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THE BODLEY BOOKS.



THIS series of books consists of five volumes, each independent of the others, but since the
characters are the same in all there is a natural connection between them, and the order of
their appearance indicates also the gradual growth of the children who make up the younger
members of the Bodley Family. The series is as follows :-

I. DOINGS OF THE BODLEY FAMILY IN TOWN AND COUNTRY.

This contains some of the doings of Nathan, Philippa, and Lucy Bodley, their father and
mother, the hired man Martin, and Nathan's Cousin Ned, upon their removal from Boston
to Roxbury. It introduces, also, Nathan's pig, the dog Neptune, Lucy's kitten, Lucy's doll,
Mr. Bottom the horse, chickens, mice; it has stories told to the children by their parents,
by Martin, and by each other. Martin's brother Hen is referred to occasionally.

II. THE BODLEYS TELLING STORIES.

In this book Nathan's cousin, Ned Adams, a young collegian, is shown as much of the
time living with his cousins, and Nurse Young becomes a part of the family. The children
are entertained with a good many stories, especially from American history; they have a
Mother Goose party, and go on a journey to Cape Cod. Hen remains in the background.

III. THE BODLEYS ON WHEELS.

The family enter a carryall and drive, accompanied by Ned on horseback, along the coast
of Massachusetts Bay from Boston to Gloucester, and thence, through Ipswich and Rowley,
to Newburyport, and so home again. Their drive leads them through historic places and by
spots made famous in poetry and legend. On their arrival home they find Martin's brother
Hen in the barn, just back from a long voyage.

IV. THE BODLEYS AFOOT.

Hen entertains the children with yarns, and, Ned Adams suddenly appearing, it is pro-
posed that he and Nathan should take a walk to New York. They set out by Dedham and
the old road to Hartford, through Pomfret ; but at Hartford, where they stay a few days
with some old relatives, they are joined by Mrs. Bodley, Phippy, and Lucy, who go down
tbe Connecticut River with them to Saybrook, and then go back to Boston, leaving the boys
to continue their walk to New York. They are stopped, however, at New Haven, by a dis-
patch from Mr. Bodley, which brings them back at once by rail.



V. MR. BODLEY ABROAD.

The reason of the dispatch is that Mr. Bodley is unexpectedly called to Europe, and in
tliis final volume of the series he goes abroad, while the rest of the family at first o-o for a
fortnight to Cape Cod, and then return to Roxbury. Mr. Bodley does not return till Thanks-
giving time, but he writes letters home, and, after he returns, tells stories of Europe. The
children, besides, have their own journeys and adventures, so that Europe and America ap-
pear in equal proportions. Mrs. Bodley, who stays at home, has been to Europe before, so
that she is able to enlarge on what Mr. Bodley writes home, and Hen, who has gone off on a
voyage, stumbles upon Mr. Bodley abroad, and comes back before him with fresh yarns.

The time of the five stories is about 1848-1852.



A ]STE\V BODLEY SEEIES.

It was intimated at the close of Mr. Bodley Abroad that the children might themselves go
to Europe when they had grown up. It is not surprising, therefore, to find that thirty years
after the days when they were Bodley children they had children of their own, and thus 1 a
new series of adventures and stories have begun. Nathan and Phippy Bodley, having married
a sister and brother, are now the heads of families themselves, and a new career opens in

THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN

AND THEIR JOURNEY IN HOLLAND,

the first volume of the second series. In this volume the two families, with the grand-
children, start from New York, after first making themselves acquainted with the doings of
their Dutch ancestors there in the days of New Amsterdam, and spend several weeks in
Holland, seeing sights, taking an object lesson in history, and especially making tie connection
between American history and Dutch history. They are Americans visiting Europe not
merely for the pleasure of travel, but for the purpose of tracing back the footprints of their
ancestors.

The time of the story is the summer of 1881.




a
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H



THE BODLEY



GKANDCHILDKEN



AND THEIR



JOURNEY IN HOLLAND



BV



HORACE E. SCUDDER



AUTHOR OF THE BODLEY BOOKS



'




BOSTON
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

New York: 11 East Seventeenth Street
litfacrstOc \Brt^

1882



Copyright, 1882,
Bl HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO.

All rights reserved.



The Riverside Press, Cambridge:
Eleetrotyped and Printed by II. 0. Iloughton & Co.







CONTENTS.



