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Broken and difordered in de-

cribing a ftormy fea, 13.

l©05.
Straining, imaged in the found,

15. 544

Trembling, imaged in the

found, 10. 446.
Panting, 13. 7zi.
Relaxation of all the limbs in

death, 7- i3, **■
A confufed noiie, n, 4 to -
A hard-fqught fpot of ground,

n. T13, itc -
Tumbling of a wall, 7. j;i.



Bounding of a (tone from a

rock, 13. 198.
A fudden flop, 13. 199 .
Stiffnefs and flownefs of old

k g e » x 3- 6 49> 6 53- — *3>

4*3-
A fudden fall, 23. 14$.
The ruftling and cralhing of

trees falling, 13. 147 •
The rattling and jumping of

carts over rough and rocky

way, *3- 139, i4°«
A fudden (hock of chariots

(toped, 16. 445-
Leaping over a ditch, 16.

460.
The quivering of feathers in

the fun, 19. 415-
Supplanted by a ftream, *i.

z68, 169.
The fiafhing of waters, zj .

*73-

Bounding and heaving on the

waters, zi. 350.

Out of breath, zi. 4 ! 9> etc.

Voice of different animals ex-
piring, 33. 41. 4*» t* c '



C 3Ji ]



I N D E



O F



Arts and Sciences,



The frjf number marks the look, the fecond the verfs.



Art Military.

PRaife of art military, 4.
631.
Ambujl) efteem'd a venturous

manner of fighting, /. 1.

ver. 299. /. 13. ver. 35:5.
Ambufcadedtfcrib'd, 18. 6o;.
Attack, 12, 95, etc. itid.

171. ibid. 305, etc.
Arming, the policy of giving

the be(r arms to the ftxong-

efc, 14. 438.
Bejieging, 1 1 . 61. — ix, 170,

303, 534. — 8. 2.61. ■

a*. 5.
Single copibat, 3. 123, etc. —

7. 80, etc.

Courts of Jult'ce in the camp,

11. 038.
Councils of war, 7 . 415 . ■

8. 610, — 9. 130, etc. —

10. 14*-.— 232. 357- —

1 8 . 290.'

Military excrcije, 7. 189, etc.



Encamping, the manner of en-
campment of the Trojans,
10. 4Qi5. Of the Thracians
in three lineSj their wea-
pons orvthe ground before
them, the chariots as a
fence, outward, 10. 544.
Fortification, wails uith bat-
tlements, in the Iine r tow-
ers upon thofe walls, gate*
at proper diftances, and
trenches inclofed with pa-
irfadoes, 7.406,523. The
ftrong gates to a fortifica-
tion, how compos'd, iz. f
545
Mar fa ailing armies', 1. 66 7,
etc. Cantoning the troops-
of each nation under their
own leaders, a. 433. Em^
bodying in an orb, 4 312.
Difpofing in order of battel,
4.342, etc. Lines of bat-
tel in exact order, 5. 641,
etc. Where to place the
vvorft foldiers, 4. 344-



INDEX of Art

Another order of battel, IX.
6x. In an Orb, 17- 4 11 -
Clofe fight, 15. 860. In
the Phalanx, 13- "7T- etc -
15. 744. In the Teftudo,
xx. 6.

Armies drawn up in two
-wings, with a center, 13.

3>*-

The ftrength of the army pla-
ced in the centre, 13. 401-

Marching an army in filence
and difcipline, 3. n. — -
4. 487.

Method of pafllng a trench
and palifadoes, iz. 65, etc.

Plunder and Pillage forbidden
till the conqueft is compleat,
6. 8*.

Retreat. The manner of re-
treat prefcrib'd, 5- 74$-
That of A'yix, n.<57S- —
17- 837.

Soldiers taught to row in the
gallies, fcrving both as fol-
diers and failors, x. 876".

Scouts, 10. 43» i 4S« and at
large in the ftory of Dio-
tned, Ulyfes, and Dolon, in
that book.
Spies, 18. 605.
Watch towers, to obferve the
motions of the foe, x. %6i,

xx. ioi-

Watch, at fet (rations, 7. 45 5-
Nightly watch by fires, 8.
631. At the fortifications
in regular bodies under di-
ftinft captains, 9. no, etc.
Management of the army



s and Sciences. 333

by night, under fears of
furprize, 10. 63 to zz<S.
The manner of the war-
riors fleeping, 10. 170.
The pofture of the guards.
10. xio. Better to trult the
guard to native troops than
to foreigners, 10. 49c, f/c.

