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45*


from retreating 2


**$


Xanthus the river,






provokes Therfues a


305


fpeaks to Achilles


21


23a


exhorts the fokliers to




rifes againft Achilles 21


X58


battel 2


347


invokes Simois a-






anfwers Agamemnon 4


402


gainft Achilles


21


364


bis fpeech to Achilles




fupplicates Vulcan






to reconcile him




and Juno


21


4*3



[ 3*S 3



POETICAL INDEX

T O

H O M E R's ILIAD.

The firft number marks the book, the fecond the verfe.



FABLE.



HP PI E great moral of the
**• Iliad, that concord a-
mong governors, is the pre-
fervationof ftates,and difcord
the ruin of them j purfued
through the whole fable.

The anger of Achilles breaks
this union in the opening of
the poem, t. I. He with-
draws from the body of the
Greeks, which firlt inter-
rupts the iuceefe of the com-
mon caufe, ibid. The army
mutiny, z. The Trojans
break the truce, 4. A great
number of the Greeks (lain,
7. 391. Forced to build
fortifications to guard their
fleet, ibid. In great diftiefs
from the enemy, v.hofe vi-
ctory is only ftopt by the
night, 8. Ready to quit
their defign, and return with
infamy, 9. Send to Achil-
Cc



les to perfuade him to a re-
union, in vain, ibid. The
diftrefs continues; the gene-
rals and all the beft warriors
are wounded, 11. The for-
tification overthrown, and
the fleet fet on fire, 15. A-
chilles himfelf fhares in the
misfortunes he brought upon
the allies, by the iofs of his
friend Patroclus, 16. Here-
upon the hero is reconciled
to the general, the victory
over Troy is compleat, and
Hector (lain By Achilles, ip,

ao, xi, zz, etc.

*

Episodes or Fables
•which are interwoven into thi
poem, but foreign to its de-
fig*

The fable of the confpiracy
of the Gods again!* Jupiter,

3



S c5 POETICAL INDEX.



Fable.
I. 516". Of Vulcan's fall
from heaven on the ifland of
Lemnos, i. 761. The im-
prifonment of Mars by Otus
and Ephialtes, 5. 475. The
ftory of Thamyris, 2. 711.
The embafly of Tydeus to
Thebes, 4. 430. The tale
of Bellerophon, 6. 195. Of
Lycurgusandthe Bacchanals,
6. if 1. The war of the
Pylians and Arcadians, 6.
165. The ftory of Phoe-
.nix, 9. S7z. Of Melea-
ger and the wars of the
Curetes and Aetolians, 9.
653. The wars of Pyle and
Elis, 11. 81a. The birth
of Hercules, and labour of
Alcmena, 19. 103. The
expulfion of Ate from heaven,
j 9. 93. Vulcan's abode
with Thetis, and his employ-
ment there, 18. 463. The
family and hiftory of Troy,
2©. 255 The transforma-
tion of Niobe, 14. 757.
Building of the walls of

„ -Troy by Neptune, 2 1 . 518.

Allegorical Fables.

Moral.] Prudence redrawing
Paifion, r^prtfenttd in the
machine of .linerva descend-
ing to calm Achille*, 1. 26!.
Love aliv.ring.and extin? mill-
ing Honour, in Venusbring-
ing Paris from the com bate