CHAPTER

I. THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS

II. THE DISCOVERY OF EUROPE .

III. THE KING'S ROAD TO ENGLAND

IV. THE FIRST PEEP AT HOLLAND
V. OLD AMSTERDAM

VI. OLD AND NEW AMSTERDAM .

VII. THE PRINCELY SHIP-CARPENTER

VIII. UTRECHT AND HAARLEM .

IX. THE COUNT'S HEDGE

X. ON THE EDGE OF THE NORTH SEA .

XL LEYDEN .



PAGE

9
31

. 44
61

. 68
77
85
9G



134
141



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE

XII. A VISIT TO DELFT 154

XIII. AN AMERICAN IN HOLLAND 168

XIV. ROTTERDAM . .173

XV. ON THE TRACK OF THE PILGRIM FATHERS . . . .178

XVI. GOOD-BY TO HOLLAND 186







THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN



AND THEIR



JOURNEY IN HOLLAND.



CHAPTER I.

THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS.

ONE afternoon in February, 1881, a carriage loaded with trunks
drove up to the door of a house in Second Avenue, New York.
There were two houses, in fact, side by side, and their doors being
next each other, it was hard to say before which door the carriage
stopped. Moreover, both the doors opened at the same moment,
and in each doorway stood a child of the same age, yes, born on
the same day of the same year, and this was their birthday. The
chief difference between them was that one was a boy and the
other a girl, and they had different names.

But they had the same grandparents and the same aunt, and it
was these who got out of the carriage, and came up the broad
flight of steps which led to the doors of the two houses. The steps
were wet with a recent snow, and as the children wore their slippers,
they waited at the two thresholds, but their tongues rattled on.



10 THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.

" This way, Grandfather," said the boy. " You 're to come to our
house first, you know."

" I choose Grandmother," said the girl triumphantly. " She 's
on my side."

"Is Aunt Lucy to be divided?" asked that lady, as she came up
behind the old people, with her hands full of bags and umbrellas.

" Yes ; you can stand in the middle doorway, Lucy," said a voice
within.

" Oh, Nathan, are you there ? " she cried, and, choosing the boy's
door at once, she ran into the house. " What a beard you have
grown ! ' she exclaimed, as she gave his whiskers an affectionate
tweak. " Now, where are we all to stay ? '

" You are to stay with us, of course, with the two P.'s ; ' and
now there came forward two people from the other house, but they
did not need to go out-of-doors. The wall had been pierced, and
a broad doorway, called the Middle Doorway by the two families, gave
a passage back and forth close by the outer hall doors. Here, about
this middle doorway, were gathered all the members of these two
families and their three guests, while the coachman was bringing
up trunks and bags. The children were jumping up and down,
and it was quite impossible to hear everything that was said by
everybody. There was such a clatter and laughter that if a show-
man had been present he would have had to raise his voice, and
say,

" This elderly gentleman is Mr. Charles Bodley, of Roseland, Rox-
bury, Massachusetts, who has come with his wife, Madam Sarah
Bodley, and his daughter, Miss Lucy Bodley, to make a visit at the
houses o his two children.

" These are the houses of Mr. Nathan Bodley and Mr. Philip Van



THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS. 11

Wyck, side by side, with a middle door between, so that they are
quite the same as one large house with two sets of rooms.

" This is Mrs. Nathan Bodley, who was Miss Blandina Van Wyck,
a New York lady of Dutch descent, and this is Mrs. Philip Van
Wyck, who was Miss Philippa Bodley ; and as Mrs. Van Wyck is a
sister of Mr. Nathan Bodley, and Mrs. Nathan Bodley is a sister of
Mr. Philip Van Wyck, why, these tw r o families are as closely related
as the two houses in which they live.

" And these two children, finally, are Master Charles Bodley,
named for his grandfather, and Miss Sarah Van Wyck, named for
her two grandmothers ; these children are exactly the same age.
They were born on the same day of the same year, on either side of
the middle door, and so, very naturally, they quarrel together and
play together and go to school together, and are as nearly like twin
brother and sister as it is possible for cousins to be."

The middle door seemed always to stand open, and though the
guests were divided between the two houses at night, Aunt Lucy
staying with the Van Wycks, and Grandfather and Grandmother
with the Bodleys, during the day it was hard to say which was the
house of entertainment. On this first night they all dined at Mr.
Nathan Bodley's, and had a birthday feast, at which the children
were allowed to assist, since it was their birthday. They were wont
to go every summer to the old place at Roseland, and after dinner
they hung about their grandparents and aunt, and asked all manner
of questions, as if to assure themselves that everything was just as
they had left it in September last.