Agriculture and Rural
Arts.

Tillage. The manner of

plowing, 10.410. 18.

617. Plowing with oxen,
13. 880. with mules, 10.
410. Ufual to plow the
field three times over, 18.
<5z8. Reaping, U. 89. —
18. 637. Treading out
the corn by oxeninftead of
threfhing, zo. 580. Fan-
ning the chaff, 5 ■ <> » • —

13- 74°-

Pajlurage, 18. 667. Meadow
grounds with running wa-
ter, ibid. Vintage, 18. 651.
Bringing currents to water
gardens, zi. Z90.

Fiping, by angling, 14- 107.
by diving, 16. 9°5-

Hunting, the boar, 17- 814.

11. 5i«5. Lion, 11.

378. 17- 743- The

deer, 11. S95- J S- 697.

The panther, zi. 680.
The hare, ia- 4*7 •
Siting, n>' in g> a 3- I0 3°-



334



INDEX of Arts and Sciences.



Architecture.

Architefture, the gift of Mi-
nerva, 5. 80.

Architecture of a palace upon
arch«s, with apartments
round a court built entirely
of marble, 6. 304.

Paris /kilful in architec-
ture, brings together ar-
chitects to erecl his palace,
6 - 39i,

Rafters, how placed, 23.
8 1?

Building walls, 16. z$6.

The rule and line, 15. 477.

Architecture of a tent, with
a fnit of apartments with-
in one another, 24. $$$,
etc.

Astronomy.

In general, iS. 560.

Orion and the Bear, 18. 563.

The rifjng of the dog-ftar,
S- 10.

A comet defcrib'd, 4, ior,

The rainbow, u. 36.

Power of the ftars in nativi-
ties, zz. 610.

Divination.

Divination by augury, a. 375,

etc. 8.Z97. 10. 310.

iz. Z30. 13. 1039.

1 ■ — Z4» 3*'» etc.



■Heeler's opinion of augury,
• Nt - ff7>
. By owns, thunder and light-
nings, 7. 571. _ 9 . 3lo .__
11. 58. 13. 3 i 9 .

The rainbow, 11. 38. 17,

616.

Comets, 4. 101.

Showers of blood, 11. 70.

560.

By Lots, 7, Z15.

By Dreams, 1.81.- — 5. 191.

By Oracles, 16. 54. ks.

zpo- that of Dcdotia, and
the manner of it, etc.

Gymnastics.

Dancing, 16. zi 7 . The dif-
feent kinds for men and

women, 18. 687. Thje.

circular, 18. 573. — Mix-
ed, 18. 690.

Dancing praclifed by war-
riors, 16. 746.

with fwords, 18. 688.

Diiii.g, 16. 905, 495.

Tumblers, 18, 698.

Horfematf.np.'} Manage of the
horfe, $■ xSi>. Precepts of
horfeman(hip, and the art
of racing, 23. 391, etc.
Four horfesrid by one man
at once, 15. izt. Three
thoufand breeding marcs at
once in the (tables of Eric
tkomtts, zo. zfiz.
The Cefius, Z3. 753, etc.
The §>ur,H, or Difcus, a 3..
£7*, etc.



INDEX of Art



W refiling, 23, 810. etc.
Racing, 23. 880, etc.

Geography.

A TABLE of thofe places,

■whofe ftuation, produtls,
people, or hijiory, etc. are
particularized by II om er.

JEtolia, and its royal family,

2. 780.
Arcadia, and the genius of

the inhabitants, 2. 735 •
Aalis, its rocky fitvtation, 2.

590.
Imbnts and Tenedos, iflands

near Trey, 13. 50-

IJliaca, famous for vineyard?,

2. 645.
Ithaca, and the neighbouring

iflands in profpect, 2. 7*2>

etc.
Larifa, its fertility, 2. leio.
Letlos, fituate on the top of

mount iirte, 14. 3 i0>
Lcmnos, traded in vuncs, 7.

SS9-
Macander, the river, 2. 1056.
Maeonia, under the mountains

of Tmolus, 2. 1052.
Me/?!', a town of Sparti, a-

bonnding in doves, 2. 7°S-
Mycaleffus, its plain. 2. 5 93-
Anthedon, the laft town in

Bceotia, z. 607.
Arene, its plain, watered by

the river Minyas, n, 8<5o.
Arisba, on the river Sellcis,

z. ioi4>



s a«</ Sciences, 33 j

^r«f, celebrated for vines, 2.

