Homer.

The Iliad (Volume 4) online

. (page 21 of 22)
Online LibraryHomerThe Iliad (Volume 4) → online text (page 21 of 22)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


L INDEX.

Descriptions.

Defcriptions of Things,

Of an affembly gathering to-
gether, 2. no.
Battel. [See the article Mili ■

tar'y Deferiptions.]
Burning up of a field, 21.

400. A bow, 4. 137.— —
Blood trickling from a wound,

4- 170, etc.
Brightnefs of a helmet, 5. 5.
Burial of the dead, 7. 494.
A breach made in an attack,

12. 485. ■

Boiling water in a cauldron,

18. 405.— 21. 415.
Beacon, 19. 405. —
Beads facrificed, 23. 41.
A bird ihot through, 23.1033.
Chariot of Jupiter, 8. 50,

542. Of Neptune, 13.41.

Chariot defcribed at large,

34- 335- — S- 889, etc. A

chariot-race, 23. 353, etc.

Chariots overturned, 16.

445- Chariots crufhing ths

bodies, 20. 577.
A child frighted at a helmet,

6. S9$>
Golden chain of Jupiter, 8,

15.
A conflagration, 21. 387,

400.
Cookery defcribed, 9. 277. —
Ceflus, the game defcribed, 23.

766, etc.

Deformity, z. 261.

Dancing, if. 681, etc.



POETICAL INDEX.



^l*



Descriptions.

Difcus, the game defcribed,

23. 927, etc.
Diving, 24. 105.
Driving a chariot, 11, 363,

6 S 5-

Dreadful appearance of the

Myrmidons, i<5. 192. — of

Achilles, 18. 254.
Darknefs, 17. 422.
Death, 16. 1033. 22.455-

The deferiptions of diffe-
rent forts of deaths in Htmer,

are innumerable, and featured

throughout the battels.
J£gii, or Ihield of Jupiter, 2.

526. — 5. 909. is- 35°.

xi. 465-

An entrenchment, 7. 520. —
Eagle ftung by a ferpent. ix.

2.33. Eagle foaring, 24.

390.
Furnace and forge defcribed,

18. 540.
Fifties fcorehed, t-.i. 41 J-
Flowers of various kinds, 14.

39 6 -—
Famine, 19. 160, etc.
Fall of a warrior headlong

into the deep fands, 5. 715.
Fatigue in the day of battel,.

2. 458. — 16. 132. — 17.

445-
Fainting, 5. 8$<5 11.460.

— 14. 487, SG9- —
Fires by night, defcribed, 8.

685, etc.
Recovery from fainting, rs.

271.
Fortification attacked, 1 *. 170,



Descriptions.

etc. 101, 304, 407.
Funeral of a warrior, 23. 156.

— funeral pile defcrib-d, 23.

200.
Gates of a fortification bro-
ken, 12. S4S-

Goblet defcribed, 11. 7 74-
Girdle of Venus, 14. 245.
Horfes, the famous ones of
Enmclus, 2. 924. Of Hec-
tor, 8- 226. Of Achiiles,
16. 181. Of T.os, 5,
327. Of Erifthonius, 20,
262.
Horfe pampered and prancing,
6. 652. Korfc killed by a
dart, 8. 1 05. Horfes a-
fraid of leaping a ditch, 12.
57. Horfes of Achilles
mourning for Patroclus, 1 7.
490.

A feat of horfemanihip, is*
822.

Helmet of Jupiter. 5- 9*8.
Helmets nodding their
plumes, 13. 945-

Hofpitable life of a good man>
6. 16.

Harveft, 18. 637.

Herds of oxen, 18. 66$.

Inundation, 12. 13. — iS-4^5*
Of Scamander againft A-
chilles, xi. 258, etc. 350,
etc. —

Lightnings and thunder, 7.
57I ._8. -93, etc. 161, etc.

Light coming over a plain,
15. 810. — 17- 43°- — ■

Light ftrcaming from a bea-



3io



POETICAL INDEX.



Descriptions.

con by night, 19. 405.
Majefty of a prince, 2. 564.

— 3. 221.
Majeftic march of Sarpedon,

iz. 356. Of Juno, 14. 26.
Melancholy, 6. 245.
Moon and (tars defcribed, 8.

687.
Marriage-pomp, 18 5 7°- —
Monument over the dead, 17.

49*-

Noife, a loud one, 5. 1054.