" Just hear those children, Phippy," said Mr. Nathan Bodley to
his sister. " To think that they should find so much in the poor
one-acre lot about the old house, when we used to have thirty acres



12



THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.



to play over, to say nothing of Long's woods and May's woods, and




Climbing a Pyramid in Egypt.



all the country towards Dorchester. It makes me sigh when I go



THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS. 13

back and see all the historic places built over : the Grove, where
we played Indian ; and the Gorge, and the Hollow, and Paul Bod-
ley's Pasture, where we had our mammoth map of the United
States ; and P. B.'s old tomb, and all the other hallowed spots.
What would I not have given last summer to have shown Samson's
Nut Cracker to the children ! I used to think it one of the largest
known rocks."

" Yes," said his sister. " I had a secret grievance, which I believe
I never told before, that it was not down in the geography as smaller
than the smallest pyramid."

" That explains it," said Mr. Van Wyck. " When we were
dragged up the pyramid, Phippy protested to her Arab guide that
she should not need much help, as she had climbed Samson's Nut
Cracker. I thought it one of her jokes at the time."

" Well," said Miss Lucy Bodley, with a little sigh, " I am glad we
have got to the end of our sales. The taxes made us sell, I know ;
but I suppose we shall be allowed to keep the old house. When 1
am the last of the Bodleys, I hope to see it turned into an Old
Lady's Home, and end my days in it. What a rage there is for
selling! Little Tommy Tobey You remember our neighbors the
Tobeys, Nathan ?"

" To be sure."

" Tommy is John Tobey's little boy, and he went to his mother
the other day, and said with an injured air, ' Mother, I wish we
could have a stick and a board in our garden, with Forsale or Tolet
on it ; all the boys have those sticks in their yards.'

" The changes are nothing in Roxbury to what they are in New
York," said Grandmother Bodley. " You know I was born here, and
lived here as a child.'



14



THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.



" And played with bits of crockery on the steps of the North
Dutch Church," broke in Nathan ; " that is the very earliest frag-
ment of a story which I remember. When I came to hear about
the Dutch in New York, I had a vague notion that you knew them,
or remains of them."

" Oh, we 're the only genuine Dutch, Nathan, Philip and I ; we
are Van Wycks. You are a New England Winthropian Puritan,"
said Mrs. Phippy.

"As if Blandina"- be-
gan Nathan.

" You are quarreling
again ! ' said Sarah, who
was well used to the little
family tiffs 011 the subject
of their ancestry. " Grand-
mother, tell them to stop.
As if Uncle Nathan and
Charles were Dutch ! '

" We seem to have inher-
ited the historic quarrel,"
said Mr. Van Wyck. " Phip-
py represents the English
that fell into Dutch ways
when New Amsterdam be-
came New York, but Na-
than and his boy remain
sturdy Yankees. They never
Peter stuyvesant " will be Knickerbockers. The

children had a scandalous discussion in front of their ancestor
Peter Stuyvesant's tomb the other day."




THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS.



15



" Your ancestor, Sarah," said Charles Bodley in an undertone.
" He wrote a villainous hand."

" He was a governor," said Sarah stoutly, " and could write as
he chose."

" Well, was n't John Winthrop, my ancestor, a governor, too ? '

" A stumpy little man," said Sarah. " I 've seen his statue in
Scollay Square, in Boston."

"That is n't a good statue," said Charles, thrown on the defensive.

" Come, come," said Charles's mother. "Let your remote ances-
tors alone, and pay more at-
tention to your grandfather
and grandmother."

" I believe this part of
New York was in Peter
Stuyvesant's farm, was it
not, Philip ? ' asked Grand-
father Bodley.

" Yes ; it is not many years
since there stood at the cor-
ner of Thirteenth Street and
Third Avenue an old pear-
tree, which the governor
brought over from Holland
and planted on his farm.
This seal which I wear is
made out of a bit of the
wood. When the old tree
fell, a shoot was planted

Witllill the railing Which had Stuyvesant's Pear-Tree.




16



THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.



inclosed the old tree. Our house is on his farm, which lay between
the Bowery and East River, and from about Eighth to Sixteenth
streets, I think. He was buried in the church on his farm, which
used to stand where St. Mark's now is ; and when St. Mark's was
built, the tomb was put in order and the original tablet set in the
outer wall."

" But did the Governor of New Amsterdam live so far away
from the town ? ' asked Grandfather. " I always supposed that

in the Dutch times,

. /JMfi- ._=^3MllWiisE>^

^.
-.. 7v



and for a long while
afterward, the town
was crowded about
the Battery."