606.
JEfepus, a Trojan river of

black water, 2. ioco.
Argns, its fca coaft diicribcd,
with the products of that
part of the country, 9.
198, rtc.
Athens, and fomc cuftoms of
the Athenians, with mention
of the temple of Minerva,
2. 657, 663.
Alybe, famous anciently for

filver mines, 2. 1045.
Axius, the river, defcribed, 2.

1030.
Bcagrius, the river and places

adjacent, 2. 638.
Bcebe, the lake and parts ad-
jacent, 2. 865.
Calydon, its rocky fituation,

2. 777-— 9- 6 53-
Cephijfus, the river and places

upon its banks, 2. $22.
Cerintbus, fituate on the fea-

Ihore, 2. 648.
C-jllene, the Arcadian moun-
tain, with the tomb of Mr
. pytus, 2. 73 1 -
Of/?, its hundred cities, 2.

790.
Ccruns, a barbarous mixed

people, 2. 1059.
Dodo>:a, its fite, tempi**,
grove, c/f. 16. 287.- 2.
909.
Dorion, the place of Thamy-
rh's death, the celebrated
mufician, a. 7 11 *



13*



INDEX of Arts and Sciences.



El'iSy its exaft boundaries, z.
747. and the iflands oppo-
site to that continent, 760
to 774.

Ephyre, the ancient name of
Corinth, 6. 193.

Epidaurus, planted with vine-
yards, a. 679.

Eteon, its hills, a. 591.

Haliartus, pafhire grounds, a.
598.

Hellefpont, z. 1024.

Helos, a maritime (.own, *.
708.

Henetia, famous for its breed
of mules, z. 1035.

Hermon and Afine, feated on
the bay, z. 680.



Hippe



i, their long life



and nutriment, 13. iz.
Hippoplacian woods, 6. 539. —

Hyfo, its watry fituation and
the genius of the inhabi-
tants, 5. 87a.

Hy peril, its fountains, z. 895.

Mount Ida, its fountains and
forefts, 14. 311.

Catalogue of the rivers that
run from mount Ida, n.
17-

Jardanus and Celadon, two
rivers, 7. 163.

Mycenae, and its maritime
towns, z. 685.

Onchejfits, and the grove of
Neptune, z. 600.

Orchomenos , one of the prin-
cipal cities for wealth in
Homer's time, 9. 498.



Parthemus, the river and pla-.
ces adjacent, a. 1038.

Pedafuts, feated on the river
Satnio, 6. 41.

Peneus, the river running
through Tempe, and mount
Pelion, defcribed, a. 918.

Phtkiei, its fituation, 1. z©4.
famous for horles, zo$.

Phylace and Phyrrhufus, a
beautiful country with
groves and flowery mea-
dows, defcribed, a. 850.

Rhodes, its wealth, its planta-
tion by Tlepolemus, anddi-
vifion into three dynafties,
a. 808, etc,

Samothracia, the view from
its mountains, 13. 19.

Scamander, its twofprings, aa.
Its confluence with Simois,
5- 965.

Scyros, the ifland. 19. 353.

Sidon, famous for works of
fculpture, Z3. 866. and
embroidery, 6. 360,

Sipylus, its mountains, rocks,
and defarts, a4. 7 7S •

Spcrchius, a riverof Theffaly,
a3. 176.

Styx, the river defcribed, a.
91S.

Thebac, in ./Egypt, anciently
the richeftcityin the world
with a hundred gates, de-
fcribed, a. 506.

Thcjjirfy, its ancient divifion,
and inhabitants, a. 833.

Th'tsbe, famous for doyes, a.
601.



INDEX of Arts and Sciences.



3i7



Thrace, its hills and promon-
tories, 14. x6o, etc.

Titarefius, the river, x. 91°-

Troy, its fituation and remark-
able places about it, x. 981.
11. zi7.

Typhosus, the burning moun-
tain, x. 953«

Xanthus, the river of Troy,
defcribed, its banks, and
plants produced there, xi.
507, etc.

Xanthus, the river of Lycia,

a. v. a/f.
JcSff, fituate at the foot of
mount Ida, x. 99%>

History.