— 13. ioss- 14- I7i,

457. 16. 767.

Night paft in inquietude by
the foldiers, and their feve-
ral pofhires of taking reft,
10. 82, 170-

Old age, 3. 150. The picture
of its miferies in ftate of
war, 22. 80.

0rphan,itsmifery,22. 6zo,etc.

Proeeflion defcribed, 6-. 367.

Peaceful life, 9. 510.

Pofture of a man receiving a
dart on his (hield lifted up,
13. $ix. 10. 325, etc.

Panting defcribed, 13. 555,
720.-—

Perfumes, 14. 198.

Plume of a helmet, 19. 410.
13- 947-

Plowing, 12. 617.

Rainbow, ix. 37, — 24. 100.
— 17. 616.

Reaping, 18. 637.

Running away, 21. 6*34.
Running round Troy, Hec-
tor and Achilles, 22. 250,



Descriptions.
etc. Seeming to run in a
dream, 22. 257.
Rough way defcribed, 23. 139.
A race defcribed, 23. 881, etc.
Shield of Achilles, defcribed at
large, 18. 550, etc. Of
Hector, 6. 143. Of Ajax,
7. 265.
Scales of Jupiter, 22. 271.
Smoke cleared, and light re-
turning, 16. 35©.
Sailing of a fnip, 1. 6x$.
Ship anchoring and coming
into port, 1 . $66.
The (lately (talk of a hero,

7. 251. is- 8is-

A iacrifice defcribed, 1. <Joo.

7. 380.—

Sleep, 2. init. — 14. 2<5j, etc,
A (laughter by night, 10. 560.

Snow, 12. 331.

Soldiers, when off from duty,

their amufements, 2. 938.

Shooting with the bow, 4.

144. to 1 s<5. 23. 1005.

8. 3S9.

Spear of Achilles, 19. 42c
A fpear driven deep into the
earth, 21. 188.
A (lone whirling on the ground

with vaft force, 14. 174.
Stone, thrown by a hero, s«

370. 7. 320.-^-12. 537.

■ 14. 471-

Svviftnefs of horfes, 20. 270.
Swooning, i<5. 955.
Vintage, 18, 651.
Wall, overwhelmed by wa-
ters, 7. SSO. — I*. 23.



POETICAL INDEX.



Descriptions.

"Woodman's dinner, ix.uo.

"Woods felled down, 13. 144
16. 767

"War, its miferies, o. 709*

Watch by night, 10. ao*.

WreMing deferibed, 23.
821 —

Wound of Venus deferibed, 5.
417. Diomed wounded, j.
A wound healing, 5 • U " •

Water, troops plunging in,
ai. 9. A fight in the wa-
ter, 21. A tree falling in
the water, 26. 2S9. Wa-
ter rolling down a hill in a
current, *t. 290. Arms
floating upon the water, a 1 .

3Si.
Winds rifing, 23. 161.

Defections »/Time$ c»^
Seasons.

Day-break, 10. 295-

Morning, 2. 60. 7- S*$- —

8. 183.— 9- 833.— 11. 1.

— 11. "S- J S>- »•—

Sun-rifing, 11. 871.
Noon, if. 93 8 -—
Sun-fetting, 1. 716.— 7. 5S<*.

8. 6*s-

Evening, 16. 94* • '

Night, 2. Mir. i° tn book

throughout. A ftarry night,

8. 63/.

Spring, 14- 3> *■

Summer, 18. 637-

Autumn, 18. 651. $. lotfo.

— aa. 4°'



3*1

Descriptions.
Winter, H. 17S, 33 r -

Military Defer Hf thus.

An a-rmy defcending on the
ftore, 1. 117- An arm y
rnai-ching, a. 18 x, 94°»
The day of battel, »'. 458.
A vafi: army on the plain,
55s, rftf. to 563. An ar-
my going forth to battel, 2.

976.— 13- 59- l6 - *SS«

— 19- 377.
A chariot of war, 5. 89°> tf*«
Confufion and noife of battel,

16. <5zi.—
A fmgle combate, with all the

ceremonial, 3. 123. etc -
The combate between Paris
and Menelaus, 3. 4*3-

of Heaor and Ajax, f.

150 to 335.
of Hector and Achil-
les, iz.
Squadrons embattled, 4. 32a.