" To be sure,"
said Grandmother.
"Why, when I was
a child, here, I lived
in Cedar Street, and
we made excursions
into the country to
pick wild strawberries where Union Square now is."

" It was Governor Stuyvesant's farm," explained Mr. Van Wyck,
" that occupied this part, and he retired to it when he was no longer
governor. The governor's house was within the quadrangular in-
closure which was the fort, and stood on that part of the island
which made the point where North River began. Within the
fort inclosure were the house and church and a warehouse, while
the settlement was at first chiefly under the walls of the fort. To
be more exact, the fort, which was first called Fort Amsterdam,









PETRUS STUYVESANT

CaptainGenera^GovernorinChieFof Amsterdam
InNewNeflierkind now called.New- Vork




"^



THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS.



17




Inside of Fort, with Governor's House and Church.



and afterward by the English Fort James, was bounded by what

now are Bridge, Whitehall, and

State streets and the Bowling

Green. I have a copy of an old

map which gives a view of New

Amsterdam as it was seen from

the harbor by persons who came

there in 1656. I'll get it."

So saying, Mr. Van Wyck went
through the middle door into his
own house. But just as he went, the outer-door bell rang, and pres-
ently in came a gentleman, who was received with delight by the
children, who called him Cousin Ned. The older people called him
Ned, though Aunt Lucy sometimes dubbed him Professor. He was
a professor in college, a professor of American history and litera-
ture, and was set down in the catalogue as Professor Edward G.
Adams. Years before, when Mr. Bodley and Mrs. Van Wyck and
Miss Lucy Bodley had been plain Nathan and Phippy and Lucy?
Professor Adams had been Cousin Ned to them, and had spent his
vacations at his Uncle Charles's in Roxbury, for he was then in col-
lege. He was in college still, but as professor, not as student. He
was not married, and he wore spectacles. The spectacles, indeed,
made nearly all the difference in his appearance between those days
and these.

"' You have come just in time, Ned," said Mr. Van Wyck. "You
can fill out what is wanting in my historical knowledge. We have
been talking of Dutch. New York, New Amsterdam that is, and I
have just brought the children the picture in the corner of Visscher's

map." He spread the map open, and they looked at the picture.

2



18



THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.



" The Dutch don't seem to be giving a very cordial welcome to
visitors," said Cousin Ned. " The gallows appears to stand near the
landing place, and to be occupied just now. Should n't you say that
was where the South Ferry now is, Philip ? ' :

" Yes, making all allowances for changes in the water front. The
building of piers and docks made it necessary to fill in the shore,
and of course it is much broader now at the foot of the city than it
then was.'




View of New Amsterdam in 1656.



' What is that tall pole for, near the gallows ? " asked Sarah.

'" Why, of course, that is a beacon," said Charles. "We had one
in Boston, with a tar barrel hung from it. There 's a picture of it
in a book I have."

" Then we had our beacon first," said Sarah triumphantly, " for
your book says they used it in Boston when they had the trouble
with Andros, but this picture was made in 1656."

Charles looked a little blank, and turned to his father and to
Cousin Ned.

" Well, any way " he began.

" They put up the first beacon in Boston in 1635," said Cousin
Ned.



THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS.



19



" There, now," said Charles.

" But we don't know when the first beacon was put up in New
York." said Mr. Van Wyck, coming to Sarah's rescue. "-It may
have been put up in 1626, when the fort began to be built, after the
West India Company had bought Manhattan Island of the Indians."

" And paid the mighty sum of about twenty-four dollars," said
Cousin Ned.

" Well, they bought it, at any rate," said Sarah. " They did n't
steal it,"

" Well said, Sarah," said her father. " Don't you mind Cousin
Ned and Charles, as long as your ancestors treated the Indians
fairly. But come, I want to make out the rest of the picture. I
don't suppose it is necessarily exact in all its parts, but that is the
fort, plainly, with the flag-staff in it, and the large buildings."

" And the windmill," added Charles.

" The windmill, I think, was outside the fort, nearer the North
River, about the foot of Bat-
tery Place."

t&tiKJ$ei^m

to the right? "asked Charles's ill

father.

" I think that must be what
used to be known as the Ver-
lettenberg, Nathan, - - a group
of low hills between Broadway

and the East River. There Old H0 use in New York, bunt in

was a marshy place below the hills."

" The houses don't look like the old Boston houses," said
Charles.