Fable.
to the arms of Helen, 3. 460,
etc. True Courage overcom-
ing PafTion, in Diomed's con-
tjueft of Mars and Venus, by
the afliftance of Pallas, $.
507, etc, through that -whole
look. Prayers the daughters
of Jupiter.followinglnjufHce,
and perfecuting her at the
throne of heaven, 9. 625.
The Ceflus, or girdle of
Venus, 14. 247' The al-
legory of Sleep, 14. 265.
The allegory of Difcord caft
out of heaven to earth, 19,
93, The allegory of the
two Urns of Pleafure and
Pain, 24. 663.
Phyfical orPhilofophical.TThe
combate of the elements till
the water fubfided, in the
fable of the wars of Juno or
the Air, and Neptune or the
Sea, with- Jupiter or the Ae-
ther, till Thetis put an end
to them, i. $16. Fire de-
rived from heaven to earth,
imaged by the fall of Vul-
can on Lemnos, 1 7^r.
Thegravitation ofthe Planets
upon the Sun, in the alle-
gory of the golden chain of
Jnpiter, 8. 25. The in-
fluence of the Aether upon
the Air, in the allegory of
the congrefs of Jupiter and
Juno, 14- 395- The Air
fupplied by the vapours of
the Ocean and Earth, in the



POETICAL INDEX.



307



Fable.
ftory of Juno nourished by
Oceanus and Tethys, 14.
S3 1. The allegory of the
"Winds, 13. 242. Thequali-
ty of Salt preferving dead
bodies from corruption, in
Thetis or the Sea preferving
the body of Patroclus, 19.
40.

For the reft of the Allegories
fee the Syflem of the Gods as
atling in their allegorical
cbaratlers, under the article
Characters.

Allegorical or fictitious perfons
in Homer.

The lying dream fent to Aga-
memnon by Jupiter, a. 7.
Fame the mefienger of Jove,
a. iai. Furies, puni'hers
of the wicked, 3 . 351. Hebe,
or Youth, attending the
banquets of the Gods, 4. 3.
Flight and Terror attendants
upon Mars, 4. jco. Difcord
defcribed, 4. 50a. Bellona
Goddefs of war, 5. 716.
The Hours, keepers of the
gates of heaven, 5. 9'^9-
Nymphs of the mountains,
6. 532. Night, a Goddtfs,
6. 3\z. Iris, or the Rain-
bow, 8. 485. Prayers the
daughters of Jupiter, 9 625.
ErisorDifcord.il. s- Hy-
thiae, Goddeflispreudingin



Fable,
womens labour, 11. 349.
Terror the fon of Mars, 1 3 .
3*6. SLep, 14. z6$. Night,
14. 293. Death and Sleep,
two twins, 16. 831. Nereids,
or nymphs of the fea ; a ca-
talogue of them, 18. 4J.
Ate, or the Goddefs of Dif-
cord, 19. 93. Scamand-r
the river- God, ai. 231.
Fire and Water made per-
fons in the battel of Sca-
manderand Vulcan.ai. 387.
The Eaft and Weft Winds,
ibid. Iris, or the Rainbow,
and the Winds, a3- 242.

The Marvellous or fu~
pernatural Fiction? in
Homer.

Omen of the birds and fer-
pent, reprefenting the event
of the Trojan war, a. 370*
The miraculous rivers Ti •
tarefius and Styx, a. 910.
The giant Typhon under
the burning mountain Ty-
phaeus, a. 952. Battel ef
the cranes and pygmies, 3.
<5. Prodigy of a comet, 4,
1 01. Diumed's helmet e
jsfting fire, 5. 6. Horfes
of coeleftial breed, 5. 327.
Vaft ftone heaved by Dio-
med, 5. 370. And Hector,
12. 537. And Minerva, 20.
470. The miraculous chariot,
and arms of Pallas, 5. 885,



POETICAL INDEX.