— 5. 637. — 8. 160. — •
Eii-ft onfet of battel, 4. 49*

to sis-
A circle inclofing the foe, $,

772.
Stand of an army, 7. 7S«
Joining in battel, 8. 7 5.
eHt ,3. 4ll . A rout,

11. 193. — 14- l66 - l6 '

440, etc. -21. 720. A for-
tification attacked, 12. 170*
joi, 304. A breach made,

12. 485. An obftinate clofe-
fight, 12. 510- 15.8^0,



3** POETICA

Descriptions.

An army in clofe order, 13.

»77 to 185, 1 7 . 4 o5.

An attack on the fea-fide,

14 45*. Levelling and
parting a trench, 15. 408.
Attack of the fleet, 15. 677,
etc. 786, 855, etc. A hero
arming at all points, Aga-
memnon, ix. ii. Patro-
elus, i(5. x5i. Achilles,
*9- 39o. Siege of a town,
18. 5pr, tf£ Surprize of
a convoy, ibid. Skirmilh,
ibid. Battel of the Gods,
ao. 6*3 to 90. Two heroes
meeting in battel, zo. 192.
The rage, destruction, and
carnage of battel, 20.574,

Defcripthns of the Internal
Passions, or of their vi-
fible Effects.

Anx ; ety, in Agamemnon, io,

13, etc. 100, etc.
Activity, in Achilles, 19. 416.
Admiration, zi. 6" a. — 14,

800.

Affright, 16. 968.—

Amazement, 14. 590.

Ambition, 13. 458.

Anger, 1. z$z.

Awe, 1. 430.

BufToonry in Therfites, 2. 25 c,

etc.
Contentment, 9. jza.
Conjugal love, in Hector and
Andromache, <?. 510, ffr.



L INDEX.

Descriptions.

Courage, 13. 109, 366 x 7 .

150.
Cowardice, 13. 355. ,$.

488.

Curiofity, in old men, 3. 194,

etc.
Defpair, 22. 377.
Diffidence, 3. *8o.
Diftrefs, 8. 290.-9. Jx , etc.
— lo t)5.

Doubt, 14. z 1, etc. 21.

651, etc.— xz. 138.

Fear, 10. 443.— 24. 441 ,

Fear in Priam, a 1. 615. For

his fon, xx 43, 51, etc.

Fear of a child, 6. 596.

Fidelity.in Lycophron,fervant

of Ajax, 15. S ox. Cale-

fius.fervantof Axylus, 6 zo.

Grief in a fine woman, 1.

x So , 3. l85 . .,

450.-

Grief of a fitter for her dead

brothers, 3. 300, etc.
Grief in two parents in ten-
dernefs for their child, 6.
504.
Grief occafioned by love of
our country, in Patroclus,
16. init.
Grief for a friend in Achilles
for Patroclus, 18. 25, 100,
etc.— 19. 335— ii- 482.—

24- 5-

Furious grief, 18. 357.
Frantic grief, 24. 291.
Grief of a father for his fon,
in Priam, zz. $z j, etc. — 24.
100, Z75, Z91.



POETICAL INDEX.



Descriptions.

Grief of a wife for her huf-

band, %%. $6x. to the end,

the epifode of Andromache,

and again, 14. 906.
Grief out of gratitude, in Bri-

feis, 19. 319. in Helen, 14.
Hafte, exprcfTed in Hector, 15.

395, 4©*, etc.
Hate, in Achilles to Hector,

»*• 335, 433, '*£•

Hardnefs of heart, 9. 750. —

Infolence, in Tlepolemus, 5.
783. in Epeus, 14. 767.

Joy, its vifible effects, 13. 678.

Love, in Helen and Paris, 3.
$Si>etc. in Jupiter and Juno,
14. 33a, etc. 357.

Conjugal love, in Hector and
Andromache, 6, etc.

Love of a mother to her fon,
in Thetis to Achilles, 18.
70.— X4 117-

Brotherly love, in Agamem-
non and Menelaus, 4. 183.

Filial love, in Harpalion, 13.
805.

Lovers forrow at parting, in
Achilles and Brifeis, 1 . 450.
In Hector and Andromache,
6. 640. Effects of beauty
on old men, 3. 203.

Malice in Therfites, z. 1$$*
— Modefty, 14. 373.



Descriptions.

Pride.in Othryoncus, 13. 457.

Pity, of a people for their

prince in mifery, 24. 401.

Repentance, in Helen, 3.

13°, 493- <S- 43* to

45°

Rafhnefs, in Afius, iz. ixy,
etc.