Hi/lory preferved by Homer.]
Of the heroes before the
fiegeof Troy, Centaurs, etc.
1. 347 to 358. OfTlepo-
lemus planting a colony in
Rhodes, 2. 808. Ofthe ex-
pulfion ofthe Centaurs from
Greece, X.90X. Of the wars
of the Phrygians and Ama-
zons, 3. *4S- Of the war
of Thebes, and embafly of
Tydeus, 4- 43°- OfBelle-
*ophon,6.i94- OfErytha-
lionandLycurgus, 7- * 6 4-
Of the Curetes and /Etoli-
ans, 9-6S3- Ofthe wars
of the Pylians and iEtoli-
ans,xi.8i8 Ofthe raceof
Troy, %o.zSS,*tc. To this
head may be referred the
numerous Genealogies in
our cuihor.

Vol. IV. *



Mosio

Mufic praftifcd by princes, the
ufe ofthe harp in Achillea,
9. 247. in Paris, 3. 80.

The ufe ofthe pipe, 10, ij.
18. 609.

Vocal mufic accompanying
the inftruments, 1. 7 75-

Chorus's at intervals, 14. 901.

Mufic ufed in the army, io.

IS-

. at funerals, X4- foo.

. in the vintage, 18.661.

Trumpets in war, 18. 160.

Mechanics.

Archery, making a bow, and
all its parts defcribed, 4.
136, etc.

Chariot making, a chariot de-
fcribed in all its parts, $.
889, etc. 24. 33S-

Poplar proper for wheels, 4.

SS4-
Sycamore fit for wheels, XX-

44.

Clock-work, 18. 44 »•
Enamelling, 18. 6 3S-
Ship-building, 5- 8o - l S'

475-

Pine, a proper wood for the
mart of a (nip, 16. 59*-

Smitbcry, iron -work, etc. The
Forge defcribed, 18. 43 5.
540. Bellows, 435. 48 x.
540. Hammer, tongs, an-
vil, S47-



333 INDEX

Mixing of metals, ibid.

Spinning, z$. 890.

Weaving, 3. 580. 6. 580.

Embroidery, 6. 361.

Armoury, and inflruments of
-war.

A compleat fuit, that of Paris,
3. 410, etc. of Agamem-
non, 11. 3.x, — etc.

Scale armour, 15. 619. —

Helmets, with four plumes, 5.
919.

■ without any crefts, 10.

303.

' lined with wool.and or-



namented with boars teeth,
of a particular make, 10.
3ii-

linedwithfurr.to.j97.-

Boivs, how made, 4. i-jj

Battle-ax, defcribed, 13. 7<S6.

Belts, crofting each other, to

hang the fword and the

fhield, 14. 46$.

Corfelets, ornamented with

fculpture, 11. 33.

how lin^d, 4. \6$ - —

Mace, or club, 7. 170. — 1%

816.
Shields, Co large as to cover
from the neck to the an-
kles, 6. 145. — How made
and covered, 7. 267. de-
fcribed in every particular,
11. 43, etc.
Slings, 13. 899.
Spear s t with brafs points, 8.

6r 7 .
A(hfit tcmake them, i<5. 143.
19. 41*.



of Arts and Sciences.

How the wood was joined to.

the point, 18. 618.
Sivords, how ornamented with

ivory, gems, 19. 400.

Oratory.

See the article Speeches in the
poetical index.

Policy.

Kings.] Derive their honour

from God, 2. 133. 1.

315. Their names to be
honoured, z. 313. One fole
monarch, z. 143. Heredi-
tary right of kings repre-
fented by the fceptre of A-
gamemnon given by Jove,
z. 1x9. Kings not to be
difobeyed on the one hand,
nor to frrerch too far their
prerogative on the other,
1. 36s, etc. Kings not ab-
solute in council, 9. 133*
Kings made fo, only for
their excelling others in
virtue and valour, i». 337.
Vigilance continually ne*
ceflary in princes, z. »7. —
10. xoz. Againft monarchs
delighting in war, 9. 8z,
etc.— z 4 . 55. The true
valour.that which preferves,
not deftroys mankind, 6.
196. Kingsmay do wrong,
and are obliged to repara-
tion, 9. 144. Character



I SI DEX of Arts

of a great prince in war and
peace, 3. %$6.
Councils.] The danger of a
fubjecYs too bold advice,
1. 103. The advantage of
wife councils feconded by a
wife prince, 9. 101. The
ufe of advice, 9. 1 37 • The
fingular bleffing to a nation
and prince, in a good and
wife counfellor, 13- 9*8.
The deliberations of the
council to be free, the
prince only to give a func-
tion to the bed, 9- *3 3-
Laws.] Derived from God,
and legiflatorshis delegates,
1. 315. Committed to the
care of kings, as guardians
of the laws of God, 9. 119*
Tribute paid to princes from

towns, 9. ac$.
Taxes upon fubjeds to afllft

foreign allies, 17- * 6 <*-
Ambatfadors, a -facred charac-
ter, 1. 43S-— 9- ***■
Vohintiers, lifted into fervice,
11. 9°4«

See the article Art Military.
Physic.