S o8

Fable.
907, etc. The Gorgon, hel-
met, and Mgis of Jupiter,
ibid. The gates of heaven,
ibid. The leap of immortal
horfes, 5, 960. Shout of
Stentor, 5. 978. Roaring
of Mars, 5, 1054. Helmet
of Orcus, which rendered
the wearer invifible, 5 1036.
The blood of the Gods, 5.
4x2. The immediate heal-
ing of their wounds, 5. mo".
The chirnaera, 6. ::o. De-
fhv.ction by Neptune of the
Grecian rampart, n. 15.
Wail pu(hed down by A-
pollo, 15. 415. The golden
chain of Jupiter, 8. 25.
Horfes and chariot of Jupi-
ter, 8. 50. His balances,
weighing the fates of men,
8. 88. — %%. %ii. Jupiter's
affifting the Trojans by
thunders and lightnings, and
vifible declarations of his fa-
vour, 8. 03, 16s, etc. — 17.
670. Prodigy of an eagle
and fawn, 8. 297- Horfes
of the Gods, (tables and
chariots, pompoufly defcrib-
cd, 8. 535, etc. Hector's
lance of ten cubits, 8. 615.
Omen of anheron, 10. 310.
The defcent of Ens, 11. 5.
A (hower of blood, 11. 70.
■ — 15. 560. Omen of an
e3gle and ferpent, 12. 230.
The progrefs of Neptune
through the feas, 13. 4*.



Fable,
The chain of War and Dif-
cord ftretched overthe armies,
13. 451. The loud voice
of Neptune, 14. 173. So-
lemn oath of the Gods, 14.
307. — -15. 41. Minerva
fpreads a light over the ar-
my, 15. 808. Jupiter in-
volvesthe combatants inthick
darknefs, 16. 412, 6g%.
Horfes begot by the wind on
aharpye, 16. 183. Afhower
of blood, 16. 560. Mira-
culous tranfportation and in-
terment of Sarpedon by A-
pollo, Sleep and Death, 16.
810, etc. Prophecy at the
hour of death, i<5. 1026. —
22.450. Achilles unarmed
puts the whole Trojan army
to flight on his appearance,
18. 240, etc. Moving tri-
pods and living ftatues of
Vulcan, 18. 44©. 488. The
horfe of Achilles fpeaks by
a prodigy, ij. 450. The
battel of the Gods, 20. 63,
etc. Horfes of a miraculous
extraction, the transforma»
tion of Boreas, 20. 264.
The wonderful battel of the
Xanthus, 21. 23©, etc. He-
ctor's body prefcrved by A-
pollo and Venus, 23. 226",
The ghoftof Patroclus, 23.
77. The two urns of Ju-
piter, 24. 66 :>. The vaft
quoit of Action, 23. 975*
The transformation ofNiobe



POETICAL INDEX.



Fa b l e .
and her people into ftones,
14- 757-

Under this head of the
marvellous may alfo be in-
cluded all the immediate



309

Fable.
machines and appearances of
the Gods in the poem, and
their transformations : the
miraculous birch of heroes;
the paffions in human and
vifible forms, and the reft.



CHARACTERS or MANNERS.

Characters of the Gods 0/" Homer, as afting in the
phyfical or moral capacities ofthofe deities.



JUPITER.

Atling and governing all, as the
fupreme Being.] See the article
Theology in the next Index.

JUNO.

As the element of A\r.~\ Her
congrefs with Jupiter, or the
.flitber, and production of
vegetables, 14. 390. etc. Her
loud (hout, the air being the
caufe of found, 5. 978.
Nourifhed by Oceanus and
Tethys, 14. 231,

As Goddefs of Empire and Ho-
nour.] Stops the Greeks from
flying ignominioufly, z. 191.
and in many other places. In-
cites and commands Achilles
to revenge the death of his
friend, 18. 103, etc. In-
fpires into Helen a contempt
ef Paris, and fends Iris to



call her to behold the corn-
bate with Menelaus, 3. 185.

APOLLO.

As the Sun. ,] Caufes the plague
in the heat of fummer, 1.
16. Raifcs a phantom of
clouds and vapours, 5. 545.
Difcovers in the morning the
Slaughter made the night be-
fore, 10. 606. Recovers
Hector from fainting, and o-
pens his eyes, 15. z8o.
Dazzles the eyes of the
Greeks, and (hakes his Aegis
in their faces, 15. 36Z. Re-
ftores vigour to Glaucus, 16.
647. Preferves the body of
Sarpedon from corruption,
16. 830. And that of He-
£tor, ij. 230. Raifes a
cloud to conceal Aeneas r
zo. ft j.