Refentment, in Achilles, 1.
<*35- 15- 7*.

Revenge, in Menelaus, 1.710.
In Achilles, for Patroclus,
18. 1x5, etc. — 19. air,
394- —

Revenge and glory, 16. 113.

Refolution, 19. 466. la
Hector, zz. 47, 107.

Shame, in Helen, 3. 185,

etc. sii- In Juno, 14.

373 —

Spite, in Juno, 15. no.— -
In Menelaus, 17. 640.

Tendernefs, of parents for
their child, in Hector and
Andromache, 6. 504, 598,
616.—

"Wiih, of Hector, to be im-
mortal, 13. 1046.

— of Achilles, for a general
Deftruction, 16. izz.
— of Ajax, to die in the day-
light, 17. 730.



3H



POETICAL INDEX.



SIMILES.



From Beasts.

The ftatelinefs of a bull, to
the port of Agamemnon, t.
$66. — Ofa ram ftalking be-
fore the flock, to L'lvflcs,
tj. %S9- A wanton ftelliott
breaking from the pa ft tires
and mares, to Paris ifiuing
from his apartment, 6. 6$%.
A hound following a lion,
to Hector follow-ingthe Gre-
cians, 8. 407. Dogs watch-
ing the folds, to the guards
by night, io, xn. Hounds
chafing a hare through thick
woods, to Diomed and U-
lyfles purfuing an enemy by
night, 10. 417. A hind
flying from a lion, to the
Trojans flying from Aga-
memnon, 11. 153- Beafts
flying from a lion, to the
fame, 10. 2x7. Hounds
chearcd by the hunter, to
troops encouraged by the
general, 11.378. A hunt-
ed boar, to Ajax, 11. $16.
A wounded deer encompafled
with wolves to Ulyfies fur-
rounded by enemies, n.
595. An afs iurrounded by
boys, to Ajax, 11. 683. A
fawn carried off by two lions,



to the body of Invbriiis carri-
ed oy the Ajaxcs, 13. z5?.
Aboarenraged, to Idomeneus
meeting his enemy, 13. 59$.
An ox rolling in the pangs of
•death, to a dying warrior,
13. 7*t. Beafts retreating
from hunters, to the Greeks
retiring, 15. 303. Oxen
flying from lions, to the
Greeks flying from Apollo
and Heclor, ij. 366. A
hound faftening on a roe, to
a hero flying on an enemy,
15. 697. A wild bead
wounded and retiring from a
multitude, to Antilochus his
retreat, 15 70*. A hide-
ous aftembly of wolves, to
the fierce figure of the Myr-
midons, 16. 194- Wolves
invading the flocks, to the
Greeks, 16. 4x0. A bull
torn by a lion to Sarpedon
killed by Patroclus, 16. 600.
A bull facrificed, to Aretus,
17. 588. Hounds follow-
ing a boar, to the Trojans
following Ajax, 17- 811.
Mules dragging a beam, to he-
roes carrying a dead body,
17. 83a. A panther hunted,
toAgenor, 11. 978. A hound
purfuing a fawn, to Achilles
purfuing Hector, a*. 243.



POETICAL INDEX.



3iS



Similes.

From Lions.

A Hon routing at his prey, to
Menelaus at fight of Paris,
3. 37. A lion falling on
the flocks, and wounded by
a fhepherd.toDiomed wound-
ed, 5. 174. A lion among
heifers, to the fame, 5. 106.
Two young lions killed by
hunters, to two young war-
riors, c. 681. A lion de-
ftroying the fheep in their
folds, to Ulyffes flaughtering
the Thracians afleep, 10.
564. The four retreat of
a lion, to that of Ajax, n.
675. Alion, or boar hunted,
to a hero diftrefTcd, iz. 47.
A lion rufhing cm the flocks,
to Sarpedon's march, iz.
557. A lion killing a bull,
to Hector killing Periphas v
15. 750. A lion (lain, af-
ter he has made a great
daughter, applied to Patro-
clus, 1 5. 909. Two lions
fighting, to Hector and Pa-
troclus, 16". 9! 5. A lion
and boar at a fpiing, to the
fame, i<5. 993- A lion
putting a whole village to
flight, to Menelaus, 17. 70.
Retreat of a lion, to that of
Menelaus, 17. 117.. A li-
onefs defending her young,
to his defence of Patroclus,
if. 14s • Another retreat
Vol. IV. E



Si MILKS.

of a lion, to that of Meac
laus, 17. 741. The rage
and grief of a lion for his
young, to that of Achilles
for Patroclus, 18. 371. A
lion rufhing on his foe, to
Achilles, zo. zoo.

