Some over cities and coun-
tries, 4 75

Some over woods, fprlngs,
etc. 20. 12.

They have a fubordinate
power over one another.
Inferior deities or angels
fubje(5t to pain, imprifon-
ment, 5. 475, 1090.
Threatened to be catt in-
to Tartarus by Jupiter. 8.
15, Are fuppofed to con-
verfe in a language diffe-
rent from that of mor-
tals, 2. 985 Subfifl



not by material foor!, y.

4. Compailionate man-
kind, 8^ 4;-.— 24. 4«2.
Able to alfill mortals at
any dUtance, i6. 633.
Regard and take care of
tliofe ".ho ferve them, e-
ven to their remains after
death, 24. 520. No re-
filling heavenly powers,

5. 49$:, rhe meannefs
and the vilenefs of all
earthly creatures in com-
parifon of the divine na-
tures, 5. 535.

Prayer recommended on all
enterprizes throughou t the
poe??i.
Prayers intercede at the
throne of heaven, 9. 624.
Opinions of the ancients con-
cerning hell^ the place of
pnniihment for the wick-
ed after death, 8. 1 5. — -
19. 271.
Opinions of the ancients con-
cerning the (tate of fepa-
rate fpirits^ 23. 89, etc
120, etc.



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