As DeJIiny.] Saves Aeneas.



3*°



POETICAL INDEX.



Characters.
from death, 5. 441. And
Hector, xo. 513. Saves A-
genor, xi. 706". Deferts
He<tor when his hour is
come, xi. 2,77.

As Wifdom.] He and Miner-
va iafpire Helenus to keep
off the general- engagement
by a fingle combate, 7. 25.
Advifes Heftor to fhun en-
countering Achilles, ao. 431.

MARS.

As rnere martial courage -with-
out conduB.] Goes to the
fight againfl the orders of Ju-
piter, 5. 7 id. Again pro-
voked to rebel againfl Jupi-
ter by his paffion, 15. 126.
Is vanquifhed by Minerva, or
Conduct, 21. 480.

MINERV A.
As martial courage -with Wif-
dom.'] Joins with Juno in re-
draining the Greeks from
flight, and infpires Ulyffes to
do it, z. a jo. Animates
the army,a. 525. Defcribed
as leading a hero fafe through
abattel, 4. 632. Aififts Dio-
med to overcome Mars and
Venus, 5.407, 1042. Over-
comesthemherfelf, 21. 480.
Reftrai. \sMars from rebellion
againfl Jupiter, 5. 45- —
15. 140. Submits to Ju-
piter, 8. 40. Advifes U-



Characters.
lyfTes to retire in time from
the night expedition, 10.
593. Affifts him through-
out that expedition, 10. 35©,
etc. Difcovers the ambufh
laid againfl: the Pylians by
night, and caufes them to
fally, 11. 851. Affifts A-
chilles to conquer Hector,
XX. 277, £tC

As Wifdom fe par at ely confidered . ]
SupprefTes Achilles's paffion,
1. 261. SupprefTes her own
anger againfl Jupiter, 4. 31.
Brings to pafs Jupiter's will
in contriving the breach of
the truce, 4. 95. Teaches
Diomed to difcern Gods from
men, and to conquer Venus,
5. 155, etc- Called the bed
beloved of Jupiter, 8. 48.
Obtains leave of Jupiter,
that while the other Gods
da not affifl the Greeks, fhe
may direct them with her
ccunfels, 8. 45. Is again
checked by the command of
Jupiter, and fubmits, 8. $60.,
580. Is faid to afllfl, or
fave any hero, in general
through the poem, when any
act of prudence preferves him.

VENUS.
As the paffttn cf love.'] Brings
Paris from the fight to the
embraces of Helen, and in-
flames the lovers, 3* 460,



POETICAL INDEX.

Characters.
530, etc. Is overcome by



Jit



Minerva, or "Wifdom, 5.
407. And again, xi. 500.
Her Ceftus or girdle, and the
effects of it, 14. 147.

NEPTUNE.
As the Sea.'} Overturns the
Grecian wall with his waves,
ix. 15. Aflifts the Greeks
at their fleet, which was
drawn up at the Tea fide, 13.
67, etc. Retreats at the
order of Jupiter, 15. 245.
Shakes the whole field of
battel and fea-fhore with
earthquakes, 2,0. 77.

VULCAN.

Or the Element of Fin ] Falls
from heaven to earth, 1 .
761. Received in Lemnos,
a place of fubterrancous fires,
ibid. His operations of vari-
ous kinds, 18 .440, 4<58, 54*.
Dries up the river Xanthus,
%l. 460. Afllfled by the
winds, 11. 390.

Characters of the Heroes.

N. B. The Speeches -which
depended upon, and flow from
thefe feveral characters, ere
difiinguifhed by an S.

ACHILLES.

Furious, paffionate, difdainful,

and reproachful, lip, 1. v.



Characters.
iSS- S. ipj. S. Z95.S.— 9 .
405. S. 746. S. — 14. 705.
Revengeful and implacable in
the higheft degree, 9. 75$,
7^5- — i<S- <58. S. 121. S.