The praife of a phyfician, 1 1

«37-
Chiron learned it from -tfeu

lapius, 4- *S*«
Macbaon and Podalirius pro

feiTors of it, a. 890.
Ba/ fl «7.] Profeffed by (Wilful



>:d Scifn C K.S.



3J»



women, Agamede GuBOOl
for it, 11.877-
Anatomy.] Of the had, u-.

41 s, etc.
The grc, 14- S7 7-
Under tbe ear, a wound there

mortal, 13. 841.
The junttare of the had «md

nerves, 14- 544-
The juncture of the week and
theft, the collar-bone, and
itsinfertion, the disj inting
of which tenders the arm
ufelefs, 8. 393. *t c '
The fpinal marrow exprefled
by the vein that runs along
the chine ; a wound there
mortal, 13. 691. '*•«

559-

The elbow, its tendons and

ligaments, ao. 554-
thoj, a great eflufion of it,
by cutting off the arm ; the
caufc of immediate death,

5- ic5-

The heart and its fibres, i<5.

59°-
The force of the mufcle of

the heart, 13- su-

A wound in the hladdcr by
piercing the Jfchiatie joint,
mortal, 13. 813.
The infertion of the thigh-
bone, and its ligaments dc-
fcribed, S 37 S-
. The wounds of the -

mortal , and execflively pain-
ful, 13- 7i8.
The tendons of the ar.kle, 4.

597.



Ef2



34» INDEX c/ Ar

Chirurgery."] Extraction of
darts, 4. 228.

Sucking the blood from the
wound, 4. 250.

Infufion of balms into wounds,
4. 250. — 5. mi.

"Warning the wound with warm
water, and the ufe of leni-
tives, 11. 06%.

Stanching the blood by the
bitter root, n. 983.

Ligatures of wool, 13. 752.

\*'fc of baths for wounded
men, 14. 10.

Sprinkling water to recover
from fainting, 14. 509.

Pharmacy and Diaetetics.

The ufe of wine forbidden,
6. 330.

Cordial potion of Neflor, 1 1 .
782, etc.

infection, feizing firft on ani-
mals, then men, 1. 70.
Nine days the crifis of dif-
€afes, 1. 71. Fevers and
plagues from the dog- (tar,
5. ioj8. 19. 412.— 22.

Painting, Sculpture,
tic.

See the -whole flneld of Achilles %
and the notes on lib. 18.

The CHARACTERS. Ho-
mer diftinguifhes the cha.
racier in the figures of Gods
fuperior to thofe of men,
18. $02.



ts and Sciences.

Characters of majcfly.'] The
majefty of Jupiter, from
whence Phidias copied his
flatue, 1. 683. Of Mars
and Neptune, 2. 569.
The majefty of a prince, in
the figure of Agamemnon,
a. 564, etc. Of a wife
man, in Ulyfles's afpect, 3.
280. Of an old man, in
Neflor and Priam, 1. 330.

24. 600. Of a young

hero, in Achilles,- 19. 390,
etc. All varioufly charac-
terized by Homer.
CharaRcrs of beauty.'] Alluring
beauty in the goddefs Ve-
nus, 14. 250. Majeftic
beauty in Juno, 14. zi6.
Beauty of a ivoman in He-
len, 3. 205. Beauty of a
young man in Paris, 3. 2 5.
Euphorbns, 17. 53, etc.
Beauty of a fine infant in
Aftyanax, 6. 497.
Beauties of the parts of the
body.] Largenefs and ma-
i jefty of the eyes in Juno's.
Blacknefs, in thofe of Chry-
feis. Blue, in Minerva's,
etc. Eye-brows, black,
graceful, 1. 683. The
beauty of the cheeks, and
the fairnefs of hair, in the
epithets of Helen. White-
nefs of the arms in thofe of
Juno. Fingers rather red
than pale, in the epithet
of rofy fingered to Auror a.
Whiteuefs of the feet in that



INDEX of Arts and Sciences

•f fdver-footed to Thetis,
etc. Colour of the (kin to
be painted differently ac-
cording to the condition of
the perfonages, applied to
the whitenefs of the thigh
of Menelaus, 4. X7S-
Character of Deformity.'] The
oppofites to beauty in tie
feveral parts, confidered in
the figure of Therfites, i.
z6i, ett.