From Birds.

A flight of cranes or fwans,
to a numerous army, z. 540.
The noife of cranes, to the
fhouts of an army, 3. 5. —
An eagle preferving and fight-
ing for her young, to Achilles
protecting the Grecians, 9,
414. A falcon flying at a
quarry, to Neptune's flight,
13. 91. An eagle frooping
at a f.van, to Heftor's a r t lck-
ing a fhip, 15 835. Two
vultures fighting, to Sarpe-
don and Patroclus, 16. $zz.
A vulture driving geefe, to
Automedon, fcattering the
Trojans, 17- Si 7- An
eagle cafting his eyes on the
quarry, to Menelaus looking
through the ranks for Anti-
lochus, 17. l6l\ Cranes
afraid of falcons, to the
Greeks afraid of Keclor and
j£nea?, 17, 84 j. A dove
afraid of a falcon, to Diana
afraid of Juno, ;i. 576. A
falcon following a dove, to
Achilles purfuing Hector, zz.
1 83. An eagle at an hare,



3'itf



POETICAL INDEX.



Similes.
to Achilles at Hector, zz.
391. The broad wings of
an eagle extended, to palace-
gates fet open, 44. 391.

From SeRTENTS.

A traveller retreating from a
ferpent, to Paris afraid of
Mcnelaus, 3. 47- A fnake
rolled up in his den, and
collecting his anger, to He-
ftor expecting Achilles, zz.
130.

From Ik sects.

Bees fwarming, to a numerous
army ifiuing out, z. in.
£ warms of flies, to the fame,
a. 55z. Graihoppers chirp-
ing in the fun, to old men
talking, 3. zoi. AVafps
defending their neft, to the
muhitude and violence of
folJiers defending a battle-
ment, iz. 190- Wafps
provoked by children flying
at the traveller, to troops
violent in an attack, 16.
314. A hornet angry, to
Mcnelaus incenfed, 17. 641.
Locufts driven into a river,
to the Trojans in Scamander,
zi. 14-

From Fires.
A fjreft in flames, to the lufirc



Similes.
of armour, z. 534. The
fpreading of a conflagration,
to the march of an army,
a. 948. Trees finking in
a conflagration, to femadrons
falling in battel, 11. zoi.
The noife of fire in a wood,
to that of an army in con-
fufion, 14. 461. A con-
flagration, to Hector, 15.
7z8. The rumbling and
rage of a fire, to the confu-
fion and roar of a routed ar-
my, 17. 8zs- Fires on
the hills, and beacons to give
fignals of diftrefs, to the
blaze of Achilles' s helmet,
18, Z4S. A fire running o-
ver fields and woods, to the
progrefs and devaluations
made by Achilles, zo. 569.
Fire boiling the waters, to
Vulcan opeiatingon Scaman-
der, zi. 415. A fire raging
in a town, to Achilles in the
battel, zi. 608. A town
on fire, zz. 518.

From Arts.

The ftaining of ivory, to the
blood running down the thigh
of Mcnelaus, 4. 170. An
architect obfervin^ the rule
and line, to leaders preferv-
ing the line of battel, 4. 474.
An artiit managing four
horfes, and leaping from one
to another, compared to A-



POETICAL INDEX.



Similes.
jax finding from fhip to fhip,
15. Szx. A builder cement-
ing a wall, to a leader em-
bodying his men, 16. 156.
Curriers (Training a hide, to
joldiers tugging for a dead
body, 17. 450. Bringing
a current to water a garden,
to the purfuit of Scamander
after Achilles, x 1 . 290. The
placing of rafters in a build-
ing, to the pofturc of two
wreftlers, 13. 815. The

-motions of a fpinfter, the
fpindle and thread, to the
fvviftnefs of a racer, 23.
889. The finking of a
plummet, to the paffage of
Iris, through the fea, 24.
JC7.

■From Trees.

The fall of a poplar, to that
of Simoifius, 4. 55Z. Of
a beautiful olive, c that, of
Euphbrbus, 17. 57. Two
tail oaks on the mountains,
to two heroes, iz. 145.
The fall of an a(h, to that
of Imbrius, 13. 241. Of a
pine or oak frretched on the
ground, to Afius dead, 13.
493. An oak overturned
by a thunderbolt, to Hector
felled by a ftone, 14. 408.
An oak, pine or poplar fall-
ing, to Sarpedon, 1(5, 591.
The flaort duration and quick



Si m 1 les.
fucccfTion of leaves on trees,
10 the generation of men, 6.
181. — if. 540.