18 IiO, I2J. S. - I9.H1.

S. 22. 333. S. 437. S.

Cruel, 16. 122. — 19. 39j.

21. 112. 22. 437. S.

495. S. 23. 30. 14.

51.

Superior to all men in valour,

20. 60, 437, etc. xi. 22,

throughout.
Conftant and violent in friend-

fhip, 9. 730. 18. 33, 371.

*3- 54, 171- 24- ;•

16. 9. S. 208. S. — 18.

100. S. 380. S. — 19. 335.

S.— 22. 482. S. — Achilles

fcarce ever (peaks without

mention of his friend Patro-

clus.

INEAS.
Pious to the Gods, 5. 226. S.

■ 20. 132, 290, 345,

Senfible and moral, 20. 242,

2 93> etc. S.
Valiant, not ram, 20. 130,

240. S.- — ■
Tender to his friend, 13. 590.

See his chara9.er in the notes
on 1 5. v. 212. andoni. 13.
v. 578.

AGAMEMNON.
Imperious and paffionate, 1,



3!*



POETICAL INDEX.



Characters.
34, Tig. S.

Sometimes cruel, 6". 8o. — a.
140. S.

Artful and defigning, a. 62,
95.—

Valiant, and an excellent Ge-
neral, 4. a 56, *<>S> etc. — 11.
throughout.

Eminent for brotherly affec-
tion, 4. 183, etc. S. 7-

jao.

See his char after in the notes
en 1. 11. ▼. 1.

A J A X.

Of fuperior ftrength and fize,
and fearlefs on that account,

13.410. 7. zz7. S. X74-

S. — 15. 666.

Indefatigable and patient, 11.

683, etc. 13. 877. IS-

throughout. 14, 535.

fhort in his fpeeches, 7. zz7.
f. 741. — 15. 666, etc.

See h':s character in the notes
on 1. 7. v. zz6.

DIOMED.

Daringandintrepid,5 . through-
out, and 8. 163, 180. S. — 9.
6$, 8ao. — 10 z<5o.

Proud and boalling, 6. 15a.
1 1. 500.

Vain of his birth, 14. 1x5.

Generous, 6. z6$. —

Is guided by Pallas or Wif-
dom, ar.d chufes Ulyfies to



Characters.
direct him, 5. throughout.
— 10. a87, 33S-

See his character in the notes
MLj.y.ii

HECTOR.

A true lover of his country,

8. 6zi. S.~ia. a84. 15.

5 8z. S.
Valiant in the higheft degree,

3. 89. — 7. 80.— iz. zio.

S.— 18. 333. S. etc.

Excellent in conduct, 8. 610.

S.— 11. 66^.

Pious, 6. 140, 339, 60S' '

Tender to his parents, <S. 3 T S«

. to his wife, 6. 456.

to his child, 6. 606.

to his friends, zo. 485*

— X4- 962-' —

Sec his character in the notes
on\. 3. v. 53.

IDOMENEUS,
An old foldier, 13.4JS, 648. —
A lover of his foldiers, 13.

z8o.

Talkative upon fubje&s of

war, 13. 34©, 355, etc. 4.

30s. S.

Vain of his family, 13. 565,

etc.
Stately and intuiting, 13. 47 z,

etc.

See his character in the wefts
en I. 13. v. Z7j.



POETICAL INDEX.
•Characters.



3if



MENELAUS.
Valiant, 3. 35. — 13. 7J3 — ,

17. throughout.
Tender of the people, 10.

3x.—
Gentle in his nature, 10. 1$%

—13. 685.—
But fired by a fenfe of his

wrongs, x. 711 — 3- 45-

— 7. 109. S. 13. 780. S.

—17. 6\o.

See his charaBcr in the notes
en 1. 3. v. *78.

NEST OR.