341



TOETRY.

See the intire In d ex.

Theology.

A View of Homer's
Theology.

Jupiter, cr the Supreme
Being.



For pilures of particular
things, fee the article I-
mages in the Poeti-
cal Index.

Hiftory, land jkip -painting, ani-
mals, etc. in the buckler of
Achilles, 18. at large.

The defign of a goblet in
fculpture, 11. 775-

Sculpture of a coifelet, 11.
33, etc. Of a bowl. 13.
Hofes carved on monu-
ments, 17. 495-

Enamelling, and Inlaying, in
the buckler of Achilles, 18.
635, 65 5 . and breaft-plate
of Agamemnon, 11 35-

Tapeftry, or weaving hi (lories,

flowers, etc. 3. 171. <*•

580. 22. 5<5o. —

Embroidery of garments, 6.
3<5o.



Superior to all powers of hea-
ven, 7. 241 -9 *Oi ^ f -
Enjoying hiiifi-lf in the
contemplation of his glory
and power, 11. 107.
fuincient, and above all fe-
cond caufrs, or inferior
deities, 1. 6.\i . The other
deitie-refort to him as their
fovercign appeal, 5. 1365.

. 2i . 593. 1 1 is will is

fate, 8. 10. Hisfole will
the caufe of all human e-
vents, 1. 8. His will takes
certain and inftant erTctr,
1. 685. his wUl immuta«
bleand always j'ift, 1 J
All-feeing, 8. 65.-2. 4-

Supreme above all, and

fole-fufficient.ii. 107- The
fole governor and fate of
all things, 2. 147- — i«-
845. Difpofer of all the
glories and fuccefs of men,
17. 198. Fore-feeing all
things, 17.228.Tlu
tfviftdry, 7. »^ 8 - iv;



34* I N D E X of Art

pofer of all human affairs,
9. 3*. Hisleaft regard, or
thought, reftores mankind,
15. a 74. or turns the fate
of armies, 17. 675. Dif-
penfcr of all the good and
evil that befalls mankind,
24. -663. His favour fa-
perior to all human means,

9. 151. His counfels un-
searchable, 1 . 705. Themis

•^ or ju (lice is his meflenger,
t ao. 5. God profpers thofe
who worfhip him, 1. 190.
Conflantly punifhes the
wicked, though late, 4.
194. The avenger of in-
jufHce/4- aoz. Nothing fo
terrible as his wrath, 5.
at 7. His divine ju-ftice
Sometimes punifhes whole
nations by general calami-
ties, 16. 468. Children pu-
rjilhed for the fins of their
parents, 11. 166. and if.
393-

The inferior Deities.

Have different offices under
God : fome prefide over
elements,i8.4<5. — 13 140.

Some over cities and countries,
4- 75-

Some over woods, fprings, etc.

10. la.



s and Sciences.

They have a fubordinate pow-
er over one another. In-
ferior deities or angels fub-
ject to pain, imprifonment,
5-475. 1090. Threatened
by Jupiter to be cafl into
Tartarus, 8. 15. Are (up-
pofed to converfe in a lan-
guage different from-^hat
of mortals, a. 985. — Sub-
fill not by material food,
5. 4. Companionate man-
kind, 8 4s. — 24.41;. A-
ble to aflifl mortals at any
diflance, 16. 633. Regard
and take care of thofe who
ferve them, even to their
remains after death, a4.
5ao. No refilling heaven-
ly powers, 5. 495. The
meannefs and vilenefsof all
earthly creatures in com pa-
rifon of the divine natures,
5- 535-

Prayer recommended on all
enterprizeS; throughout the
poem.

Prayers intercede at the throne
of heaven, 9. 614.

Opinions of the ancients con-
cerning hell, the place of
punifhment for the wicked
afterdeath,8. 15. — 19^71.

Opinions of the ancients con-
cerning the ftate of feparate
Jpirits t %■$. 89, etc. uo. etc.



F I K I &.





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