20



THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.



" No ; when people come to a new country, and can put up any-
thing better than temporary booths, they are pretty sure to fol-
low the style of the houses in their old homes. The Dutch began
very soon to build houses of brick and stone, like those in Amster-
dam or Haarlem, with stepped roofs, and weather-cocks at the
peak, and stoops at the entrance. They were so used to Dutch
ways, in fact, that they began to make canals, though the country
was not flat like Holland; and they built a Town Hall, or Stadt Iluys,
which stood on Pearl Street, then a road running along the bank of
the East River."

"It was used for an inn first, I believe," said Cousin Ned, "and

stood at the corner of Pearl
Street and Coenties Slip."

" Yes ; but it was im-
proved when it was turned
into a town hall. I believe
the cupola was put on then.
An inn was really one of
the first necessities, for
there were a good many
visitors to New Amsterdam,
who came to see the coun-
try, and to stay or to come
again if they thought they
should like it. Two of these
travelers, who came over in
1679 to New York, made

The stadt Huys. sketches of the country,

which have been preserved. They speak of visiting a farm near Wall
and Pearl streets.'




THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS.



21



Why did they call it Wcall Street ? " asked Sarah. Was there
a wall there ? "

" Yes ; for a long while the town of New Amsterdam lay below
Wall Street, and there they had a palisade for protection, and that




View of New York from the North, 1679.



is the way the street got its name. By little and little, as there
was less fear of the Indians, the town began to stray away from the
protection of the fort and |
the palisades. At first the
houses and farms were near = :
Wall Street, but before the /
end of the centuiy the isl-
and was dotted with houses.
It is pretty hard to get rid
of streets and houses now
in our imagination, and to j
think of a deep pond where
the Tombs prison stands ; to
remember that Maiden Lane was a valley road, and that the ground




Dutch Costumes.



22 THE BODLEY GRANDCHILDREN.

covered by the City Hall and its park was a common. I do not
know, though, that it is much less difficult to imagine the slow-
moving old Dutchmen and Dutchwomen who built comfortable
houses, and tried to live on the edge of the wilderness, as they did
in the flat Holland towns. They set up weather-cocks over their
houses, and planted tulips and hyacinths in their gardens, and filled
their fire-places with Scripture tiles, before which the old Dutchman
sat with his long clay pipe."

'" I don't see why my ancestors are spoken of as if
they were always smoking," said Sarah, with an injured
air. " People talk about the Dutch as if they came over
here just to smoke long pipes. I am sure old Governor
Stuyvesant was a lively man."

" That he was, Sarah," said Cousin Ned. u Did you

a

ever hear how he once tore a letter to pieces, and had to
patch it together again ? '

A Dutchman with

his Pipe. " JS T O."

" It was at the time when New Amsterdam passed into the hands
of the English, and became New York. Peter Stuyvesant was gov-
ernor of the colony, and held his commission from the West India
Company of Holland, who had established the post. He was a
brave man and a stout Dutchman, who believed in his country,, and
had no mind to let the English get possession of the colony. But
the English had occupied New England on the north and Virginia
and Maryland on the south, and their colonies were growing more
populous every year. The Connecticut people began to crowd the
Dutch, and to claim Long Island as belonging to them. The West
India Company, meanwhile, was growing poorer in Holland, and
less able to look after their American possessions. The English




THE BODLEYS AND THE VAN WYCKS. 23

king, Charles II., made a present of the Dutch colony to his brother,
the Duke of York and Albany "

/

" But how could he ? ' interrupted Charles. " What right had
he ? "

" That 's just what I would like to know," said Sarah. " Those
English ! "

" It certainly did not show much regard for Dutch rights ; but I
suppose that if the king of England wished to find a reason which
would sound well, he could claim the coast by virtue of some dis-
covery or exploration. There was a great deal of confusion about
the title of different governments to the coast of North America.
In point of fact, the people who occupied the several portions were
the successful owners, provided they could have the support of their
government at home ; the Dutch settlers in New Netherland were
not very strongly upheld by Holland, and they were looked upon,
also, as members of a trading company that had not much to do with
the real patriotic life of Holland. At any rate, Charles II. liked to
give presents, and he gave a large piece of North America, including
the land occupied by the Dutch, to his brother. The Duke fitted
out an expedition under command of Colonel Richard Nicolls, and
sent it to New England, with instructions to take possession of New
Netherland. Stuyvesant heard that the fleet was at Boston, and
he feared there was to be a movement against New Amsterdam ; but


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