Wife and experienced in coun-
cil, i.lV*34° x. 441 — •

Skilful in the art of war, *.
43*, 670. — 4- 338, etc. S.
— 7. 39*- S.—

Brave, 7.165 •— »l 1 • 81 7 .

15. 7p*. S.

Eloquent, 1. 33a, etc.

Vigilant, 10. 88, i8 6 » 6x4,—

Pious, 15. 4x7.

Talkative through old age, 4.
370, — 7. i4S- — IT - 800.

— 13. 373. 7i8 and in

general through the book.

See his charafter in the votes
on 1. r. v. 339 — on x.

402, etc.



P R I A M.

A tender father to Heclor, xx.
51. S. — 44. 275.

Vol. IV. D d



Characters.

. to Paris, 3. 381.

to Helen, 3. %\x. S.

An eafy prince of too yielding

a temper, 7. 443.
Gentle and companionate, 3.

211, 38a.
Pious, 4. 70 14. jzo. S.

See his cbaratler in the notes
en 1. 3. v. air.

PARIS.
Effeminate in drefsand perfon,

3- X7, 55, 80, 409.
Amorous, 3. 5 so.
Ingenious in arts, mufic, J,

80. Building, 6. 390.
Patient of reproof, 3. 85.
Naturally valiant, 6. 665.—

13. 985,

See his character in the notes
*n 1. 3. v. x6, 37, B6,

PATROCLUS.

Companionate of the fufFer-
ings of his countrymen, 11.
947. 16. 5. 3i- S.

Raih, but valiant, 16". 709.

Of a gentle nature, 19. 310.
17. 755.

SARPEDON.

Valiant, out of principle and
honour,5. 575.S.-— 11. 371.
S.

Eloquent, ibid.



POETICAL INDEX.



3'*

Characters.
Careful only of the common
caufeinhis death, i<5. 605. S.

See his character in the notes
en 1. 16. y. 511.

ULYSSES.

Prudent, 3. x6i. — jo. 187.
19. zx8. ■

Eloquent, 3. 183. 9. 19$.'

S. etc.

Valiant in the field with cau-
tion, 4. s66. — 11. 515, etc.

Bold in the council with pru-
dence, 14. 90.

See his character in the notes
«« 1. 1. v. 402,. et fparfim.

Characters of other
Heroes.

Agenor, valiant and confide-

rate, &i. 648.
Antenor, a prudent counfellor,

7. 418.
Ajax Oileus, famous for fwift-

nefs, x. <5ji 14, €iQ.

Anrilochus, bold-fpirited, but



Characters.

reafbnable, and artful, 4.

$xx. — 23. 505. 618, 666. S.

— *3- 9*o, 930.
Euphorbus, beautiful and ta-

liant, 16, 973.— 17* U»

5 7-—
Glaucus, pious to his friend,

16. 669.- — -17. 165. i8».
Helenus, a prophet and hero,

6. 91.
Meriones, dauntlefs and faith-
ful, 13. 315, etc.
Machaon, an excellent phy fi«

cian, x. 890. II. 630.

Phoenix, his friendfhip and

tendernefs for Achilles, 9.

<So>.
Polydamas, prudent and elo-
quent. See his fpeeches, 1*.

70, X45.— 13. 907 18.

300.

Teucer, famous for archery,

8. 3zo. 15. 510. etc.

Thoas, famous for eloquence,

15. 3zx.

For other lefs dtjiinguijhei
characters, fee the article,
Defcriptions of the paffions.



POETICAL INDEX.



3W



SPEECHES or ORATIONS.

A TABLE of the mofl confiderable in the Iliad.



In the exhortatory or delibera-
tive kind.