From the Sea.

Rolling billows, to an army
in motion, z. 175. The
murmurs of waves, to the
noife of a multitude, z. X49.
Succcflion of waves, to the
moving of troops, 4. 478.
A frefh gak to weary ma-
riners, like the coming of
Hector to his troops, 7. 5.

The feas ftrtling trcm-

felves, to thick troops ccm-
pofed in order and file nee,
7. 71. The fea agitated
by different winds, to tb£
army in doubt and confuGon,
9. 5. The waves rolling
neither way, till one wind
fways them, to Neflor's
doubt and fudden refolution,
14. 11. A rock breaking
the billows, to the body of
the Greeks, refilling the
Trojans, 15. 746- The
fea roaring at its recep'ion
of a river into it, to the
meeting ofarrniesat a charge,
17. 310. A beacon to
mariners at fea, to the light
of Achilles' s fhield, 19- 4°S-
A dolphin purfuing the lefllr
fifh.to Achilles in Scamander,



Eei



3*8 P O E T I C A

Similes.

From the Sun, Moon,
Stars.

The moon and flars in glory,
to the brigbtnefs and num-
ber of the Trojan fires, 8.
687. A flar fometimes
fhewing and fometimes hid-
ing itfelf in clouds, to He-
clor feen by fits through the
battalions, 11. 83. The
fun in glory, to Achilles,
lp. 436. The evening flar,
to the point of his fpear, az.
399. The dog-flar rifing,
to Diomed's dreadful ap-
pearance, 5. 8- to A-

chillcs, az. 37. The red
rays of the dog-ftar, to A
chilles's helmet, 19. 41a.
The morning-liar, itsbeauty,
to young Aflyanax, 6. 499.

From Torrents,
Storms, Winds.

Torrents rufhing to the val-
lie?, to armies meeting in
an engagement 4. 516.
Torrents drowning the field,
to the rage of a hero, 5 .
116. A torrent flopping a
fhephcrd, to Hector (topping
loomed, 5. 734. The
violence of a torrent, to A-
jax, 11. 615. A ftcrm o-
verwhelming a fhip at fea,
to the Trojans mounting a



L INDEX.

Similes.
breach, 15. 440. An au-
tumnal ftorm and a deluge,
to the ruin of a routed army,
1 6. 467. A florm roaring
in a wood, to armies fhout-
ing, 16. 913. The wind
tofling the clouds, to Hector
driving the Greeks, 1 1 . 395.
Different winds driving the
dufl, to different paflions urg-
ing the combatants, 13.415.
A whirlwind on the waters,
to the hurry of an army in
motion, 13. 1000. Winds
roaring through woods, or
on the feas, to the noife of
an army, 14. 457. A
tempefl and fhipwreck, com-
pared to the rage of H«ctor
and terrors of the Greeks,
15. 75X. The north wind
drying a garden, to Vulcan
drying the field afte^an in-
undation, zi. 403.

Frcrn heavenly appearances,
Thunder and Light-
king, Comets, Clouds,
etc.

A mountain fhaken by thun-
der, to the trampling of an
army, a. 950. The blaze
of a comet, to the defcent of
Pallas, 4. 1 01. Thedark-
nefs of troops, to the gather-
ing of clouds, 4. 314. The
regular appearance of clouds
on the mountain tops, to a



POETICAL INDEX



Similes.
line of battel, S- 641. Pe-
(Hlentiai vapours afcending,
to Mars flying to heaven, s-
1 os 3. The quick flames of
lightning, to the thick fighs
of Agamemnon, to. 5.
Thick flakes of finow, to
(bowers of arrows, 12. 17 5-
Snow covering the earth, to
heaps of (tones hiding the
fields, u. 331- The blaze
of lightning, to the arms of
Idomeneus, 13. 318. Clouds
difperfed and the profipect
appearing, to the fmokes be-
ing cleared from the fhips,
and the navy appearing, 16.
354. A cloud (hading the
field as it rifes, to the rout
of the Trojans flying over
the plain, 16. 434- The
figure of a rain-bow, to the
appearance of Pallas, 17-
616. The luftre of fnow,
to that of armour, 19.380.