The oration of Neftor to Aga-
memnon and Achilles, per-
suading a reconciliation, i.
340. The orations of Ne-
ftor, Ulyffes, and Agamem-
non, to perfuade the army
to flay, 2. 350, 402, 451.
Of Sarpedon to Hector, 5.
575. Of Neftor to encou-
rage the Greeks to accept
the challenge of Hector, 7.
145. Of Hector to the Tro-
jans, 8. <Jn. OfNeftor
to fend to Achilles, 9. 127,
Of UlyfTes, Phoenix, and A-
jax, to move Achilles to a
reconciliation, 9. 295, 562,
741. Achilles'sreplytoeach,
Hid. Sarpedon to Glaucus,
xx. 271. Of Neptune to
the Greeks, to defend the
fleet, 13. 131. Of Ajax to
the Greeks, 15. 666. Ne-
ftor to the fame, 15. 796.
Of Ajax again, 15. 890. Sca-
inander to the river Simois.
ai. 360. Juno to Vulcan,
ai.387. Achilles to Patro-
clus, 16. 7c, etc.



In the vituperative kind.

The fpeech of Therfites, 2.
a, 75. That of UlylTcs an-
fwcring him, a. 306. Of
Hector to Paris, 3. 55. Of
Agamemnon to Diomed, 4.
42 2. Of Hector to Paris,
6. 406. Of Diomed to A-
gamemnon, 9. 43. Of U-
lyfles to the fame, 14. 90.
Sarpedon to Hector, 5. 575.
Glaucus to Hector, 17. 153.

In the narrative.

Achilles to Thetis, 1. 47*.
Pandarus to iEneas, 5. 230.
Glaucus to Diomed, 6. 190.
Phoenix to Achilles, 9. 562,
652. Agamemnon to the
Greeks, 19. 90. iEntas to
Achilles, 20. 240. Of Ne-

flor, 7. 163. 11. 800.

and the fpeeches of Ne-

ftor in general.

In the pathetic.

Agamemnon on Menelaus

wounded, 4. 186.
Andromache to Hector, and his
anfwer, 6. 510. 570.
d2



3i«



POETICAL INDEX.



Speeches.

Patroclus and Achilles, iff.
ro, etc.

Jupiter on fight of Hetfor,.
17. x$i.

Lamentation of Brifeis fos
Patroclus, 19. 303.

of Achilles for Patroclus,.

*9- 335.

• of Priam to He&or, a a.

Si- 530.

- — -of Hecuba, to the fame,
22. 115- and again, 24.
243, 943-

■ of Andromacb-e at Hec-
tor's death, xx. <5o8.

of Andromache at his fu-
neral, 24. p©3.

of Helena, 14. ptfx.

Lycaon to Achilles, zi. 85.

Thetis to the Nereids, 1.7. 70.

The ghoft of Patroclus to A-
chilles, ij-. 83.

Piiam. to Achilles, 14. 600.



SPEECHI&,

£2 the irony, or fauafm.

The fpeech of Pallas on Venus,
being wounded, 5.. 505.

Ulyfles ove? Soeus, 11. $66-,
Idomencusover Othryoneus*
13-47*.

Four farcaftic fpeeches over
the dead, 14. 5x9, 550, 561,
J 87. Juno to Mars con-
cerning Afealaph us, 15. izo.
iEneas to Meriones, 16. 745.
Patroclus on Cebriones, iff.
903. Heclor on Patroclus,.

16. ro®3. Achilles to O-

try n tides, 10. 450. to

Lycaon, %i. 135. to H«-

ctor, xx. 415.

Speeches to horfes-,

Heclor to his horfes, 8. u$.
Achilles to his horfes, 19. 440.
Jove to the horfes of Achilles,

1 7. S04.
Antilochus, 23. 483.
Menelaus, x$. $xx.



Descriptions of IMAGES.

A Coll e CI ion of the moft remarkable throughout the Poem,



Defcrtptlons of Places.

Of the apartment of Juno,

14- 191.
Of a burning mountain, 2.
950.



City in flames, 17. 8x$.
Court of juftice, 18.577.
Ends of the earth and fea t

the relidence of Saturn and

Iapetus, 8 597.
Fountains of Scamander, iz.

i^5.



POETICAL INDEX.



3i7



Descriptions.
Field, plowed, 18. 6x7-
Forelt, when timber is felled,

ii. no.' 23. 144-

Heaven, the feat and pleafures

of the Gods, i. 690, jiz.

• 4. 3. The gates of

heaven, s- 9*8. — 8. 478.

The Gods aflembled, xo. 9.
Ida, its forefts, temple, and

profpedt, 8. S7- J 4- 3*°-

Landfcapes of a fine country,

x. 84.0, 1036, 1040. Of

pafture-gronnds and fheep,

18. 677.
Mount of Hercules near Troy,

xo. 174-
Palace of Neptune, 13. 35.
Palace of Priam defcribed, 6.

304. Of Paiis, 6. 59-
River Axius defcribed, %.

1030.
River Titarefius and Peneus,

x. 910.
Sea, and iflands rifing out of

it, x. 770.
Tempe defcribed, z. 91S.
Tent of Achilles defcribed,

14- S53-
Troy, the country about it,

and roads, u. 191. 13.

ao. — 14- z6°-
Tomb of Ilus, ir. 47 7. Of

Eateia, ». 9&4- 0f Sar "

pedon, io\ 8zo.
Vulcan, his palace, forge, etc.

18. 43 1 . etc -
A vineyard, 18. 6$t.
"Wall of the Grecians, 7- 5*3-
"Winds, their court and man-

V



Descriptions.
Hon defcribed, 13. 141.

Dcfcriptions of P 1: R so N s .

Achilles's dreadful appearance,
z$S9- **.3 X >^-3P3- —

Apollo's perfon, enfigns, and
defcent to earth, 1. 61.

Apollo's appearance in the war,
15- 348.

Ajax, his fallen retreat de-
fcribed, Il.«7S,#C to 696.

Brothers, two killed together,
xo. 531.

A coward, defcribed in Ther-
fites, beaten, x. 3x6. A
coward defcribed through-
cut, 13- 359- — a g ain in
Theftor, 16.488. A cow-
ard furprized. 10. 443.

Diana cuffed and buffeted, n.
570.

Gods, Homer's great ideas of
them, in the defcriptions of
their armour, s- 9°7- Mo*
tion, 13- 3°- — *S' 9©- — U
960. Battels, 15- *$*• —
xo. 63, etc. xi. 450, etc.

Hours at the gates of heaven,

5. 919-
Hector's horrible appearance
in battel, 8. 4*7- — !*• 553-
13. 1010. — 15- 73°- He-
ctor's dead body dragged at
the chariot of Achilles, x».
5®o.
Jupiter in bis glory, 1. ij,

t j X . 8. sso — in his cha.

riot, 8. 50. 541. eic - — m

<»3



318 P E T I C A

Descriptions.
his terrors, 17. 670.

Juno, dreft, 14. zoo.

Lycaon, his youth and un-
happy death, 21. 4c, etc.

Mars and Bellona before Hec-
tor in battel, 5. 72.6* — ■

Mars in arms, 7. 252.

*3- 385 - -15. 7*6. his

monftrous fize, 21. 473.

Mercury defcribed, 24. 417.

Neptune, his chariot and pro-
grefs, 13. 28, etc.

Niobe, turned into a rock, 24.
773-

Old man, a venerable one, 1.
330. Old connfellors of
Troy converting, 3, 197,
etc. A miferable old man,
in Priam, 22. 80, etc.

Priam palling through his
people, in forrow, to go to
redeim Hector, 24. 402.
Priam weeping at the feet of
Achilla, 24. 636.

Pallas, her defcent from hea-
ven, 4. 00. Her armour,

fpear, and veil, 5. 50 j.

9. ^66.

Teucer, behind Ajax's fhield,
8. 3*f.

Touth, a beautiful one, killed,

4. 542. 17. 55. etc.

20. 537. Interceding for
mercy in vain, 21. 75.
A young and old man (lain in
war, their pi&urcs, 2a. 190.


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