From Rural Affairs.

"Waving of corn in the field,
to the motion of plumes and
fpears, a. 172- A (hepherd
gathering his flocks, to a
general ranging his army. 2.
j6z. A thick mirt on the
mountains, to the diift taifed
by an army, 3- *S* T ^ &
bleating of flocks, tothenoifo
of men, 4. 491 • Chaff fl/-
&w from the barn-floor, to
Ee



319

Si MILES.

the duft, 5. 611, Corn fall-
ing in ranks, to nun Gain
in battel, 10. 90. The j >y
of a (hepherd fitting his fleck,
to the joy of a general fur-
veying his army, t$. 6*0,
The corn bounding from
the threfhing-floer, to an
arrow bounding from armour,
13 739. Two bulls plow-
ing, to two heroes labouring
in a battel fide by fide, 13.
879. Felling of timher, to
the fall of heroes in battel,
16. 767. Oxen trampling
out the corn, to horfes tram-
pling on the Main, 10. 580.
The morning dew reviving
the corn, to the exaltation
of joy in a man's mind, 13.
678.

From Low Life,

A mother defending her child-
from a wafp, to Minerva's
dickering Menelaus from an
arrow, 4. 161. An heifer
(landing over her young one,-
to Menelaus guarding the
body of Patroclus, 17- 5«
Two countrymen difputing
about the limftsof their land,
to two armies d'.frutir.g ct
poil, 11 -5"- A poor wo-
man weighing wool, the
fc'ales fiangihg uncertain, to-
the doubtful fates of two
armies, 1*. $J** Bq 2 3 '



33o POETICA'

Similes.

building and deftroyinghoufes
of fand, to Apollo's over-
turning the Grecian wall,
15- 4 T< 5- A child weeping
to his mother, to Patroclus's
fupplications to Achilles, 16",
it.

Similes exalting the chambers
cf men by comparing them to
Gods.

Agamemnon compared to Ju-
piter, Mars, and Neptune, x.
564. Ajax to Mars, 7.
15 »• Meriones to Mars rul-
ing to the battel, 13. 384.
Hector to Mars destroying
armies, 15. 726.

Similes difadvantcgious to the
Characters.

Paris running from Menelaus,
to a traveller frighted by a
fnake, 3. 47. A gaudy
foppifh foldier, to a woman
drefTed out, 2 1063. Teucer
/hulking behind Ajax's mield,
to a child, 8. 325. Theftor
fulled from his chariot, to a
fifh drawn by an angler, 16,
495. Ajax, to an afs, patient
and ftuhborn, 11. 683. Pa-
troclus weeping, to an infant,
|<S. 11. Cebriones tam-
bling, to a diver, 16. 904.



L INDEX.



Simile:



Miscellaneous
Similes.

Soft piercing words, to fnow,
3- 185- The clofing of a
wound, to milk turning to
curd, 5. iu 4 The fall
of a hero, to a tower, 4.
518. Indefatigable courage,
to an axe, 3. 90. Aga.
memnon weeping, to a foun-
tain, 9. 19. Juno flying,
to the mind paffing over
diftant places, 15. 80".
Dancers, to a wheel turning
round, 18. 695. A warrior
breaking the fjuadrons, to a
mound dividing the courfc
of a river, 17. 839. Men
feeming to run in a dream,
to the courfe of Hector and
Achilles, 22. 257. A fa-
ther mourning at the funeral
of his fon, to Achilles for
Patroclus, 23. 271. A
fragment of a rock falling,
to the furious defcent of He-
eler, 13. 191. A poppy
bending the head, to Gorgy-
thion dying, 8. 371. The
fvift motion of the Gods,
to the eye pafling over a
profpeel, 5. 960. The
fmoothneis of their motion,
to the flight of doves, 5,



POETICAL INDEX.



33'



VERSIFICATION.



Expretfuig in the found the things dtfcribed.



Made abrupt (and without

conjunctions) in expreffing

hafte, 7. z8z. 15. 401.

Short, in earned and vehement

entreaties, 11. 4x0. 13.

5©6.
Full of Breaks, where difap-

pointment is imaged, 18.

101, 144, zz. 378.

■ — where rage and fury is ex-

prefled, id. 137-
— where grief is fcarce able to

go on, 18. 101. — az. 616,


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21

Online LibraryHomerThe Iliad (Volume 4) → online text (page 21 of 22)